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New-York tribune. [volume] (New York [N.Y.]) 1866-1924, November 18, 1906, Image 5

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Condensed Statement of
THE NORTHERN NATIONAL BANK OF NEW YORK
' AT BROADWAY AND FOURTH STREET ?l""
Close of business November 12, 1906
RESOURCES. LIABILITIES
,-.«— • :::::::{-:: t1.942.7M «3 < apltal *^«t.« t . O- —*•..
C . J». ■«■«. --^ n r-:::::: 2.50000 action T? 245.10**7
- K«Uon n,nd ■••■•■ 4...100 00
jamtlure * rixtnrw. •-• 4«:«J2 u pJ,". ....':::::::::::::::::::;::::;::; 227.000 00
l Z* fron. Bank, and Banker. 40..C9. B8 P«Po..t"^--. 5.018.158 80
r»»h «»» hand: ■
?— rfnl Lrral B«**rre «1.-». .» — — ■

SS.HS4.M4 96 ■
12,884.064 96
The lawful reserve on hand is 26 2-10 per cent., and, with the amount due from
banks and bankers, the available funds ire 41 2-10 per cent, of the $2,012, 158.59 due
depositors.
This BANK is adhering to the principles of A STRICTLY COMMERCIAL BANK
,ad invites interviews and correspondence from merchants and others desiring banking facilities
»nd accommodation.
HENRY A. BELDEN, Cashier HEN RY Dl President. PETER RADO. Asst Cashier
TRACTION FIGHT ENDS.
Sex Fork and Port Chester Road
Sold to Rival at Last.
A fierce traction fight was ended yesterday
Trtien the New York. W>«tc"hester & Boston
Kattroad Company, through Oaklelgh Thome,
president of the Day and Night Bank, and
others bought out Its rival, the New York &
Port Chester Railroad. It Is rumored that Au
gust Belmont had a hand in bringing about the
gettiement of the fight, which has been going
en for three years, as be expects that fhe new
rapid tr.-inpit system will become an important
feeder of the East Side branch of the subway.
It is paid that the merger Insures the speedy
ruction of a four track rapid transit line
between 177 th street, in The Bronx, nnd Mount
Vernon. New Rocheile, Port Chester, White
Plains and the other larger towns in Westchester
County. The W«-stchester road is capitalized for
130.000.000 In stock, and has $20,000,000 in
bonds. The Port Chester road is capitalized
'or only $2.VM"tOO, but It holds important fran
chises In New Rochelle and Pelham Manor.
The news that the two companies had been
merged caused a big Jump yesterday in the price
of the securities of both companies. R. E. Rob
inson, of the firm of Dick & Robinson, bankers.
of New York and Philadelphia, when inter
viewed regarding: the sale yesterday, gave out a
statement, saying:, In part:
We have passed over the control of the New
York. \\> t< hecter & Boston Railway Company
to Oakleigh Thome, president of the Trust Com
pany of America, and Marpden J. Perry, of
Providence, R. I. The same parties have also
secured control of the New York & Portchester
Railroad Company, which has been carrying on
a bitter fight against the Westchester company
for the last three years. Our firm will continue
as syndicate managers and will be properly rep
•"■■ ted in the management of the company.
The \\>=«r bister company has already spent a
million and a half dollars in construction work
in the Borough of Th« Bronx and In Mount Ver
non. Its roadbed is practically graded from
177 th street to the Mount Vernon line and many
of the steel bridges over the streets and high
ways are in their places. The extreme weight
of "these bridges has given color to the report
that the Pennsylvania Railroad Company may
run trains over the new line which is eventually
to he extended to Boston. The cars and equip
ment of the new road will be the same as those
of the subway and a speed of seventy miles an
tour will be possible for express trains.
CORNER ON CLEAN HANDS.
Soap Trust Planning to Make the Bath an
Expensive Luxury.
New 1? Is the soap trust that has come to riarrass
the soul and pinch the pocketbook of strupclinff
humanity. Daniel J. Sully, the former "Cotton
Kin?." who. by the way. has recently pone Into
ihe poap business himself, paid so yesterday. What
a horrible thought, that perhaps humanity may
have to cat down its supply of soap! People might
, ret tons without the product of the Beef Trust
end possibly get through the winter with a smaller
order of oor.l, hut what self-respecting man could
IcesiHy live without soap? . ...
To tie proverbial "hobo." however the new? will
bring gr^at Joy. Should the price of soap get so
high that iKing houses which now Insist on his
taking a bath before he occupies a bed would
lave to rescind this rule, th« "hobo" would pos-
Jtively <ian<?e with delight. „.„>,
But this cru'-l and heartless trust will lurnlsn
ro camp&lpn oratory to William Randolph Hearst,
lor it Is an Enßliph corporation. This trust. Mr.
Bully saya Increased the price of Its soap, so that
tradV was driven to the smaller manufacturers.
The trust then started in to corner the tallow
market, so as to force the smaller concerns to
depend on it for raw materiel. Having bought all
the tallow- it could find In England. Mr. Sully says.
tho trust "turned to the United States, and is now
baying Illy— yes. fiercely— over here. '
More than that, according- to Mr. Sully, the
Chicago houses -re are "rapidly eating up all the
tallow that comes into the market." The result
hftf" been, he declares, that "tallow has already ad
ranced from 04 cents in July to 7^ cents at the
present time, and you will see It selling: for 9
,c*i.is before January 1." .
& "You will find," said Mr. Sully, 1 "that Armour and
tvery other big apmaker is watching the market
irlth intense eagerness. Well posted men know that
none of the biz American manufacturers have any
■upply on hand, while the small manufacturers are
trtuaUy huptling around for their necessities day
by day."
Men who liv« in large hotel? will probably not be
effected by the increase in price of hoap. because.
Mr. Sully says, many American manufacturers
l.&ve contracts for several years ahead to supply
hotels and other larg« soap users at prices based
on the former pi es of tallow. It Is hard. on the
manufacturers, though, for Mr. Sully says: "The
«'»ian<-<;s are that many big: manufacturers will lose
In the coming year more money than they have
mp.io in the last rive "
Th^rj Mr. Sully sounds a warning. He says soaps
will probably he cheapened in quality, and declares
that • r«>papers ought to warn people to Insist on
procuring pure soap. Must it be that in the future
svi will have to carry around a soap testing ap
psrritus so as to make sure they are getting pure
foaji?
Incidentally. Mr. Bully says that the packing
house investigation is indirectly responsible for a
i:»Tcafc ii. the tallow product. 'Fewer cattle are
i*:iijc killed, ;iem-e less tallow is produced. And,
nga:t:. the Pure Food law and the Pure Drug law
r.:wo cnus^i manufacturers of these eommodltle.fi to
u«e pure tallow, where they formerly used' inferior
Fr'-r lS c.=. This also has. had its effect in hicreaslng;
»r.e pricfl of p'Jre tallow and ting a shadow over
We T-jturt- of soap users.
GOVERNOR-ELECT HUGHES TO SPEAK.
Oovernor-eiect Charles E. Hughes is announced
"■' the principal speaker at the annual banquet of
ths Ktnplre State Society. Sons or the American
Involution to be held at the Waldorf-Astoria, on
•rtll be ffovernor
8 A ■•■ rufl of C nnecticut Cornelius
. '•■■.■ presideni general of the Sons of tho
r»r .1. Herman RandaU and
i- Scott
HARD FIGHT FOR DETECTIVES.
After a desperate strußKle, Detective Sergeants
DURgan and Kir.sl~r. of the Central Office, arrest-
W alleged thief, who pave his name as
Mcrrls BleUchW. Bieiseber was arraigned yester
-a> :n the Essex Market court and held in J7 000
»at. the mnn C ot one hand fr*A and presoM 2 re
i"r'^rTwi"" Btf2s*X W *'" a M°™*n- PUllins tit;
Park&Tilford
FOUNDED I*4o
Offer the finest selection of
the best Imported Cigars
from individual factories, .
at lowest pri ces .
Cajjj or send for 'Price-list "
&x>**v 9> art Twenty-first, Street,
******** Forty-first. Strt.-*,
/HUi Avwmt v* Fifty-ninth Street,
™ .^v«iu>. *<*r Ninth Street,
<-okimbu S Ave.<2i, Seve*y -secoml St,
MR. SHAW ACCEDES.
Pittsburg Postoffice Site Held Up—
Mr. Burke Apologizes.
[By Tel«ar«.rh to Th« Tribune.]
Pittsburgh Nov. 17.— Becretary Shaw has ac
ceded to the pleadings of Pitteburg business
men, and will not locate th© proposed new post
office on the Perm avenue site which was of
fered by politicians, and upon which, it is al
leged, there is $300,000 graft.
This afternoon Secretary Bhaw sent a long tel
egram to Congressman James Francis Burke,
telling him that the site would not be selected.
at leant not until he had personally visited the
city and looked into conditions. Last night Con
gressman Burke sent Secretary Shaw the fol
lowing telegram:
Congress gave the people of Pittsburg $1,000,
000 for a site, and as their representative I shall
demand that they be given $1,000,000 worth of
property. They are entitled to more, and they
will take no less.
In his reply Secretary Shaw said to Congress
man Burke:
I <So not see the propriety of the language con
tained In your telegram of last night. You are
at liberty to withdraw it.
Mr. Burke wired the Secretary this evening
that he meant no offence.
TO WELCOME JAPANESE.
San Francisco Preparing to Receive
Visiting Squadron.
San Francisco. Nov. 17— <"ollector Stratton
has been directed to prepare for the reception of
a Japanese squadron which will come to this
port next spring. The visit will assume much
international importance, and every courtesy is
to be offered the officers and squadron. The
Japanese government has appropriated 500,000
yen for the cruise.
Vice-Admiral Kataoka, commander of the
third squadron off Port Arthur under Admiral
Togo, Is to be in command. The squadron is to
b* « omposed of a first class battleship and two
cruisers. It will arrive in March or April, after
making a brief stop at Honolulu.
STANDARD FEELS SAFE.
Directors Say Company's Position Is
Sound, Legally and Morally.
The directors of the Standard Oil Company
Issued a circular letter yesterday to its stock
holders, saying that the company's position is
unassailable from both a legal and a moral
standpoint. The directors declare themselves
confident that in the proceedings now instituted
the company's position will be successfully main
tained and vindicated. The circular follows:
Regarding the suit this day began in the
United States Court in St. Louis, In which It
Is sought in prevent the Standard Oil Company
(of New J<?rspy) from holding any stocks of
other companies, your directors are entirely
convinced that the company's position is unas
sailable from both a legal and n moral stand
point- We are confident that in the proceedings
which will follow, the company will successfully
maintain its position upon tho merits and vindi
cate it before the public and the law.
While your directors feel that there la no ade
quate reci»on for such a suit, either In the or
ganization or tho conduct of the business, yet
under the circumstances it Is perhaps better for
your interests and the business Interests of the
country that the. controversy should be removed
to the judicial atmosphere of the courts, in
whose Integrity and wisdom every citizen should
have the fullest confidence, where mere allega
tion must give way to legal proof.
The present organization was formed after
an exhaustive consideration of the legal and
business problems involved. It has existed un
challenged for many years. Everything relat
ing to it has been a matter of public report, and
at every step the utmost care has been ob
served to conduct the business honestly and
fairly, and in accordance with not only the
spirit but the technical requirements of the
law.
The legal organization of your company is of
essentially the name nature and character as
that of the othor Important industrial interests
of the country, and the continuous growth and
expansion of its business have been legitimate
and normal. It is not to be lightly assumed that
there is to b« a. reversal of the wheels of prog
rf-8.« or a destruction of the foundations of the
great industrial businesses of the country.
You may be assured that in this litigation, as
in all matters affecting the company, your di
rectors will see that the proper steps are tak?n
to protect your interests.
INDICTED STANDARD OIL MEN HERE.
Findlay, Ohio. Nov. 17.— Thomas H. McConle,
attorney for the Standard Oil Company, said
to-day that the Indicted officials of the com
pany, M. G. Vitas. H. P. Mclntosh and J. M.
Robertson, all of Cleveland, were in New York
City, attending a meeting of the company's di
rectors. He paid they would bo In Findlay on
Monday or Tuesday, to plead to th~ indict
ments charging violations of th« Valentine
anti-trust law.
LIABILITIES EXCEED ASSETS $500,000.
Boston, Nov. 17.— Schedules wore filed in tho
Bankruptcy- Court to-day by the Matthews Con
solidated Slate Company of Poultney, Vt., and
Boston, which was petitioned Into Involuntary
bankruptcy last June. The liabilities amount to
$£90.4.'S and the assets $79,424. The secured claims
total $0G6,600, and the unsecured $50.509. Of the as
seta 110,250 is in real estate In New York.
The principal quarry of the concern was at Poult
ney. Vt.. and it also owned the Red Basrle quarry
In Granville, N. V., and a farm of 166 acres In
Granvi)l<\ each valued at ?5/*io. The City Trust
Company, of this city, trustee under a mortgage
deed of trust, is the only secured creditor. The
trust company holds as 'security $36fc.fWO worth of
bonds, with coupons unpaid. 8*995 shares of the
Matthews Slate Company, the KaKle Quarry and
tho farm.
Balnbrldgo W. BunJick, of Albany, N. ST., holds a
claim for &2.103 for a Judgment against the com
pany.
CIRCULATION MANAGERS MEET.
"An Hour with Ourselves" was tho wording- or an
Invitation sf-nt out by Secretary John J. A. Fenton
that brought together yesterday afternoon, in Ger
nannt's rathskeller. No. 92 William .street, nearly
every circulation manager of every New York dally
paper. The luncheon was given by the member
ship and promotion committee of th« National As
'soclation of Managers of Newspaper .Circulation,
the chairman of which is Alfred Zimmerman, or
"The World." With him aro associated John A. J.
I'enton. of "in*) Press, and John v Kelly. It
was the first time that (in effort has been made, to
bring the New York manage™ together for purely
■octal reasons. The success of th« luncheon ex
ceeded tho hopes of those who arranged It.
Among those present were James McKWnan.
"The. world": John A. J. Kenton, "The Press";
Victor Ryebere. "The Morning Telegraph"; Alex
ander Thomson, "The Kvenlng Post"; Alfred Zim
merman, "The World": W. li. |Jryant. Thr- Trib
une: K. A. Elcock. "The Kveriing Post"; J. J.
Matthews. "The )'.]"oklyn Times": Victor Hitter
"Staats-Zettiißtf".: J. K. Kelly, of the ECelly Syndi
cate; '' Newman, "The Brooklyn V..t -'. -" ; i- S.
Rtscy, "The »u:irk News"; K. S. Stone, • Th<-
Lrool lyn Citizen,'.' and C. S. Stout, "The Plain-
Held Courier.".
NEW- YORK DAILY TRTBT T NE. SUXDAY. NOVEMBER 18. 1006.
Toys, Dolls, Games, Books.
We offer a large assortment of
suitable Christmas Gifts for
children. The stock now
contains many novelties that
cannot be duplicated later in
the season.
Dolls: — rag, celluloid, washable, jointed, undressed, dressed,
baby, stockinet, kid, speaking and Esquimaux.
Dolls' Hampers, Beds, Bassinets.
Swinging Horses, Mechanical Trains and Iron Toys.
Velocipedes and Tricycles.
Pianos, Music\Boxes, Metalophones.
Cycle Skates, Simplex Typewriters, Banks, Magic\Lanterns.
Rnhher and Kid Balls.
Bowling Alleys and Building Blocks.
Large Variety of Party and Other Games for Children.
A Full JAne of Juvenile Books,
comprising Toy Books, Painting Books, Rag Books, Puzzle Books,
Fiction and Children's Classics.
Trimmed Millinery.
ATTRACTIVE SHOWING OF RICHLY TRIMMED HATS, DESIGNED ESPE
CIALLY FOR THE HORSE SHOW AND EVENING WEAR. MODERATELY
PRICED.
LARGE SINGLE ROSES, WITH BUD AND FOLIAGE. VALUE t*l S.
$2.25 EACH, FOR i./D
BLACK OSTRICH TIPS. VALUE $1.75 EACH, FOR 1.35
Gloves.
Horse Show Specialties.
EXACTNESS OF FIT AND CORRECTNESS OF STYLE ARE THE
SPECIAL AND LEADING FEATURES OF OUR GLOVES. A
COMPLETE ASSORTMENT ALWAYS IN STOCK.
Women's Waists.
WAISTS OF GOOD QUALITY BLACK TAFt-ETA SILK, ENTIRE
FRONT AND BACK TUCKED AND TRIMMED WITH FRENCH
KNOTS, OPEN BACK OR FRONT, TUCKED SLEEVES. a » E
VALUE $3.50 EACH, FOR .' Z./t)
WAISTS OF BLACK TAFFETA SILK. THREE STYLES, TUCKED
FRONTS. WITH FRENCH FOLDS, FRENCH KNOTS OR HAND
EMBROIDERY; LONG OR THREE-QUARTER SLEEVES; PER
FECT SHAPES, ALL SIZES. A j-fV
VALUE $6.50 EACH, FOR 4.DU
WAISTS OF FANCY CHECKED CHIFFON TAFFETA, IN ALICE
BLUE, NAVY AND BLACK AND WHITE; TUCKED YOKE AND
ENTIRE FRONT OF WAIST HAND EMBROIDERED IN FANCY.
DESIGN. 0 -7 —
VALUE $10.50 EACH. FOR 0./ i)
WAISTS OF WHITE AND CREAM LACE, ENTIRE FRONT. BACK
AND SLEEVES HANDSOMELY TRIMMED WITH CLUNY LACE
AND MEDALLIONS, LINED WITH CHINA SILK; SHORT g- OQ
SLEEVES. VALUE $8.50 EACH. FOR t)."O
Fine Furs.
BLACK LYNX THROW . | a j-i-v
10 50 LARGE PILLOW MUFFS.. 1
SCARFS IV.OU ,
PERSIAN PAW SETS 14.75
NATURAL SQUIRREL
SET .... ... 12.75 PERSIAN LAMB SETS... 1 O.UU
MISSES' AND CHILDREN'S SETS IN ALL THE POPULAR FURS.
ALSO AN EXTENSIVE VARIETY OF THE FINER GRADE FURS, REP
RESENTING THE NEWEST STYLES THIS SEASON.
Feather Boas.
BLACK MARABOUT AND OSTRICH SETS, PILLOW MUFF AND | • AA
LONG SCARF; PER SET 1 tf. \J\J
BLACK AND BROWN MARABOUT SETS, PILLOW MUFF AND | Q j-/\
FLAT STOLE, 54 INCHES LONG; PER SET izfmOXJ
FANCY COQUE AND MARABOUT RUCHES, WITH VELVET A^JtZ
ENDS; UPWARD FROM *T*lO
ORDERS BY MAIL OR TELEPHONE FILLED AT ONCE.
Broadway, Eighth and Ninth Sis.
THE "ARNOLD" KMT NIGHT DRAWERS.
o*b • The weather now demands these garments to protect the sleep
y- -\ ing child from colds, croup and sickness. Prices, 50 cents in all sizes
y^C\ up* to six years, and 8 years at 75 cents: 10 years, $1.00.
sO AN THE "ARNOLD" 'Very Fine WHITE DOMET FLANNEL
I -^m NIGHT ROBES, lace trimmed. A sleeping luxury, so light and fine
jry JW as not to be too heavy for warm or overheated rooms. Price $145.
Mm fL jl^ Large sizes, 17 and 18 inch necks. $1 .60 each. A^ _ *^>
iH' \T 1 111 The "ARNOLD" Knit Bed or Slumber 7%^.-/^^"^
KM l4iL Slipper. Just the thing to put on when re- '^■■W^omJ
■IL^JmBB tiring with cold feet and poor circulation. joy}'-- 'M
flßsfPz? All colors. 25 cents. Children's, 15 cents. -'■ W'^a
The "Arnold" Knit Serviettes, $1.68 per dozen. (^T^-.-.-; > v \]?J
Knit Serviette Belts. 25 cents each. y<ii^!oy <ii^!o^ m^
The "Arnold" Nursery and Maternity Robes. Great variety of colors and pat
terns. Also good for the sick room. . Price $2.75 and $3-75
the "-AJRosroiLiiD " :b.a.Z-A..a_:r, 3
Phone 6835 Gramercy USTIEW YQEK. 48 West 22nd St.
MAERIN SAYS HE IS INNOCENT.
Storey Cotton Man Held in $25,000 Bail-
Goes to Philadelphia Willingly.
Buffalo. Nov. 17.— Francis E. Martin, who was
arrested here last night in connection with the
failure of the Storey Cotton Company, in Phila
delphia, was arraigned before United States
Commissioner Keating to-day. He said that al
though he was innocent ha had no objection to
being taken to Philadelphia Immediately, as ho
did not fear conviction. "This is a mountain
wade out of a molehill, with enough of a veneer
of truth in it to make it plausible." was his com
went on the chaise. He was held in $25,000 bail.
60-62 West 23d Street.
and will be taken to Philadelphia late to-night
or to-morrow.
The charge against Marrln is that of violating
Section 5.440 of th*» I'nlted States Revised Stat
ute* in conspiring with others to violate the pro
vision of the law apralnst ti3ing the United States
mails for fraudulent purposes.
District Attorney Clarke, of Kings County, is
trying to Induce the IVpai tmftit of Justice to bring
Frank C. Marrln. who was arrested in Buffalo on
Friday, to Brooklyn for trlai before he is taken
to Philadelphia. Twelve years ago Marrln. who
wi(^ once ■ lawyer in Brooklyn, It 1b alleged de
frauded Mrs. Caroline a widow, of JTO.OOO.
Mr. Harry 1b mill living lti Brooklyn, and though
now nn old woman. Is anxious to take the stand as
D witness fiKßin»t him.
BETA THETA PI DINNER.
The Bets Theta Pi fraternity will ho!d ■ dinner
at the v.,ii lorf on Tuesday, In honor of Uia older
members at Uie traternJl*.
1. Altaian $c (to.
FIFTH AVENUE,
THIRTY-FOURTH AND THIRTY-FIFTH STREETS. NEW YORK.
LACE DRAPERIES.
DECORATIVE LACES and UPHOLSTERY FABRICS
FOURTH FLOOR
FINE LACE DRAPERIES IN THE LATEST FRF.NCH AND SWISS
EFFECTS; ALSO LACE MATERIALS. LACE ARTICLES
AND UPHOLSTERY FABRICS. AS FOLLOWS i
LACES. Modern designs and reproductions of old laces, including
Vitellio. Filet. Cluny, Point Venise and Point Axabe, in edges,
insertions, motifs, etc. for the making of window draperies and wesf>
bule panels. Lace Articles for boudoir use. embracing bureau,
dressing table and chiffonier scarfs, tidies, etc.; together with tha
necessary laces for making these and other articles.
FABRICS. Artistic effects in materials suitable for wall and furniture
coverings, door and window hangings, and various purposes of interior
decoration, including Gobelin tapestries, damasks, plain and figured
moires, silk reps, French and Genoa velvets, silk brocades, etc
LACE DRAPERIES AND INTERIOR HANGING 3
DESIGNED TO ORDER
ORIENTAL RUGS
A NUMBER OF UNUSUALLY FINE CABISTAN AND SHIRVAN
RUGS HAVE RECENTLY BEEN RECEIVED. TO WHICH
ATTENTION 15 ESPECIALLY DIRECTED,
PRICES RANGING FROM $35.00 UPWARD j ALSO NEW IM
PORTATIONS OF KIRMANSHAH. GHEORAVAN AND OTHER
FINE PERSIAN RUGS. IN DESIRABLE SIZES AND COLORINGS.
AT ATTRACTIVE PRICES, (FOURTH FLOOR)
FUR EVENING WRAPS
WRAPS FOR EVENING AND CARRIAGE WEAR. MADE OF
CHOICE FURS. INCLUDING
Russian Sable, Broadtail, Chinchilla, Caracul and Ermine. Fur
lined Cloth Coats in pastel shades; also a selection of Muffs and
Neckpieces, m styles especially adapted for dress wear.
A variety of selected FUR SKINS, embracing rare specimen* of
Russian Sable and Real Black Fox, from which exclusive effecti
may be obtained in garments made to order.
FUR HATS
NEW MODELS FOR WINTER WEAR, MADE OF THE FASH
IONABLE FURS. INCLUDING STYLES SUITABLE FOR AFTER.
NOON AND EVENING WEAR ; ALSO HATS OF VARIOUS
DELICATE FABRICS. IN LIGHT COLOR EFFECTS.
ON MONDAY. NOVEMBER J9TH,
FUR HATS, IN ESPECIALLY PREPARED MODELS
REGULAR PRICES $40.00 TO $50.00. AT
(THIRD FLOOR) $30.00 EACH
WOMEN'S GOWNS.
S. Aitmatt 3c (la. will hold a sale of Women's Dresses,
Tailor Suits and Separate Skirts, in the department
for made-up Gowns, THIRD FLOOR.
On TUESDAY. November 20th,
Dresses of black and colored silk dair de lune, silk lined $35.00
Princejse Gowns of black and colored clair de lune, 3o.UU
Eton Suits with b!ou«e effect, made of black and colored
broadcloth 40.00
Coat Suits of black and colored broadcloth . . . 3 3.00
Skirts of black or brown broadcloth . ' 5.00 and I 8.00
COLORED DRESS FABRICS
ON MONDAY. NOVEMBER 19TH. SEVERAL THOUSAND
YARDS OF IMPORTED BROADCLOTH. IN BRO^X TAN,
GREY. NAVY BLUE AND GREEN. GARNET.
ETC.. OF A QUALITY USUALLY
SOLD FOR $1.75 PER YARD . AT $1.25 PER YARD
WOMEN'S CLOVES
Women's G'ovea in the prevailing styles and coloring*, for ttreot,
calling, op«ra and reception wear, made of glace and suede kid
«kin, reindeer, mocha and cape, including a complete selection oi
lined gloves. Angora, Vicuna and Worsted Gloves, for golfing,
sleighing, etc.
On TUESDAY, November 20th.
the "MARVEX" KID GLOVE, an exclusive importation, made
by Treiousse & Cie., Chaumont. France, in the following
styles and lengths, at Special Prices :
Three-clasp glace ....... $1.35
Mousquetaire, eight-button length, suede and glace • 1 .65
Mousquetaire, twelve-button length, suede . • • ZXaJ
Mousquetairr, sixtecn-buUon length, suede . . . Z. 50
fifth ii VcnUC, CWrtyfourih and CMrtv-flfiD Strettt. fttv YOTtl
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