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New-York tribune. [volume] (New York [N.Y.]) 1866-1924, December 05, 1906, Image 16

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14
THE ENGLISH CHURCH.
Car, There lie Self - Government
Without Disestablishment?
London. November 21.
Can thr English Church govern Itself without
•JNataMMMNOtT That Is the question raised
by the Royal Commission on discipline, and the
Prime Minister and the Archbishop of Canter
bury are making ;entatlve efforts to have a
solution worked out. The commission In a
unanimous report had convicted High. Low and
Brood clergymen of irregularities in the conduct
of pubiio worship and had shown that the ma
chinery for the maintenance of order and dis
cipline had broken down through the straining
of ancient rubrics. It recommended that letters
of business should be issued to the historic Con
vocations of Canterbury and York for the estab
lishment of a M Ornaments end ether rubrics
and the reconstruction of the ecclesiastical
courts, so that there could be Intelligible laws
for the government of the Church and efficient
tribunals f or enforcing them. The Prime Minis,
ter has Issued the letters; the Convocation of
the Southern Province has appointed an ad
vleoxt committee for assisting the Archbishop
cf Canterbury In making a formal rep In Feb
ruary to the summons from the state; and the
Convocation of the Northern Province without
doubt will take similar action. The ground is
now open for a practical demonstration of the
capacity or Incapacity of the Established Church.
with over fourteen thousand parishes in Eng
land and Wales, to adapt itself to existing condi
tions and to restore discipline by a new order of
■elf-g-ovemment.
The objection Is promptly raised by represent
atives cf every school of thought and practice
within the Church, as well as by Free Church
men ftr;<l agnostics outside, that the Convoca
tions are powerless, since they cannot effect any
change* or reforms without an act of Parlia
ment- It Is true that they cannot do anything
Independently of Parliamentary sanction, but it
floes not follow that they are powerless. When
the Church Is established as a state Institution
ecclesiastical law becomes necessarily a figment.
Scan law as there Is for governing It Is state
law authorized by act of Parliament, and th*
Judces empowered to interpret It are state offl
clala. Tha English Church Is a Parliamentary
church, with a Prayer Book compiled and re
vised by royal license, with Articles of Religion
proclaimed, by authority of the Crown, and with
rubric* «Jid public worship regulated by acts of
Paxl'a: le it The assent of Parliament to any
char-yea In the details of the Ornaments or other
rcmic* drawn up in the sixteenth and seven
teenth e»nturt»a, or to any reforms in th« consti
tution of th* dltdpllnary courts, is as necessary
cow c* It «rs« when the Prayer Book, the Ar
daw*i of Religion. th« Act of Uniformity and tho
T-übtl* Worship Act originally came from the
Convocation*. While Parliament retains its full
power -A RsStfMMsß th« State Church, the Con
v\»cs.tlona s£m have iheir historical prerogative
of T«o-3n:fror.<J!ne legislation for amending: exist-
In* robr*a« and Public Worship acts. In this ln
utanoe their rights, which are more Rncient than
T'ar*.lß.m«ut Itself, are reinforced by th» Royal
CoinacUslon and the Prime Minister. They aro
Inrlufl 'a propose effective remedies for existing
lawl*Ksne«» in the Church. If they respond to
the appeal *r.d make definite recommendations
for the prevention of current disorders, Parlia
mont vrlU be forced to face the responsibility of
approving or rej-ctir.gr the amended rubrics and
law*. The b«re possibility of an agreement by
Convocations upon a new Ornaments rubric
«u?flc«?» to set the House of Commons shivering,
let F.rastiar.lrm be what It may.
Parliament has the power of making and
revising the lav.- for the Church, but shrinks
from exercising it. Th» House of Commons is
made up of Churchmen, Roman Catholics. Non
conformists, Jews, agnostics and atheists. It
might undertake! to settle abstract propositions
such as the relaxing of an unduly rigid Act of
Uniformity, 01 the abolition of episcopal veto
on the prosecution of offending clergymen, or
the reconslStution of the courts, or the substi
tution of deprivation of a benefice for impris
onment as a means of discipline. Certainly it
Ii not a body to discuss and determine such
issues as are raised by the Royal Commission,
as. for example, tho Athanaslan Creed, prayers
for the dead, the practice of habitual confession,
the use of incense, altar lights end sacramental
vestments, genuflections, veneration of Images
ana roods, hymns to the Virgin, stoups for holy
water, the blessing of palms, the washing of
the altar with wine and water and devotions
before the reserved Sacrament. It is hardly
credible that en elective body bo mixed in its
religious opinions can ever take up In detail
these controversial matters and undertake to
settle what shall be 0m regular order of wor
ship In the English Church. The choice between
oath and affirmation nearly drove the Commons
distracted In Bradlaugh'a time. What would
happen if a House in which Churchmen form a
minority divided among themselves were to fol
low the lead of a majority strongly Noncon
formist in adapting the rubrics of the sixteenth
century and the principles of the Reformation
to twentieth century requirements? There are
some things beyond the reach of party cau
cuses and Liberal and labor federations, and the
regulation of public wort-hip and private con
science is one of them. Disestablishment would
be a foregone conclusion if Parliament were to
undertake either to veto or to amend rubrics or
.'awe recommended by the Convocations.
There has been Indeed a revel of individual
ism In the public worship of the English Church.
Every vicar considers himself at liberty to de
cide for himself what ornaments were In use
during the second year of Kdward VI and many
other controversial points of ritual. When pros
ecutions have been ordered thTe have been
•ndless bickerings over ambiguous rubrics and
ancient usages which have ne\-er been authori
tative::.- interpreted. The only resource of op
rortunitm has been good advice from the bish
ops when they affect to be powerless to enforce
their decisions. The disorders and irregularities
have Increased until almost as many lawbreak
ers are reported by th« Royal Commission among
. t} boneSced clergy as there are in the peniten
tiaries. In this emergency, when th* energies of
a great religious communion are engrossed with
"■'■■■■■ to Fre« Churchmen and agnostics
trivial details, tho Convocations are <alled upon
to propose an effective rstem el government
by which the « omprehensive directions of the,
Prayer Book can be revised and loyally carried
«-ut in parish churches. Can they succeed in
finding the Via Mc-dia where all factions will
!>•» eoote&ted and at peace, well abreast of mod
. ♦•m -_•■.- and free to carry on useful activities,
; - et loyal to ancient order and the principles of
the Er.gl'rh Reformation? If they can do it the
sze of miracles will not havo passed.
It \\ ill b«5 a seven years' labor, even *.•. I; fco
rtalesroSnllke a Primate an the Archbishop of
*'*'■'-■ rbury to direct the deliberations with id ;
help of r>roa<i::)iride<l prelates such as the Bish
op* of Ripon. Hereford and Carlisle. It is essen
tially v problem of self-Rovernment and a most
BssßOvragtag one. It vill be worked out, if at all,
1 >■ reforms which v.ill convert the Convocations
'''' representative bodies. The diocesan biehops
of each province now constitute tlio upper
houses, and th<j lower chambers include deans,
trchdeacons and proctors chosen ay ov«ry «-a
th«dral cjhapter and the diocesan cicrgy. The
curates aro not represented at all and th* bene
r.ced clergy mo.n inadequately. ... is a Houf<j
of Laymen attached ii» each Convocation, but
i the members aie licked out by the cathedral
chapters and have no standing In matters of
ecole«!astical policy. Convocation now repre
sents the cathedral chapters rather than the
clergy and laity and lacks the moral force and
practical experience required for brushing aside
tho antiquated rubrics, which can be interpreted
in many ways, end substituting: for them toler
ant and elastic definitions for enforcing: con
formity. So long as a large body of laymen in
the Church look upon Convocation as a strong
hold of aggressive, intriguing clericalism they
will consider the House of Commons as the rock
of defence for the Reformation. ..With Convoca
tion unreformed a statesman and an optimist
like the Archbishop of Canterbury seems con
demned like Sisyphus to roll up hill a stone that
ever rolls back. What peace loving, conservative
Churchmen are sighing for is tin authority of
an independent, living organization, which will
not act compulsorily through acts of Parlia
ment and courts of law, but voluntarily through
!ts own Convocations end diocesan bodies. Will
It ever come without disestablishment?
I. ft. F.
MOTJ.Y PITCHER."
Woman Who Was Honored as a
Revolutionary Heroine.
Women have tilled no unimportant place in mili
tary affairs from the £hvb of Joan of Arc to those
of the most modern of daughters of the regiment.
Hut few. however, have had any lasting memorials
of the part they played. Some have figured in
man's attire in both the army nnd the navy, and for
all vhoss identity became disclosed there were
doubtless many others who preserved the secret of
ttK'ir Bex. despite the- proverbial tendency of fem
inine members of society to make known the facts
which should be r.iont sedulously concealed.
Of th- American women who have taken part In
warlike scenes, none is more widely known than
"Moll, Pitcher." the heroine of Monmouth. This
battlo was one of the Important conflicts of the
Revolution, and was fought in the summer of 1,,8.
when the British troops, retreating from Philadel
phia, were overtaken and attacked In New Jersey bjr
the Continental forces under Washington. Although
no decisive result occurred from the battle .the fact
that the American forcea wer« not repu sed by t he
foreign foe rave heart to the colonies to .continue
•ne effort, besur. two years before; and which were
to last five years longer before success was 'attained.
In the troops from Pennsylvania was John^ Hays a
„ in the Ist Artillery. Continental line. Ho
nad Sen accompanied by his wife when the troop,
to which he belonged had been sent to the , Cent,
and she busied herself in doing; laundry work for
tl On°u"t'jul y day. when tho n S ht raged on the
New Jereey Plain, the thermometer stand ng^a .«
d o B ree« In tl.e .hade, Mrs. Mary Hays DttsW her
edeff7r%ale d eff7r% alT y,u s water in a vltche, ; xrom a .prlng to
SSSSS -iScffif I hl«Sm which sur-
K«SW?!SSSS! ind'hero^m "which sur
passed her limitations of sex. fl-hUng and in
the >ff*Z£%? i gj& %££
ingston and Narnum. In a ° a^ J h t not ki ned,

woman, Wlin net ►,•" i«<-« »• «. ...i rireenr
smoke of battle, was summoned by General ureeru,
SSH& Saws? * sw&ffZi
of 2SouV ritcher" was born at Carlisle. Perm in
October. 1744. Her maiden name was Mary Ludwl = .
and her father came to this country from Ger
many. She waa employed as a servant in the fam-
Mv of General William Irvine, in Carlisle, and there
In 1769 she married John Hays, who was a barber.
He became an artilleryman in December, lno.
The story Is told that his wife was with his troop
at Fort Clinton, on the Hudson. In November 1,77.
when that fortification was assaulted and taken
by the British. The American garrison flea In such
baste that Hays dropped a lighted match, with
which he was "about to touch off a cannon, and
his wife picked up the match and put it to the
touchhole of the i-"in, and so fired the last shot
before in* render.
After the Revolution "Molly Pitcher" lived at
the barracks at Carlisle, doing cooking and wash-
Ins for the soldiers. She was also employed 'as a
nurse by a number of families, as *he was fond
of children and penile to them, although some
what rouch in her manner and stern in matters
of discipline, demanding military obedience. For
a considerable period in her later years she kept
a small store, and Is described as having been
garrulous and querulous. Several years after the
death of the gunner. Hays, she remarried, her sec
ond husband being Berg< ant George McCauley. He
la said to have abused her and to have lived on her
earnings. In 188. ■ year before her death, the
Pennsylvania Legislature recognized her services
in the War of the Revolution by voting her the
sum of $40 at once and the same Bum as an annuity
for life, to be paid half yearly. Her death occurred
at her home in Carlisle in January. 1823, and she
was burled with military boners. Her grave re
mained unmarked until the centennial year of
American independence. A sum of money was
then collected for the purpose and a shaft erected,
on which appears tnls Inscription:
1 1
I !
' Mollle McCauley.
' R«nowaed In history as
'•Molly Pitcher."
The Heroine of Monmouth.
Dl»<1 January 22. 1823.
As* seventy-nine years.
Erectn.l by the citizens of Cumberland
' County. July the Fourth. 1870. ;
There Is a nas*-rell*f representing the battle hero
ine fa the art of ramming a cannon on a monument
• •ii the battlefield of lion mouth. In the painting of
"The Field of Monmouth," by George Washington
Paike Curtis, '-.Molly Pitcher" also figures.

WOMEN FAILED TO VOTE.
From The Chicago Inter Ocean.
The total vote cast In the recent election In Chi
rago iras 502,706, of which Just 1.5T9 were cast by
women. As the number of men ami women of
voting ape la approximately equal, the necessary
inference Is that only one woman in 191 really
cares to vote.
Of course, it will be said by the estimable women
who keep up the agitation for woman suffrage that
more women did not vote because they "had noth
ing to v •! for but university trustees,"
Tile plain truth is that woman H>iiYr;iK«» is a
lost cause. Wherever tried it has failed to Justify
the promises made for It. In Utah it has merely
helped to hold up a waning relic of barbarism. In
Colorado, instead of "purifying" politics, it }::■■•
shown new ways of corrupting womanhood, and
lias made of ii >■ spectacle which shames every de
cent man and frightens every decent woman. * The
persona] purity of women is not the same thing
as political purity in nun. They belong to differ
ent realms of the moral consciousness. Mixing
llk m Improves neither.
ENGLISH CHANNEL TUNNELLING.
FYom The Baltimore Bun.
The proposal to drive a tunnel under the English
Channel, to connect the French and English rail
way systems. is again receiving attention, and Un:
lish fee! is supposed, in view of the pood rela
tions at present with France, to be more favorable
to the project than ever before. The chalk strata
under the Channel are thought to i •• easy to pene
trate, v.iili v minimum risk The distance to be
tunnelled is 21.4 miles— s i.-fr^--> contract. In ISS!
a iunin-i seven feet In diameter was driven {*,:ci
feet in ejsjht and one-half months on thn French
ude. Th was later extended to a length of 6.OSa
!••' and to a diameter cf 11 feet. On the English
Fido a tunnel was driven 8.9H6 fc-rt, nine-tenths of
it being under the Chant* I. Tli« new proposal is t.i
have twin tubes 20 feel in diameter mv.l DO 'eel
apart for • raffle, with an auxiliary smaller tunnc]
for <3rv:inat;* and construction purposes.
SOLD, NOT SOLED.
From The Philadelphia ltecord.
Some new testimony as to the efficiency et Chi
nese body servants is furnished by a Philadelphia^,
who returned recently from the Philippines, and
who i brousrbt ■ Chinaman who had served him
faithfully Uiere as .1 valet It look Jehn but a short
time to learn; '' - new ways •: his master in tHis
city, tho new lingo and some other new things, and
nil went well until 11 cam* to a question of cleaning
out :t shoe trui.lt. T.I.- master. In looking over the
Btock picked up a pair of low shoes which had
e«^n better days "These you may throw away,"
he Fa id to John, "and these pit-king up another
pair) I want *f led. ; Next day John came to his
master with ?j .-em*. Shoes ] sold not much
F«.od. ho. sai.l. -Only catch 25 cents. '
COTTONSEED VALUES.
Front Th<> Haltlmore Sun.
13efor« tho Civil \\ : , r cottonseed constituted a
nuisance. MJsHUainpi in m? passed a law fining
ginnery Pfl ii day for oeglecUng to remove or do
stroy It. A Yet .l 11 V %M ilues were extracted from
pouonaeed to th« extent of 512.0 M) .- includint' oil.
lutt.-r. •'■I'm. fertilizer. soap. lard, paper and
batting. I '••- •" wli^n r-li:iea is not to bo fiistln-
KJiFhed from olive „11. \\> u »* in this country, it
is paid. <-..t! •■», •=. oil almost exclusively only Ital
iuTi olive oil labels being Imported by our enter
prising manufacturers for the delectation of con
sumer*
NEW- YORK DAILY TRIBUNE. WEDNESDAY. DECEMBER 5. 1906.
GAMBETTA'S ROMANCE.
Quiet Burial of Mm*. Uon, His
Friend and Confidante.
Paris, November 20.
The heroine of the most touching romance In
the history of the Third Republic was burled sim
ply and modestly last Friday, November 16. at
12:30 o'clock, in the cemetery of Passy, over
looking the Trocadero Garden and within a few
hundred yards of the recently erected monu
ment of Benjamin Franklin. It was a dull au
tumn day. and the rain fell steadily. There wero
only seven mourners who followed to the grave
the remains of that woman of rare Intelligence,
incisive wit and fascinating beauty. Mme.
LSonle Leon. who. from 1872 until the day of
his death, on December 81, ISS2. was the faith
ful and trusted helpmate and confidante of Won
Gambetta. On last Saturday, the day after the
burial of Mine, bfonla Leon, the following notice
appeared in the. Paris evening newspapers:
"Mmc T>ris-Gambetta, sister and sole heiress of
Leon Gambetta. requests us to announce that, in
conformity with her rights, she intends to for
mally oppose tho publication, in part or in full,
of tho letters written by her brother."' On Sun
day your correspondent had the good fortune to
meet If. Joseph Relnach, who, during the latter
years of Gambetta's life, was a close friend of
the great French tribune. When asked whether
he had read any of the letters referred to in the
notification issued by Mme. I>rls-Gambetta. M.
Joseph Reinach made the following interesting
statement: "Yea. Mme. I.eon once showed me a
great number of Gambetta's letters, and I have
no hesitation in savins that if they are ever
published— there are about three thousand of
them altogether— they wyi be one of the most
Interesting political and literary monuments of
the nineteenth century. Mme. L/onle Won was
a woman of remarkable Intelligence and intui
tion. Gambetta was in the habit of talking
freely and consullng with her in reference to «.ll
his political and diplomatic undertakings. He
invariably asked her advice upon matters of
importance. Scarcely a day passed but what
Gambetta wrote to Mme. I^-on. and in his cor
respondence he expressed hta opinions with re
markable frankness. Some of the. judgments
formed by Gambetta regarding his contempo
raries are terribly severe. Many of them arc?
unjust, but these harsh views are often cor
rected and modified by Gambetta himself in sub
sequent letters. Appreciations not only of men
and women, but of events, are Jotted down on
the spur of the moment in nervous, incisive sen
tences. These letters contain the whole political
history of the Third Republic, together with
highly edifying portions of the diplomatic his
tory of Europe from 1872 until 1882 Gam
betta, who was supposed to be a very meagre
writer, who probably never wrote over a dozen
articles in his life, stands forth In these letters
as one of the greatest authors of our time. His
ideas on politics, art, literature, and especially
of notable persons whom he met. are set forth
in clear, concise language, and with masterful
Intuition. They are mingled with personal epi
sodes and reminiscences— all written In a style
at once pure and fascinating— that supply . a
mine of facts, data and biographical portraiture
for future historians. The famous correspon
dence of Mirabeau to Sophie falls Into Insignifi
cance beside these remarkable letters of Gam
betta. In several of his missives to Mme. Leon
the present Anglo-French entente Is predicted.
In many other instances the accuracy of his
opinions has been confirmed by events. There
are many Incisive, vigorously written sketches of
the Prince of Wales, now King Edward VII. of
Bismarck, of the late Marquis of Salisbury and
of Prince Bulow, then attached to the German
Embassy in Paris, and who In his recent speech
In his capacity of Chancellor of the German Em
pire paid an eloquent tribute to Gambetta's
memory."
It appears that Gambetta, In company with
Mme. Leon, made a trip to Varzin and visited
Bismarck's house, where he was shown the little
table upon which Bismarck and Jules Favre
signed the treaty of Frankfort. Gambetta
when he saw the table remarked: "I shall
never lie completely happy until I have this
table in my own villa at Ville d'Avray." Gam
betta first saw Mme. Leonie Leon in the gallery
of the Corps Ltgialatlf in IS7O. He was deeply
Impressed with her beauty, and a, year after
ward, In October, 1871, when a Deputy in the
National Assembly at Versailles, ho again saw
her in the gallery and addressed a letter to her.
which Mme. Leon never answered. A few days
afterward, however, he met Mme. Leonle Leon
at a dinner given by the mother of one of his
intimate friends. Gambetta wished to marry
Mme. L€on. and repeatedly urged her to consent,
but this she Invariably refused to do. He gave
her a plain gold ring, upon the Interior of which
was engraved the words. "Ilors cet annel, point
nest d'amour" ("Outside of this ringlet love does
not exist"). Mine. L6on. who was the daughter
of an officer of artillery who in his youth was
attached to the Due d'Orleans, son of Louis
Phllllppe and grandfather of the present Due
d'Orleans. used to say to Gambetta, "I can be
of far greater use to you as a ilisereet friend, in
the shadow of your Intimate life, than us your
wife." On November i:». 1882, Gambetta wrote
to Ifmo. Leon Imploring her to terminate their
feverish hide-and-seek existence by a. marriage.
In an interview with M. Amir.' N4dC, of the
"Figaro." M. Joseph Reinach states: "1 lunched
for the last time with Gambetta in his apart
ment, in the Rue Salnt-Didler, on Saturday, No
vember •_'.". 1882. Ho asked me to call upon
Bonnai and arrange with him for bis portrait,
!>ut desired mi to Impress upon Bonnat to hay
nothing about it so as not to draw forth premat
ure reproaches from Meissonier. After luncheon
Gambetta wrote to Mine. Leonie Leon, Informing
her that he would call to see her that evening at
the Jardies villa, at Ville d*Avray, and suggested
that they pass the following Sunday together
there. He also mentioned In tlir> same letter that
he Intended during the coming week to announce
officially his coming marrlagt, and that this
sit had been warmly approved l>y his father.
On the following Monday Gambetta remained
at Jardies, nnel received the visit of General
Thoumas. former director of artillery at the
government of national defence, and an in ate
friend of Gambetta, Garabeti ; asked General
Thoumas to remain and take breakfast -with
him, but the latter declined because he had pre
viously accepted an Invitation to lunch at Ver
sailles. if Genera! Thoumas bad remained and
lunched with Gambetta the fatal accident with
the pistol would in all probability never have
occurred. Gambetta, after the departure, of
General Thoumas. amused himself by discharg
ing his revolver at a target In the garden of the
Villa Jardies. . He called to Mme. Loon to come
downstairs, and as he did so he handled with
habitual carelessness his revolver, of a new
mode] that he had bought at Claudia's, and
which was loaded. The revolver was accident
ally discharged, and the ball wounded (>amb«tta
In tho hand. Gambetta was suffering from dia
betes, and the sugar In his system caused blood
poisoning, and death ensued. Mine. Leou nursed
Gambetta with admirable devotion, and always
with the name discretion disappeared from the
room whenever any friends presented them
selves On tho night of December 81. however,
when Gambetta died, she was at Ills bedside, at
also were Paul Bert, Htlenna. Bpuller and Dr.
Fleuzal. I arrived a few moments later. Gam
betta was already dead. At about 3 o'clock In
the morning, when th old servant announced
the arrival of Mm* L4rls. Gambetta's Bister,
iline. L*ou gazed Intently and lovingly for the
last time upon the remains of her cherished
friend, walked rapidly and sllsntly from ths
death chamber snd vanished. A we*k later It
was found thst Gambetta had left no will. Mm*.
L4on was almost without resources. A small
group of Gambetta 1 * friends, Including Seheurer-
Kestner, Gulchard. Ruyz. Etlenne and myself.
contributed funds thst provided Mmc, Leon with
a comfortable annuity during her life. During
the last twmity-five years she has lived In mod
est' retirement, and made frequent visits to
Rome. She always refused to allow the letters
written to her by Gambetta to be published."
It was from a small window In the Rue Royals
that Mme. Leonie LSon witnessed the public
funeral of the greatest statesman produced by
France between IH7O and 10<>0. which took placo
on January % 19BX and which was the most
imposing inanit'estation of national sentiment
ever witnessed in France on a similar occasion.
Mme. Leonie Lion, who had quit© recently been
sabjeeted la a painful surgical operation, was
burled modestly at Pussy on Friday last, and the
veil thus falls on the fascinating heroins of
Gambotta's romance. C. I. B.
HELLBENDERS GOOD TO EAT.
Harrlsburg dispatch to Philadelphia Press.
A hellhero>r was revived at the Division of
Zoology a few days ago. Ther«» 1« nothing start
ling In this event, for specimens of this amphibian
frequently reach the scientific offices of the De
partment of Agriculture.
But right after this one came in half a dozen of
the young sctentlsta who help Economic Zoologist
Surface became involved in a dandy scrap about
the edible qualities of the beast.
"It's good," said on».
" "Tisn't," flashed back a contradiction.
So the snake dissectors and tha animal skinners
and the bird mounters and the bus; students made
up a chafing dish party right away.
"There's no reason why the hellbender shouldn't
ha good to eat." explained one of the. head scien
tists. "Its principal food is the crayfish— th« same
as tha principal food for bass. The hellbender be
longs to the same family of amphibians as the
frog and Is very closely related. Both are hatched
from th<» egg and both BOSS through the tadpole
stage before reaching maturity. The hellbender Is
a mighty fine nsh, as any one can prove to himself
if he will conquer his natural aversion."
The hellbender is found principally In streams
about the foothills of the Allegheny Mountains.
BANISHING THE GUILLOTINE.
From The Boston Herald.
A parliamentary commission in Paris has by a
vote of R to 2 reported in favor of the abolition of
the death penalty and the substitution of life Im
prisonment. Hitherto the. [Tactical but polite French
people have met all appeals for the abolition of the
death penalty with the grim reply: "Assuredly, but
l^t messieurs the murderers e»t the example."
WHAT BRYAN MUST MEAN.
From The Montgomery Advertiser.
When Colonel Bryan talks of Democratlo x'lctories
he can't mean Colorado, where wo will lo»e a Sen
ator: nor Idaho, where Democratic Senator Dubois
will have to walk the plank: nor Montana, which will
£enU a Republican multi-millionaire to the Senate
in place of Democratic multi-millionaire Benator
Clark. Above all others he can't refer to his own
State of Nebraska, which went Republican by an
Increased majority. Ho must mean Alabama,
Texas and the rest of the Solid South, but their
votes will not ele'-t a Democratlo President nor
secure control of Congress.
European Advertisement*.
REMOVAL NOTICE.
Kindly note that the European offices of The
New York Tribune have been removed from No.
149 Fleet street to the modern office building,
"Danes Inn House," No. 265 Strand (overlooking
Aldwych and Kingsway), London.
LONDON SHOPS.
THE
Goldsmiths & SilYersurifts Comga^ f
113, REGENT ST., LONDON, W.
Cbelceet Steck hi tks WsHi sf
DIAMONDS. PEARLS,
RUBIES, SAPPHIRES,
EMERALDS, OPALS, *&,
AT MERCHANTS' PRICBaV
Tbe
Goldsmiths ft Sll.trsmiths Company, itA,
112, RBQBNT ST.. LONDON. W.
Depot for Irish Peasant Industries
Under Royal Patronage.
IDE IRISH WAREHOUSE
147, Regent Street, LONDON, W.
SEASON JNOVELTIES
Telesrams: "Shamrock. Londos."
Telephone 2471 QerMtrd.
IltlSII— Irish Lares dlrert from our own worker*.
I BH- -1 r Hosiery — Balbrigna.
IHISH— Irish Handkerchief — Urge rerletf.
IKlSH— lrish Thl.li> Linen— finest qualities.
IRlSH— lrish — Color* and Black.
THE 14 n E <I rTbUSE
fk merican
LA Groceries and Whlskys
/ m DIRECT IMPORTERS
RT. JASKSON & CO.
172, Piccadilly, London.
Purveyors to His Excellency
The American Ambassador.
I'rlrr LM nntl Recipes for 170 Dainty Dlshea. bit as
Ainerlr.in l^jii.v. on appUcatloa to Dgpartaaeat ><o. 4.
Foreign Resorts.
LO3JION HOTELS.
"f^ECARLTON
Hotel, Restaurant,
and Grill Room,
LONDON.
Unrivalled Position in London
I AFGHAN HOTEL,
jL~4 Portland Place & Regent SL W.
Family Hotel of the Highest Class
Jtfoderfl Appointments. ModerateTarifl
HOTELS IN ENGLAND.
LONDON ,
MIDLAND GRAND HOTEL
MANCHESTER . .
s MIDLAND HOTEL
LIVERPOOL. ADELPHI HOTEL
LEEDS .... QUEEN'S HOTEL
BRADFORD. MIDLAND HOTEL
luUtttLAMbE BAY . . .
MIDLAND HOTEL
CE^nr . . MIDLAND HOTEL
W. TOUI.K. .Muaaser. Midland Itailvraj UutrU and
Kci'rcftliinrnt ICuvuis, etc. Chief Oflico— AilUUaU iiraad
Hotel. l.ouUou.
HOTELS IN THE BRITISH ISLES.
.UOt'.NT tfMKAIM— TV NBKtIX.K « KIM. _,„„
UOIU v»KiXI-N<»' r O>.
-IIANKIIX- Oil OF WIi.HT ...
mil.l.lths NHANbJJN lloitl El«e- Light
HOTELS IN SCOTLAND.
GLASGOW— SJ-. I.MMM HOTEL ... , .
<lor Wctrro Uixtaiasd*).
AVK— STATION HOTEL w , .
(For Duma Birthplace).
»»l Ml STATION HOTEL . __ .
U»r Boras *>!•■■■ •»«s).
Foreign Resorts.
MA A * %/• _^ • Proprietors: Tb.
Hotel Victoria, —»««* ii
CXOBB TO BUCKINGHAM PJXACB. I W -^ -i
WT»T*INSTEIt ABBEY AND CON I I (I11(j ft l^
I VENIENT FOR EVERYWHERE. I *—^ * * ** •
¥""% A r% 1 The Most Fashionable HOTEL and RESTAURANT
|-^/V |tX I_^ «t the Metropolis. 4. «rr/ %
RE E r^ y D The Continental
Th» tomi of many DISTIMGUISHED MMERICMMS daring ihtir waits fa *,„•,.
Cairo- Egypt \
dhepheard's Hotel.
ThE PREMIER HOTEL IN EQYPT.
500 BEDS. 110 BATHROOMS.
The Restaurant boasts the
BEST CUISINE in Carlo.
fHAS, BAEBI.H.
Rome-Grand Hotel Excelsior
O°5N THE YEAR ROUND
Most Modern House. Splendid Petition.
UNDER S.'iE MAM EHENF AS TK IRAN < I3TEL NATIOIAL, LOCERIE.
Qfm Hkl fff| M Theta two fitful Haatix locate* In ba^
EllW m\ **• »»*' central and connmtnt part !•>
SAVOY HOTEL. & c/ 0$ * to landing of Stsamirs from *«» JMTmL
HOTEL de LONDRES r< "** <""* C 9 Railway Station. IBjr
HOTEL DE LONDRES _„,.„ noun ana amtaa with print* JMJJMK.
Tbor^*^,.:: o<l r:v^n, F>ctl " < -*& *«/> splehoio r/£irj o^o^j
HOTELS IN ENGLAND.
Tariffs of the Hotels and foil particulars ac to routes
may Be nua at tue European timer* of "The Tribune."
at "Daaee Inn Mouse." tSS Strand (overlo«kios
Aldwych and Klnc»way>. London.
UPPER NORWOOD QUEEN'S HOTEL.
Near Crystal Palace. London. Healthiest situation In
England. Lov»lj- gardens. Boarding term* from $2.30
per day. Special terms for large parties. Convenient
tram service for City and West End London.
EUROPEAN RAILWAYS.
MIDLAND RAILWAY
THE BEST ROUTE IN THE OLD I
COUNTRY FOR COMFORTABLE I
TRAVEL & PICTURESQUE SCENERY. |
between BIBSSSIBBBBBBBBBBIBSaW
UVEEPOOL. »nd LONDON (St. Pancra*)
AND PRINCIPAL. TOWNS AND
HOLIDAY RESORTS IN THE BRITISH ISLES.
BREAKFAST. LUNCHEON AND DINTNO CARS.
Send stamp for *et Illustrated Post Cards. Apply for
Guides, Timetables. Maps. etc.. to the Company's Passen
ger Agents. Messrs. T. Cook * Son. 245 ft 1200 Broadway,
and 649 Madison A vs.. and to Messrs. Thos. Meadows *
Co. 87 Beaver St.. Midland Agent* for Freight Traffic
for freight rate* to all parts of Great Britain. W. Quy
Granet. General Manager.
FRANCE, BELGIUM AND HOLLAND.
Grand Hotel
PARIS
BOULEVARD MS CAPUCINI3 AND PlACft-
Dl» LWW. 1.000 ROOMS WITH PRIVATE
\ BATHS TARIFF ON APPLICATION.
i
PARIS ( Favorite American House.
HOTEL CHATHAM.
PARIS HOTEL DE L'ATHENEE
finiU 15 Rutt Scribe
.. Ooposlte the Grand O-«era
The Modern Hotel of Paris."
E. ARMBRUSTER Mana-er.
PARIS
■ HOTEL DE LILLE ET d ALBION,
228 Rue St. Honor*, close to Place Vendome. First class.
All modern Improvements. Every home comfort. Large
hall. Restaurant, luncheons and dinners at fixed price or
a la carte. Telegrams: LILLALBION. PARlS.— Henri
Abatlte. Proprietor.
DQIIQCn OLE GRAND HOTEL
DIiUuOIisLM OrUl H *"> ! Ainrrlcan Bar.
ITALY AND SOUTH OF FRANCE.
CANNF^ OVERLOOKING THE
/\l^|l^l-ia^e MEDITERRANEAN
Hotel
Metropole.
BEAt'TIFtX PRIVATE GROOTM OF 30 ACRES.
Monte Carlo.
Hotel de I'Hermitage
Most Modern and luxurious In Monta Carle. Magnifi
cent Terrace, sub-tropical garden overlooking Bay of
Monaco and Mediterranean, full view yacht ancaorage
and Firework displays.
Rome, Italy.
Grand Hotel.
OPEN THE YEAR ROUND.
The most beautiful
end comfortable
4 Hotel in !:aJv. Electric
light throughout. American
elevators. Charming suites
with bathrooms attached.
Under the same Direction as
THE SAVOY HOTEL, LONDON.
Rome, Italy.
Cd Hotel Quirinal
OPEN THE YEAR HOUND
Highly rrput?<l and fa*hinnabl« l»t rlax* Uutel In Ih.
heulthirat and llae-t part i>f i;om«>. Ilverv , u ,,j,. r !
,on,J«rt Udluwr. ****** »M. Bnnd. rrlv.t7S.th?
rouuis. l>-fei-» fcanltatlnn. '"
lilt. ll CLASS )'i:i:.\l H RlsTtlKl^T
steam HEAT THKOtX.HOIT:
__^ _ — - —————— ——^-— —-———___________________
Rnwjp 1 run south.
Illtlbi Flertrlcltj. «•«
ROYAL HDTEL »«!,«.,„_
Opru the Year Kound. J Private i: 1ir. ...,„,
ROME -Savoy Hotel
FINEST LOCATION.
vi* Luoovtsi. FACIMG QUEEN'S PALACE
MOOEKKi DETAILS THnOLGMOUT BESI
*r4ERICftN AND ENGLISH PATRONAGE.
SAN REMO. **«•
SAVOY HOTEL,
Foreign ResorU.
The Traveller's
•• TV inter VI ay Ground. m '
Ghezireh Palace Hotel
ON THE BANK OP THE NILE.
A Luxurious Oriental Polar* transformed tat* t_«,
most comfortable Hot*!. Large fir* Greatest a«e*.
fort at moderate chare;**.
<irn«rnl <lan»i>r.
ITALY AND SOUTH OF FEASCZ.
San Re mo. ( i«..
Hotel
M. Bertolini.. Royal.
Cannes! "-ssssl
HOTEL 6ALLIA
Opened in 1901. 40 Private Baths.
Perfectly appointed Garage for 30
Cars.
ICE STw ""Swa
HOTEL DE NICE.
Private Baths. Southern Eipotum Garden*.
N| flf" J*rdia Pabllqae
lOb <Prom «*•» Aaciala)
HOTEL DE FRANCE
Highest Repute. Motor Ga
rage. Best American Patronage.
|GE SEA VIEW I *-——««.-
NICE SEA VIEW ■ l**« Comfort*
IV BBS Americaa*.
f, , n , f latest Comforts,
brande oretagna B.th»om. *»«*«««
Jurdla Jt'ubllc • * by Mott, N«w York,
•J >r,i!n PnbUc J by Mott. N«w Tors,
GC" *| /% A IN BEAUTIFUL
til wAI PRIVATE PARK.
"EDEN PALACE."
rl ft DC 13 PC Hotel-de-Luxe.
LUnCIIUC Finest Position.
r GRAND HOTEL
Late Continental ft R'de la Pali.
Magnificent Panorama of the Arno and sur
rounding- Hills. Large Winter Garden.
G. KRAFT. Proprietor
II All Railway Tickets. Telegrams*
II AIM Locks** Registered.
■•""•'• lift. Electrto Licit
HOTEL DE LA VILLE
NAPLES HOTEL BRISTOL
44 A Home from Home."
(and Imperial. Chamsaix).
Flr« cl««» House. Flae ana healthy situ
ation. Bath and steam heat In each ratta.
Moderate chars**. French oalatn«.
Proprietor: A. L-»>'O»T.
ENICE. *^.-
VENICE. I — LISST*
GRAND HOTEL. "VST 1
Has a Frontaee of 800 Wo* A. IIHHaV
on the Grand Canal. Muiiim.
Venice. Hotel ] °~:^^
Royal Daniel! """° -« »
3 < Steam Heat. „
AIX MODERN COMFORTS. »-it— -- t-.i.^.
MKHXV KgfirrgD. Hallway I cseis.
EGYPT AND STJDAIT.
KHARTOUM. GRAND HOTEL
The only first claaa hot«l In Ktiitrtoam. pret»
tUy situated on th« banks of the blue Nile, Is It*
own extensive :i».ni j;»ci.n« comiuaadla* ties'
from the terrace of the hotel our the blu* MSB
white Nile. Omtiurman and the battlefield*.
Entirely rebuilt and refurnished In i ••'■>■ mortars
European comfort. Klectric light. Laura Tennis.
St ablins. Boating: own farm and dairy produce. C«B
niouolltan cuisine; European service.
M«nas«r: U. OTTO HOCK.
Late Holland House. New York.
- .
HOTELS IN GERMANY.
DRESDEN.
HOTEL BELLEVUE
Distinguished House of otd reputation. Unique
position. R. Ronnefetd. Gen. Manager.
IIIICCDAnrAI \ vat sumo aft
VJILpDAU&rI J .*uucAji rams*
W Palace Hotel a ***•>
AUSTRIA, HUNGARY & SWITZERIASB.
AISTKI\> ~*
VIENNA i-ustrli
1 HOTEL BRISTOL
Located on the Fashiorsabla Karntherring, •«*
the favorite resort cf American*. Psrrssi
French Cuisine and choice wines. •_^
Vevey ( 6rand fioui «*#|
{ palace Md
OPEN ALU TUB YEAR ROCM*
LMdlng Hotels, .rlfais .*•<*»»'«?
••4sra improvemsals. lOG MICHW*
ADVERTISEMENTS ANl> SUBSCRIPTIONS {»»''*•
f ■«- Trlbuna rec«lved at their Uptown •'*.- •Siss
UroiiUway. b#t»esn Sitt\ *nJ JTth •".. until » •"JJJ
P m. A(lverilwir.«n!i rscelv-d »i th* fol.o« u V^»i
offices at rt-euUr ortlca rates unUI S o"clock p. «a-. \ sai ■
53< Bth ave7. i. •. cor. t3d st.j 133 «th avo.. «»'• »S|
■*•: t»: Eitst uth st : :st w«*t *v st. b«tw»«a J^JS i
«th .v«.:* ;s3 Ve»t i:sth st.: 1333 Id a^ b.JJ*g H ,
• >; th itud ::.:. at*.: vr:* 3^ *v«.. ne«r *!•* V- r^La) >.
»v«. n^:»r S9th st.: IST E»-t lfflth .•*•* WATFm i
•'••J «5» Jd »v*. nsex tlat ttJ •»• M •»••■*
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