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New-York tribune. [volume] (New York [N.Y.]) 1866-1924, March 27, 1905, Image 14

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14
TO REACH WORKMMEN.
Dr. Ely Tells of Plans for Summer
Evangelistic Work.
Deep Interest has been aroused in this city over
rOb#> announcement of a summer evangelistic "tent"
•campaign for greater Kew-Terk. Ministers and
' Christian workers of all New-York denominations
fjiave agreed to take part In the campaign, and at
.lea** ten teats will be provided for Manhattan
(aland. An equal number, it is hoped, will be fort'a
<x>mln£'for Brooklyn.
Already a partial canvass has been made of the
■city, and some fifteen vacant lots are in view for
{tents. It is purposed to ;:• t a sufficient force of
i speakers, at art ml lielpers an.i singers to conduct
' cervices every afternoon for children and every
I'nlghi for adults. Sunday afternoon meetings will
be held, as also niplit moetinjrs. Noonday services
■will hf conducted In shops and public places where
'audiences may he gathered. At least two tents
•will be assigned to work none the Italians. M.
Xardi. who in considered a modern Paul amonsr
the Italian necjije. has bocn asked to lead this
branch of the work.
■\Vlii!*-. the general scoj-e of the work is new to
Xow-Vork. ;he inothod agreed oji has been success
fully applied in Philadelphia for the !.i«t Fix ye.irs.
■where large crov.-ds from all classes have nightly
attended th<- services. Much of the church for
mality w'll lie abandoned: and the services will be
elmple. Old familiar hymns will be sung, and oc
aaaionally the stercopticon will be .-••'! to illus
■'trate texts and hymne. Stu<!c-!it helpers from the
•seminßri^s will receive a practical expertenee In
BeraonaJ work, and will spend the day visiting it"
Rhe homes, distributing t.ie "literature." It is not
lintende-d to place the tents la thoroughfares so
[■men as in the midst of clusters of houses. All
'■will he made welcome to the cervices, regardless
jef dress or nationality. Where church meetings
hhavr- been held it has been found t'.iat hundreds
Kiarv together to their working clothes, directly
Krom a hasty evening meal.
"While New-York church people are being asked
fee mtucrflrt <'".■-■." the Rev. Dr. James B. Ely.
khA superintendent, told a Tribune reporter yeater-
Mai'. "no collections will be taken at the meetings.
mils unselfish altitude to the people, as proved
telsewhere. Is as effective a feature of the work as
Btiie preaching itself."
L Asked how tiie working- people had been affected
3by this movement m Philadelphia, Dr. Ely said:
"lii twenty labor unions we have committees hp-
I>olnted by the unions who co-operate in the work.
IWe have closed a series of Sunday afternoon meet-
Ing? In an opera houee which have continued all
■winter, the working men acting as ushers, and
announcing the meetings through the meetings of
the unions, also giving space to articles in their
{papers. It Is not an unusual sight to pee from
twenty-five to thirty mothers standing by the baby
icoarh" around the tent. The best friends of such a
»work are often the policemen, who have again and
inpain testified that their work is ma.l» lighter. The
{people of given sections, without regard to de-
ISomlnational or religious affiliations, soon come to
ook upon the i* t as a place of common interest.
They am not afraid of being trapped or over
pen="un/ied to Join some Institution. The seed of
"hri'tiaji civilization is sown into the heart? of
K^oung- and ol.i alike. There soon arises a sense of
appreciation of tho=« things which make a Chris
tian nation different from a heathen nation.
~ "Tli<=> fact of the matter is that only a small pro
bortion ef a city's population knows anything- about
fen an mud trip to Europe or a season in the rnoun
kain*. While life in its activeness is not as intense
Sn cummer «sMn the winter, yet the tendency to
tvll in a congested city is greater. A doctor must
to to ■ patient at the time of the greatest need.
£o the time of greatest need in a congested city Is
Jt'he Rummer Eeatton. and the neediest place is near-
W>Bt. to where the dally life 1." lived.'
: Another meeting of the evangelistic committee Is
VaJled for to-dey. and a still more definite announce-
Iner.t is expected to follow it.
SALVATION ARMY SERVICES.
kJorcinander Eva Booth Delivers Two Ad
dresses at the Academy of Music.
Here than two thousand persons attended the spe
>dal nt-rvlres Riven under the auspice* of the Salv.i-
Itlon Army yesterday afternoon in the Academy of
pjuric Representatives of the Army from various
fcities in the Kaft. West and South wvre present.
2kfiss Eva. Booth. oommandlna; the Salvation Army
tin th*- United States, was the principal speaker,
did h^r subject was "The Song of the City."
At the services held In the evening: fully fifteen
hundred were present. and Miss Booth spoke on
""Th"* Shepherd." Sbe appeared dressed in shep
toe '.< garb.
T.hp twenty-fifth anniversary of the Salvation
jArrny will be celebrated on Tuesday evening in
'■KZarr.egln Hall. 57th-st. and Tlh-aye.. with appro
priate #>x*>rcises. RepresfTitatives iron all over the
country, it i K announced, will be present, and a
number of inter^Mins addresses will be delivered.
NEGRO YOUTH CRITICISED.
SDr. Stinson Says They Are Doing Nothing to
Uplift Race.
The Rev. Dr. R. D. Btlnaon. finance commissioner
pDf the Morris Brown College, of Atlanta, Ga., ad
idressed the colored men's branch of the Young
Men's Christian Association on Saturday evening,
iet tho Baptist Temple, lif.th-?t., near Sth-ave. He
■cai<l in part:
wO I^' l^ 1 a c the y° un % people of the race doing in
fine North and Bast to prove to those who would
criticise or find fault thai we are deserving as a
race? To say that then are not scores of deserv
• l i ? 'u' " deported, refined nnd educated people
jpf this race In every community in this broad land
JSs to deny a self-evident fact, and yet think cf the
rmil lions who never nee a Bchoolhouse the year
■round, who do not know whal it is to c ,t. ■- a
|churrh. the. poverty and inability to secure work
•at living: wages and the suffering— is only
Btnowi; to the teachers and preachers of the race
an the mor< * lowly and more humble walks of life.
DM you ever stop to thinK that whatever the. ne
gn. owns and whatever substantial progress he Is
BlaKl-: that is creditable to our race is owned by
members of the race in the South? The churches
colleges, schoolhouses. homes, farms and real bust
ness enterpriPfts among the race are in the South
ern States That which seems to be dissatisfaction
tmonp us is but misunderstanding. I would stake
my if on it there «re friendships among the
hC'U'hc-rn white and colored men stronger than you
■will find among: the tame els of men In the XoYth
End KasL
BROOKLYN MINISTER INSTALLED.
The Rev. John Holthasan. the row pastor of the
tlmmanuel German Bhmagellca] Lutheran Church,
hrooldya. was Installed last night. He. was for
itneriy th« pastor of the Evangelical Lutheran
JChuirli of the. Holy Trinity. Brooklyn The Rev
TEmiX A. Kr.-y. pastor of the German Bvangelicai
jj/utherfln Church of St. Marcus, was the installing
clergyman. He was assisted by the Rev. .Film
f2ierbst and the Rev. Johannes Frey
SERMONS BY DR. HUEBSCH.
At the Temple Emanu-EI yesterday the Rev. Dr.
X>aniel E. Raebach preached the first of r, series of
«-ix mons. His subject was "The Legend of the
fiapphire Sword." ■ Bemitic Betting of the Sleg
pnund-Sieplind^ epfpode. Moses, the hero, is sup-
Ijwsed lo win his bride. Ztpporah. by drawing from
Who earth 'he magic sapphire Fword. after ■ long
•line of princes, her other suitors, nave tried In
rvain.
I His >ther sermons will be: f.Tturday. April I 'Do
TO <•• Need 3 T« nple?" Saturday. April 29 "The
■chiller Centennry '; Saturday. May 13. "The Func-
Uions of a Modern Minister**'; Saturday, May 27.
£Soru» Elements of Faith": Saturday, June 10.
•^Typ» b of Religious Expression."
SUNDAY OUTING FOR PARISHIONERS.
The parishioner* of the ''hapti of the Epiphany.
1n Btanton-st.. have been picked out for the free
Gunday rides In i,.< s-:^....
Bishop Potter has arranged for the transporta
tion of the children and their parents, during the
| MIDI im I. to the vesper senrlcea at the Cathedral
of St. John the Divin». Th*.«* services v.-ii! be held
in the cathedral crypt, «n.i at times under the trees
i\i « P ln K adj ? lnln / the cathedral. Benches and
In; L la / f '. d iv th " park and the children
.1 t > e ..»'f r »n»tte<l to Fpend the afternoon there
*om n e^ lr ovomnz m ' aI before returning to th--ir
These Sunday online!" til be due to the gener
osity cf jam.-s Jarrftt Blodßett. who me time
a^o gave Bishop Potter a sum of money, the in
Sht br«U ' Wa^ l ° b ° USed " S the Bishop
DR. BOYNTON BEGINS PASTORATE.
!The JUv. Dr. Nebai Hoynton, latfi of Detroit,
began hip pastorate at the Clinton Avenue Congre
gational Church. Brooklyn, yej^rday. He preached
at both the morning- and evening service* At «he
.morn:.' . servife hr- spoke on "Christian Service "
i After the sermon he paid a high tribute to the
.Her. Dr. Thomas B. Mcl>»od, who was na«tor of
♦the churn for tweaty-ave years, and whom ho
■ succeed*.
! LENTEN LECTURE BY MRS. STAPLES.
The second lecture In the Lenten series by Mrs.
Ellen M Staples will be given at the. homo of Mrs.
Archibald Alexander. Casil«« Point, to-day. Kip-
Hag Is the author under discussion, and Mrs. Sta
ples 'viH give i<*K.dlnßF from Ins poems and "Captain
SGadffby's Wedding Day." The musical features will
Include De Koran's arrangement of Kipling's Re
!<v»ss'.onal by Mine. Carl Willenbnrjr. contralto, ac
companied by Mr.-;. Harry Stone, and a solo by Mr.
,-*T .Alexander HowtU, barytone, accompanied by Mrs.
V--;xfc*odor* Sutra.
LAST OF DEDICATION.
Services ■at Tabernacle — oman
Prompted Rockefeller Gift.
At the i o'clock service In the Broadway Taber
nacle yesterday the Rev. C. C. CYe«»gan. secretary of
the American Board of Foreign Missions, referred
to the recent gift from John D. Rockefeller of
JIOO.OCO to the board. Dr. Creeaaa would not dis
cuss the right fulness of accepting It.
Dr. Creegan said the gift had really come to the
board through the efforts of a woman of the Broad
way Tabernacle's congregation. After the service
Dr. Creegan declined to give the natjie of the
church-.voman referred to. further than to say she.
was ■ sister-in-lnw of the man who gave the
money, Me did not mention Mr. Rockefeller's
name.
At the 11 o'clock service Dr. Jefferson preached
on "Christ and the City." At tour o'clock short
addresses were made by the Rev. A. F. Beard,
secretary of the American Missionary Associa
tion; the Her. Edward S. Teed, secretary of the
Eduction Society; the Rev. .Toseph B. Clark,
secretary of the Home Missionary Society; the Rev.
William A. Duncan, secretary of the Sunday School
and Publishing "Society; the Rev. Charles H. Rich
,->r«i=. secretary of the Church Building Society, and
the Rev C. C. Creegan, secretary of (lie American.
Board.
At the afternoon service Dr. Jefferson announced
that a young woman member of the Tabernacle
would soon go to Turkey, there to devote her life
to mission work in the field. At th» evening
service addresses were made by the Rev. Francis
E. Clark, president of the United Society of Christ
ian lEndeavor, and the Rev Henry A. Stimson.
secretary or' the American Board of Foreign Mis
sions, and former pastor of the Tabernacle.
FUSE $100,000.
WOULD R
Dr. Washington Gladden Would
Xftt Accept Rockefeller's Gift.
Columbus, Ohio, March X.— Dr. Washington Glad
dr-n. pastor of the First Congregational Church of
Columbus, and moderator of the General Council
of Congregational Churches of the United States, in
a -seiiuon delivered to-day discussed the gift of
JlOfl.OuO niad« by a prominent capitalist to the
American Board Of Missions. Tie said:
T!ii> money proffered to our Board of Missions
comes out >f a colossal estate whose foundations
wer<- laid in the most relentless rapacity known t<>
in<-'d-'n commercial history. The success of this
business from the beginning: until now has been
largely due to unlawful manipulation of railway
rates.
The United State? government 1p now engaged In
a strenuous attempt to ferret out and punish this
injustice. And the people of the United States have
a tremendous battle on their hands with tho cor
porate grreed which has intrenched Itself in this
stronghold and has learned to use the railways for
th« oppression and spoliation of the people. And
now. on the eve of this battle, they are asked to
accept a great gift of money from the. man who
more completely than any other represents the
system they are summoned to fight.
1 hope they are not mean enough to take his
money and then turn around and fight hlrn. I hope
they are not so faithless to their obligations as to
take his money and Fhut their mouths or lwcome
his apologists.
We do nor want this man's money. To accept it
will be to earn the contempt of millions of honest
men: to reiect it will strengthen our churches in
thr- affection and respect ot million? who are in
clined to doubt whether the churches love God
more than mammon.
Our missions will be richer and stronger without
It than with It, and we shall lose nothing by our
loyalty to the things unseen and eternal.
MEAL TOO MUCH FOX MEMORY.
M'Kenna Forgot He Ate, but He Settled in
Court.
Substitute John McKenna for Howard Somer
vTUe Jaffray, gr-mdson of E. 8. Jaffray. In his day
one of the c'ty's bept known merchants, and a 3d
ave. restaurant for Sherry's, and you have in part
a situation like that which was responsible for
young Jaffray's appearance in court.
Mi Kenna went into the Id-aye. restaurant yester
day.
"In- hungry." he said, sitting down at a table.
"Brinpr me a dozen raws."
The "rawf" were brought, and disappeared.
"More raws." said McKenna. A dozen more
reached the spot where the tlrst were resting.
"Now," said McKenna. tipping back in his chair.
•'I will have something to eat. Those just tickled
my palate. Bring me a porterhoupe steak, French
fried potatoes and all tho 'sides' in sight."
They wore brought. nn<l soon joined the oysters.
"A piece of pie 1 ." commanded McKenna. The pie
went the way of its predecessors.
"A cigar," ordered McKenna.
Smoking the cigar, he settled back in his chair
mi.l slept. Young Jaffray slept, too.
When McKenna awoke and starter! for the door
Frank Eieberg, the restaurant proprietor, asked for
for the food which McKenna hml eaten.
"The fond!" said McKenna. "Back to the kftch
ing! I Just dropped in hero an' sat down an" went
to sleep. Me eat: Why, my innards is as empty as
a promise for cheap gas! G'wan!"
M'-Kenna's memory still failed him in court, but
>:e consented to pay $i 10 to the restaurant man.
The Jaffray bill at Sherry's was $26.
STEEL MILLS WORKED ALL DAY.
Press of Orders Forces Breaking of Custom
of Closing on Sunday.
fBT TELEGRAPH TO THE TKIBU.VE.]
Ptttaburg, M-r.'h 26— The Sunday quiet of the
MJonongahels Valley was disturbed all clay by the
ng rf pter! and the thundering of rolling
machinery. Owing to the vast number of hurry
orders the st«--el corporation h.is on its books many
rlfrnrtments that have, n»vpr worked on a Sunday
v.er» kept running all last ni^ht. all day
; nd t"-night. It has been the practice to shut
down the rolling mills on .Saturday evening at 6
o'clock and ti> resume on Sunday at midnight.
'i here arc not enough mill workers to be had to
man all tho machinery.
'S PROPERTY SOLD.
MURDERED
Brooklyn Church the Purchaser — To Expend
$125,000 in Improvements.
The Raw Peter Donohue. pastor of St. James's Pro-
Cathedral, in Jay-st.. Brooklyn, has purchased for
$9.00<» from the widow of George Abbott, the junk
man, who was murdered in his little shop on the
premises, the property In Chapel Alley and a parcel
in Concord-St. Kor many years the church had
been trying to make this purchase, because of the
rKic,r character of tbe buildings on it, but the o;r'.
junkman would never sell, although some tempting
were rniide to him.
The land will le ufM ns the site of a new St.
.iarr.ee Academy. The building will be a four story
i.ri'k structure, with stone trimmings. On the
ground floor there will be an auditorium for L2OO
persons. It i=; estimated that the improvements will
■ ... -i ..l.uut JIK/jGO.
BENEFIT FOR FIRE SUFFERER'S.
Allen-st. Victims Will Divide About $2,000
— Distributed Thursday.
A benefit for the sufferer; of the tire at No. 106
Alien-st., whi~h destroyed the belongings of twenty
families an 4 caused the loss of a number of lives,
v.-ns held l;u=r night In Mir. th Bowery Theatn
About $i.2<v> was re-ii'zed. nni this will probably be
••! J**"! b] ttntrfbuttons. The ln>'.:se was
■old out c i"n after th< doors opened. The sin Kins
of "Tammany." by ■Dan" Riley. occasioned some
Uneasiness, ;;« th*> song, it was said, reflected 011 t ),.,
"Big Chief." Some declared that had they known
the nature of the song ii would have h»»n stricken
frr.m the programme. There are only seven fam
eported to be In ,\u-> need, an.) these win
each receive a share of the 8.000, which will u
distributed next Thursday night at the rooms of
the "Florrte" Sullivan Association, in Qrand-at
GIRL STOPPED JAIL DELIVERY.
Sheriff's Daughter Forced Prisoners to Give
Up Their Saw 3.
Montgomery. Ala.. March 26.— A dispatch to "The
Advertiser" from Bcottaboro. Ala., tells of a daring
attempt at a Jail delivery there, which was frus
trated by Miss Lulu Austin, the young daughter of
Sheriff D. O. Austin.
After three of the steel burs leading Into the
main corridor, which would have practically ad
mitt. them to their liberty, bad been cut. " Miss
Austin learned th* condition of affairs and hersei;
forced the prisoners to turn over to her the saws
which had been used in the operation, six In num
ber. It is fupposeii that t!.. men received the tools
through some oue who had been admitted U> visit
tiiem.
NEW-YORK DATLT TBIBUNE. MONDAY. MARCH 27. 1905.
A NEW SHIRT I
TO REPOIr ON CLERKS.
Dr. Maxwell Says Saving Justifies
Change in System.
To Justify the Board of Superintendents In its
effort to save $200,000 a year by returning princi
pals' assistants or clerks to regular, class work.
City Superintendent Maxwell will soon present a
report to the Board of Education. Dr. Maxwell
prepared this report because the Board of Educa
tion two weeks ago resolved "that the matter of
the action of the Board of Superintendents in as
signing clerical assistants In public schools to
classroom work be referred to the .Committee on
Bylaws and legislation for investigation as to the
authority of the superintendents to take, such ac
tion, and Hint, pending the report of said commit
tee, the Bcwrd of Superintendents suspend action
in reference to all such assignments."
The City Superintendent cites, as giving the Board
of Superintendents authority in the matter, sec
tion? of the revised charter, bylaws of the Board
of Education, and a report of the committee on
elementary schools of the board of Education ap
proved on June 8. 1904. The first two authorities
give the superintendents the legal right to return
the clerks to the regular class duties. The report
says. in part.
Wh^n a rewslenment is made, the appointment
of a regular teacher is rendered """^^^VV^iar
the annual Increase in salary of such "Wlar
teacher is saved to the city: this annual increase,
belns cumulative, amounts to a ronsi l 1l 1 . er . ai>i ® ?'2?}: lp
Incases where regular teachers paid In Sehertuie
TV are aligned to classes (and there are mam
such), it becomes unnecessary to make a promo
lion a further cumulative saving being thus
cf 'from these direct savings, it has been con
,idered that this branch, of service has heretofore
been Conduct e,l upon a too "P*" l^^ 1 , 8,',.8 ,',. " d
that the cost of it could be very materially re
duced Estimating from the basis of the average
annual salary now paid to re??u teachers acting
as clerks. 11.204, the amount paid for this kind of
sen-ice would be reduced by about one-half. If all of
the Bchools entitled to addition^ teachers were sup
plied at this rate, the cost would be $1,204 x -. $te-.
872. If supplied with substitute clerks at *»'<>£"
annum the cost would be $576 x 318 = $183,168 a differ
ence of about $200,000. Of course, it would be Im
practicable to put substitutes in all the schools at
Cn While the paving in the cost of clerical work is
reduced more than one-half by th« employment of
substitutes as. additional teachers, the actual saving
to the city is the difference between the cost of the
substitute teacher, whose annuaj salary Is constant
at 1671 and the cost of a teacher from the £*££
list whom It. becomes necessary to employ In case
the regular teacher is not reassigned to the class-
The TolTovrlnK table is intended to show thn actual
wiving to the city represented by the employment
of substitutes Instead of regular teachers in trie
318 clerical positions in the five borougns:
Annual Total I Annual Total
318 schools, savin*. savin*. 838 school*. sarlM iwlW
Hi y«ar... 520,862 120.882 l>th year. $122,112 5«41.05.s
2.1 v.ar... 13.071; M. 424 10th year. 134.832 775.820
3d l£r[ 46.7 M mi.218 11th year. 1*7.552 023.472
4th year.. Hill 157,72« 1 12th year. 1f.0,272 053.744
Bth year.. 71.232 228.960 i?,th year. 172.W2 l-25«-"«
flth year.. *-:l>.-.2 312.102 14th year. U6.TU J-442-«f,
7th year.: 96:«T2 400.r,54|15th year. 198.482 { .«*>•«£
Sth year.. 109,392 518.07C1 16th year. 211.152 1.852.032
Total $1,862,032
The Important conclusion .to be derived from an
examination of this tablo is that it shows an
average annual saying of $115,752 for sixteen years,
after which the full benefit of the change will be
obtained by tne annual saving of $211. This cal
culation is based upon the number of additional
teachers in the schools to-day It does not take
into consideration the future growth of the sys
tem The amounts given, therefore, are somewhat
below -what they will actually be.
TO WITIIDR
C. F. U. Order to Members — Still
Sore Over Dinner.
The Civic Federation came in for denunciation
yesterday at the Central Federated Union meeting,
and a resolution was carried calling on all its
unions to withdraw from the Civic Federation their
members who were connected with that body.
This action was a sequel to the report of the com
mittee of five which waited on August Belmont last
week to ask for the reinstatement of the Interbor
oueh strikers
James Hatch, chairman of the. Central Federated
Union, and a number of delegates declared the fed
eration was run in the Interest of the employers.
Delegate Hand, who attended the federation din
ner which grave the Central Federated Union such
a jolt, said he had gone there Pimply to find out
what the Civic Federation wanted to accomplish.
Up found that "the whole system was rotten." He
did not say why he waited threa months before
making this explanation. Samuel Gompers, August
Belmont and a number of others were attacked
by a man who had not beer. Invited to the dinner.
Herman Robinson, who is a member of the Civic
Federation, scolded the men who were attacking:
it. He said it mode him ashamed of the Central
Federated Union to henr men who did not know
what they were talking about hurl abuso on every
body who did not think as they thought. Dele
gates who were attacking the Civic Federation
hnd boon benefited by that body in the settlement
of strikes.
Several motions were carried over the protests of
a number of the members, one being th*t relating
to the Civic Federation and another tnt a mass
meeting to protest againpt the glvlpg of more fran
chises to corporations by the Rapid Transit Com
mission, and demanding- that all future subways
should be constructed and operated by the city. _
HURT IN FIRE PANIC.
Several Women Badly Injured in
Brooklyn Tenement House.
When a rire bro',;e out. about K> o - clock last even
ing, in the three story double tenement house No.
10 Unlon-ave.. Brooklyn, the tenants became panic
stricken. Three women leaped from the first sfry
and were seriously injured Mrs. Klizabeth CottUS
ilv received a fracture o^the skull and inter
nal Injuries. Her daughter, Kate, had a leg broken
and sustained Internal Injuries, and Mrs. Julia Jen
sen ahw suffered internal injuriep. All were re
moved to S« Catherine's Hospital. The damage
whs about Jl.ono. Trntf.c on a dozen car lines was
t!.-d up for an hour.
HOME NEWS.
NEW YORK CITY.
A meeting will b» held in the Church of Holy
Cnmmunlon. Twentle»h-st. and Slxth-ave.. at 2:Sf>
p. m. to-day, in the Interest of city evangelism.
Paul Lavosque, th« Frenchman, of No. 402 East
.•Sth-pt.. wrro was thrown downstairs on March 19,
according to the enargea iigainyt Jame« O'Connor,
a janitor, of No. 'AT lst-ave.. died at Bellevue
Hospital from his injuries on Saturday night.
O'Connor was nrreMed soon aft*r the death was
known, nr.rt was taken before Magistrate Crane In
Yorkv.lle court yesterday, Th« magistrate re
manded him to the i-oroner.
TO SHOW PICTURES OF INDIAN LIFE.
Edward S. Curtis, of Seattle,- is to exhibit hi*
photographs of Indian life, showing their curious
rites, ceremonies and customs, at the Waldorf for
one week, beginning to-night President Roosevelt
in reply to i letter from E. H. Hnrrlman Informing
him that Mr. Curtis, who was the photographer of
the Harriman expedition, whs to exhibit his collec
tion, wrote:' "I esteem It a matter of real moment
that for our good fortune .Mr Curtis should have
had the will and" the power to pre?i»rve. as h«» has
preserved in bin pictures, ihlu strange and beautiful.
aad new vanishing, Ufa," -
Correct —
For young men or old.
For business or pleasure.
For day or night.
For town or country.
What more can you ask of an over
coat than is offered by a light weight,
knee length garment of blnok or dark
gray material.
$15 to $30.
Rogers, Peet & Company.
Three Broadway Stores.
258 842 1260
at at at
Warren St. 13th St. 32nd St.
NOTES OF THE STAGE.
Mr. Huneker's "Iconoclasts, a Book of
Dramatists."
Last fall James Huneker was asked how he occu
pied his time since his desertion from the ranks of
what he himself has called "the chain gang."
"I'm writing a book about the drama." Mr. Hune
ker replied.
"American?" was tn» query
"I said about the drama," was Mr. Huneker's
laconic reply.
It is no surprise, then, to find this book, called
"Fconnciasts. a Book of Dramatists." published by
Charles Scribner's Sons, dealing almost entirely
with the Continental drama, nor. recalling Mr.
Huneker's other books, to find it treating of such
plays nnd playwrlgnts as would most Irritably
offend Max Nordau Mr. Huneker. while ho was
recently dramatic critic of "The Sun." spent por
tions of each 6eason visiting the theatres of Eng
land. France. Norway, Germany and Vienna, His
linguistic culture nnd his facilities for personal en
counter with the dramatists themselves enabled him
to gather much material of Interest aside from
routine criticism, and the articles he then wrote
had more than an ephemeral newspaper interest.
The bulk of the present volume Is an enlargement
nnd a sifting of those articles. Much critical writ
ing of value has undoubtedly been lost in this coun
try because of the brief life of the daily newspaper
Issue Mr. Huneker has set himself the laudabl*
task of saving some of it. of putting It In permanent
oi m between the covers of a book.
Thn chapter heads of Mr. Huneker's volume Indi
cate clearly enough Its subject matter. They
are "Henrik Ibsen." "August Strlndberg," "Henry
Becque." "Oerbart Hauptmann," "Paul Hervteu."
"The Quintessence of Shaw." "Maxim Gorky's
'Nacbtasyl.' " "Hermann Sudermann." "Princess
Mathilde's Play," ' Duse and DAnnunzio," "VHllers
ile lisle Adam" and "Maurlse Maeterlinck." Ob
viously, in this list of titles, which is seen to ln
c'.ude. but one writer ot th» English tongue. Is little
that the man of culture in thi:. generation has not
at least a smattering- knowledge of. One does not
look to Mr. Huneker for bibliography, nor. It must
be confessed, for that sort of criticism which Is
horn of a finality of conviction. Finality of con
viction would be the very thing Mr. Huneker wouM
repudiate himself, and clt« quotations from a dosen
writers to back him up: Save for the final convic
tion — eten the impressionist cannot escape that con
viction—that these dramatists he writes about are
distinctly worth while, he does not urge a creed.
though he may seem to do so. nor pet up a definite
standard of values. Ibsen, in his letters, wrote that
freedom wasn't of any value, only the struggle
for it mattered. So one gets the Impression from
"Iconoclasts" that not what these men are smash
Ing, nor what they are going to put up In place
of the <>id idols, greatly interests the author, but
the process of demolition is a Joy to his heart:
As a reference work (perhaps apologies are in order
to Mr. Huneker for use of that term!) "Iconoclasts"
will not be found of much value, then. But in Its
vivid Impressions of recent plays as yet unseen in
America and some not so recent. Its personal and
intimate sketches of authors unfamiliar here, in its
preservation ot documents, such as the letter from
Mr. Shaw concerning the meaning of "Candida "
that woujd otherwise have been lost, in its frequent
felicity of phrase and of characteristic- humor and
in Its fresh revelation of that most interesting
thing, a clever man's reaction in the presence of
works of art, "Iconoclasts' will be welcomed even
by those serious creatures, th^ "students of the
ilrama."
W FROM C. F.
Mr. Huneker saw of Shaw: 'His facile use. with
the aid of the various mouthpieces he assumes at
will, of the ide-as of Nietzsche. Wagner. Ibsen and
Strin.lberg. fairly dazzles." Somebody is going to
ask Mr. Huneker if this isn't the "Quintessence of
Huneker." for his work is stil! marred by his
alnrmlnc? facility of quotation.
The French play to bo given next Friday and
Saturday at the Carnegie Lyceum, chiefly by
French residents. Is producer! primarily to interest
the French quarter around Jones-st. In the Set
tlement work of Greenwich House. The drama is
felt to be the surest way of reaching these people'
nnd is the rnethol employed in Paris, whero "I,e
Hulan." the play selected, has already served that
purpose. This drama has Its scene on the German
frontier during the Prussian-Danish War, and Is a
preachment of the doctrines of Tolstoy.
If any reader of this column has written to Miss
Ellis Jeffreys for her autograph— many persons
am said to have rl^ne fo- he has doubtlesß re
ceived In reply a card announcing that a small con
tribution for the Actors' Fund Is needed to bring
the desired signature In this way. common In
England. M'ss Jeffreys has collected a snug sum
for the fund.
After Miss Mnxine Elliott's London season at the
I,yric Theniro she will rest a few weeks In Eng
land and return to begin rehearsals of a new- play
by Clyde Fitch, entitled "My Girl Joe." which will
be produced In New-York early in September
To-night, at the New-York Theatre, where "Mrs.
Blnck Is Back" opens a week's ensagement, Miss
May Irwin will make some side remarks, hy special
request, regarding President Roosevelt. The speech
has no connection with the play, and will be made
between acts. It is said the affair is the result of
a bet, but this has not been confirmed.
Beginning the early part of April. Walter N. Ijiw
rence. of the Madison Square Theatre, will begin a
peiies of flying matinees in ~ittes within a radius
of one hundred mil^s of New-York, thereby follow
ing the vpgqe that holds extensively in England.
These matinees vill be given on Mondays. Thurs
day*, sind Fridays, and will In no wise interfere
with the regular performances at the Madison
8ou;!re Ther.tre.
Daniel Frohman has the following features for
the annual Actors' Home benefit, which will take
place nt the Broadway Theatre, on Friday after
noon. April 7.
William H. Crane and Fay Davis will act a little
p!ay by Anthony Hope, entitled '"The Philosopher
In the Apple Orchard." A burlesque sketch, to be
written by George H. Bmadhurst. on the plot of
"Th» Duchess of Danzic," will be performed by
Holbrook BUnn. Court ice Pounds. Lemprlere Prin
gle, Lawrence Ren. Dorothy Dlggs and Miss Evle
Green. "Kiss in the Dark" will be played by
members of the Gillette company of the Empire
Theatre. Another play, a drama. In one act, en
titled 'In the Eyes of the World." will be per
formed by the members of the company of the
Lyceum Theatre. The sixteen "Matinee Maids."
from I>?w Field's Theatre- Jefferson De Angelis
nnii Katie Barry, from the FVtntana company, In the
Lyric Theatre. Miss Beatrice Herford. (In one of
her new monologues), also will be features of the
entertainment R. F. (Hitcault. the author of
"Buster Brown." and "The Yellow Kid." and Will
lam Gillette will also rpnear. • rv..
DYNAMITE EXPLOSION KILLS TWO.
Cumberland. Md . March 28.— Two men were
killed nnd seven Injured by an explosion of dyna
mite at Okonoko. or the Western Maryland Rail
road extension. The blast, which hart failed to ex
plode when first set, wan being rammed when the
accident occurred. All the dead and Injured were.
Austrian*, murrleti, a»id had fi*nUrtl at Falrrau.it.
W. Va,
ORIENTAL RUGS.
35 Pieces Very Rare Antiques.
Kazaks, Khurdistans and Mossouls of the l6th
and 17th century; most beautiful designs and
colorings; they arc rich ART PIECES; in
various sizes." Prices rang? from $25.00 to
$95.00 each.
HAND-MADE
Persian Rugs.
A SPECIAL, Slightly Imperfect: <*«* 4£& Cff%
a rar? opportunity to obtain th*:n M^ ■V U
AT HALF VALUE. Wit — -—
Slues average 2.G to 3 by 4 to 4.« ft. . \jg7 each
values $10.00 to $12.<V>. at .'
SHEPPARD HUPP & CO,
SIXTH AYE.. 13TH * MTH »TS.
Proposals.
"T)EPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR.
-*-' United States Geologlral Survey. Reclamation Ser
vice. Washington. D. C. March 17. 1005. Sealed proposaUi
will be received at the office of the United State* Recla
mation Service. Chamber of Commerce Building. Denver.
Col., until 2 o'clock p. m.. Tuesday. May 16. 1906. anil
thereafter opened, for the construction of about 45 miles
of main canal, involving about 2.800. C00 cubic yard* of
earthwork and lOO.fxiO ruble yards of rock work for th»
Irrigation of lands in the North Platte Valley In Eastern
Wyoming anil We*t«-rn Nebraska. Bids win be received
en excavation and embankment for one or more divisions,
which will approximate 300.000 cubt- yards each. The
right is reserved to award to one bidder as many or as
few of such division* on which he has b?d as the Interest
of the Sen-Ice, may require. Specifications, forms r.f prow
posal, and plans may be Inspected at the office of the
Chief 'Engineer of the Reclamation Service. Washington.
D. <'-, and at the office of tne Reclamation Service. Den
ver. Col. The bid on each division must be. accompanied
by a certified check for J2.000. payable to the order of
the Secretary of the Interior, as a guaranty that th«
bidder will, if successful, promptly execute a satisfactory
contract and furnish bond In the sum of 2O per cent of
the contract price for the faithful performance of th«
work. The right Is reserved to reject any or all bids, to
accept one part and reject the other, and to waive, tech
nical defects as the Interest of the Service may require.
Bidders are invited to be present Proposals must be
marked: "Proposals for Construction of Interstate Canal.
.North Platte Project." E. A. HITCHCOCK. Secretary.
kVGVtntA ARSENAL. AUGUSTA. OA..
Feb. 27. 1005— Sealed proposals. In duplicate. »Tib-
Ject to the usual conditions, will b» received here until 1
P. M. on Mar<-h £8. lflCfi. for the purchase of condemned
ordnance stores Cataloisu^s Riving quantities, condition,
etc.. can be had on application to D. A. L.YLE. Lieut.
Col . OM. Dept.. CnrrdK.
Public Notices.
BUREAU OF THE TI'BLIC ADMINISTRATOR OF
THE COUNTY OF NEW YORK.
No. 110 Nassau Street.
New York. March 18. IPOS.
]S^OTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, PURSUANT
to Chapter 230 of the Law 8 of ISOS. that the state
ment of the receipts and axperdlturea of the Publlo Ad
ministrator during the year 1004 was published In the
City Record, three times each week for three weeks, be—
ginning February 21. 1008.
WILLIAM M. HOES.
Public Administrator of the County of New York.
Amusements.
NEW AMSTERDAM ȣ?. j
S^haw, SVIA^SFIF.LD
To-night. 8:15 A PARISIAN ROMANCE
I IDCDTV Theatre. Matinee Saturday. Evp., «IS
ySISHn.,. THE EDUCATION OF MR. PIPP
I by Augustus Thomas. With DIGBT BELL.
lirUf VHDkf Theatre. Prices 23. 50. 7;.. 1.00. 8:15.
RtW lUIIN TO-NIGHT— ONE WEEK ONLY.
al*V IQtUlal MRS ' BLACK IS BACK."
fin A S lllTflri Regular Prices. Mats Wed. * Sat.
A »/»E-IDjr*Al\l •*•**• •'■ CORBETT in "PALS."
Af r llL.gVlV^/^i 1 » Eve.. vi,y Mat. Wed- a & 50c.
MARINE INTELLIGENCE.
MINIATURE ALMANAC.
Sunrine s:33! Sunset «:l!>!Moon rises 12:44 am !Mcon"s tge 21
HIGH WATER.
A M.— Sandy Hook 12:2S|Gov. Island 12:52 Hell Gate 2:45
p.' 11. Sandy Hork I:o2 jGov. Island I:2S'HeU Gate S:IH
INCOMING STEAMERS.
TO-DAT.
Vessel. From Line.
Wearslde Rotterdam, March 3 Vogemann 1
Bristol City Swansea, March 7 Bristol City
Armenia Hamburg. March 7 Hamb-Am
Pretoria Hamburg. March 11 Hamb-Am
Olulla Naples. March 8 Austrian
•Cltta dl Napoli Naples, March 13 Italian
Iroquota Jacksonville, March 23 Clyde
Fatria Gibraltar. March 14 Fabre
•Kroonland Antwerp. March IS Red Star
•Ryndam Rotterdam. March 18. .. Holland-Am
•Caracas.. .....; Porto Cabello, March 17 Red D
•Ollnda Matanzas. March 22
Kansas City ...Savannah. March 24 Savannah
Manitou London. March 17.... ..At Trans
El Cld Galveston, March 21 Morgan
TUESDAY. MARCH 29.
•K. W. der Grosse.. Bremen. March 21 X O Lloyd
•Cltta dl Reggio . Gibraltar. March 15 Italian
•Slblrla Kingston. March- 22 Hamb-Am
San Marcos Brunswick. March 25 Mallory
Laurent lan Glasgow. March 18 Allan- Stats
80v1c..., Liverpool. March 17 White Star
Italian Prince Cardiff, March 15 Frinca
El Sud Galveston. March 22 Morgan
Otto Sverdrup St. Lucia. Ma re 20
WEDNESDAY. MARCH 28.
♦Teutonic Liverpool, March 22 White Star
♦Sardegna Naples. March 14 Italian
•Advance Colon. March 22 Panama.
St. Andrew Fayal. March 19 Phccr.lx
Nueces Galveston. March 22 Mallory
Eldorado New-Orleans. March 22 Morgan
THURSDAY. MARCH 30.
Graf Walder?ee Hamburg-, March 18 Hamb-Am
Gneisenau Bremen. March 1? N G Lloyd
Proteus New-Orleans. March 23 Morgan
•Brings mail.
OUTGOING STEAMERS.
TO-DAY.
Vtssel
Vessel. For. Line. Mails close. sails.
Jamestown. Norfolk. OfcJ Dominion . . . 3:00 p- m
TUESDAY. MARCH 28.
Barbarn««a. Bremen. N O Lloyd 10:00 am
Slavonla. Naples. Canard 12:00 m
Apache, Charleston, Clyde 8:00 pm
Monroe. Norfolk. Old Dominion 8:00pm
WEDNESDAY. MARCH 20.
Baltic. . Liverpool. White Star 9:3Oam 1:00 pin
otatendajn. -Rotterdam. Holland-Am»r. 7:30 am 10:00 am
Hellig Olav. Copenhagen. Am. ..11:00am 2:oopm
Trinidad. Bermuda, «Jii«^b«c 8:00 am 10:00 am
Prln* Willem 111.- Haytl. DW 1 11 :00 am 1:00 pm
Unula Bright, Argentina, Barber 12:00 m 3:00 pm
Flandria, Colon. Panama. 9:30 a m 1 :00 p m
Bemlnole. San Domingo. Clyde 12:30 3:')opm
Concho. QalVetoa. Mallory — 3:oOpm
Proteus, New -Orleans, M0rgan. ........ — — — 12:00 m
Iroquols, <"harfeston. Clyde — — 8:00
Princess Anne. Norfolk, Old Dominion.. — 3:00 p m
SHIPPING NEWS.
Port of New-York, Sunday, March 26. 1905.
ARRIVED
Steamer Etruria (Br). Peter. Liverpool March 15 and
Quecnstown 10, to the Cunard Sb Co. Ltd. with 214 cabin,
and 747 steerage passengers, mall* and nvise. Arrived at
th*- Bar at 10:12 p m. 23th.
Steamer 1-a. Bretagne «Fr>. Poncelot. Havre March 18.
to the Compagnle Generals Transatlantlque. with 175
cabin, 1.04S steeragt passengers, malls and mdse. Ar
rived at the Bar at 11. a m.
Ptesmer Kllsyth (Br). MacKenj!e, Colastlna February
23 and St Lucia March IS. to the New- York «n.i Boston
Dyewood Company, with quebracho wood. ArrtTed. at
the Bar at 2:30 p m.
Steamer Craigneuk <Bri. 'Hendry. Sagtia March 17 and
Matanzas 20. to .1 H Winchester & Co, with sugar. Ar
rived at the. Bar at 7:15 a m.
Steamer Santona ifln. Boyd. denfueges March 18. to
Funch. Edye. & Co, with sugar Arrived at th« Bar at
6:30 a m.
Steamer Matanxas. Miller. Tampico March 17 and Ha
vana 22. to James E Ward 6 Co. with 3 cabin passenger*
and mdse. Arrived at th* Bar at 2:30 p m.
Pteamer Bradford <Ger>. Bruhn. Port Antonio, Ja.
March 21. to the. I'nlted Fruit Company, with 19 pas
sengers and fruit. Arrived at the Bar at 12:30 j» m.
Steamer Sablne ißr>. Taylor, Baltimore March 24. to
Barber & Co. in ballast. Will load for South Africa.
Steamer Margaretha iltal). Vaccarrazza. Havana
March 21, to \V D Munson. with molassea. Ar/tved at
the Bar at 6:20 p m.
Sandy Hook. N I. March 2*. »:3O p m— Wind •ant.
light breeze, raining. • -„; . •
SAILED.
Steamer* Kennebec <Br). for Singapore: OMhamla (Br),
Hong Konc: La Ga»cogne (Ft). Havre; Uderton (Br).
Havre and Dunkirk: Captain A F Lucas. Port Arthur.
Tex, Roland »Ger). Baltimore; Buceroa <Br>. Cape Town,
Alg.->a Bay. Ea»t U>adon. etc; New-York (Dutch tank).
Rotterdam. Indus «Br>, Calcutta via Norfolk; United
Htat«-s dredge St Joh:-
MOVEMENTS OF STEAMERS.
FOREIGN PORTS.
Queen*town, March 28. Up m — Arrived, steamer Umbrla
<Br). Stephen*. New York for Liverpool (and pro
ceeded); March 26. 0:50 a m. sailed, steamer Cam- ,
pania (Br.. rrttchnnl. from Liverpool for New-York.
Southampton, March Arrived, steamer Nevr-York.
Roberts, New-York via Plymouth and Cherbourg.
Dover, March 2«. 1:30 a m— Sailed, steamer* Zwlan>i ,
(Bri. Brcomhes.,l. from Antwerp for N«w-York; 1:29 j
n m. B!u#oher lQftr>, Kopff. from Hamburg for New ■
York via Boulogne. j
Flume. Marc! 2fl — Sillied. Centner Carrathla iRrV
T.i>n«r. New-York via Naples and Trieste- .
Ur*men. March 25 — Railed, strainer C.roeser Kurfurst ,
cirri Retmkasten, New-York via Cherbourg land I
|HM« Trawl* Pulnt Wltw. 1
Amusements.
Madison Square Garden.
■••»> •ft»rn'v>n at 2. Every ev-nla- a» S nvinrt
Enthusiastic crowd* attest tlf* Or» i ! jV°JT X
..2J luch Bwcnlflcmt «how ever vn b.- o ~^;
.—,*"" "' «»• Greatest Features on Earth ••"
m* sensational act* of an am*iin« character - '
BARNUM <& BAILEY
Greatest Show on E^Lrth
The Ocly Ctrcua to he Seen In Xerr Tortt. *
Presenting the t»o m*rv-Hfui» French >*nM:i^M t?Lif
*'•'• th* talk, of Eumr*
THE DIP OF DEATH.
A Iw\r»V LOOPING THE ■„»!■ IN AN AUTOMORrtE.
Highest Priced Attraction Er« r KnnTi
AN w^ihjggg A*B sawwg
Another Astonishing ami Awful Abysmal Aebievsmtat
IKS FKKRE.S ANCII.LOTISWTI ■ EXPLOIT.
Double Simultaneous Looping ths Ga.p^ '
a.nd Leaping the Quadruple Ch&sms.
Dual Quadruplet D*«lj» of D«r!a».
The Corgeon* Delhi Durbar.
A MagriArmt Introductory Hprrtawti'atr Pageant. -
Together with all the marvellous a:rractirn* of the ir»- j
po<jr»me. Triple Clrcua. Double Menagerie, x H-ri* Wr
Elephants. HtJ of Giraffes. Wild K»«st». Dror-, »•
<'am»l». Jumping: Hors-n. L^pin* P-snt»». T)**p~ra,i
Races. Gymnast i.- Fears. Acrobatic Kxploits Aer-j!
Wonder*. Traln»-1 Animal*. Curious Feature*. Ur"n»
Human Curiositl.-s and Freaks. Jri
100 ACTS BY 300 CIIA3IPIOX ARTISTS.
15 ACTS GOING ON AT ONE TOIE.
SPECIAL PKATFBXS PROVIDER FOR (HII.DSEX
2 EXHIBITIONS DAILY AT ! AND it P. M.
Door* Open an Hour Earlier.
ADMISSION' TO ALL. WITH SEAT. 25 an* s«> <"£>;-*«.
Reserved Peats. 73. $1 * $1.50 tMarSlsnn iv. door!
Private Box Seats. $2 and 52 ."• according- to location
Box Office op,. .tally from ft A 11. to 5 P. M for ma!«"
of «»ats In advance. Children, half price to a!! rmmil
seats but 73 cent seats, and tfc*y are 60 cent a. 25 si and
75 cent seats not sold In advance
FMPIRF rilun;l Broadway ft «oth St
LAST THREE WSI
WM. GILLETTE | affi™
UlinCnjJ TlmvrßE - 44th •*•• nr Bmadway
lIUUOUiI Evs. 8:15. Mats. Wed. St Sat. 2:is.
VIRGINIA HARKED aaffiffir l^
COMING-- -THE HEIR TO THB HOORAH."
KNICKERBOCKER. Broadway and 38- Street
To-night at S.IS Mat. Sat. at 2:15. '
Mlss LLLIc uLrrnLTo I prince consobt.
LLLIu uCrrnLIO I prince consort.
APL. 3— LONDON ASSURANCE, with Special
Cast beaded by MISS JEFFREYS. Seats ready
rp|Tt:pirj\lT«BATl»E. Broad way * 4«'h 9t
MAHY MA.VNLKING
(* A DDlPaf* THEATRE. 33 th St. near Broadway.
UAnnlUlV Ev%.i:in. Mats. Wed & 3a: . 2:13.
ARNOLD DALfS 60. lo Bernard Shaw's
AnnULU UflLI o bu. vor nitveb cxs teix.
To-day. i:30 — First Lenten Monday Shaw Matin*?.
"Candida" (only time) with Mr. Daly * Oni Cast.
Nest Lenten Mats.. Apl. 3 & — DOUBLE BILL.
"The Man of Destiny." with Mr. Daly, a.-.d "How
He Lied to Her Husband." with Clara Bloodzood
especially engaged.
© A Ufl V THEATRE. 34th St.. near Broadway.
OAVUI E • 535. Mats. Wed. * Sat . 2: IS.
GRACE GEORGE £»£?£££*
Apl. 3 — "A Case of Fteniled Finance"
lim 11 II THKATRE. Broadway * 35th St.
ntnuLU Uy. Ets SIS. Mats. Wed.* Sat .2: IS.
31 lUOUC Wit £11 Last 3 wits 73thTlin*.Art4.3c«iTs.
aLallonc nALon tub woman c* the case.
nA I V'C Broadway & 3-Hh St. Ev-s at i.
UAL! O ' Matinees Saturdays at 2. THE
DUCHESS OF DANTZIC
I ynnUl Broadway and 45th St. Eves at 1 10.
LllfbUrn Matinees Thursday * Saturday. 1:15.
100T1I TIME, APRIL STH. SOCVEMKS.
MRS. LEFFLNQWELL'S BOOTS
X
BURTON LYCEOMI^^S^V *'
urn lire "ROUND LONDON"
HOLM CO HAMPSTEJI HENLET.
11V -' lv -* llj ' W i HAMPSTEAD. etc.. et<?.
TRAVELOGUES. : Prices 1.50. l.(». 750.. JOc.
CARNEGIE IIAU. Pat.. April *. at 2:15.
« 13 ESH SP\ i(P3^ "^^^lo PASEWH.L
»■ OR- HE?
THE MARVELLOI"? HrXG-.VRIAN VIOLINIST.
MANAGEMENT OF DANIEL, FROHMAN
On this occasion he will ; lay the entire Beethcrea
Concerto, Vieuxtemps M ballad* and polonaies. Peril's
Trllle. •»., etc.
Prices as usual. Seats Sat. at Hail.
WA! I ■Pk"9 Laat Week— Mats. DllipUlU tnMHe
WSLUUH 0 wed.&Sat. Amelia DINdIUM ManU.
Monday, Apr. S. Seats on *al" Thursday.
ALICE FISCHER 'n ■ r^X?*
GARBEN. 2Tth & Mad. Ay. Ev. »:S». Mar Wed *3«?
hi&H* COLLEGE WIDOW
I unin -»2d. w. of B'way. Mats. Wed. i Sat.
LYRIC DE AKGELIS in FiNT jiii
PRINCESS. Evs. »:30. Mats. Tuea.. Thars. & Pat.
X; k "-' WHEN WE DEAD AWAXL
DDA -W" *1« S*- * B'way. Evs.. S:&
DKIAUVV Al Mat. V>d. A Sat.. 2:13.
TO-NIGHT FLORODORA
THE Miff •"• """* ■«■*»* «
'■ CAST BETTER THAN EVER. —
Ariel* Ritchie. Cyril Scott. Maude Lambert. H. V. Don
nelly. 'El»i. Ryan. Phil Ryl*r. Joseph Phillips. T. A>
Klernan.
BKAI'TY SINGINO THOBIS OF 75.
ANNUAL ACTORS'
HOME BENEFIT
BROADWAY THEATRE. FRIDAT. APRIL 7 AT X*»
»• • ■ :•■ Prices $1 (*> to S'~ M Sal» op^ns Friday.
Orders received with checks by mail.
CARNEGIE LYCEUM
March Slat and April Ist. at •P. M Mcrtrep. April I*.
**LE *HULAN"
By Tola Dorian.
•*LE BONHOMME JADIS"
By Henri Murger
Ttto French Plays to be |h»n by French retlJ»3ti
fn connection with Greenwich House Settlement.
Tickets can bo obtained at earnest* i.yeaom ana
Berkeley Lyceum.
TICKET?. $2.00 AND *1 M\ PAXES. 815.C0 AND Slidi.
UHUUCDQTriII'C « 8 «- B-way A 7 Ay Taiiy S*ia
nflmmLnOltlri U rjtlrely new Vattde%Ule each wee*.
E~~llehp3rf c.\RVEGrc
Liin&alVL^lair ihur.dvi
SIX ENTIRELY NEW * i>w»y»
LECTURES uPcrtSe.
Mch. »0 * It— "TANGIER & ANDALVStV-^
DCI ACAn THEATRE. Tc~nlir?it. Mat .S«- *
U C LA U DAVID BELASCO presents MR3.
LESLIE CARTER. Vob^"
ACADEMY OF MVSIC. Fourteenth St. A- Irving Plesa
DAVID BKLASCO Presents
BL/\NCHt BATES - 55IS£$S
Popular Fric««. Mats. Wei. & Sat.. 2. Bva. R.
DI mil Evenings. Ma Matln»« Saty ail
DIJUU DAVID B£LASCO ITesent*
WARFIELD T St»
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MRS. FISKE I LEAH liLESCH>A
M'Ki I\l MATS. Wednesday. Mar. 29: Wed. . x *' A
Manhattan Company in -Hi^Ey** cf th» Heart.
Light from St. Aan»»" and "Th« lloae.
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Mat. Wed. Bit. TELEGRAM J Week_ I
Tomorrow.! MARGARET wtctieri-t. «•'**•"?
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TON. JEWELL'S MANIKINS. Moult^r *»•
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CULUMAL Mala Pally. :s & s»c
"JI!ST I. IKK A «o.|»s ** »*»«• * Fenton. ««••
thorn* Plater*. Great Albany. Vfm Gould. Mr »•'
Mrs- Mark Murphy Eva W»»trott. othf r». m
Cr> r- aVI ■ *"< » " '• N WAX. New Oroo?*
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