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New-York tribune. [volume] (New York [N.Y.]) 1866-1924, October 01, 1906, Image 12

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PEASANTS TO GET LAXD.
MACIUXERY IX MOTIOX.
More Hope of Peaceful Reform in
— Many Concessions.
St. Petersburg. Sept. 30.— The final step to set
In action the liisthllifirj cf the Government's
plan for the distribution of land to the peas
antry was taken to-day by the publication of
voluminous regulations to the local agrarian
commissions, under which the sale of 11,000,000
deciatines of land in European Russia will be
gin immediately. These commtsstona, which
ftre composed of fleies*tes elected by the peas
ants, the land owners and the zemstvos and of
representatives of the government, act as in
termediaries in the valuation of land and the
fixinsr of conditions of sale.
Thes° are charged also with arranpenients
for emigration. The land in Eastern Kussia
sn.l on (he Bfbertan stpppes surrendered by th^
Enipcnr \vi!! !><"• sold on easy terms. The price
Is less than .*:_' an acre, and payments are spread
over fifty yean.
The commissions have taken especial pains
to piv» the widest publicity to their proceed
ings. «nd hnpe tnat the distribution of land will
minimize the nutunm aprnrian disorders, which
alrendy have beerun.
With the Constitutional Democratic congress
only one week away and. the formation of a
formidable new party on Count Heyden's plat
form, peaceful regeneration seems fully assured.
The political campaign Is becoming animated.
The ban upon the meetinp-s of the Constitu
tional Democrats In Pt. Petersburg and Moscow
has be»>n removed, snd these assemblies have
been sanctioned subject to the restrictions of
ex-Premier Witte's temporary law.
Encouraged by this concession, the Constitu
tional Democrats contemplated transferring
.their congress of October 8 from Helsingfors to
St. Petersburg, but they will adhere to the ar
rangements made to meet In the Finnish capital
unless they are definitely assured of noninter
ference, as they are in wholesome fear of the
regulations of "reinforced security." It Is <x
pected that about four hundred delegates will
attend the congress.
Seizures of reactionary literature fomenting
attacks upon Jews and Liberals are reported to
day to have been made here, in Moscow, Odes=a
nnd elsewhere. Premier Stolypin has expressed
his regret to the chief rabbi of KlshJneff at the
action of the chief of police in Interfering with
the celebration of the Jewish New Year there.
The appeal for mitigation of the death sen
tence passed upon the assassin of General Koz
lov. who was killed in Peterhof Park last July,
has been joined by the general's widow. After
fruitless Intercession with the commander of the
St. Petersburg garilson. Mme. Kozlov has tele
graphed the Empress asking that no further
blcod be syilled upon the tomb of her husband.
There ii good reason to-night to expect the
disclosure of a grave military scandal, a colonel
of engineers having been arrested for alleged
connection with the sale of important frontier
plans to the agents of a foreign power.
The newspapers '.ar<- to-day that the Minis
tej- of the Interior baa instructed the provisional
governors to make special provision for the pro
tection of foreign consuls, in anticipation of a
recrudescence of the lawlessness of last winter.
A private dispatch received here from Toklo
Fays the Minister of Marine had asked the Jap
anese Parliament for an appropriation of $135,
<»orM'Ktfi, to b*> Btributed over seven years, for
the C'nst ruction and repair ■> r warships and the
building of a new dockyard.
"iiki. Vladimir Provlnoe, Russia, Kept. 30.
- Agrarian disorders have broken out here and
a. number of est;m-.s have been pillaged.
CHANGE AT ODESSA.
Orders lssued Against Union of the
Russian People.
o<i*-=;=.-;. Bept. Sf».— Thp sntnarlUas appear to have
euddenly |ievcit<l ber attitude toward the union
c! the Russian people. The prefect to-day withdrew
his ptmlssiini -for Bieettngs of the union, and ln-
Etructed the police to arrest any pnrson assaulting
or searching citizens oa the streets. Th" news
papers attribute this radical change to the random
policy cf th** government.
CRONSTADT MUTINEERS SENTENCED.
Douma Member To Be Deported — Nineteen
Sailors To Be Shot.
Cronstadt. Sept. 30.— The sentences of tho
I court martial on the sailors and others charged
•with taking part in the mutiny at Cronstadt
last August have been delivered, subject to con
firmation. M. Ornlpko, one of the leaders of the
peasant party In the former parliament, is con
demned to deportation and the loss of all his
civil rights.
Nin»te.-n sailors are condemned to death by
shooting. 12 to life servitude, 120 to terms of
pervitude ranging from four to twenty years, and
429 other sailors to service with the disciplinary
■battalions and various terms of civil imprison
ment. A!! the condemned prisoners forfeit their
military privileges. One hundred and twenty
nine pallors were acquitted.
DEFY THE VATIC AX.
Sarrien and Clemenceau Say France
Will Enforce Church Lares.
Paris, Pepr. Premier Barrien and M.
Clemenceau, Minister of the Interior, each de
livered a notable speech to-day, in which it
was set forth that the government was firmly
mined to carry out the law providing for
the separation of Church and St;ue.
M. Clemenceau declared that the entire trouble
arose from a misunderstanding. He said that
the Bole desire of the jrov. nimr-iit was for abso
lute liberty of conscience, and that this neces
sarily Implied the separation of Church and
State. The task at the government was to bring
about a new spirit of tolerance. The uncom
promising attitude of the Vatican regarding
Franco, where the Church had been stirring up
a spirit of rebellion and civil war ever since the
formality of the inventories, compared in an
astonishing way with the Church's docile sub
mission to t!i" rigorous method* put into force
by Germany. Under the pretext of religion, the
speaker i::ue(). the Church was attacking re
publican Institutions. A foreign council had re
jected the ration law without trial and in
Eplte of the opinion of s majority of the French
clergy, but France alone bad th«; right to make
Fren. h laws, aiid she would not tolerate outside
Interference with them. The government, the
Minister of the Interior declared, would refuse to
negotiate these matters ■ .■■ h T- ■ Igners.
J'r.rnier Sarrien said be thought the Separa
tion law was ll ben I enough to satisfy the most
exactina minds, asid th« government had re
solved not lo flinch In its application. Th-
Premtei declared th< government did not desire
religious persecutions, but that It would not sub
mit to the Imperious summons of the Church to
make changes in French legislation.
CAR VICTIM WAS H. H. HAMILTON.
The man wl:o was killed in a trolley collision be
tween i: Seventh avtnue car nnd a Flatbush £venuo
car early yesterday morning at natbnsn avenue
a<n.J Jiirß-n t.trec-t. I ooklyn. was identified yes
terdzy afternoon as Herbert H. Hamilton a fan
C." "'.S.ault P«lnt. N Y. liis brother. Frank, of
>..». a Beventh? avenue, who bad been tearchW
:or i.irji. upon learning cf the accident hastened
'.j rh* MurtiKf urxl id.ntlil.-d the body. The dead
juasi nas on the SevenUi avenue car*;. L tie t!n:>
of ihe crash, a:;d was foilliil undcineutij when r;,,.
vmcck wum cfcateda
FIERCE EAST SIDE RIOT.
j Mob Wrecks Streetcar That Knocked
Down and Injured Child.
Two thousand foreigners, residents of the East
Side, enraped when a two-year-old girl was
! knocked down and Injured by a 14th street car.
' on its way to the Willlamsburg Bridge through
Ew=ex strret, yeptertlay afternoon brutally beat
the motorman. wrecked the car and rioted until
tho r?perve* of the Eldridge street police station
i scattered them.
WmUm were hurled from windows and house
tops, and passengers on cars and pedestrians
fled panicstricken from the neighborhood. It
! took an hour bard %york on the part of tho
police t<> disperse the rioting Jews and Italians.
Car 2.016, of the 14th street line, with Philip
i Rocelli. of No. 512 East 14th street, ac motor
j man. was running slowly through Essex
1 street, which.. as usual, was crowded, the bell
! clanging vigorously. Rosie Schenle, two years
old, of No. 101 Essex street, was playing in the
: street with hundreds of other children, when she
darted in front of the car. The fender struck her
and she was knocked to one side.
Rocelli stopped his car, picked her up and
hauled her to several women, who immediately
set up an outcry. A mob of men and women at
once surrounded the motorman. Peno Saidon
stein, of No. 185 2d street, who, the police
say, was recently discharged by the rail
way company as a conductor, mounted a stoop
and harangued the mob in Yiddish. The crowd
then began an attack. The motorman broke
away and took refuge in the car. which was
bombarded with stones, decayed fruit and other
missiles. Several passengers were hurt and
some had their clothes ruined. The passengers
escaped, and in a minute every window was
broken. Another car behind the one attacked
was also battered. Its crew ran to the assist
ance of the first. Charles Sanger, of No. 108
Essex street, one of the mob, was hit on the
head with a controller.
Captain Murtha arrested Saidonstein 'on a
charge of inciting a riot, and Charles Sanger on
a charge of malicious mischief, it being alleged
that he was one of the first to throw' missiles
through the car windows. Hugh Froll, the
motorman of the second car, was also locked up
on a charge of assault made by Sanger.
The girl over whose accident the riot started
was attended by Dr. Warren, of the Gouverneur
Hospital, who said that she was suffering from
a dislocated hip. She was attended and then
taken to her home.
TUBE BLAST KILLS MAX.
Three Injured by Explosion in
Brooklyn Tunnel.
An explosion at the Brooklyn end of the north
tube of th^ tunnel from the Battery to Brooklyn
at 9:40 o'clock last night killed one man, John
McLa-jghlin, of No. 65 Columbia Place, Brook
lyn, mid injured three others. Among the in
jured are Clarence Riggs, of No. 240 East 236 th
street, The Bronx, contusions, and William
Dougherty, of No. 385 Warren street, Brooklyn,
contusions. They were taken to the Long Island
College Hospital.
Frank Ellegood, of No. 41 Garden street.
Brooklyn, !»r^k»> h<s jaw. It was set by an am
bulance surgeon and the boy was sent home.
David Harrington, of No. 255 Erie street, Jer
sey City, the night superintendent, who was
arrested. rharge r l with criminal negligence., re
o allow any one in the tunnel except tho
Rev. Father Madden, of St. Charles Borromeo
Church in Sidney Place, near the scene of the
accident. He went in to administer the last
rites of the Church.
It is presumed that one charge of a blast
remained unexploded and that it was discharged
by a pi^k.
PLUXGES IXTO RIVER.
Engine and Cars Fall Through
Bridge — Injured Rescued.
[By Telegraph to The Tribune.]
Memphis, Sept. 80. — Three are dead and ten
or more were injured in the wreck* of the
Northbound fast mail on the Louisville & Nash
ville Railroad, which plunged through an open
draw in the bridge over the Cumberland River
to-night. The dead and nearly all the Injured
were trainmen.
The bridge watchman had turned the draw to
allow a steamboat to pass, and it Is thought that
the engineer failed to notice the red lights until
too late. The engine, mail, baggage and express
cars went through the draw. The passenger
coaches remained on the bridge. Tin- steamer
H. W. Buttorff. which had just passid, picked
up several Injured, who were located by tho
boat's searchlight.
XOT THE WORD OF GOD."
Bishop Williams, of Michigan, Says
Bible Is Used Wrongly.
Detroit, Sept. »».— Bishop Charles D. Williams,
of the Episcopal diocese of Michigan, in an ad
dress to Y. M C. A. members here to-day on
"The Bible and th.- Word of God," declared that
thf- Bible is not the word of God and that the
teachings to the contrary are the most prolific
source of unbelief the Church has to contend
with.
Tlv Bishop said, in part:
Tho Bible m-eds no defence; all it needs is a
Bquare deal. Thrre are those who read it de
voutly, diligently. But I never say the Bible 1h
the word of Hod; I say the Bible and the word
of God.
T<> those who accept the entire book as th<>
literal word of God I would point out that it is
nowhere so stated Christ tore asunder the Old
Testament precepts, the Law of Mopes, ainl fur
nished new ones. Where the Old Testament
directed men to hato thf-lr enemis, the teachings
of Christ were to love your enemies.
We must learn from the Scriptures Itself how
to read the Scriptures. Some of us us<» it as a
heathen doe;- his fetish or amulet — a wicked use
of the book.
MAY RECOGXIZE PAXAMA.
lie public and Colombia Likely to
Agree, Says Mr. Barrett.
[Prom Th-> Tribune Bureau.)
Washington, Sept. 30. — Propects for a settle
ment of the difficulties between Panama and
Colombia and the making of treaties between
those two republics and between Colombia and
the United States are excellent, according to
John Barrett, American Minister to Colombia,
who arrived in Washington to-day with Secre
tary Root from Cartagena.
Mr. Barrett is here to assist in the negotiation
of th- treaties, and will take part in conferences
to be held at the Statu Department on the ar
rival of Senor Cortes, the new minister fro,
Colombia to '.he United States, who will reach
here In a few days. it i a believed that tho
establishment of friendly relations between
Colombia and Panama will be one of the he
c-omplishmenta to which Secretary Roofs irin
contributed largely. •> "' ' s t!l;)
There has been no treaty of amity and com
merce between this country and Colombia slr^o
the treaty of Ne« Granada of 1846 w«h dr '
nounced. Should Colombia and Panama onl
elude :i treaty . th« agreement will be a formal
recognition ol Panama as an Independent re
public on the part <>f Colombia. Steps have al
ready been taken which lead t,, the belief thut
'.ho negotiation* conducted h«ro will b. suc
ce&sful
NEW- YORK DAILY TRIBUNE, MONDAY. OCTOBER 1. 1906.
Anti-Septic
Creme
THE ORIGINAL TOOTH PASTE.
Used by the Elite of
the World Since ISSO.
Dr. Sheffield's
Tooth Powder. Pnt
up ■'".»<■ nle nl l y
fur Tourist*.
SOLD EVERYWHERE.
ROGERS OPENS BARREL?
Humors of Millions to Back Colgate
Committee.
H. H. Rogers and some of his a. c ?oriates on the
Mutual Life's board of trustees, according to a re
port last night have contributed $3,000,000 to assist
the Colgate committee in its campaign for the elec
tion of the administration ticket. A prominent
committeeman, according to the same report, Is
to receive $50,000 for his services from to-day until
December 18.
Biscoe Hindman, the company's Kentucky man
ager, will call on President Peabody to-day, and,
it is understood, will refuse to ekctioneer for the
administration ticket, and probably to receive no
tice of dismissal, either to-day or to-morrow. Mr.
Hindman is a candidate on the third ticket.
Mr. Hlndman went to Monmouth Bi-ach yester
day, where, It is said, he conferred with Thomas
11. Howie. 1 ., who organised the Mutual Life Policy
holders' Association, now fused with 1 1 1 — interna
tional committee, and who has denied any share
in the organization of the third ticket.
Should Mr. HinJiimn be dismissed it is believed
that ills brother, Thomas C, the company's man
ager for Central and Eastern Tennessee, also will
leave the company's service.
The Hindmans have been with the company for
nearly two decades, Biscoe, it is said, being part
ly responsible for George T. Dexter' s appointment
as superintendent of agencies, recommending Mr.
Dexter' a appointment to ex-President McCurdy.
Manager Hopkins, of Boston, and Manager Che
ney, of New Hampshire, have apparently not yet
declared themselves definitely for or against the
administration.
The "united c< mmittees' " sub-committee of
twelve, composed of four candidates and four com
rnitteemen from each of two organizations, will
hold their tlrst meeting to-morrow. It is under-
Hlood that ex-Judge Parker. General Benjamin P.
Tracy and Charles Emory Smith will be three of
the four international commltt*emen represented.
The Mutual Life's agency committee also will
meet to-morrow, when the announcement of fur
ther dismissals of managers is looked for. Samuel
Untermyer, the international committee's counsel,
is not expected home from Europe until October 23,
or possibly November 1.
NEW YORKER MAY HAVE CONTROL.
[By Telegraph to T!>p Tribune.]
Richmond. Ind., Sept. 30.— There is a well denned
rumor in Indiana financial circles that Daniel G.
Reid, of New York, formerly of Richmond, has
obtained control of the Indianapolis Fire Insurance
Company. The stock has Increased in value within
the last few days.
W. G. NEWMAN'S DAUGHTER DEAD.
Capitalist Hurried to Virginia To Be with
Her — Mother Married Coachman.
[By Telegraph to The Trlbun».l
Richmond, Vn., Sept 30.— Marion Elizabeth New
man, daughter of Walter George Newman, a New
York capitalist, died at her home In this city yes
terday, after a brief illness. The girl had visited
her father in the North during the summer, and
had Just returned here when she was tuk^n ill.
MiftH Newman lived with her mother, Mrs. Mc
i.'omb, who pome years ago obtained a divorce from
Mr. Newman, afterward marrying Mc«"omb. who
was bead coachman on the Virginia <state of h*n
first husband. Mr. Newman, upon learning of his
daughter's illness, hurried to Virginia on a special
train.
Walter Georpe Newmnn started life as a stable
boy. He became a clerk with Flower & Co., where
he was v. special favorite of the late Governor
Flower, and his rise was rapid. His first wife ob
tained a divorce from him in Brooklyn in 1902. He
made nn defence to her suit. Later In that year,
however, he brought suit to obtain the custody of
his daughter from her mother, charging that she
was ill treated, but was unsuccessful.
His divorced wife married John McComb,, MY-
Newman's former coachman. In the name year
Mr Newman married Miss Katherlne Murray Moon.
of Lynchburg, Va. He is president and director of
the Gold Hill Copper Company and lives at the
Holland House.
"IF CHRIST CAME TO NEW YORK."
Dr. C. E. Locke Speaks of Glaring Evils in
Large Cities.
The Rev. Dr. Charles E. Locke, speaking at the
Hanson Place Methodist Church, Brooklyn, yester
day, on the subject. "If Chriat Should Come to
Greater New York," said, In part:
We are rapidly coming to be a nation of cities.
The ;:r. at problems and possibilities of our nation.
therefore, art to a lui'Ke extent connected with the
Cities. Instead of living In the quiet retreats ut
Bethany or of Nazareth, Jesus ("hri.it preferred to
t<> dwell in Capernaum, the largest city In Northern !
Syria. From the beginning ol his ministry v'hilst
grappled with the serious problems of the crowded
centres In truth, there is no such fruitful field for
the Gospel of Jesus :is in tlit- crowded thorough
fares and throbbing centres of city life. There are
the people, wtih their conflicts, their griefs, their
successes, their temptations, their joys; and tiiere
Is evil in ail Its Iniquitous and insidious forms.
If i hrii-t were to come in person to this city as
i:» went to Jerusalem, He would first cleanse the
temples; H<- would summarily drive out all thoso
who desecrate the courts of the lu>rd's houst-.
Those who hnve sought to transform the church
Into a social club, or literary circle, or commercial
enterprise, or mutual admiration society, would be
driven out.
if Christ should come to New York, how severely
would He rebuke all forms of vice, g-anivlin^ nn<J
profanity and prizefighting, impurity and drunken- (
neae and profligacy! If I'hrtst were : <> come to !
New Y->ik lie would seek th* needy -the needy
poor, and u\:>- them bread: the needy rich, and!
yiv-' them counsel, as He went Into the tio':s.. of I
eus, the needy doubter; the needy sad hearts,
and sympathize with them, as He went :it the tomb
of Lazaru
And. hear me! I f ' Jesus came to this city, H>
would seek for the fallen ni^n and women -those
upon whom socletj hurls its missiles of ostracism,
men and women who might be won by protection !
:'. p.d affection back to positions of virtue and re- i
Bpect.
I?ut will ("hrlst come to grrater New York? Yes!
and C'hrlst has come! Wherever there Is a life
given to loving Bervice for Christ, there Christ !uis
come, and Is working through that humble life to
the extent of the faith and talents of that conse
crated heart.
HIGH OFFICE NOT FOR SEEKERS.
Pith of President Hadley's Address to Stu
dents at Yale.
[Ny Telegraph to The Tribune..]
New Haven, Sept. 30. President Hadley, ad
dressing the classes in Battell Chapel, the first
Sunday of the college year, took for his text l uke
xvli. 20: "The kingdom of Qod cometh not with
observation." lit- said in iiart:
During the early years of the Civil War there
were on the Northern side a number of generals
whose Interest in the struggle was ohletly profes
sional. They had been trained to lead theii coun
try's armfes, and they intended to lead theni with
skill and fidelity, J.ut in the vital issues over whii
North and South were fighting they had no special
concern, and their eyes were on the reports which
would record t';<-ir deeds and the army lists in
which they would receive promotion, ru'tlier than
the deep issues of the «trufrj;le.
One after another of th»-se many dropped out
gave place to others whose military skill wan less
but who were In the war to fight, not merely to get
the . redlt of fighting. It has become v proverb that
no man ever became Presldeni who had madi>
this the goal of his political effort Henry CHv
in the first half of the nineteenth century ari»i
James Q Blalne, In the last half, both made 'great
name* t r themselves, Thej butll up Urn fol
lowlngs of devoted adherents The\ span no
pains to 'lo whatever might honorably be done to
further their political a< vancement, but when t!"
time came for nomination or election the votes
went to men of Inferior hrllllancv or abilttv who
stood'for some purpose or some principle men who
had not been piling up <-r.-!if t,. their own ac
count, bul who had pui what they <ii,i into th«
general account i f the country hs a whole.
SUMMONS FOR NEW YORKER IN FRANCE.
Paris, Sept. 80— Albert Grey, of New v.,ik. whila
Hiitomobllinß n^.ir Montmorency to-day, ran over
and seriously Injured an Italian boy. who was taken
to a hospital In a desperate condition. A summnnJ
baa been issued toi Mr. <3r*y. Ml
James McCreery & Go,
Sale Of
Oriental Bug's*
Fourth Floor.
Two hundred flue Bagdad Moimi! Rugs.
31.00 each
Value 60.00.
Twenty-third Street.
MONEY RELIEF PLANS.
OPISTOXS FROM ABROAD.
European Financiers Tell of Spe
cially Taxed Bank Xote Issues.
The tightness of the money market may possibly
S be relieved in the future by allowing the banks
! to issue notes in times of pressure under a special
i. tax. without first having to Increase their reserves
! or set aside any particular part of their assets
i to ruarantee payment. At least, this is the «ell-
I nigh universal adv.ee received by the special corn
i mittee of the Chamber of Commerce on currency
1 reform from European bankers. Letters were «n
during the summer to ihe governor* of the Imperial
Bank of Germany, the Bank of France, and the
Auatro-Hunßartan Bank, asking then to adrta.
j the committee on the operation of their stems
The te ba*rof Germany and of Austria-Hungary
I are legally bound to keep their reserves above a
I certain percentage of their loans, as are the na-
I tional banks in this country. When, however, a
! money stringency occurs, they are al ow*d hy
their respective governments to! Ny«jJ-r«J.
i Issues, provided they pay a 'ax of 5 per cent on
1 every loan made beyond the legal limit.
To make clear to these bankers the situation in
' this country which needs remedying a member -of
| h e committee went to Europe last sumn *er anj
, conferred with them on the subject inters in
i favor of an emergency issue under a special tax
have been received from all of them.
The benefits of such an emergency ..sue *r* **
forth by Dr. Koch, the governor of the Imperial
Bank of Germany, as follows:
■■I
"K.Tin.tance. the tank retained its official Ms
amount was exceeded thirteen times
" I, ■' o "ri™'» ..' not.. 1... b«- n nrj ■*»•£
fmcoverednofe issue. It has been made yosslWe for
r-i^einer its circulation accordingly, and even in
of the penalty incurred through the government
tax baa been avoided.
The advantages of the taxed circulation are em
phasized also by Dr. Arthur Salomonsohn. one of
the managers of the Disconto GeseQscbaft He
says:
Both the total note circulation and the uncovered
portion of it are lowest during the first months or
the year, in which the requirements ~>f business ;\r*
comparatively small. They are both at their high
est during the last quarter of the year, which
period !s usually characterized by a strong demand
for money Both classes of circulation show quite
sudden increase at the end of each month and espe
cially at the end of the quarter year, when the
settlements call for large payments.
For instance, the movement of the total circula
tion during the year 19<i5 was between U87.854.000
marks (s2M.oOft.nolvi. on February 23. and 1j1H.M6.000
marks (1408,000.000) on September 3f>. Th<* difference
between these two points, as you will see. was 515,
792 fWO marks ($122,000,000). Almost regularly at the
turn of the quarter th^ Relchsbank tlnds It neces
sary to issue notes that are subject 'o the tax. This
period of overissue, however. Is of short duration,
for the return flow of money very soon so Increases
the cash reserve that the tax ceases.
The advantages of practically unlimited right of
note Issue by the Hank of France are set forth by
the Governor, M. Pallain, in the following para
graph:
The limitation of the right of Issue by the opera
tion of restrictive clauses might provoke an abnor
mal rise In the rate of discount: that is, a rise not
justified by the commercial situation. If, In effect,
the circulation was on the point of attaining Its
legal maximum, and new demands appeared, the
bank would no longer be able to meet them except
by means of Its metallic resources, and even this
means might fail If the figure of the reserve en
tered as a coefficient Into the determination of the
limit of Issue. But, outside •<{ this consideration
even, the necessity of maintaining its reserves
would constrain !t to rai.=»> the rate of discount
with a View of diverting a part of the demand. The
conditions of credit would thus be rendered more
rigorous by the intervention of restrictive legisla
tion.
The povernor of the Aiistro-Hunjrarlan Bank.
Dr. yon Billnski. ]">irits out how often the privi
lege of Issuing; notes under the special tax of 5 per
cent has been availed of. and how It has benefited
Austro-Hungarian commerce, as follows:
During a period of eighteen years, 1888-1906, or fctH
working weeks, the excessive circulation ov-r and
above that permitted by law. free of duty, occurred
fifty-five times, and the amounts vary from 4.V£t
krr.ne:is to 89,800.080 kroncna (J17.60ft.000), and tike
amount of duties paid to th»i government ranged
from 47.560 kronena to 93.591 a week, or embraced
a total payment to the government of 1.25 M.830
kronens. I would furtiier point out two notable
periods; that is, of these flfty-tive periods where
ihe not.- Issue vrai exceeded, twenty-three occurred
In tin month of October, which. In this country.
Is the harvest tin. nth. and thus called forth addi
tional activity, both in trade and commerce, and
further, that the system of note taxation exerted
r. •■> decided Influence upon th«- discount policy of the
V.;mk, inasmuch an the council of administration,
ufter careful consideration of v.U circumstances,
had occasion to raise discount rates repeatedly
during times when the limitation of its r\"U- Issue
had not been reached, and also on several occa
sions When Itfl limitations were reached maintained
a discount r;ite lower than the legal 5 per cent rate.
Thus th«- cost of the tax was not borne by Its
olk-nts but by the bank Itself.
IT ALIAX S MOB OFFICERS.
Stone and Imprison Constables lifter
Co n n try ma n 's j i mrj t .
[fiy Telegraph to The Tribune.]
Somervllle, Sepi 30. Two hundred enraged Ital
ians mobbed John R. Stevens and Janes Wood,
two county constables, and held them prisoners
In an old house at Schomp's Mills, ten miles from
here, for several hours to-day. Hoth constables
w-r<' badly Injured by stones and >-lui>s thrown
by the mob. A riot call was sent in from Pea
pack late tl-.ls aftenu ilo the Sheriff** otnee here.
telling of the danger of the twe imprisoned con-
Btables, .nu\ Deputy Bherlfl Anderson, with three
policemen, start -d in Senator Joseph S. Frellng
huysen's automobile for the scene of trouble As
the tfnctala neared the old house they were met
by Stevens and Wood, who had Just been res
cued from the mob by a posse of farmers, after
ii stiff light.
SUES TO RECOVER SON'S BODY.
[Dv Telegraph to The Tribune. 1
Cincinnati. H«-pt. 30. -Although yesterday after
noon was the time set for the funeral of Harry
Hoffman, who died Thursday at the City Hospital.
his body lay In the mortuary chapel of Gunter
Brothers, undertakers, to-day. Late in the after- .
noon a replevin Bult wbs filed in a local matfls- |
trate's court by the deceased man's father to re- j
cover the body, described as "one corpse, valued at i
t:o."
The, difflcultv has arisen over th* question of the |
funeral Mil. QuntCT Brothers refused to allow the
removal of the body, and the suit followed.
MARINE INTELLIGENCE.
MINIATVRE ALMANAC.
Sunrlae r, V. | Sunset 6:4B|Moon SttS 4:48! Moon 'ii ag.. |i
HIGH WATER.
A.M.- randy Hook «■»« «Joy I»lam1 ti;m Hall o*t« 8:01
I\M.— Sandy Hook ti:soiUov. I»lai d I:22jHeH Qau w.ia
Amusements.
NEW AMSTERDAM a^, 8t
TO-NIGHT, 8:15 T&^-.xT
I «EI). -MAT.. BEST SEATS. $1.50. "i
NIXON & "ZIMMKRMAX announce
First Amerloah Appearaacwi of
MX. 11. B. MISS IJOHOTIIEA
IRVINQ=BAIRD
ap.fl LONDON CO. in Stephen FhiHlps's
PAOLO ano FRANCEbCA
(Arrani?(»n^nt with Mr. Oeo. Alexander.)
UD^RTY THEATRE. *2<i st . n<>ar Broadway.
D«.n I I Kv'gs. >■!•"•■ Mat. Saturday. 2:15.
S N " WED. NIGHT *£?Zt»
ELEANOR
ROBSON
(LIERLER & CO NfanHgor^)
in the New 4-Act Comedy by 1.-r..-! Zangwlll
"NURSE MARJORIE."
MEW VftD!/ Th rr< B'Tvay. 4B«kj et. Kvs. «15
rSCfV iy>r)!\ Mats Wed & t=at. LAST WEEK.
Trirps 35. .10. 75r. and S!. No Higher
MRS. WKiUS.y/*; CABBAGE PATCH
NEXT MONDAY, Seat Pale Thursday
BLANCHE RING "SSuSP?
CnCial WORLD IN WAX. SI'ECIAI. GROCP9.
CUCrI CINEMATOGKAriI Every Hour.
MI>KE REALISTIC FIGURE \VM J. BKYAV
Public Xotices.
NOTIGE TO TAXPAYERS.
Department of F!r«nce. T
Bareaa for the Poll^rtlon of Ttxas. j
No. X Chaaiirrs srre«t. I
Borovjh of Mjthi'.tn, I
N»w Xi k, ScpUmber t4th. 13ft. I
KOTTCE IS HKSKBT GIVEN that th* Aatttt.
■lent roila of R«al Eat»te and Per»on«! Proparty
to The Oitj of New Tork tor the year l»0«. and th»
*airan'.i tor th» o»Wwtlaw of tuts. h»Y» been
<!e!'v«re4 to the uod-rsl.t"ed. aaj that all the tax**
oa said as*e*kcc«::-. roi:« are due oad payable Oil
Monday. October 1. IJS«. a: the mttict of the Re
celrer cf Taxes tn the borough in icbtcn the prop
erty la ioe&tad. as foiionra:
Borough cf Uaohafan. No. E7 Chambers itr*et.
Manhattan. N. T. ;
Boroa«h of Th« Bronx. corair Third and Tresioat
avar.uts. The Bronx. N. T. .
B.^rou«li of Brc«i-!ya Ry,ii I 4. t ud I Maato.
lp<U aui;<!rg . Brooklyn. .V. V. ;
Beroogh of Qneeaa. sorter Jackson a»eone ao4
Fifth a«re«t, Long I«Uuxl City. N. T. ;
I>rough sf KKhmood Borough Halt. St. C«rj«.
S:aten Idasd. N. V
Id msa of pmjtr.ant dnrhig Octtber tha peraoo
■o p»»iug 3ha!l b-> eatU'.ed to the be=«!i:» raea
tlOEUd In atrciloa tlo of th« Gn&tsr New Yor<x
Charter (rh*pte» 573, Lava cr MaTD. vlx. : A dedec
tloa of iotcreii at the rate of ( per eeat. per
aniuai between tbe day ef ■•eb pajaiant and the
Ist d»7 at Ceeetnbar a«xt
' ALL Bn,LB PA.ID DURING OCTOBBR MUST
BE RITBATED BETOnE CHECKS ARE DRAWN
FOR PAYMENT.
When ebeeiri are maiisil ta the Receiver of Taxes
they MUST BE ACCOinfAI.'IBD BY ADDKS33QD
BNVELOPSS WITH rOSTAOT. PREPAID In oroer
to ln«ure return ot rw»lp»4 bills b? mall.
Checks dated October Ist ahouid be mallad ta to*
Receiver aa toon as possible after bills have beem
received by tbe taxpayer.
Draw checks only to the order
of the Receiver of Taxes.
DAVID E. AUSTEN.
KeoolTer «f Tajcaa.
Proposals.
SEALED PROPOSALS WILL BE RECEIVED AT THE
*■ office 'f the Llgrht-Hous» Engineer. TompklnsvlUe.
N. V.. until 1 o'clock P. M . Oct. 29. IPW. and then
or.»ne.i. for furnishirg and delivering the metal work for
the Port San Juan Llght-Hous*. San Juan. Porto Rico.
either at Pan Juan, or at N-w York. N. V.. In accordance
with »peclftcatlon», copies of which, with blank pro
posals' anl other Information, may be had upon applica
tion to Major Chas. L. Potter. V. S. A.. Light-House
Engineer.
y S. ENGINEER OFFICE. 22ND AND X STS.. N.
L • W.. Washington. D. c\, Sept. 27. 1906. — Sealed
proposals for constructing government pier. Jamestown
Exposition, Hampton RoaOS, Va.. will be received here
until 12 M. Oct 22, 1906. and then publicly opened.
Information on application. Blue prints may be seen
here, at U. S. Enpln.er Offices at New Tork, Philadel
phia, Chicago. Buffalo. St. Louis and Boston, and at
office of Board of Design. Jamestown Exposition Co.
Norfolk. Va. E. J. DENT, Lieut.. Engrs.
INCOMING STEAMERS.
TO-DAY.
Vessel. From. , Une.
•Zeeland Antwerp. September 22 Red Star
•Potsdam K.'tt.'r.lani. September 22 . . .Holl
•Unit-.1 Statea ChrUtlansand. September 22. .5ea-Am
Vlgilanola Santalago, September -4 Ward
Panama O.">lon. September 29 Panama
Mesaba London. wptcmbor 23. . . . . Atlan-Tran
Proteus X«w Orl«ar.». September 23 So Pac
El Rio Galveston. September 26... So Pua
City of Atlanta Savannah. September 23 Savannah
TUISDAT. OCTOBER 2.
•Kaiser TV. der G Ur.-n.en. September 28... V O Uoyd
Urfmen Southampton. Sept. 23.. ..N O LloyU
Algeria Almrlu. September IS. . Anchor
Oironla Liverpool. September 23 Cunard
WEDNESDAY. OCTOBER 3.
•Oceanic Liverpool. September 26. .White Ms>
•Maraval Pt>rt Spain, September 28 Trln'did
•Trinidad St. Thomas, September 28. . Quebwo
Lumpasas Galveston, September 29 Mailory
•Brings m.ill.
OUTGOING STEAMERS.
TUESDAY. OCTOBER 2.
Vessel. Frr. 1.1r.e. Mallclcwa. sail?
Kronprlnz Vllhelm. Bremen. NG LJoyd 2:30 am 00am
Etona. Argentina. Norton 9:t»a m 11-30 d m
Apacho. Jacksonville. Clyde _ — S (X> d m
Monro". Norfolk. Old IV.mlnion 3 : oop m
City of Macon. Savannah. Savannah.. 3:oopm
WEDNESDAY. OCTOBER 3.
Majestic. Liverpool. Whit« Star B:3Oatn 1000 am
Maracas, Grenada. Trinidad 10:00 am 120Om
Valdlvla. Haytl. Hamb-Ara 11:00 am 2:00 p m
Hynuam. Rotterdam, Holland-Am. . 6-OOair
N r '. America, Naples. La VeJoc*.... _!
Sofia HuhenberK, Naples. Austrian ....
Germanla, Naples, Fabre — — ___
Prlncoss Anne. Norfolk Old Dominion.. .. 3'OOnm
Proteus, New Orleans. So Pacific 12:00 m
Nueocs. Galveston, Mallory 3:0 Op m
SHIPPING NEWS.
Port of New York, Sunday, Sept. 30, 1906.
AJUUVCD.
Bteamer BlUcher (O*r>. Reestac, Ilambursj September
SO. Southampton -'I and < herbouri 2U. to th* Hamburg-
Amertcan Llae, with 4."v cabin an.! 1.2V«3 steerage pas
tsenKors, malls and nidie. Arrived at the liar at 6:36
v m.
Steamei Raa Bera (Br) Morrht, Hamburg September
13. In ballast, to Shewan Tome & Co. Arrived at the
liur at 3 p in.
Steamer Columbia <BrV Wadsworth. Gla««ro-.v and Mo
vtlle September 22. to Mt-rderson Broa, with 538 cabin and
610 sterrage pa»Btnge-i end mdae. Arrived ar the Bar
at 5 a m.
Bteamer Toronto (Jn-\ Young. Hull Bept»uib»» n via
Boston SB>, to s.i-:.:- X Son. with m.lse. Arrived at
the liar nt 10:80 v m.
Bteammr Prtau Eltel Frledrlcta <Ger>. Yon Leltner
Colon Septembei 22 an.l Kingston 23. to the Hambura^
American Lino, with ■»•» rabtn i«ssenger!i. matla and
mdse. Arrived at the Tv lr at 1p m.
Steamer VtKllancia. Kn'.ght Santiago September 2-4 and
Nassau 2T. to Jamea E Ward * Co. ■rtth 3T paasennTra:
mails and mds« Arrived at the Bar at tt:«S ■m. Sat
urday.
Bteamer Trautenfela |<ler>. Crorau. Calcutta Au u«t m
Colombo 1». Port Said t-Vitemher 3. Algiers 11 and Boston
Bur at ' n °m "*' °" W ' th mii * r - Arrlv *<l at the
Bai .it 3 p m
Bteamer El Knr. B-ims N>w Or loans teaahai -4 a*
the Southern Pacific i'oni;any, with md*. Left Quar'an
. Steamer Jefreraon. EJ 01 * tivwppti New, an.i Norfolk,
to the Old Dominion Ba Co. with mmnn and mdse.
i.»>rr QoaranttaM at 2 p rr. •■■«»».
Ssn.'.y Hook. N .1. Sept 30. 9:30 p m-Wlnd north
aortheaat; Mrona breaie; cloud] "«nu
THE MOVEMENTS OF STEAMERS.
FOItriON PORTS.
Llverroo! S*pt 20—Arrtvrd. Hiiwiii Etrurta <Br>. Pot
jKwsSTmJSV* «*———»; •••* isala. Br >-
Queenstown Bept 30. f.-r.O a m— 5.11.-.1. steamer Cam
»■"■ ' ,Hr> Warr. (rum Liverpool for New York
Dovar Sept Bft— Sailed, »ttamei Kroonlan.t. IX>xruil frcm
t'\"YIK ,f, f " r Ntw York: 3lHh - P»»»»J. »fVam«r
hrie.iiiu .vi <;,,,-.. ,-,... Ble«k«r. llrem«n t<.<. N« w
Jfovllle. Sert :»— \rrl- itMIM CSjMaSMS (Br> Baxter
•New York tor aiaator (and rroce«Je.l>: 30th sailed"
' mm I'urn-saia ' f ' r> Ulalkle. from tSUu*;ow for
Boathampton. Bvpt 30—Atrlved. .teamer New York r,.k_
•tt«. .N«» yy O rk vU l.im.mth and "Chwbouig. '
Amusements.
BROADWAY SSSS?
f _J!!^C^V^L^W RWR WJ i^ S
■n>d. jiar. m^ m I 1 sr 1 — ~- — i
THE §g
If Hi« a PUy as Ben If ,r -•i^"^
PRI M C E
"A Worthy Hurrr«<mr to Rn II r
I N D ft
n.-irnt dJ. I. o Car*. Mus. Prof Hnr P»ih,
5 Acts „ William Farnum. Kmm»tt fVr-VT"
■II Scenes |i S^S: ™ig
600 People H Xc% a man 7 ° th^ r "'" k *^
uALY'S -^
MARIE CAHILL --^S^5-
NEXT MONOAV. Seat Sale Thursday
RICHARD CAKLL iS^ 0
EMPIRE WSS-ZSttFite S r
JOHNjbREW „- I
KNICKERBOCKER THEATRE. ITway an^ 3V h^
Evening S : 15. Mat* WM. anrt Bat 215 t>
•■Best Musical Play Ever on Broadway'
MONTGOMERY & STONEML.
CRITERION SS'fSf-^Ts^tl
hattik U'llma.m.s 8 ITTI C ftUmiin
intheMus!calPia S . LITTLE CHERUB
. JAMES BLAKELET. TOM WI3 and TO OtherT
HUDSON ™«T?" ! M,v:v:, : Mrai
THE HYPOCRITES
SAVOY THEATRE. 34th St and F war
vJrtTVJI Evgs. X:3O. Mat. Saturday 22<X **5
Last Week at ROSE STAHL ™E fHORQ 1
this theatre. nUOt ClilnL LADY f
Next wawil Lillian Russell In "Barbara * Mtllloui- '
IYr^UU 45th St. and Bcoartwav. Ev«s. | : tc.
LiUCUm Mats. Thurs and Sar at 2:15.
THE LION %& MOUSE
v BEGINNING OCT. 7 and 8,
BURTON HOLMES ' v^
( olurt-a View* and Mottoa Ptrtore*. '
5 Sanduy Evm. at li:30. 3 Moodiaj .Matinee- at 9.
•CAIRO," 'THE NILE." "At HENS \-<.-> NEW
OLYMPIC OAME3.- "NAPLES and XEARBT"
"VESTVIUa an.l the ERUPTION OF 130f
»nr» Ticket*. «S and $4. Ort. 1 to 3.
Single Ticket*. «1 and 75<?.. Oct. 5.
nAnnifilf Tn&WRE - 3=>h St.. near Broa*»a . ;
IMnniUrX Last 6 Ntßhts. Eves. S:jo. Mat Sat. !14 >
7* m, H. GBANE -the price of money* I
\-xt Week— KasE STAHL— Th^ Chorus lidy. " „
j AaTUK T&&i<k&p | 'gsssx
j ASTOR "AJrcariAxrsa
(MANHATTAN "'il,,"^^^
•• GRA« E »,EOR4.E !n CLOTHIS.
WEST END Mat » T °-»AY & Wed. 15 A Ma.
" ti3l >IH.LIO.NAUUES KKTUcbm
HAfKFTT THEATRE, ttjt iTatsiThupi
nALftLII 1 HACKETT "« »^«
JAMBS ■ ««VI*ILI 1 of JIJUCHa
Next Mon. — BmUs ready Alß. HOPKIN3O>f.
BIJOU B" ay&3oth«t. Mat Sat. 2M. Ev*. 9:J\
»t -. FIRST TIME TO-MGHT.
NAT. C. GOODWIN \ By and a l*
__ In THE (iENH>. ) Cecil rSf MIH»> t
\( VI»E>TY OF MCSIC. ,, 4 th S t & Irrtnc Pi!
MEliaV, D A U Romantic Drama.
Prices k gtf^S —Si Wed * Sar .S. Ev- 1 J|,
BEUSCO T "V TRE B^ c V^ e9^ Sa M ?? n d *i«
ELANCHEJAT]rS«KvU
fIIFFOHROMF
1A M4#ffT itessa Ma&rmMa&sar sssl
Btxth Ay. 43d to 44th. T»l. B-yaat.
WcrldsMoat I SOCIETY GIfICUS Tsm
Gorgeous fl .Mil.fr 1 I I 1,1 MX Shews
Production. ft tiUUILII UlflllUO inOnV
Mghtn. 35c. to $L3O. DaUy Mat*., 23r. to »L
\ PRIMPECC OPEN 3 Era
\ I nil «W COO SALE OPENB TO-D\T
rnirvwCOO sale opens to-d\t
\ MARGARET HENRY I In THE GRIAT
x ANOLIX MIIXEB. 1 DIVIDE.
\ CASINO l^^^aTs'i^S:
\ MY LADY'S MAID
\ Lew Fields' Herald Sq.
\ All Star Go. in ABOUT TOWK 'isgg 1
\ MAJESTIC f e r^'%\ BESTSEITSJ
\ THE TOURISTS
nftl niUIAI IKarno'3 Com«dy Co.. "A XfeW
ULUrIIAL I in the Slums of London."
ÜB'war & «:d it. J The Fays. J. W. Ransoae. Ttzt
Mat--" Dally. 25c. I Quartet. Sheaa A Warren, oti I *.
I Aft I AUIAI >Karno~ . \ >tekt
nULUniAL ! in the Slum, of lon*a^
I a B'way 4 6:d »t. ! The Fa^s. J W. Raaaone. Tfest
W Mats Dally. 25a. ' Quarr-'.. 4 Wsarca, oth'a
sll II HDD k ! Kaln-Dear*. Meaetekel. W!!aoa'»
aLtiAmDnA IMonker. Jeaa'.e, i Borsani
" Mats. Daily 23c : Troupe, Ed F. Reynard, others.
CARNEGIE HALL, 32?; OCT. 8 *Ssr
LEONCAVALLO
AM) IA SCXL.\. OKCHI^TIti.
PrlC3s iI.OO. 41.50. I2.SA. Bux «eata. fialX.
U/AII A O If' C Broadway and 30th (treat.
IfALLAVIV OEv'ls. 8:2). Mats. Wed. and S*t
TO-NIGIIT AT 8:20. riKST TIME H£WB.
Thos. W. Ross ta< N^Sm?ar' 4 Poplaiitj
; i
A A BltCli THEATRE. ITta »t. 4 Madison a*
UAnliCn EVgs, » 13 Mats. We J. 4 Sat.. Ml
OPENS TO-MORROW NIGHT.
THE STOLEN STORY
UAMMERSTEIN'S --kSrirw
PI DIILV MATS. ! Arthur Frlnca. Josephine
I I 23c. and 50c. I tan. William* & Tuekar. otn s,
U/lOCD'C B"way.29th St. Eve S:ls. M»:jT'j«»**
WbOCn O -Wins Saccess."— Herald.
HILDA SPOIViG mc*«js3
- PURE FOOD SHOW
I ST. NICHOU\S FOOD SHOW I
ST. NICHOLAS Adm ' }
I lII.NK. series of coupons. »o>»l iwr 1
S «sth St. & Col ay package of i.tu«». isjf I
I Op»nln* To-ntght delicacies, dairy P~*f| I
■ 7:30. i etc. Roun Orchestra. I
MOTOR CA^S
Book your orders now for Gasolena T , our , ! °f ££2:
14-Pas» Pljtht-seelnit C^rs: 34-rass- DouOH-a*" —~
Onnlbui and Electr'.o Vehicles for th« - _
VANDERBILT CUP RACE,
*EW YORK TRANSPORTATION CO..
Bth Aye. & 49th St.. T>:. 2350 tVlumbua ■_
COUNTY FAIR"
OPENS TO-I>AY
AT MADISON SQ. «.AKI>EN
™.. v SHOWS l-> OSE. l^
;*<>('; rißrt-s— exhibits— racing. «* v _
Th* Turf.
Brighton
"Kace-s
BEGIN .'
TO-DAY (MONDAY)
WITH >l\ STAR \rrßAtTlO!«»\
XXCUTDINQ THE GREAT
$30,000 PRODUGE STAKES
(TWO RACES)
AND A mmmHA .
FIRST KACE AT 2:W V M.
Ml SIC n\ MIGRANTS BAND.
four.*. oan b« reacted from New \ork KoS J
lyn Bridge by Special Electrts TralM oa *>**£?£ c «*
•nd by ttml»h Street and f£r S* *i
J'arlor Tar tralra on Long Island K^ "-^ Jtrrr i*>« rf
"'■ 13 10 an.i I; .50 i> m. Also via 3Wh »-J£!2S^ w .rs
Whitehall $:.. bout* e*ery SB """'"^ *^ c«
»l*clal •toctrte train* direct to irarfc. JroiW '..."iiif
n«vt with Kaat *2i St.. K«»! 23«*. *»>»
Bt. CvrrtM.

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