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New-York tribune. [volume] (New York [N.Y.]) 1866-1924, May 07, 1905, Image 31

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83030214/1905-05-07/ed-1/seq-31/

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AM AUTOMOBIJLB ABVIEMTUIRJL
WHEREIN CUFHD GUHDEB THE CHAUFFEUR
Ml to tell a story
■ ■•< ..::;•» iat that came
in. the river alone which the fam-
ily plai Ktended for several miles. Some of
■.■.ere working by moonlight, when they
1 boat's whistle and saw the appa
rition No! a moment did they
ir the house at their topmost speed,
ter they ran the more vivid became their
■ . who was an exhorter and had
inalion than his fellows, led the pro
■ do< 'r\\ ay. As si mm as
. his breath lie exclaimed between
"Hades a;ii broke loose, an' de debil am a-swim
riber chawin' smnahs an' spittin' out
■ ne!"
■ railroad 1 ed in one of the
ing suddenly up >n
i line, si ion the track and tried to stop
• • . me by i hands, and the en
• ent a tncj' dy.
■■-•■■ • balloon causes in remote
■• ■ . riti metimi - I 5 great
1 ■.••••.■■ days of aerial experiments.
i :.. in the crowded centers of popula
1 ling 1 if ast< >nishmenl ;
■ • ■ I foi ■ .' .tin mal in 111 1
n and 1- •■ 1 tion; bui 'here are parts oi
the new wonders of invention are
: eople are startled by such
■ 1 ess '.
. - r wholly believed Jamison's story
■ ' negro bush-meeting in the South until I
an experience of my own. Jamison was
g in the backwoods when he cane upon a
eting — a bush-meeting, it was called,
it was an a jemblage without tents, a
• • together of the nesroes of the vicinity for
aJ services in tiie aiternoon.
When Jamison hove in sight with his touring-car,
md ■' exhortation and shouting instantly
; then th< i mighty cry; then a relapse
: single negro would
h him or 1
[ami ■ ' ' tory with the necessary
The explanation was that just before he
upon the scene the preacher had been
rating: "Ye'd bettah ready, sinnahs;
ve'd bettah git ready ri^ht heah an' now, fer de
chariot am a-comin*. di- chariot am a-comin*,
v.;d ole Gabriel tootin' de horn — " and
i : t then Jamison appeared on the scene
It was pleasant to think thai one
oew adventures in an
hen wonders have be
and b i I de
: to lake my usual trip
Florida by easy stages
[about ways in my
:. 1 knew I should
Is, and
dd be numerous
ry hardships; but I
was a I '■ t time, and
• roi pe< t of novelty was
inviting.
I veered well to the west,
to strike the more inter
esting life of the foothills of
SUNDAY MAGAZINE for MAY 7. 1905
T^y Chester Pealfee
the Blue Ridge, and was several hundred miles
below Mason and Dixon's Line before anything out
of the usual happened. My observation showed
til at in most parts the auto was more 1 >r less familiar;
but as 1 got well down into the pine bell where the
settlements were few and far between and life was
elementary my appearance caused women to drop
their pans, and men to rub their eyes to see it they
could believe their sight, and even dogs to swallow
their growls in genuine and delightful consternation.
Once two boys driving an ox-carl fled precipitately
into the woods, and I had a hard time getting them
back and convincing them that my machine was
not a thing with wings that had taken its flight from
another w< >rld.
Again 1 had trouble in getting shelter for the
night, because the doubtful farmer declared:
"Haow do we-uns know the blamed thing won't
bust an' blow us inter kingdom come." We had
to compromise by putting the machine in an old
ramshackle shed a quarter ol a mile away Irian the
log hut in which the family slept — and, by the way,
we all slept in the same room on the same rough
floor, and when 1 got up in the morning I had more
peaks and crevices in my anatomy than a mountain
Early in 'he afternoon of the following day I
was going carefully along an excuse for a road
through a wilderness of wonderful charm and
beauty. I became anxious about the wear upon
the 'ins, and stopped to see how they were faring.
As I dismounted, 1 caught sight of a young man in
the thick growth along the edge of the way.
"Hello!" I said.
"Hello yourself." he replied. "Who be you after?"
Suddenly They Began to R.uise Their Cuns
"No one. 1 am merely on my way south."
"What kind of an engine (pronounced enge-ine)
is that?"
"An automobile."
" Runs itself, eh ? "
"I don't pull it." I answered.
He came out to look at it. He had a good face,
one of those blue-eyed, tirm-mouthed. solid coun
tenances that indicate fearlessness and meet any
situation, however unfamiliar.
" Goin' fur? "
"I've got three or four hundred miles to make
yet."
"I low much before sundown?"
"It will depend upon the roads. Forty miles, I
should say on a jjuess."
I was bending down doinij some patching on the
front wheel and not particularly caring for the in
quisitiveness of my new acquaintance, ami so when
he said, "So long! Good luck!" 1 thanked him
without looking up from my work, and dismissed
the incident.
In a few minutes I got under way again and gave
my thoughts to the wildness through which I was
passing. I broke into a hearty laugh at the antics
of a rabbit, whose enormous ears shot up Straight
ami whose eyes seemed to be bulging out of his
lie. id. and later I slowed down to watch two squirrels
that stopped their play to gaze at the wondrous
thing thai had invaded their forest. I had
gone several miles when the road came to an
opening, and a hundred yards distant 1 beheld
three men — a tall patriarch with long whiskers
ami two younger persons, who may have been his
sons.
They hailed as though frozen in their tracks, and
by some impulse which I did not understand I
slowed down. Suddenly they began to raise their
guns.
"Hold on there!" I exclaimed. "I'm a stranger
down here, and don' want to be used as a
target."
There was a minute of suspense — and they
laughed, or rather smirked as though they felt
sheepish; but I was glad to see the smile, for it
meant safety.
"I do eternally declar'!" said the <>I<l
man. rubbing his head and then pulling his
beard, "ye knocked us clean plum' out!
What in blazes is that there thing any
baow?'
I tried to explain; but their wonder grew,
until they had to accept it all without un
derstanding it. "Well, say, mister, ye've
in>t ther mule skinned tor death, ain't ye?"
he finally said.
"What are you hunting to-day?" I
asked. " Rabbits? "
" Yeh — a two-legged rabbit. Didn't hap
pen to set- him as ye come along, did ye?
Smooth fared young feller?"
" What has he done? "
"More'n plenty," was the grim reply.
"But you don't mean you're going to shoot him,
do you?" I asked incredulously.
They laughed. "Wall, we don't calculate on a
funeral all at once, but we may pepper him up some
if he don't behave right."
I did not intend to become a party to the per
formance, and so I told them that 1 had seen no
(Continued on page 17J
y\.s» Love's Chaußeur
I Hope I Performed
My Duty Well
7

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