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New-York tribune. [volume] (New York [N.Y.]) 1866-1924, October 15, 1905, Image 20

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83030214/1905-10-15/ed-1/seq-20/

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MAIN APPROACH TO DUNGENESS, THE HOME OF MRS. LUCY CARNEGIE, ON CUMBERLAND ISLAND. GEORGIA.
A SEA ISLAND ESTATE.
Thingeness, the Winter Home of
Mrs. Liicy C. Carnegie.
Ihingeness, upon Cumberland Island, in the
fwy southeasterly corner of Georgia, the winter
fcetne of Mrs. Lucy C. Carnegie, is one of the
gunous old sea island estates dating from the
period of the Revolution, when it was presented
%y the grateful Southern people to General
Wathaniel Greene, the New-England soldier.
Who, with "Mad Anthony" Wayne, cleared the
Bouth of the British, as a sequel to the sur-
KMnder of Torktown.
The beautiful modern buildings occupy a site
■ear the location of the ruin which has been for
pmny years all that remained of the once state
ly plantation house. Broad avenues pierce the
great live oak forest, giving glimpses outward
■pon the yacht anchorage in the bay, across
Which is quaint old St. Mary's and its little
Stream, marking the boundary of Florida, and
Iwyond the town of Fernandina. In the opposite
ftreetion, and reached by a short walk, is th*
•cean, beating upon a broad level beach, which
teaches the length of the island, a distance of
twenty-two miles.
Dungeness was once the producer of some of
(be finest cotton in the world, but from the
l^ars of the Civil War it lay devastated and
boely until Mr. and Mrs. Carnegie, fascinated
■y its beauty, even in ruin, made it their own.
General Greene did not live long to enjoy
Ms gift His later years were filled with
tetress Incident to debts contracted through
Indorsement of an army contractor. He died
Bear Savannah, and his widow, marrying again,
hecame Catharine Greene Miller. She was the
■evoted friend of Asa Whitney, inventor of the
ratton gin, a machine which, despite the bitter
•©position of the South, has proved one of its
fTeatost blessings. The cotton gin was per
fcscted at Dungenesa.
In the little family cemetery at Dungeness
nsts the body of General Lee, "Light Horse
ffarry," of the famous Southern cavalry, and
fkthrr of the great Confederate leader. General
lice died there while on the way to Cuba on a
fnest for health.
The present owners have cleared away much
wt the jungle of semi-tropical growth which had
covered the island, but many beautiful palms
have been preserved. One of these, a magnifi
cent date palm, is said to be the largest of its
in America,
Mrs. Carnegie numbers among her winter vls-
Jtors now and then her brother-in-law, Andrew
E&rnegie, who must find there a striking con
frast to his rugged Scotch estate.
MRS. R. G. DUN'S HOME.
Ounmcre's Rare Combination of
Rockxcork and Vines.
Ihinmere, the summer home of Mrs. R. G.
Ihin, la considered one of the most beautiful
places at Narragansett Pier. Rough rockwork,
Vines and many trees have been utilized in
Wautifying it. Everywhere are vines, trees.
Sowers and stonework. At the entrance the
Bnooth roadway Is flanked by a stone tower
szxd a rock. Between them and over the road
springs a rough stons arch. The tower, the
C»ck and the arch are half covered with vines, as
NEW-YORK DAILY TRIBUNE, SUNDAY, OCTOBER 15, 1905.
are also the rambling stone and shingle house
and the stone walls.
As one approaches the place from Ocean Road
on a clear day, a riot of color is presented to the
eye. In the foreground is the gray arch, with
its green lace trimming, and the stone tower,
with its red cap of tiles. On either hand flowers
glow in the sunshine. The arch and tower
stand out against a cerulean background. At
the foot of the green slope within tumbles the
blue Atlantic. It stretches away until it meets
the azure sky. A white sailed yacht dipping on
the swell is the only object which breaks the
great expanse of blue.
Mrs. Dun's place is a specimen of the land
scape artist's handiwork. It comprises several
acres of ground and includes a small lake. It
was planned and begun by the late R. G. Dun
fiftfen or twenty years ago. Everything is in
keeping, the keynote being the rocks on the
shore at the foot of the lawn. From the front
of the house the lawn drops away to the water
in a series of terraces. The trees represent a
fight to conquer the elements, in which man
won. It is said that, owing to the proximity of
the place to the ocean and its exposed situation,
it was difficult to grow the trees. Among them
are many rare and beautiful ones. A number of
the fine varieties of grapes are found upon the
place.
The house is almost hidden beneath the vines
which have been permitted to clamber over it.
It has received additions from time to time. One
of its features is a large ballroom. The small
lake was the origin of the second half of the
name of the place.
"SERMONS IN STONES."
Illustrations of Aesop's Fables Deco
rate City College.
The students of the sub-freshman or prepara
tory school of the College of the City of Xew-
York when they get into the new building being
erected for their use, at Amsterdam-aye. and
139th-st., will find that literal "sermons in
stones" have been inserted for their benefit.
There will be no escape for the wandering eyes
of the inattentive scholar, for when he lili_?
them from the tediDus pages of his book to "he
rafters, there to the left and the right, v. J te
moral lessons in the form of pagan sermons,
carved in the eternal rock, convicting him of
idleness and teaching him that honesty is a bet-
RUINS OF HISTORIC MANOR HOUSE AT
HOME OF MRS. LU
DUNMERE, THH SUMMER HOME OF THE WH

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