OCR Interpretation


New-York tribune. [volume] (New York [N.Y.]) 1866-1924, September 16, 1904, Image 7

Image and text provided by Library of Congress, Washington, DC

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83030214/1904-09-16/ed-1/seq-7/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for 7

$$%SGKusossk !^
A BRIDE'S GOING AWAY DRESS
STRAIGHT FROST TO STA Y.
Corset* Will Akcays Be Under
Diaphragm, Says Mist White.
"Forever while we live tre are going to put our
corsets en under our diaphragms." said Miss Kllza
beth C. White before tbe Dressmakers' Protective
Association yesterday pomtng. "People, who say
the strairht front and loir bust are going out
(Imply show that they haven't good ser.f-e or that
they don't know iajtUsg about the vray we used
to wear our corsets.
"Thire was a tiir.e. not so very long ago, when
each and every weman put her corset on on top of
her diaphragm, This made her look ■-- '■■ sbe
ha<ir. tar.- diaphragm. It gave her narrow shoul
ders, a r.ped back ar.d distorted bust. Lots of
■wata "*ho had really pretty fir-rr-s didn't even
look respt-table when they put on their corset and
dress. The corset m.vde th»-ra. Instead of th^lr
making the rset.
"ft'hes lUe MM is pet on over ths diaphrapm
on*- always vaata to keep puSlns It down. I never
had any comfort ur.til I learm^l to put my corset
on properly, and If you will lej.rn to do the same
tfcirg for your customers no one will evtr be able
to suit th«a but you, isslen they can find some
other Tvcai^n -who can do the sisin thing."
Al! ti.is was apropos of the corset dexnunstra.tlons
whi'-h M.?s Vh'.te proposes to jrive on Saturday
erd Tuesday evenir.gs at th<: convention head-
Quartcri In the Masonic Tt-mple. Livlnij siodeis
will be ut^d, and an;" member of the corset wear
l.-.g sex will l>e admitted. On th«-se occaFions Mlsa
White w.U show how to wear this much abused
s;arsaei".t co as to make it a.rjsoiut«-ly innocuous
and at the san<e time ta mould the fljjure to the
Chape d^rr.nnded by fashion.
"If put on property,™ said llirs IVhite, "a corset
cannot cause th» slightest injury."
This corst-t talk was preQxnlaary to the lecture
announced for the morning, on the new armhole,
under which head Miss White took up the whole
subject of the fitting of linings.
Most. and. to lact, nearly Bit, dressmakers, she
ud. treated v w<jrr.an s boiy ua t'.ough it were a
damn::., and were eatlsfled if her gown looked well
when the stood raotiunless.
"But the WOBU has to turn and move ln her
gowr..' laid Miss White, "and you ca.n't expect the
garment which is smooth axd unwrir.kled on the
4umi:.. to reniain co on h»-r. We must have wrta
kies. 'dZitl wh.it we want to do Is to put tht;ai into
the i.r..r.v; when we are ;r.aklnff it. bo as not to have
ttoem ■apes. In the cuttlde material aftertfard."
Mjjw 'White then explained In detail how she put
* tuck In the shoulder of the lining to mi up the
holic* there and prevent the outside garment from
wrirJti!ng at that point; how save doubled the lining:
at the waist and put a cluster of tucks acroes the
hack to withstand th« extra etraJn oa three parts,
aad how sh«- put ruchln^s across the bu*t. to give
fciecessary tulscsa and to prevent the dress from
yield::*?; •' the continual morion of the body. But
the Bjost Irr.portar.t point of all, she said, was the
cutting of tbe hack. Il ehould be exactly aa wide
a* the wearer's back, whfrrßs it WMM gen«-r:iUy
trcna an ir.rh to a couple of Indies narrower.
' A dress rr.ay look all rißht with a narrow buck,"
«aid Kit White, "although it r.oesn't usually, but
it ae\er v.ii! be er>ir;fortaiile, end you aevtt can
took •» ln your clothes if you are not comfortable.
"Now, e%-t-ry woman wants to be comfortable, as
•"'ll a» jmurt. Wht-n a cust inier Fays to you.
Give me a wide chest.* or a wide back, or a bis
■rmaoii *he really means, 'Make me a c-mfortabie,
w&.st." If you make her comfortable ghe will call
you tuesi .ir.d pay j'ou any price you ask."
The asuociatlcn h*l<l a business rt!f»i!ng In the
*▼*"!?.(? a nd OlsemMd the *«ablishment throughout
we cour.try of dr•*^■snlak!nl^ Institutes. wh"re rrery
thing eor.r.er«»,i with the art of <3re«amak:ng, from
Jne rnaklns »if jownn to the mauugem>-nt if cus
tomers, will be ta'jßhc
CARPET
CLEANSING
MR «1 TEiHS. EkTABUkUEDIMI
*»»«S)ea» ■»■!•■ <■!«. Cmmpmmfd tlil'w.l.
" •»» nr«cr>»ll» «n<l wh-11 • ram, aril.
ft r» 'tins- ■•» «!«r A- m.i«tl»«
Telrpbenea Sps* ft "TTM AY.
633 & 634?fr ; fd^»3 I iIV«
Chelsea. & NEAR 28th ST.
T Wi STEWART/
t ♦
I ARE YOU SEEKM3 I
! EMPLOYMENT? I
; ; Th: Tribant Makes * Spec?*! X
% £*'« on Advts. of This Kind. ♦
I 54 WORDS. 3 TIMES. ISC. I
: 24 WORDS. 7 TIMES. 305. :
♦ Lmm *: Any Advmiu^ Off:» %
; « Sou Dc«. 4 %
The Laar-s Pin»<viai
wmfymffl
• r c>i- r - sT^^Wi 'iH-^if
THE EFFECT OF PERSONAL HABITS.
Th<»y had met for afternoon tea In th« drawing
room— or, more strictly, living room— of th« little
apartment; «ix clever girls, Who delighted In talk
foff things over.
■ l wonder that any on*» ever marries," said
Sara, who sat on the edge of a large, solid writing
labi*, preferring th;tt Informal p>*rch to a cushioned
courh or wicker rocking chair. "There are so
rr.any obstacles that don't enter Into ordinary cal
culations. Only the madness or blindness of love
ran account for the fact that two p«ople can en
dure acs) other's qua!!t!*ii and personal habits for
a lifetime."
"How about relatives?" observed Alice. "They
have to cr.dure each otter."
"They don't always make a success of It." an
swered Sara, dryly. "It qualities were all, that
would fee one thing-; but it's not so simple. Tou
m!»;ht posdbly find a rain who was kind and hon
orable and courageous and— and fairly good look-
Ins, a!! at once; but how cou.u you be sure that
hfc wouldn't snt«, or have frequent cold» in the
h«rid. or wear ;i collar tco long, or tiait hi would
t.-at in an alxsoiult-ly perfect way? It's the per
sonal h.iUts that m.ik.- lh«j real difficulty between
P«.-,opie— if tn^y're. at all nervous or fastidious. I
couldn't endure an ar-.-hun^el a :.u sn«S«-d. loudly,
or— an ur ted:"
"Oh, Sara, how abnurdt" exclaimed Marie. But
Edith, the hostess, said: "I think she's right. I've
often thought how much depends on those little
things. It complicates Hie. but what can one do?
Some of us are ;if¥ect«*d t<y such things, and the
others nevtr think of th«? effect thry produce.
Once, when we nu<l a lonif lllnemi in the family and
couid not employ trained nurwen all the time, we
bad an attendant who wore false t»eth and who
Incessantly rr.ailt- a little, un<»;iny wound In her
mouth. It drove mo wild: I never rested until we
pot rid of h«-r. I'll never forget the. nervous torment
of that habit."
"I don'i think I object to sounds," remarked
Ai?r.«-9, "hut I know what you mean, for if I mar
ried a man who bit his nnils I should have to be
divorced. It kiv«s me an Incessant squirm along
the spine."
"In fcorr* ptnry of Tolstoy**," said Ethel, "he
mention* a m.tn who was irritated by his wife's
way of handling her teacup. 1 think he said «he
stuck out h?r little fh:«er."
"Of course!" cried 3ara. "Can thine be more
maddening than those little affected movejneiita
and looses? 1 met v woman one summer who was
devoted to embroidery and who thought she had
pretty h:inds>. If you had s«*n, her pose hem with
every -low. languid atitrh ■he drew! Like this"—
and she llliiFtrat«-d. "You've seen the hands In
tho**- old fashioned annuals and 'Beauty Books.'
She «trurk attitudes with h< rs like those lovely
fi-maic? with curls and big eyes And when she
par* slh rtruck :itt!tu<l<-s with her mouth, and
posed with her Lands In playing the accompani
ments Jerusha.2 (KxctiM my swearing). I lived
In d.iily f^-ar of rolji*; mad and assassinating' her.
y«-t h*r moral an<l mental oua!itle« were excellent."
"Perrple have »-nril<»t=s bad habits at table. said
Mari<». "I'll pram you that disagreeable ways of
<-:tti'-)? are almost unb^arabl^. I don't mean Inv
poasible thing*, like eating with one'« knife, but
little thins* that -. me refined People do. I have
a cousin who talkn while «he chews" —
Snra save vent to another Innocent but emphatic
'!ve.
"She really oupht to he. plain V she exclaimed.
"My cousin only Jingles the silver, and fusses with
everything In reach— keeps her hands moving on
the table until you're dizzy, and wonder why you
f»-»ii co nervom." „ .... , .
"Cut thos«- things ar.noy every one, said Marie,
"ev*n people who ire not nervous."
Tea I ' miow." answered Sara, "but the real
trouble with m* Is that I am too easily annoyed.
Tilings s!mj>ly drive me wild that wouldn't worry
others at nil. Tittle odd ways of pronouncing
words for example, or getting n;.m<-s wrong. We
ha.l an Knglish dressmaker whom I used to want
to hit b*'-.iu«e she called mv sister 'Miss Mar-yon,
ir. two syllables, instead of Marlon."
Margaret, the sixth ff!rl. who was an artist. had
all this time been absorbed In a book of Illustra
tions, and had taken no part in the discussion.
Now she looked up at Sara with an amused
'Well T must say." she remarked, "for a girl
who ia so easily annoyed, do you know. Sura
Mason, that for the last ten minutes you have been
swinging your foot and swishing your silk skirt In
the m<\»t soul harrowinc manner?"
"I dar«» «ay." said .-'ara. coolly, alighting from
her perch. "Just because lam nervous. I «up
n.j««> I'm the bUsest nuisance of the bunch!"
"Inm wonfl.-rinfi." -il-f Edith, meditatively,
"whether th" secret of charm may not consist In
the mere nb«enc<» of annoying or n-pellant personal
hah'.ts. Tfcnt would make It a omewhat negative
Quality, to be «iir». but It would srlve such a, 'ie
njrhtful effect of smoothness and ense."
••%•., I think." "M Margaret, "that It would take
mor' than that to make ■ person positively at
tractive. But that would >»• a factor We all
sh""ld take mor* pains to avoid the trifles that Jar
upon oth~rr>. Then utcain"— rhe smiled at Sara —
•*r.-e really must rot to too fastidious: It makes
::i rc!s*.rable."
ONE OF MANY.
The Friend (who bus U<?en abroad)— And how la
your wife, old man?
Ex-Husband— Oh, I hnven't any wife now. She
K ot a- divorce lspt pprinsr end is now on the stage.
The Friend-- Ah, an •■ trees, oh?
Ex-Hu*band— Oh, no: she's merely on the stage.
— (Ker.nebec ("51 c.) journal.
Maude— He says he loves me dearly, yet he has
known me only two days. -
Clara— Oh. well, I suppose that accounts for It,
4enr.- (ChlciGo Daily News.
CARPET '" e'UEANSING
. largest Is t:.e V.'urld. T.very detail.
' '■'■* yrar»' experlcnre.
THE THOS. J. STEWART CO.
mtjndwsy ond *nih St.. New Yora. Vbone **■ *■■•
wo »AOB K^^n^'»a^AND MOVxNa .vax*
BTORAOE WAKBnOUSD AND MOVING VANS.,
. . Write or ttlcsooae tat tetereatlac booklet.
NEW- YORK DAILY TRIBUNE. FRIDAY. SEPTEMBER 16, 1904.
OH MAILBIED LIFE.
Its Jars and Troubles Fashioned
Theories and Mutual Obligation.
A prominent case of denial of divorce brought
cut pome shrewd comment and sound advice from
the presiding Supreme Court Justice in a remote
State not long ago. The main complaints were
"cruel and Inhuman treatment" and "incompati
bility of temperament." .
According to the judge's Interpretation of the
evidence, the "cruel and inhuman treatment" com
plained of by the wife 3?<=rr.3 to iiave consisted
mainly cf occasional exhibitions of boortshness on
the part of the husband. On one occasion he was
bored with her piano playing, and attempted sum
m.ir'ly to stop thai annoyance by closing the lid of
the instrument. His wife resisted, and her fingers
were pinched ir. consequence. At another time be
refuse*! to budge from the two chairs he occupied
in front of the window, to enabia his wife to re
move some pet birds which wers hanging outside.
A third specification related to the violent ringing
of the doorbell at night by the husband. Acts like
these were the head and front of the offending.
There may have been evidence enough in the
case, said the judge, to secure a verdict from .-.
Jury of women that the husband had behaved like
"a brute." But then, the judge asked, had tlu
wife's temper and conduct no snare in making him
so. it was very wrong to close the piano on hi»
wife s fingers, but was it quite right to insist on
coxnpelllEv a man to listen to music that he did
not want: Is It wise to make a mans home so
disagreeable that he must either stek quiet and
repose outside of it or resort to force to secure
them Inside? As to the pet bird episode, it would
be Interesting to hear in what kind of tone the
wife asked her husband to move; and before con
demning without reserve that morose and surly
person, it might be only fair to give him some
credit for a dim feeling of regret that the woman
he had courted in days gone by had love to spare
for her birds, but none for him. Again, why should
a wife's nerves be tarred by her husband's ring at
the doorbell, even If it were late at night? There
are women who find more melody in that sound
thun is contained in ail the octaves of their piano
fortes or all the trills of their pel birds.
The- old fashioned theory of mutual obligation In
the murrlatjt' relation Is a good denl lost sight of in
these days, declared the judge. Men ■!!■•■ too apt
to carry their business faces and their business
thoughts home with them, and so bring nothing
but coldness, hardness and reserve to the society
of wives and children On th»- (jth.-r hand, women
are net ready enough to make allowance for the
wear and tear of business life upon tne nerves
and temper of the man who has to bear the brunt
Of the struggle. It Is to a very large extent for
their wive*' ami children's sukes that men are
tempted to overtax their energies, and to mftko
thrro.«elves prematurely old. In the endeavor to
ucquirc wealth or to maintain a certain social
position. There are many thßgs that cloud a
man's brew an«l try his temper about which he
cannot take his wife Into il : confidence. She
would jri>bubly n:>t understaa4 hem if he did. and
the attempt to translate tin 1 troubles into cVflnit-?
speech is to mnny men a more acute pain than
simply to endure them Women may have noticed
the fact that the boiling kettle continues to bubble
for a Little After it has been lifted from the fire.
In the vim-- way the active brain of the hard
work <! professional or business man will, ln s, ■!•■■>
of hlmsi'i'. run on the affairs of his old after he
has corns within the precincts of home, A wise
wife will make allowance for the occasional grviiT
ness whose source she cannot understand, art?
Will make It her business to smooth out the hnrrt
lines of the troubled face, an.l to a!.' the in
fluence of a pl.-asant home to work its gradual
but certain cure.
Of arse, leeper than all faults of heedleasness
or want of heart Is the radical moral err r of for
jretting what the marriage covenant Is. the judge
reminded his htirers. People take In marriage cer
tain duties on themselves, and Mndert;ike to bear
the Infirmities of humanity which each possesses.
Whether "for letter or for worse, for richer or
poorer." is expressly covenanted or not. the condi
tions ire distinctly understood, and married peo;i!-«
ant as obviously bound to accommodate their
tastes and tempers to each other as they are to re
spect the InvlolabllUy of their neighbors property.
They have no right to subject their children. If
there are -hlldren. to th» demoralizing Influences
of a contentious home, or to the shame Inseparable
from a broken marriage boi They have Just as
little right to weaken the tie which holds society
together by treating the marriage vow a.« ■ thing
terminable at the price or the vindictive !mpuls»
of elth-r of the p«rtle» to It. There has been a
great .1. r»l too much talked and puhll-'h^d about
the sentimental side of this |ue*l On thy ••a*-.
in the court of Justice. In all our nodal Ife. Tv«
hay* ha.! too many exposures of the m'->rhM an
atrmy of the minds of vain or vicious r>*-ople who
chafe under the ties of matrimony. It Is about
time that the simple and Imperative dJ?y of mar
ried men and women shouM be ••-'•?»■ upon.
THE REAL LACE CRAZE.
•wvrrie:-. who are the fortunate possessors nf
stores of real !ac*t should bring out every scrap
they own at the present time. There is a place for
it on almost every LoatuaM and nothing look*
quite so smart. A little Ingenuity Is required.
however, in r <ler to use the lace without Injury
to It for to cut valuable, lace* Is an enormity that
no right-thinking person would be guilty of. Bome
timep the cutting seems unavoidable, but much
can be done by skillful plea! and doubling.
THE TEIB
A Tissue Paper Pattern of Girl's Apron. No.
4.827, for 10 Cents.
Attractive aprons are always In demand for little
girls, and are as etermlnc as they are serviceable.
This one is
novel, and
gives lonir.
vn h r ■> ken
l!n.-« at th«
front that
ure almost
v n lversally
beeo mint,
while the
skirt Is full
at sides and
back. As 11-
rated the
material la
lawn. with
trimming of
* mbroldery.
ut all ma
terials In use
for aprons
ar« equally
suitable, and
th- trlm
mlnir can
be varied fb
suit Individ
ual tastes.
Dretelles of
needle wr>rk
are |irc!!y
IfO. -'JIHL.'S APnON. an ,l Vastly
made, but those of the material with some dainty
finish often are preferred. The quantity of material
required for the medium alxe (ten years) la two and
one-half yards 26 Inches wide, with two and one
half yarda of embroidery and four and one.-half
yards of insertion to make as Illustrated. The pat
tern. No. 4.827. Is cut In sizes for girls 6, 8. 10 and 12
yean« of age.
The pattern will be went to any address on receipt
of 10 cents. Please give r.um»j«r and ajr* distinctly.
Address Pattern Department. New-York Tribune.
If In a hurry for the pattern, iJTnd an extra two
cent stamp, and we will mall by letter postage in
sealed envelope.
Hoti>setMji*Vey Ejcchange.
SOMETHING ON BOTH SIDES.
•A Daughter" has hit upon a suggestive topic
for discussion, and I am clad to sen that It Is to
form th« objerthre of the next contn. t in the very
interesting Housewives' Exchange. There is a lot
to be said on both sides— for the daughter and for
the mother or parents or brother— but I think most
women will agree with mo In believing that com
mon humanity should Impel a daughter to stay by
her parents, at whatever sacrifice to herself. should
age, poverty or misfortune overtake them.
The fact that In your correspondent's letter
Mary's family was well to do could make no pos
sible difference In Mary's obligation to her 111 and
aging mother. Surely Jlllal duty and respect would
busk* « r tha devotion which "A Daughter^' seems
to tiilnk so superfluous and unnatural.
When on* considers the sacrifices that parents
make, voluntarily and lovingly, for th«»tr children,
girls should not hesitate to make whatever return
iDi'V be demanded of them.
I do net believe, however, that many daughters
retard the. sacrlilceß they make for their parent*
In the light of "martyrdom." Happily, no. Love. If
not duty, dictates the devotion, and Is It* own com
pensation. . A MOTHER.
Flushing. N. Y.
THE MOTHER THE VICTIM.
I have read with Interest the letter published In
the Housewives' Exchange on . the question of the
martyrdom of daughters, and while the case that
It cites, to uphold the affirmative of the argument.
in strong. >•' !t «e*' rs to me that the writer la
prone to pronounce, a gen erar Judgment from one
specific case wh!-"h upholds her opinion.
Tl'e Instances of a mother's ' unselfishness—
amounting to martyrdom— ln order that a daughter
may have a happy time.' are so common that they
pass entirely unnoticed, or •)»<> one excuses tna
daughter with the r-roark: 'It's only fair. Her
mother had her fun i ears ago. and now iff Mary's
turn." $ .. .
■ One of tte commonest toaticcea of a mother.
THE SHUT-IN.
Boar with thy day's lons pain,
H»ar if it come again.
With morning's son,
Aral lo! from out the days
Will open wondrous ways
To peace well wen.
Bear with thy wasted powers.
Thy weary waiting hours;
Still Life Is great—
Great by all human ties.
Great In love's sympathies—
In patience wait.
Hours wasted, did I sigh?
Not one that passes by
Hut sings with Hope
So musical and strong,
I listen rapt and long
To grasp its scope! —(Transcript
NOTICE.
Letters are received occasionally from admirer* of
the Tribune Sunshine Society showing that they hare
confused It with organization* of nearly similar name
snbfeqoently started by person* whom they mistakenly
believed to be still in the nervlce of The Tribune. To
avoid error nit communications, packages, etc.. should
be addressed "The Tribune Sunshine Society, Tribune
Building. New-York."
SPECIAL. CHEER.
Mrs. 8.. of Waiea Hill, has sent the Srst con
tribution—s3—toward a wheel chair for the Ala
hama Invalid.
MIDDLETOWN <VT.) BRANCH.
The officers and members of the Middletown (Vt.)
Branch, as at present organised, are as follows:
President. Mrs. Dana S. Carpenter; vice-president.
Mrs. Albert A. Greene; secretary, Mrs. Qulncy A.
Norton; treasurer. Charles R. Ballard. Other mem
bers of the branch are Pana S. Carpenter, Miss
Norma Young. Mrs. Leonidaa Gray, Mrs. "William
Hickox and Miss Lillian Spaldlng. Mr. Ballard
says :
"There are now only nine of us, all told, as the
Rev. Frank W, Hazen Is now ln Meriden. Conn.,
and Mrs. Henry L. ISallt'y has been in Long
msadow, Mass.. for nearly three ynrs. As I write
'nine' I remember that John Rldii says 'Nina is
the orossest of all cross members! 1 but. luckily for
us. he uses 'crops' In a mathematical, rather than
ln 1 temperamental sense. We can do but com
paratively little outside of our own home field, for
we have "the poor always with us." and we feel
that our first duty ia to th«m; the spirit to do much
more is willing, but th» m^ar.a re wanting."
Th.» office is not disposed t.i think of this branch
a.« "a feeble folk." for it knows how genuinely help
ful Is the work done by ltd members.
SINCERE THANKS.
As Miss Conran, of Naugatuck. Conn., cannot
use her crippled hands. Mrs. Fannie E. Tale
makes th« following acknowledgment of birthday
greetings received r>y this Invalid:
Miss Conran desires, through the eolunm. to
express her sincere thanks for the many bright
ray* of sunshine that reached her on h- ' anniver
sary day. August 13. She was the recipient of
twenty-live letters and packages. Personal letters
of thanks have teen mallfd to all, with the excep
tion of the fallowing, whose names were not
given: Mrs. U. Hotel Champlain; L. M. and 3.
Mm P'at»-n Island: "A Sun.-hlner." it Nnroton.
Conn.; "Tribune Reader." Brooklyn; "Port Chester,
N. Y." The sifts Included money, lace collar, ailk
r.e.-ktle. silver book pa«>» hoM^r. photographs, 60
cents In "tnmps. a box of J.irar.*<»> writer flowers.
i. l.irgr hanging birthday card. Illustrated maga
zines, etc. A pretty white photo frame was sent
from the office.
FLOWERS
A large box of flowers gent as a special gift to
a miaaton Of hospital was recelTed on Wednesday
afternoon from J. 3. Vander Veer, of Westbury,
Lorg Island.
REPI KB.
A Brooklyn Admirer: The sunshine you kindly
offer mm make several people happy. instead of
one. and if you will send It to the office we shall
be glad to see it distributed In a way to do the
most good.
Mrs. K. C. 3.. Manhattan: Please send the
magaxlr.es to Miss M Reid. No. 132 West Slxty
fourf'
Mrs. Smith. West Slxteenth-st. : The T. 9. I
does not employ any wagon to collect parcels.
Contributions an \*> sent to th* headquarters of
Sunshine. Tribune Building, by any local express.
CONTRIBUTIONS.
Boxes by express, led with excellent sunshine,
were recelve.l yesterday from Freehold, N. J.; C.
W. 8.. of SrrlrgJVld. Mass . and Asbury, N. J.
Several yards of new goods from Mrs. W. W. "Wln-
Bhlp. of Brooklyn, will help m supplying cheer to
Went Indian children; packaKes of miscellaneous
reading came from Mrs Charles E. Oral and
B. T. Dola:i; a crib, mattress and all furnishings
from »T. S. S. friend, for aom» needy mother
PATTEKN.
A RAY OF CHEER.
Mm J. B. Lane, of New-Jersey, asks that cheery
letters ha sent to the Rev. I- C. Scott, at the Home
for Incurables. Forty-el«hta-at. and Woodland*
aye.. Philadelphia. He cannot use his hand in any
way. but the knowledge that some one tn the busy
world outside has thought of him In his helpless
ness will add a brightness to the lonely days A
motto to hang on the wall of his room win. be' an
preciated. Will some of the Philadelphia members
please visit the afflicted man?
That day ■ heal wherein we give
A thought to others' sorrows;
Forgetting self, we learn to live.
• And ssings born of kindly deeds
M.ike »■;.<■-••. our to-morrows.
-(Rose H. Thorpe.
NO BREAD FAMINE HERE.
The rise In the price if wheat has naturally had
a direct effect on the bakers, hut as yet they have
not taken any steps toward increasing the price of
bread.
H. B. Cushman said yesterday morning: "Flour
In selling at from $6 to Pi sr, a barrel, wholesale.
No one seems to have a large supply on hand, so
the speculation in wheat Is especially Interesting
at present. We are still using last year's wheat
for flour, and when this year's crop comes from the
mill, which will happen soon now. conditions may
change. It is pretty certain, however, that flour
will not be what you can call cheap all winter, for
a good deal of the crop has been damaged."
Mr. Cushman does not predict a bread famine,
however, like some of the bakers in Boston, where
flour l« said to be IS a barrel, with prospects of an
Immediate rise In price.
The price of rolls has been stationary since last
devotion Is sending the only daughter away to col
lege. The time whin a girl Is ready to begin her
higher education, which comes as she la about to
enter young womanhood. Is Just the time that a
mother long* tc have her daughter near her. Be
fore this Kh* has been a happy. Irresponsible child,
but at seventeen or eighteen *he begins to be a
companion.
Then remember th.it hundreds of college girls
coma from homes wbera one or no servant 13 kept.
In this case the mother, who Is probably beginning
to get along In years, mint tail* up all the little
dnrifK that were daughter's when she was home.
And haven't you over guessed as you looked at ..
friend with a child '■.. college who seemed. Just a
wee bit shabby that sho wanted to get along on
a.i little as possible, si. ice "father" was having ex
tra demand* on his nirse?
Then there is another proof of a mother's un
selfish ness In sending her daughter away to col
lege. I know a woman in a tiny place along the
Massachusetts coast whose daughter has recently
been graduated from one of the leading cottages*
for women. A few months before the beginning c.f
Helen's colics** course, the father died, but the
mother decided that her daughter must go on Just
the same— it waa her husband's wish. He loft some
money, aid Jl«'!fn had .1 free, happy time for four
years. £h« gave and went to little dinners galore
and wore better clothes than she had ever known
before. At commencement the quiet little mother
went op to see her daughter graduate, and she.
war" quite overawed by Helen's clever, dressy
friends.
•Now. motiitr, dear. explained Helen, "my
crowd has jirrun?ed for a house party up on Laka
George for two weeks right after commencement.
then I've hall promised to visit two of the girls
up in Vermont. You'll let me. won't you. that* a
dear? and then m come back and sett!-- down "*
But Helen hasn't settled down yet. and when abe
Isn't away with some of her college friends, she i>
grumbling at the sleepiness of her : iti,.- town.
I have considered espe <4 :i!!y th«> ens* when th«
dir jliter goes to oollegf . '■ 1 there is } UB t «*
mm- .1 chance for it mother to sacrifice for the stay-
hi>m*> girl, for there an .1 thousand und one
little a/jts of love, of teniVrnesa and of patience
that are enacted every day. at. H. B.
j Brooklyn.
« > ■ GOOD CIIEEB.
I Have you had a kindness shown?
i * Pass It en.
I 'Tttbs not given for you alona—
. P.-.ss !t en.
Let It travel down the years.
Let It wipe another"» tears,
a j Till !n h«»av«r. the deed arrears —
ft ' Pass It on.
a *
•prtngr. In some local they are brtegfetff 19
a ao»n. . wntte In ofba, nti^Sbth^
■ell at 12 cenis.
At the bakery of Charles Abbot. !ti Elehth-«re
the manager -sail that there to Vr!S» ."hlSeS of
K^S^uS WttWa * *• **y* to
GL^NWINC.3-
Although the number of women who will cast
ballots in the comin? PrpsltJpntial etecticn is com
paratlvcly small. 100.flO>, their political learin;s are
said to be a natter of considerable ceaecrq to
both Republicans and Democrats. Th*- cor.'nitut*
It is said, the doubtful element in four istatc?. Colcv
rado, Wyoming. Utah and Idaho.
TVTien Indiana want to show particular hnr.or to
* white can or woman, they a<!opt him or he*
into their tribe. it is an evidence, therefore, of
their extremely kinn resard for Miss Mary Jame
son. pastor's assistant of the Third Presbyterian
Church, of Rochester, that the. Deer Clan or the
Seneca tribe of the Iroauola Indians have made
her their Bister, and given to her the beautiful
name of Ah-wae-aewas. which means "picking
flowers out of the water." Miss Jameson has been
In the habit or viaitinc the Indiana on the Cat
taraugu3 Reservation, and conducting services for
them while at hor summer home at Lotus Point.
Lake Erie, and 1« this way the Indians became so
attached to her that they asked If they might not
adopt her. All the member* of a clan are supposed
to be brothers and sisters, and constitute a kind
of secret fraternity.
The School for Mothers, which was originated tn
Bordeaux, will probably be Imitated in Parts and
other large French towns. In it girls will be
taught everything, from th« elementary principles
of hygiene and the dressing of Infants to the man
agement of household expenses and the price of
food.
Colorado has a recently appointed woman Justice
of the peace, Mr*. Rosarel Ruby, of Colorado
Springs.
"When It comes to pensions, women are In the
land." remarks •'The Woman's Journal." "Mrs.
Garfleld and Mrs. McKinley receive £5.000 a yeas)
each. Mrs. Philip H. Sheridan receives C 5..0. while
the pension** of Mrs. Logan. Mrs. McClellan and
Mr« Fran'* Blair are each &OCO. Eighteen widows
of generals and admirals receive J1.2U0 a year, six
$300 and two hundred have- pensions of $&*> each."
Mar." a Japanese soldier wears an "obi," or belt,
of cotton cloth with one thousand knots embroid
ered !n It. This cloth was originally bought by bis
mother, wife or sister, marked with one thousand
dots and paaaed along to 993 other women for each
of them y> make one knot. "While making this
knot each woman gives her best thought, wish or
prayer for the safety and protection of the soldier
who is to wear the belt." says "Leslie's Weekly."
It Is called to* Sen Mm Riki. which, translated.
mean.", "the strength of one thousand people." and
is believed to be a. talisman.
A mushroom fiend bewails the popular denseness
which permits the wholesale destruction c' puff
balls by golfers and other "Ignoramuses." "Why.
on the golf course." he says, "that I have been
In the habit of frequenting, a bushel of delicious
food is destroyed every day, by wanton golfers, wao
make practice swipes at the round white puff balls
they encounter on their way." Although the com
mon meadow mu.-hroora Is gathered assiduously,
other equally delicious species, among them the
puff ball, are Igi ored, all on account of the popu
lar dread of the deadly aminista,"
Instruction.
The BARNARD SCHOOL FOR ROTS.
COLLECT PREPARATORT. 721 St. Nicholas A»e..
KINDERGARTEN * PRIMARY 23» Lenox At».
19TII YEAR BEGINS SETT. 23D. CATALOG.
The BARNARD SCHOOL FOR GIRLS.
COLLEGE PREPARATORY. «21 Wot I4StS St
KINDERGARTEN * PRIMART. 131 Convent At*.
9TH YEA* BEGINS SEPT. tIST. CATAX.OO.
For Boys and Young- Men— City.
Berkeley School.
72D STREET AND WEST EOT) AYE.
ESTABLISHED !380.
PREPARES BOT9 FOR ALL. COLLEGES.
THOROI'i.H INSTRUCTION.
Highest Honors Won by Berkeley Boys
in Scholarship and Athletics.
PTH TEAR BEGINS SEPTEM3ER SSTK. 1904.
PROSPECTUS MAILED UPON APPLICATION.
W. WILBERFORCE SMITH. A. M.. Head-M»ster.
J. CLARK READ. A M.. Asst. Hea4- Master * Resistrar.
THE HEAP-MASTER WILL BE AT THE SCHOOL
EVEHT MORNING FROM TEN TO TWELVE O'CLOCK.
COLUMBIA INSTITUTE,
122 Wot 72d Street.
Preparatorr School for Boy*.
FROM PRIMARY TO COLLEGE.
Optional Military Drill. Playground.
Study hour under Instructors.
Reopens Sept. ZSth. Catalocues.
EDWIN FOWLER. A. 8.. M. D, PrincipaJ.
Now at the School.
C OLU3VSB/ 4
CRAMNSAR SCHOOL.
Founded 176:. 3*-36 E. Slst St.
Spacious bu'idtnc. Thorough ttatatas « aSI »nit ftj
dividual — fir ail colleges, scientiric schools and bust
ness. Primary Class's. Laboratories. Gymnasium.
Athletic grounds. REOPENS WEDNESDAY. B£PT. 21.
B. H. CAMPBELL. A. M. t
F. F. WILSON. a. M. » Headmasters.
CUTLER SCHOOL.
NO. to EAST 30T II STREET.
Sis graduates entered colle«» last June, ■■****>
without conditions, but with special 'credits- or
honors. "
Reopens Wednesday. September SSth.
Primary Department. Monday. October 3d.
\» «5 W«-»t B;ahiy -at-iit «tr«»t. * i,
THIRTEENTH TEAR QE.JINS SEPT ISTH.
Illustrated catalogue ob »ppllc»ttoa
N. ArchibaM Shaw. Jr.. Principal.
A thorough trulainc fer /»o» bo^
I RVtHc SCHOOL,
IU 3A West JHtb St.
LOUIS DV. i>;ilV KAY. Head Master.
PRl\i\l:Y DEPAJ'.TMKNT. JUNIOR AND
COLLEGE PREPARATORT GRADES.
SCB-PKIMART CLASSES FOR BEGINNERS.
No asaoa study to» boys under n;u«n. as an l«.«»on« ar*
pr»pare,l m -cW. y>|ar b r K .n» >ept. SBth.
DP. HAY now at *-hool morning*.
6ymn*ilum- " La-»rutory. Playground
Collegiate School,
•4t HWBSI SEVENTT-SEVENTn ST.
Boy» prepared for the < oll«gv» ami ScivßttSe Schools.
Fri-iarr Department. ■Well-mulppea gymnastum. R»
cper.» HEPTEUIBEU 28. L. C. MTOATT. Prtncipa!.
CHAPIN COLLEGIATE SCHOOL,
M KA'-T eaTIl ST.. NEW TOBK.
<fMT**l» Vonr Basics Oct. 3. IJO4.
Wtli ILal EnKl.ah. Clascal anl Prt^Ary
11l I' ill En«l.3h. t :u<. leal ant Prnaavs
WV B. LORD BUOKUCT. A. D.. Principal.
H. B. CHAPIK, I>. I>.. Principal Km<rrUua.
TRINITY SCHOOL,
139-14? WEST »IST ST.
A t»mT School for boys Founded In 179%.
Primary. Cramaar ana HUh Seaeasa
Woodbridge School
417 Madison Aye.
;JD TEAR BEGINS SEPT S9TK
THE FREE LAND school
6PAU>.MJ )ft nriT.mNG. T
(OU.EI.E IMiEPABATIUX.
"THE LYON SCHOOL
Ciii FIFTU AVr. Reopnw September *3tb.
IJmtu-d to forty him. Tw<>aty-3econJ year.
DWIGET SCHOOL, 15 West 43d St "
High itl * % P** l *' 8 ichr for bars rrom ' tqjq y«f»,
IndlT»3mU attmtlm. AtJUatles. AHTIIUIS TTlliitAMd,
yjla. XL E. CAiIEKEi, As>oc. rrtn.
Instruc&m.
For Tours; Ladies— City.
THE
VELTIN SCHOOL
.5.
160 and 162 W. 74th St., M. Y. Cit/.
College Preparatory and General Course
Number of pupils lirr.itrd to 'twelve in
each class. Fireproof birrMinjr, -lioroughly
eqtnppcr!. ™ ■
Reopens October 5.
The Misses Ely
'Boarding and 'Day School Jor*
/ Gtrlji.
RIVERSIDE DRJVE.
S>th and 86th St.. New York.
De Lancey School for Girls,
71 West 85th Street.
College preparatory and speci&l enu.-ies. Alx> ■_!_
** ry and Intermediate. Twanty-thJrd l?«r (W
sasium. College certiacatta, Smail clasaam. Taar
too* on apt,:.. *^ m
Circular on apghcaUoa. Xaw J/glnVoSrV*.
The Hisses Jaudoo's
BOAR^ D =. I / N iV.^ N ' E> DAT SCHOOL FOR CTSI.TA.
REOPENS THURSDAY OCTOBEa i
~* ga»« 50th strret.
THE MISSES GRAHAM
(Successors to '.&• M sacs Green).
Boarding and Day School for Gixb.
'E'l'-:.-^! till) Reopens Oct. 5.
»w Locution. KM Went 724 >».. Hluraas Seaaam
THE FINCH SCHOOL boarding "and-day
111 L. I I.iViIJVIIUUL, SCHOOL FOR GiRLI
HEW FIREPROOF BtTILDIIfS.
Sl-«3 t.\>T ~..1U ST.
MRS. JAiIZ - WELLS FINCH. A. K. LL. B . n tin laal
Ofice hoars It) to 3 o'clock.
INSTITUT TISX« g^J ESS*
Itamoved from Sl3 W«.n Eail ATsaus to
£.->,» WEST »3KD STREET.
Collec« preparatory. French Kindergarten.
Reopens Oct. 3d. Mma. arietta T:*c4, Pr'nctpeJ.
THE HERBILIrVAN T.ATra SCHOOS,
Formerly
THE PEEBLES * THOMPSON BCHOOX.
BOARDING AND DAT SCHOOL FOR CttALJL
30. 32. 24 East »Ttit Streec
Miss Brown's Boarding and Day School
(Formerly Tll-Hl2-715-7X7 Fifth An.)
Wl'.l re-open Ocu J, 1304. at Park; X... For c'.rcnlare
address Mi»» Anne Brown. HlghrUire Hall. Fara aUU
an-the-Hudson (Yanken). New York.
MRS. LESLIE MORGAN'S
BOARDING AND DAT SCHOOL FOR GIRL3L
13 AND 13 WEST I4TH STREET.
NEAR CENTRAL PARK, N. Y. ITT
REOPENS WEDNESDAY. OCTOBER FIFTH.
BXMOVAIr-COMSTOCK SCHOOL,
FROM 32 WEST 40TH-ST. TO 31 WEST -*»iTH-«T.
Reopens Oct. 6th. M!3S " AY. PrinclpaL
mHB MISSE3 RATSON SCHOOL FOR >IRUL
X snr..t.i classes throughout the school.
RF.OPFNS OCT. 8.
17* ITS. ISO West 7St!i Street
MISS ROBERTS" 3 SCHOOL FOR UIPJ-3.
X:- >:;a:'. r. and classes for beys. Advanced eanxats
lor »Beciai students. Recper.s October 3rd.
: WEST 39TH STREET.
KINDERGARTEN TR.\lMNG.— Opers Sept. IX Fr*»
Scholarships ltd.; r : iCls early reztatrattoa. FROaV
BEL NORILAL INST.. ! A. CUTTEN. iS Irvias Pl-.X.T.
4 CADEMT MOUNT ST. URSULA,
X\. For circular address Mother Su-pertor.
BadSafi Park. Wow Tessi City.
For Both Sexes— City.
PACKARD
Means THOROUGH
*TTH YE.»K. All comsserclal branches, til»
\i^ua. -. tloa. Eater at ar.v Cas.
FUK.VP.r> COM3IEBCIAI. MHOOU
«th Aye. i 23i St. L>ay aad -ventng.
THE BERIJTZ SCHOOL OF t %>OCAOES.
Mafiisoa Square tl.l~l B'wayt; Brooklyn. 71 Court St.
New tarflU btf.an.ns now. Trial -aasooa troa>
Hoboken.
STEVENS SCHOOL.
THE ACADEMIC- DEPARTMENT OF TH3
STEVENS 1.\.-«TITt TE OF ICCHNOLOGY.
R.v«- Street. betw««n 3ta and (it.-i :**.. UoDoJmo, X. X.
REOPENS »Ec*T. liTH. I*M.
Rec7str»ttcn day (or sppl leant* lor ximl-i-iloa ea Say
tcmber Mta>
Kasmsaansaa tar »imiii— l a oa :hm uta sad lsta o£
September.
rcsspieio eoarses of study preparatory to an Ustrtr
sl-.ies. Coileroo. Schools of HMBjssi Law as<t lXe4!e!sa.
?h* rat* of tuition for a!! classes) -» ilZu par jtar. a*
a» par term. Th«s« terms tncluda al! th« st'jdiaa.
For cataiosaaa apply lo tho Principal of Staves* BeTvwC
For Young Ladies Country.
MRS. MEADS SCHOOL,
NOftWALK, CONN.
Xw#n:y-flr»: v - o;er!» deptemiier Si
H'si'y saiiorsed. Cbli*s« Preparsitjry and General
Courses.
Apptr to Mrs. M. E. MEAD, Hi'.lsiie. NorwaTk. Conn.,
or PERCTJ WINTHROP MEAD. -47 Cedar sc. 'New Tor*.
Miss c. c. susosra
SCBCRBVN w'KOuL.
FOR GIIILS A.ND TOCNQ U.VDIES.
~raua castle:. ••
T.UIT.TTOWX-O ViiV DSON, X. T.
The most br^^tlful and best, mai^ped school for gtra)
la Ui* vicinity of Ne.v itr*.
illaS C. El MASON. LX* M.
RYE SEMINARY ""JS-SSf"
IXxm. 5. j. Ljfb. Ta« i 1 ..-.».-» sIOWE, ny*. N»w Tora,
MORAVIAN SEMIXART aw Girls. Bethlehem, Fa>.
?*oun<i«a fHsi i.'-st:> year ?;«u.» S«g- -iJU Ad
eicas *. iIAX H VKK. D. U.. IMSi
A UELK.HTVI I H«>>lE and !«rnooi for littte guas>
Ht:««iti> y».*r becic* September 2»tn.
sits* JoiiN »-.i Mm ALCOTT.
Port Chaster. S. T.
man M '•»<-. M«t<-»:r» Bowdtu and Day Se&o«4 tor
JL Oirls. .»rn-jwa. N. Y. Coil<r«« preparation. PHjel
c&l Culture. T*nnl» Basket-ball. Reopens Sept. SSd.
For Boys and Touns Men— Country.
•UTA'DTTrnrnnTI •" *** pr*D»r«l for bustn«ea or oss
iii-n. ZLJU W \t\JJJ. legf . j.-: ne gymnaatun). axMatla field.
On* of the mo« beautiful locations In Eastern Pa., modeca
eauipmenf 43 years of success; fccy» forgw to tho front
cne in C. '&. Senate; the failures ia other •chools becoaia
wl:h u» succc«»ral students; wo all worU, tSea play.
j 9HORTUT>O> (Tale). A. M . PT'n. ConcordTUio. pa.
PENNSYLVANIA MILITARY COLLEGE
LHt>rtK. PA. 43nt Tsar B««in» Septembor Ji.
¥ ,IVII. ENIHNEERIN<I. CHS^IISTRT. ARTS, ALSO
PREP \R\TORY CLASSEa INFANTRT. ARTIIXERT.
CAVALRY. A Superior System of Education. CATA
LOGUES OF COL. CHARLES E. UTATT. PUESIDSNT.
PEEKSKILL 3»SS£R.
round^a I«^X reolakm. «. T.
A ronr.isTowx school,
AL Morristown. New ••-■*?>. reop*-n» Frt.. Sis*. Mtav
Xo.v »ad cunditiontd boys. m, Sept. SSVi.
ri^UK iRVtN'I SCHOOL. FOR EOT 3. Tsrnrta- • a-o •
1 Hndactt. X. Y. •
MOHTCLAIB MniTAST Ad&BEMT.
3,-i IVitlUra ri:u — . Montclair. N. J.
'"7-
School Agtwcma,
AMERirAN AND FOREIGN TEACHERS' AGITCCT
tcdpli'"' Professocs*. Teachers. Tutors. Coverneaaaa, etc.
!oCiU*s«». schools *c.t FamitVa. Apply to
jjr*. sx. J. lOUXiIFI'LTUX. 2i Union Square.
Lax School*.
fVT~ M , Vftrtr Sev-ar'.oth r~ar Opea» Sept. I*.
rNeW lOrK :.iMw»:ta « ■!■—
■ . • _.«._;*.«. \fron» Z:Zj tj » p. it. Eiealßi
University c:*.^*. *■•*. ; ..>m sui>p. m.
_ «■««_■ '-f»ra:its degree* of LL> 8.. U,
Law School im. a?** j.i». i» rumoa. ::;j.
TjZ^ . v ,-~-. . .: For rkewtan aJ»lr«o
I_ J. TOMPKIMS. aeßStrair. Waahingtoa *».. X. T.
MLV.' \O:Ui l liny >..-iiju». ■.'■ XmiaK.
LAW st 11OOL ! lf*>iac School. New Tara CUT.
••Dwtrbt Method** of Instruction IX. B. ta two wn.
IX. Mm threa years. llistx stan<Smr<ts.
a»aa Car «a.t*&ir.i«, CSOr. J i CJT a JX, :En^».
A t

xml | txt