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New-York tribune. [volume] (New York [N.Y.]) 1866-1924, February 03, 1905, Image 11

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THE NEW DIRECTOR.
ymething About Sir Caspar Pur
don Clarke.
Liondon. January 23.
«-*e ensafrement of Blr Caspar Purdon Clarke
the Metropolitan Museum is something more
j,' n » ir.atter of money. A large salary alone
i^ja scarcely have drawn to America the dl-
Ljor of th * art museum of South Kensington.
! veteran in his sixtieth year, whose life has
* pent In the service of «>n art institution of
1( j v .:de reputation, must have had some
Aer ground of complaint than his Income to
«ye jecont -:I<hl lilmself to foreign residence and
--^ration from a circle of old companions and
friends. His connection with the Brompton art
tns dates back to ISG2. when he entered the
«jrir.g school as a Jem of architecture. The
llsscum had then been open about five years,
the foundations of what is now a compre-
school of design with illustrative col
j-dions in every branch of art had barely been
,£ He was an industrious and clever student.
jjfat the end of three years carried off a medal
proficiency Di architectural design. He ob
jSied employment in the Office of Public Works
f , Bhort period, and returned to South Ken
jSyton as an assistant architect. He took an ac
tlrtpart in the preparation of plans for the new
rsseurss In Brompton and in Bethnal Green, and
csseijufntly designed several consular and era
assj buildings, and the Indian Pavilion in the
£st Taris Exhibition. He was appointed as
«;star.t director of the museum at South Ken-
and after a protracted period of service
te was proructed nine years ago to the post of
tfreetor, and eubpequently honored with knight
hood. As a collector he made many Journeys to
•he Continent, and a long tour in India. His or
r«i!zlnp talent was displayed In the Fisheries,
Health and other exhibitions, and especially In
Ac Indian section of the last World's Fair in
Paris. His experience and knowledge as a col
lator In tlie broad field of illustrative study
in-3 plfed art ' ' ere exceptional; and by a life
time of arduous service he had qualified himself
for the rearrangement of the vast collections of
gpatl! Kensington In the new buildings to be
roir.pieted In the course of a few years. Sudden
ly the nation is deprived of his skill and authori
•y by the Metropolitan Museum In Now- York.
Dismayed by so serious a loss to art Interests,
•Jie critics Id the London newspaper offices are
denouncing with more irritability than acumen
the penurious scale of payments to experts in
BU&PUI2S and galleries. The salaries, it is true,
tre a; princely, but neither are they niggardly.
At the British Museum Sir Edward Maunde,
tie principal librarian, receives a salary of
$4jjOlI; eight heads of departments are paid
•rea $3.5<X) to HfiMi, and a large staff of assist-
earn from $750 to $3,000. There are retir-
Jj^ pensions and opportunities' for authorship
(afl expert study. Among th« heads of depart
pjena are men like Mr. Sidney Colvin, keeper
tf prints and drawings; Mr. Ernest A. Wallis
B-jic-. curator of Egyptian and Assyrian an
tiqritles; BIT Robert Kennaway Douglas, keeper
ef Oriental printed books and manuscripts; Mr.
Cecil H. Smith, curator of Roman and Greek
ts!«uities; Mr. C. H. Reed, keeper of British
aid mediaeval antiquities, and Mr. B. V. Head,
ssjsjtor of coins and medals. Salaries ranging
from S3..VK) to $4,000 are not munificent for ex
j«ts like these, but the men are where they
can prosecute favorite studies and turn their
to practical account. Professor Ray
"jtnkpjter, director of the Museum of Natural
Hirtory, receives about (6,000; Sir Edward J.
jaroter, director of the National Gallery and
<*a of the Tate Gallery, $5,000; Mr. Lionel
Henry Cust, director of the National Portrait
Gaikry, 13.000; Mr. Claude Phillips, keeper of
:h» Wallace collection, from $2,500 to $3,000,
md Sir Charles Holroyd, keeper of the Tate
<".;iiler)-, from 750 to $2,500. As director of
the Victoria and Albert Art Museum, In South
Kensinpton, Sir Caspar Purdon Clarke has
•smed between $3,500 and $4,500; his colleague,
J2r. \V. I. Last, director of the Science Museum,
ia recfived r.bout the same sum; the keepers
and assistants under them are paid all the way
from $'JO<J to $:J.O(K). Some of these officials
vithoat question are underpaid, when the re
(juireKeiUs of expert knowledge are taken into
iccour.t, but the majority of them work In a
leifurely way, taking advantage of opportunities
for extra employment, and the veterans have the
assurance of a pension in their declining years.
Wbile it is natural for English critics to re
sat the loss of the director of the South Ken-
Kspor. Art Museum, It is hardly just for them
:c iu*,gcst that he has been Induced by a prom
ised a salary twice as large as his own to de
■d a post where his services were pre-emi
notJj useful and satisfactory. It Is only fair
to ieff- that, tempting as the New- York offers
CJ7 have been frcm a financial point of view.
It would have rejected them if he had been
thoroughly contented where he was, and at lib
•ny to carry out his ideas and to work In his
own tray. There are many intimations that he
interfered with by officials In the Civil Ser
vice, and that he welcomed a release from the
•■Mlesome activities of domineering clerks.
The Victoria and Albert Museum was originally
wider the direction of the Board of Trade, but as
to character as a school of design was developed
it came to be regarded as a department of prac
tical art, and a few years ago it was placed
toder the control of the education office. Tech
tlcaliy it is a Fubdivision of the department of
Wence and art of the committee of council on
education, arid practically it is not self-regu
latins, but is under the supervision of officials
tfliO have crotchets and hobbies of their own,
«£4 are accustomed to amuse themselves by
■»mdli,j and unwinding spools of red tape.
Ji«*itrfc grounds for the belief that Sir Caspar
fssjsj Clarke was hampered in the control of
toe raff and In the completion and arrangement
tf tit collections by the fussiness and arbitrary
4 f "*M«»»+~»++*4»»4MMM ♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦< tTTT-r-r-r^ t
: Weil! They Did Smash
: the Records at Ormond.
• But What Were the Former Records ?
I Do You Know?
I The
Tribune Almanac
; For .1905
I Will Give You the World's Records
\ for Straightaway and Track Courses.
j Price 25 Cent,. ' For Sale At Hotel Newsstands.
decisions and prohibitions of department offi
cials. There had been nn investigation with un
satisfactory results, and thero was more or less
friction in the conduct of the Museum on tha
educational side. He had his own Ideas about
adapting art collections to the practical purpose
of systematic training of teachers and students
In schools of science and art and th» "elevation of
standards of public taste. He might not have
/found It easy to carry out those ideas after the
I completion of the new building*, when It would
be necessary to rearrange the collections.
Whatever may have been the motives which
influenced Sir Caspar Purdon Clarke In accept
ing the American appointment, it is certain that
the Metropolitan Museum will pass next Septem
ber under the control of an accomplished man.
He is a systematic w-orker, and has a genius for
organizing art collections, and arranging them
so as to be attractive to the public and useful to
students. His services have been Invaluable
here whenever a special exhibition has been
planned at South Kensington or an Important
section has had to be enriched and decorated at
a world's fair. As a collector he has shown
shrewd, practical judgment, and has not been
duped by mendacious dealers or credulous
owners of overvalued treasures. A close ob
server with a trained eye, he is also a profound
student of art and science. He is a man of
energy and force, laborious by habit, tenacious
in opinions and good tempered in expressing
them. He has travelled in every European
country, and has seen every museum and art
collection; but he enjoys "specially his remi
niscences of India, where he spent much time
and succeeded in completing, with painstaking
care and accurate knowledge, one of the best
departments of the South Kensington Museum.
He is without doubt the most capable and the
best informed conductor of a museum of applied
art in Europe, and Mr. Morgan and the trustees
of the Metropolitan Museum have earned the
gratitude of American art lovers by their enter
prise in securing him for director. Having
found a master of the art pf collecting what is
valuable and Intrinsically useful, they will act
with discretion if they allow him to work in
peace, free from annoyances which have irri
tated him here. I. N. F.
THEATRE MANAGERS GO FREE.
Sunday Theatricals Case — Magistrate Bar
low Lenient with Them.
f ummonses for the appearance of Louis Werba
and Martin Leuseher, manager and press agent, re
spectively, of the New-York Theatre, which were
obtained by Captain Flood, of the- West 47th-st
station, after his detectives had discovered evidence
of alleged violations of tho law regarding Sunday
theatrical performances in that theatre, were dis
missed by Magistrate Barlow, in the West Side
police court, yesterday. The magistrate said that,
whilo the testimony indicated several specific vio
lations of the law, he was inclined to be lenient on
the theatrical men, because he believed a theatre a
better place for a mail to spend Sunday evening
than the back room of a saloon. He told Captain
Flood to note if further violations of the law oo
curred. and, if they did occur, to bring those re
sponsible to court.
The Rev. Dr. Francis J. Clay Mornn. secretary
of the national law committee of the Actors'
Church Alliance, at whoße instance Captain Flood
6ent the detectives to the theatre, paid that lie had
started the proceeding against the theatre In behalf
of the overworked actors, who wished to have a
day oft on Sunday.
REACHES 104 TH BIRTHDAY.
Although t-he is unconscious most of the time
Miss Rachel Martense. of Flatbush, who for three
weeks has been fighting bravely against pneumonia
and bronchitis, has lived to have her desire ful
niled. She is 104 years old to-diy. Her death seems
to be only a question of a few dnys at the most.
LAWYERS' MORTGAGE-BOND COMPANY.
Jn alliance with the Lawyers' Title Insurance
Company and the Lawyers' Mortgage Company, a
corporation to be called the Lawyers' Mortgage-
Bond Company is to be formed, whose field is to
be the issuance of long time bonds secured by
deposit with a trust company as trustee of an equal
amount of New- York City mortgages.
In all us essentials this mortgage business would
be the same as that transacted by the Lawyers'
Mortgage Company, except in the form in which
the security reaches the public. By this variation
in form three new markets will be reached— first,
long term Investors who r.ow buy railroad bonds
to avoid the annoyance of constantly renewing
mortgages: second, small investors who are now
unable io purchase mortgages running from $500 to
$1 'w aid third. European investors, among whom
guaranteed mortgages are unknown, only mortgage
bonds being salable. The company Is to be incor
porated with a capital of $2,<KK>.OOO, and a surplus of
fiOO 000; the issue of stock to be 20,000 shares, of a
pur' value of |100. sold at Jli'o. Preference is to be
Kiven in the allotment of the stock, to the stock
holders of the Lawyers' Mortgage Company and
the Lawyers' Title Insurance Company, a certain
;.m6unt 'however, being retained for allotment at
the issue price to outside interests, especially bank
»>s with foreign connections who might aid in
placing the company's bonds in Europe.

NEW PUBLISHING HOUSE FORMED.
■\V\ D. Moffat, for twenty years with Charles
Scribner's Sons, and lately business manager of
"Soribner's Magazine," and Robert S. Yard, man
ager of book advertising for the same house and
Editor of "The Lamp," announce the formation of
a corporation under the title of Moffat, Yard &
Co to engage in a general book, art and periodical
publishing business, to be carried on at No. 359
4th-ave They aIFO announce a business alliance
with the publishers of "Town and Country," in
which vhey have acquired an interest.
PAUL MORTON SEES WALL STREET MEN.
Paul Morton, Secretary of the Navy, who has
been in the city for the last two days, made a
trip downtown yesterday afternoon, "not on public
business." It is understood that whilo In the nnan
elal district be held informal conferences with rail
w*(V executives on the rate regulation question.
The Secretary intended to return to Washington
la.-a night.
C. AND S. VOTING TRUST TO END.
Grenville M. Dodge, Frederic P. Olcott. H. Wal
ters Henry Budge and J. Kennedy Tod, voting
trustees of the Colorado and Southern Railway
Company, notify holders of their trust certificates
for the first preferred, second preferred and com
mon stock of the company that, exercising the dis
cretion vested In them, they have decided to ter
minate the voting: trust agreement on April 1. On
2nd alter that date holders of the certificates can
exchange them for capital stock certificates ol the
railway company at the office of Hallgarten & Co.,
£o 6 Naesau-st., agents lor the voting trustees.
NEW-YORK DAILY TRIBUNE. FRIDAY. FEBRUARY 3. I<XT).
me; run: ix isijp.
Blaze Shortly After Midnight
Threatens Large Part of Town.
Isllp, Lionir Island, Feb. 2.— Fire broke out shortly
before 12 o'clock this mornlne in the Vail Block,
and now threatens to be the most destructive con
flagration that has ever visited this place. Word
was sent to the surrounding 1 villages to send all
the fire apparatus available. At 1 o'clock this
morning the fire threatens to destroy the New-York
and New-Jersey Telephone Exchange, the Orowoo
Hotel, the Leonard block and all the property la
both Bides of the street. The Town Clerk's office
in the Vail Block is also threatened. A high wind
Is blowing Hnd this helps to carry the flames. The
damage now Is not known, and the cause of the
lire is a mystery.
TO ABOLISH BOARD OF ALDERMEN.
Mr. Grout Has Plan to Give the Board of
Estimate Its Powers.
Controller Grout said yesterday that ho believed
the powers of the Board of Estimate should be en
larged, and that several 1 " of the smaller boards now
In the city government should be abolished. lie de
clared:
T would ahcJW] the Board nt Aldermen, the Rapid
Transit Commission, the Armory Board, the Hoard,
of i'ity Record, in fact, all boards, except the Board
of Estimate and Apportionment, and to thut board
i would K'vt> an th« powers that art now scattered
among those other board?. Then the city would
have a responsible head, and we would get some
thing done.
Then: should be more borough autonomy. The
more local government we have the better for us.
"What would you do with the Mayor?" was
asked. Mr. Grout replied:
He would not be a. figurehead. There ;s a Gov
ernor for every State in the Union, and yet tho
Piesldent of the United States is not a lipurehead.
I think it would be a pood plan to vest all ttye
Dowera now enjoyed by tho various boards in a
board of directors for the city. This would practi
cally b« thf- lioard of Estimate as at present con
stituted, with the addition of {our or five others
to bf elected by the city nt large. There could be
a meeting of this council every <J;iy.
m
PHYSICIAN COMMITS SUICIDE.
Member of Staff of Syracuse Hospital Takes
Poison.
[by telegraph to the tjubtjxe.]
Syracuse, Feb. 2.— Dr. Aloert G. Anthony, a
prominent physician, committed suicide because of
111 health last night by drinking carbolic acid. He
was connected with the staff of the Syracuse Hos
pital for Women and Children, For the last three
days he had been missing-. The family attribute
his act to temporary insanity, brought on by over
work and Brighfa tHsfiiw.
Dr. Anthony was forty-sis years old and a native
of Pari. u . He leaves a wife and two sons. He
ended his life in v. cheap hotel in the southern part
of tho city.
NEW LINES FOR THE BRONX.
A postponed meeting of the North Side Board of
Trade was held hist night at 3d-ave. and 142d-st
Olin J. Stephens, the president of the board, com
plained of lack of police protection in The. Bronx.
He uecommended that action be taken asking the
Borough President and the local boards of The
Bronx to urge a plan for beautifying the borough.
The board adopted a resolution approving a meas
ure introduced In the legislature.
A letter was read from the Union Railway
Company stating that it would soon begin a line
from Fordham by way of P«lham-av«\ to the Pel
ham Bridge, and from Morris-aye. and loist-st. to
Fordham Landing.
EUCLID BUILDING SOLD.
Parcel Has a Frontage of 52.8 Feet
in oth-ave.
Horace S. Kly & Co. have sold for Mrs. Mary F.
Bstts the Euclid Building, No. 564 to 568 Cth-ave. It
is on the west side of the avenue between 46th and
47th 6ts.. 62.8 feet in uth-ave., with a depth of 100
feet on the northerly side and 76 feet on the south
erly side, on which is a six story store and oflice
buUding. The property adjoins the northwest cor
ner of 46th-st. it is understood the purchase has
been made for investment.
BUYS DOWNTOWN BUILDINGS.
The Charles F. Noyes Company has sold the
bulldingo No. 100 Gold-.st., 26x58 feet, for the Mus
liner estate; No. 102 Gold-st.. 23x55 feet j 1 Nos 49
and ol Fraiikfort-st.. lor Alexander Frirdbtrg, to
William H. Harkne.«e. The asking price was
The same brokers recently sold Nos. C."> and S7
Franlcrort-st., a seven story fireproof building on
lot 43xd feet, to Jacob Rossbach. Mr. Rossbach
is not identified with the Gold-st deal*
MANY SALES BY W. PETERS & CO.
William Peters ft Co. have sold for Dr. S. Busby
Allen to A. P. Martin a plot of ground, 50x100 feet,
on tho east side of Bronx-st., 200 feet south of
UWth-st.; for John A. Fry. to a client, threw lots
on the west side of Rose-st.. 60 feet north of Morris
Fark-ave.; for }$. Busch, to M. F. Adler two lota
on south side of Columbus-uve., 25 feet west ..f
Hancock-st ; for A. C. Anderson, a two family
dwelling house, on the south side of Columbus
aye 25 feet west of Gurtield-Srt., and for John
VVeeks a plot of ground comprising about ten lots
facing Boston Road and Fordham Road, Bronxdale.
MILK COMPANY BUYS ARVERNE PLOT.
A. E. & E. A. Karelsen have sold to the Shef
field Farms-Slawson-Decker Company the block
front of twelve lots between Clarence and Vernam
ayes., adjoining the station, bordering on the Long
Island Railroad at Arverne.
The company will erect a large plant for tho re
ceiving and distribution of milk on thW plot. The
plant will cost $40.0u0.
MARKET FOUND FOR CHOICE HOUSE.
Slawson & Hobbs have sold for Leonard Paulson
to a client for occupancy the five story American
basement dwelling house No. 307 West 74th-st., size
24x70 feet. This house was specially constructed
for Mr. Paulson, and faces the new home of Charles
M. Schwab.
The same firm has also sold for Dr. IL S. Fincke
to the Adamant Realty Company a plot, 75x150 fret
on the north side of Sherman-ave., 100 feet weal
of Ishiun-st.
BURNETT PLACE PLOT CHANGES HANDS.
Richard Dickson. in conjunction with Jacob Som
mer. has Bold for Lewis Dorfman the plot, 60x100
feet, on the south side of Burnett Place, about 145
feet east of Barry-st.
AFRO-AMERICAN COMPANY A BUYER.
Philip A. Payton, Jr., has sold for Schmidt &
Schmidt to ihn A fro- American Realty Company
the two rive story double flathouses Nos. G7 and
58 West Wth-sty Boxloo.ll feet H<- iuus also sold
for GeurK<; W. (torn to a client the two ilv« story
triple flathousea, with stores. Nos. 309 and 311 West
37th-st., uOxl'JU feet.
SYNDICATE GETS FLATHOUSE ROW.
L. J. Phillips & Co. have sold for Charles Knapp
to Messrs. Shongood. Frank*) and Kupferberg nine
story nathouses at the northwest corner of «d
st. and Ist-ave. Mr. Shongood Is one of the united
States marshal's auctioneers*.
THE ROCKWOOD HOTEL PROPERTY SOLD.
John H. Kife has sold the Rockwood Hotel prop
erty for Henry S. Dunran. including the furnish
ings and about sixty acres of land, to George R.
Jones proprietor of the Pierre; pont Hotel. No. 43
to«Vest P «S-st, Mr. Jones will build an addition
to the hotel of one hundred rooms, and also several
new cottages. The consideration in the transaction
wa> about J4o.Ckj<:.
TRANSACTIONS IN REALTY.
According to a report. Nos. 61. 63, and 65 "West
36th-st.. five story dwelling houses, have been sold.
The Bile of the combined parcel is 75x98.9 feet.
Duff & Brown Bold to Heilner & Wolf and the
Uf^'tv MorttratSf Company the northeast corner of
lWd-at and It. Nicboias-ave., a plot 75x100 feet.
The Cohen Realty Company has aold to Lazuru
Kahn No. 442 West 125th-st.. a live story triple
nathouse. With stores, on lot 25xluu feet, for Mr.
ru-rnard Smyth & Sons have sold to Charles M.
Kosenthal, for the Central Realty Bond and Trust
Company, a plot of lots, 60.2x100 feet, on the west
side of Old Broadway, 1/5 feet 1 Inch north of Man
hattan-st. The purchaser recently bought a plot
adjoining the parcel. The size of the two parcels
Is MX'xllS feet.
The Hudson Realty Company have sold to Max
J. Klein the three five story ttathouses on the
southerly aido of 135th-st.. Nos. 40-42-44 West 13£th
nt • each house Is 2i.x100 leet. The same company
hi" also sold with Walter J. Conn to Klein &
Jackson the block front on the easterly »id« or
Thlrd-ave., between CSth and 67th Bts. The size of
the plot Is 200.10x110 feet. This is part of the i ! '"i.
. rtv purchased by the sellers from the Manhattan
Railway Company. It was formerly occupied by
tha American Institute lair. M. Morg.nthuu, Jr.
& Co. were the brokers. have sold for the T »«iitv
H D HRkfr & Uro. have sold for tho Realty
Transfer Company to th« Unique Realty Company
U - block front, aooxlW feet, on tho coat Bide or
Winter Resorts.
NEW-JKHREY.
ATLANTIC CITY, N. J.
The Boardwalk is dry and free
from snow or slush. Come and
enjoy the popular roller chair or
a promenade, breathe the invig
orating salt air from the sea,
tempered by the warm Gulf
Stream. The best hotels are al
ways open. Write for rates.
C.AX.FN HAIX CHAXFONTE lIADDOS HALT, »** -; HOTEL TRATMCUIB HOTEL BRIGHTON
Hotel^and^Sanltariura. THE LEEDS COMPANY. LEEDS & LIPPINCOTT. TRAYMORE HOTE3 CO. F W. HEM3LEY A SOU.
HOTEL DKNNIS MARLBOROUGH HOUSE HOTEL ST. CHARLES THE WILTSHIRE Ameri "n^d Eu7ol££ pl»n.
, WALTER J. BUZBT. JCSIAH WHITE & SONS. NEWLIN IIAINES. S. S. PHOEBUS. CHAS It MYER&
PERMANENT BUREAU OF INFORMATION AND DISTRIBUTION 13 OPEN DAILY AT 1354 BROADWAY, between 38th and 37th Sis., wher* Illus
trated booklets and all Information concerning- Atlantlo City and Its hotels can be secured. Tele. 5367 3Sth.
Through vestibuled train service from New York to Atlantic City without change. The Central R. R. of New Jersey leaves Liberty Street. 9:49 A. 31..
3:40 P. M. Sundays. 9:40 A. M. The Pennsylvania R. R. leaves West 23d Street Station. 9:55 A. M.. 2.55 P. M. Sundays, 1:55 A. M.
Heal Estate.
Safe Investments.
Mortgages on improved prop
erty in the City of New York,
with payment guaranteed and se
lected by a Company which has
the skill and experience necessary
to distinguish the safe mortgages
from the unsafe.
No purchaser of a mort
gage guaranteed by this
Company, has ever lost a
dollar on his investment.
Bond & Mortgage Guarantee Co
Capital and Surplus
$4,750,000.
146 Broadway, 175 Remsen St,
New \cr\i. Brooklyn.
U MONEY TO LOAN f\
ON BOND & MORTGAGE.. M ■
UNITED STATES TITLE \
Guaranty A Indemnity Co. T4
Manhattan: 160. 162, 164 B' way. I ■
Brooklyn: ISH Hemsen Street. J^ff
Bronx: 31»6 Third Aye.
City Property for Sale.
FIVE NEW HOUSES
especially planned to make IIOI'SKKEEPINU
CONVENIENT.
They ar,- everything that Is MODERN and
DEHIRABLE.
SEE THEM
and learn what a thoroughly I"P TO DATE,
MODERATE rRM"FJ> house is like.
4Gi> to 474 West 141st-st , between Convent and
Ammstcrdam avm.
ELEGANT ACREAGE WITHIN CITY LIMITS FOR
HALF VALUE.
JOHN B. HimtARD. 156 BROADWAY.
To Let for Business Purposes.
IN
Potter Building,
Park Row, Beekman and Nassau Streets
OFFICES
Large and small, single and en aulte.
Rents floderate.
APPLY AT OFFICE OF THE BUILDING.
ROOM 50. 38 PARK ROW.
X
LARGE TOP FLOOR IN
METROPOLITAN REALTY BUILDING
NOW USED FOP. FHOTO- Tf\ j p T
ORAPHING AND PRINTING. \\J LL I,
RULAND & WHITINO CO., 5 BeekmanSt.
Unfurnished Apartments to Leu
-t f/T-iei EAST 31ST-ST, — Elegant apartment; 6 rooms
-LOtO t and bath; every lmprovem<nt; $4.V
Furnished Apartments to Let.
TO LET.
FOR THE MONTH OF MARCH.
One of the largest and moat de«lrab ( le Apartments in
Washington City: two parlors, flic sleeping rooms, two
bathrooms, kitchen and butl«*» pantry; all fully and ele
gantly furnifeht-1 for houi<ekeepinK, or hotel service if
preferred two competent servants; also. If desired, fine
pair of horses, two carriages, with reliable coachman, who
thoroughly knows the city. Fine opportunity for a party
'. ulr i « to be In Washington during Inauguration season.
Address "OWNER," P. O. Box 1.172. New-York City.
Anist. r(iam-av<\, between 133 th ifaid U^th sts.
Heilner & Wolf ami Ihe Realty Mortgage Cora
pany have bought, through Duff & Brown, from
ii Havanash tho northeast corner of St. Nicholas
av. :.nd lii?d-st., a plot 74.11x100 feet
Mnndelbaum i Lewins have bought, through c*.
E Deppler, from Robert Rotthlesberce Na 167 to
171 West tSd-s-t.. three three story brownstone front
dwelilns; houses, on plot 50x100.6 feet.
REALTY NOTES.
Mrs. Marie LockWOOd denies th<> rssjSiTt that, she
hns sold a plot of five lots on the south side of
124th -st.. Btt feet west of Pleasant-avo.
William Baylis is the buyer of No. 11 East 66th-st.
I.is! .V- Reese were tha brokers In the sale of No.
llu Bast T.Mli-^t.. ii four story and basement dwell
ing bou.se. 17.4x102.2 fret, for Alfred J. Stern to Mrs.
Mabel i:. Purdy.
BUILDING LOAN CONTRACT FILED.
IS3d-st No 207 to 215 East; Harris MiniK-lMnm
and Fisher "Lewlne. with Louis Rand and Oscar
K«-»!«-nbH'ini MI.WO
AUCTION SALES YESTERDAY.
By Joseph I* Pay: l ( »' and 111 r»road-*t. n c cor Front
st e0x2a.8x5J».6«285. eight «tory bk loft office and store
bids- A 8 Goodwin art J Nunsbaum: A L Squire* atty:
It A Pryor. r.f; amt Sue. *»9.2t» 50; taxes, etc. $1.406 48;
to Cathleen Tumey for *102,000.
Hv Peter F Meyer: 781 9th-ave. n w cor &2J «. =£-*
100; five story bk tenement; J Everard agt J Brann!*an
et al: I> M N.ul.iKur. atty; EL Parrts. r ; f. ami due,
*J»MO2a2: taxes, etc. I 3.100: adjourned to rebruary 9.
MANHATTAN BUILDING PLANS.
Delancey-«t. >• •. W ft » si Tompklns-st^ for _ a
ens Btory lirlck garbage Incinerator. tOxloO.
.ity, owner; M de H Parsons, architect. ...... l^i.uw
116 th »t. n h. -A*> ft m of Lenox-ave; for three six
•ton brick tluthi.uf«ii and stores, 41.8j87.1J.
Markranrky & Applebaum. owner*: a V fei- M(m
113t"'«t, 1 fi w of 'a<i--uve; for a «ix •lory
brick nathoii"*". M>x«7.o; U l*eriii«-ttl. o«.n*r; L -^
Ht 1 .i wvih-r. architset ft 'nor" lß3<i-«tt: for [M>l '" lU
.st Mlcholss-»v». s n 1»4 io ii n of ia»n--t; ror
a six .tory brick (Uthouae. 9x108; M Miller,
owner; WE Young., architect..,. *"**>
Winter Resorts.
SEW-JT.RSET.
STONE. IRON AND SLATE CONSTRUCTION.
Open all the year. Capacity CM.
MARLBOROUGH HOUSE
ATLANTIC CITY, N. J.
Pre-eminent for Its
LOCATION — A whole block on the beach front in the centre of principal hotel district-
Ocean view unobstructed by stores, -pavilions or piers.
CONVENIENCES — All comforts and conveniences, including: hot and cold aea water in
all baths. 'Phones and running ice water in the rooms and valet and
ladies' maid service.
MUSIC — By high grade artists every day in the year. This la a special feature -which Is
deservedly appreciated,
fiolf Privilege*. JOSIAH WHITE & SONS. Ownership Manwnwnt.
HOTEL TRAYMORE,
Atlantic City. N. J.
Remain* open throughout the year. Every known com
fort and convenience. Golf privileges. Running water la
bedroom*. ...
TRAYMORE HOTEL CO..
D. S. WHITE. President.
WnTTTT 111111011? ATLANTIC CITY. N. J.
UUl£.li itUUUUT, OPEN ALL THE YEAR.
On the Beach front. Orchestra. Representative at New
York office. 288 4th-»v».. 10 to 3 daily. 'Phone 8.345—
Gramercy. CHARLES R. MYER3.
VIRGINIA.
VIRGINIA HOT SPRINGS
-YORK OFFICE, 243 STU A\ E.
Waters, baths, hotels and surroundings nowhere
equalled. Rheumatism, gout and nervous diseases cured.
Complete hydro therapeutic apparatus. New sun parlor.
Golf, livery and outdoor pastimes. Compart sleeper
leaves New York 4:.V> P. M. Tuesdays. Thursdays and
Saturdays and arrives Springs 8:30 A. M. Excursion
tickets at C. & O. office, Bd2 Broadway, and offices Penn
sylvania R. R. ' „; "
FRED STERRY. Manager. Hot Springs. An.
PRINCESS ANNE HOTEL,
VIRGINIA UEAI-U. VA.
Most delightful spot on earth.
Golf. HunUns, Automobilinjt. Booklet.
JAMES S. GROVES. Prop.
NORTH CAROLINA.
KENTLWOKTH INN,
BIL.TMORE. near AshevlKe. N. O.
Dry Invigorating climate, adjoining Blltmore Estate.
Magnificently furnished. Cuisine unsurpassed; orchestra.
coif: livery, bunting, rishlng. Open all tne year. Write
for booklet. EDGAR B^ MO^RBX Proprietor
Brooklyn Property for Sale.
ON XtlE HILLS SKIRTING
PICTOREdQUE FJ.rSHIXG BAT.
BEAUTIFUL EAST - ELMHUBST
HALF-HOUR FROM HERALD SQ.
Lots with every city Improvement at J3TS on
easy monthly payments. Will be worth 11.000
each within two years, on completion of Penn
sylvania tunnel and Blackwell's Island Brides.
Colonial cottages ready to occupy on payment
of iiao. SEND A postal CARD
FOR CIRCULAR AND VIEWS.
BAXKKKS' [AND * MORTGAGE CO..
887 Manhattan Ay.. Brooklyn.
BEST BARGAIN IN BROOKLYN.
For a first class dwelling on the best part of tho Park
Slope, near the mala entrance to Prospect Park. Don't
wait for the Subway, but buy now while you can get this
excelleat Investment. This property if easily worth
$19,000. Cost more: can now be purchased at only $14,500;
mortgage $10,000. at 5^,: three story and basement brown
«on?ia rooms and bath, hardwood trim and floors: all
modern Improvements: In excellent order.
LEONARD MOOD i tu., 87 montague sr.
OTH AYE NEAR MONTAUK CLUB.— Handsome 3
8 story brownsrone: U rooms; perfect condition: beau
hf.,l loLktlon- close to main park entrance: must be aoM
tlful lo if n 'lLtVst C hanco ever offered en Park t-lope.
&<SaRiTmOODY R. E. CO.. 300 Flatbush Ay,,
Brooklyn. > V.
Country Property for Sale.
FOR 80 YEARS WE HAVE SOLO
COUNTRY PROPERTY ONLY.
i tttaloc tree to lnlendins buyers!
nwner»TwlßhlnS to "ell. cail or writ«!
rhlllln. W«U». UK Tribune BuilUiß^. K. T.
HI \ VOVK fOVNTRY HOL>B
«-»Tj->r»MiriiPT n V J — To obtain Information regarding
Do You Want
a Good Girl?
Consult the Situations WanteJ
Advertisements in the Narrow
Columns of To-Day f s Tribune.
Winter Resorts.
SK» iv .; -: \
Hotel Dennis
ATLANTIC CITY, N. J.
The world's famous Winter and Spring resort
is most attractive and the climate never more
invigorating than at this season of the ye.ir.
HOTEL DENNIS is delightfully located
directly facing the Ocerm and Boardwalk,
and offers an unobstructed view from *U part 3
of the house.
Large sun parlor on first floor and
smaller sun parlors on each sleeping floor, all
overlooking the ocean. Hot and cold sea
water in private baths. Golf Links in fine
condition. Open all the year.
WALTER J. EIZBY.
Atlantic City's Newest Hotel.
CHALFONTE
A modern Ten story fireproof hotel, complete la «v?tj
respect. On the Beach.
THE LEEDS COMPANY.
Alwayn Open. . Write for Folder.
THE ST. CHARLES
Directly on the ocean front. Atlantic City. N. J.
Hot and cold salt and fresh water la every bath.
Highest class patronage. Pure artesian water. Long dl*
tance telephone in rooms. Unexcelled cuisine. Golf.
Koom pUna rates, etc.. can be jeen at 3U Fourth .we.
NEWLIN IIAINES.
GRAND ATLANTIC.
n::vk'; CLOSED.
Virginia Aye. unit Orach, Atlantic Cltr. N. J.
liooms en suite with private baths. Including hot
and cold sea water. Delightful sun parlors, steam
heated. Excellent table. Hates 12. Pr raj, (M
weekly Capacity. TOO. Write for 1915 booklet. Coach
meets trains. A. C. MITCHELL A CO.
Seaside House,
ATLANTIC CITY. N. J.
On th«> ocean front; «v«ry comfort, including ••* ■»■*£??
btth» elevators, golf. «tc. F. P. COOK A SON.
THE PENNHURST,
Ocean •**] MieMpun Aye.. Atlantic City. X. J.
Elevator to street lev.i. Special Winter Katea. BooW-t.
•V M J\. HOOD-
Instruction.
.„_,.^..^.»^,-.,..s . ..-. -i.. -i — -.-. — — —
For Both — City.
S* üBW A V
MAP. Running Time, I
Pnrb«t Calendar, etc.. with ftame iafaraaatloa S
about "Th<- Mmml that ha* Made a Sp««laU*t I
of £ach Student for 40 Years." fro* to Hums 1
who apply at onee — personally, by mail or by |
telephone. Ask for Circular T.
PACK AR D
COMMERCIAL SCHOOL,
i 4th Aye. & 23& St. "Phone ISI Gramercy.
I • Individual Instruction. Enter now. '
"la Everything Pertaining to Buiinrvt i:du
sbMssi PACKARD Mean* HNMNI."
~ - ■-■ — ■■■■■■■IITV IIIIM I !■■■!■ 111^
HAMILTON INSTITUTE FOR BOYS,
'. 43 WEST MOT STP.EnT.
HAMnJON INSTITUTE FOR GIRLS,
10S WEST M^T STUEKT.
Second ha!f school session begins February 6th.
Special Advantages for New Students.
THE BKIUUITZ SCi!»«t OF LANGCAGES.
MadUoa S«juar« 11.132 B»«y»: Brooklyn. •? Court SB.
N«w urm> b*Klnnlr> now Trial I'"«M frr>.
! School Agencies.
11

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