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New-York tribune. [volume] (New York [N.Y.]) 1866-1924, February 12, 1907, Image 4

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PAREDESI?! THE FIELD.
!. I UGE FORCES PURSUE.
titbit* Followers Reported Few —
Castro's Condition Worse.
'.'ainras. 1-'.>l>. '.» (via Willcmst».&, Feb. 11).-—
<;enTiil Antanlo Paredes, who f:.s ■ e •?:•>. prepar
ing a revolution against PrcsMent Csstro and Is
reported t o have innOfil In Venezuela^ near
Pedcrnala 1 , early t'lis month, ;:; said to have
• aptmeri ; i numlicr <■* toast guardsmen and
jTijpreps* <l them Mt. i his service. Later he i*
yzWi to have man fiod towanl Maturing capital
f>" the statt* • " Matiirin, in which Prdeniales l.s
Situated. The s<»vcrnn".ftnt Iras sent two steam
*r?! I"h>1«-'1 ivi i !i tro"i s from hero, and has dls
r>atche<l fi:n!:e<- detachments of troops from
<'U:axt\ Bollvai-. Zapate and Maturln to Inter
fiertt P.iredes. The letter is fai<l to have had
only tw'eijty :ne;i v.itli him whesi hs landed, ant!
it i« added thftt they liad in tiielr ,:jop?ess!on
only thn-e liundred r;<U? but it is pointed out
that many succesffdl revolutions !jav«' previous
ly r>ecn '>egiin in Venezuela with fewer en and
weapons. It i:; recalled Th;;r l J • [dent Casuo,
when he t'n>k vr> arms against Andrade, started
practically barefooted, alona and unarmed, re
marking that he had friends and that the enemy
hal .inns.
Tlie report that a sympathetic reyolutionarj'
rnovenieut lias l^Mi started near the Colombian
border is not confirmed, hut is credited in many
T!arf-r.« hen-. Tlie ConservTitives say thot they
have lenp expected an attempt, would be mn<Y
10 overthrow the jiie.-ont government, and they
rire-flirt that the whola country will po In Barnes
within a fe?> - weeks. Ou tne o'.h^r hand, the
government officials maintain a fi:rfi\r attitude,
faying thrit Pa redes is a person of no conse
quence, ami that h« will poor, bo subdued.
The healfa of E»reßident Ctstro is L-nin a
matter of concern. in spitu of the official opri
mlsm. Several of the most piomincnt local
physicians went to Macuto to-day, and it i? al
leged that this was preliminary to the per
formance of a serlouß operation, the outcome
of which is considered to b» & matter of grave
dour t.
DOLGE FILES CHARGES.
Bold Attack on Alleged Corruption
in Venezuela.
Caracas. Feb. 9 (Via WHlemstad, Feb. ID—
bold attack on allege I Venezuelan government cor
ruption has been rna.ie hy R'idolf >-. American
<>meular Afrent here, resident director of the
«)rinoco Corporation and secretary of the American
ngnsuniaaton on Venezuelan claims. Mr. Dolse has
filed with th«» government long charges of com
plicity of certain prominent ofllcials In an attempt
to rob the corporation of Ms valuable rights in the
Orinoco delta. Printed copies of the document are,
ViHtig distributed. The censored local newspaper*
are afraid to publish, the chareff. In order to
avoid causing embarrassment at Washington, Mr.
Doige lias jirc=rn?f.i his rctiErnatioti as ".he Con
sular Ag- 'it of th« Tnite.l States at Caracas to
Thorn P. MOffat, tho American Consul at i.a
•'Juayra.
In the document filed Mr. Dolga recites n loi't;
list of alle?<d wrongs, blnmin? prominent poli
ticians for them nnd visorouslv protesting against
thoir nctions. The latest aggression complained of
by Mr. Dolge is that tht authorities consented to
'he transfer to a New York syndicate, known aa
Orinoco I^umber Comwans", or pa r! of the prop
*rty which, ha nays, according to the decisions of
v >otii the Venezuelan Supremo Court and the tn-
I'mationHl Al bit ration Commission of 1903, L>»-
!on?s to the uritiocu Corporation.
Washingtoi Kci>. 11.— It Is fully • ■ oect< d here
ih.nt Mr. Dolge will b<- expelled fiom Venezuela, a^
•«■.•>« Mr. Jaurett for a similar attack upon the pov
< rntnent.
The Btate Department has now before it for <-on
-;i.!'-rati')!i a number of claims :isninst Hrer-iuetit
• Visiro'f- government, most <if them founded upon
the «lle«;ed vacation of concessions uranted to
American citizens and corporations. Most of tho
l;-.itii!- have been presented to the Venezuelan For
f\fv. Offlce. !>ut rot having rcceU'cd satisfactory
oiiiiJoraticn tlt'y will acsin he brought to ItS
.is s.ion as conditlojin become more set
tled. Tbe i-Jalm of th>- Orinoco Xavisation Com
r-anr. In which Mr. Jjuls' Is lnt«»reFtod, is s.ii-1 to
>.<• one .if th'se case?.
I7EW SOUTH POLAR EXPEDITION.
Lieutmant Shackleton in Command — A Mo
tor Car for Ire Travel.
London. Feb. 11.— a new British expedition
to South Polar regions will leave England next
October, under the command of E. V- Shackle
ton, who was third lieutenant on the Discovery
expedition to the Antarctic. The present enter
prise baa influential support, and it will follow the
Jines of the Discovery expedition in an pndeavr.r
to reach the geographical South Pole, | n addi
tion 10 landing a party nt Mount Melbourne to
attempt to reach the magnetic r-cie. A novc-1
feature of the voyage will be the employment
of a motor car built for ice travelling.
MURDERER OF MISS LAKE FOUND,
■Essen. Feb. 11.— Th«.j mystery of th« murder of
gtaaa Ifadeletee LaJce, a British army officer's
Aaagnter, whoi mutiUtod body was four.rl at iitiek
an October i last '.:. •.!.<? City Park, has been
solved. Edward Land, twenty years old ."urren
de.red himself at the. police station hen.- on <;,_».
urday chancing himself with being th.! murderer
of Una Lake. He Informed the police that ho
formally was an employe of :ho . (V'estphallan
Coal syndic ite anU fled to Jegi after lho murder.
ANOTHER CONCESSION TO VATICAN.
Church Contracts Modified— Mayors Willing
to Sign Denial from Rome.
Paris. Feb. 31. — In anticipation of the rejection
by the Vatican authorities of the form of con
tract for the lease of the churches proposed
by M. Briand, the government has allowed it to
"be publicly understood that it is willing to ac
cept a modification making the- contracts run
eighteen years for the benefit of the parish
priest named or bis successor "fulfillinc the
name conditions.'' This will surmount the ob
jection raised by the Vatican that every ti;ne
a parish priest is changed a new contract must
be negotiated with th commune ■•■ municipal.
ity la which the church is situated
The "Culvers,** a Catholic organ, «.- i ih;;t
reports received by Cardinal Richard show that
more than half the mayors of France are willing
to sign the model contract for the lea^e of ihe
churches.
Rome. Feb. ll.— The Vatican authorities deny
the statement made by the semi-official "Temps '
of Paris that the decision of the French • At o
pate regarding contracts was reached at Rome
between French bishops and the Pope
duett Shirts fit 1
perfectly — wear %
i longest — look best |
for every type and |
style of man. The pj
perfect shirt for k|
3 every occasion. a
Aik for Cluftt Skirt*. a
'■* Look for lhr duett label. t\
CLUETT PEABODY A CO.. ft
• MtKIIII - „.,» mum. f3
.THE HAGUE CONFERENCE
[ii. MARTENS IN LONDON.
t — — — —
. Sessions May Begin June — The
Disarmament Question.
! London, Feb. 1! — M. Martens, who has arrived
: here In pursuance c* hlt» mission to canvass the
i sentiment of the powers relative to the pro
i gramme of the corningVession of the Hague con
j fcren<f. held a long conference to-day with P!r
j Edward Grey, the British Foreign Secretary.
i This will do followed later in the week by con
] ferences with sir Henry pbell-Bannermai
j and, li la expected, with Whltelaw Reid, th«
1 American Ambassador. M Mart( may discuss
; with th. Ambassador the Intentions of the
| United States In relation to the Hague Tribunal.
i M. Martens said to-day that ;■- a result of his
: inquiries tin date of the meeting of the Hague
J conference probably would be fixed for Juno 15,
! with sessions lasting' two mouth*. He added:
There can he no doubt thru tho question of
i Inclusion of disarmament and the limitation of
'■ arrcanient*- will be ii'>' leading subject of dts
• ii — *-•■_. and If either the British or United
States governments h.i\ • really decided to place
! this question on liii programme the powers will
be obliged to dfsRUEi it. I cannoi imagine that
any one potfer would object to the extent of
niakii thi? question the cause of a serious
political complication.
i Personally, my feeliner If that th<* matter is
.•!■•' yet ripe for discussion, and I am ftUite On
j vlnccd that at t (].- present moment it will be
i quite impossible to attain any practical result
i from Its dlpcussion.
With regard »■> th 0 results of my mission so
I far. I may say that Germany. France and Rue
| Ma all hold that the question of disarmament
| is njt yet ripe for discussion, and further, that
i even the limitation of armaments not heing a
I practical question, no good can come from dls'
I cussing it. but this opposition fa on the merits
; of the question and does not g<> to the extent of
[ cippoping- any consideration of the subject if the
| United States or Great Britain insists upon such
I ' ■-;.■••
The United States has reserved the ripht of
placing the question of disarmament before the
conference, bul I have not heard as yet whether
the Washington government has actually do
clded to do this 01 not.
Turning to the quest) of the Drago Doc
j trine, M. Martens said
: This matter has provoked some misunder-
I standing and bad feeling. If the doctrine is to
; form a guarantee to any power not to pay Its
I debts, naturally It will not evoke very much
: sympathy, and from this point of view I <Jo not
j think It will be approved even in the l"nit«*'l
| States. The, doctrine was accepted by Mr. Hay.
■ the late American Secretary of State, with con
( slderable reserve.
If. on the other band, the doctrine >v ill have
I the effect, of referring to The Hague, Instead of
raufinsf a resort to force, questions which can
- lie settled by arbitration It can only be very
useful.
THE RUSSIAN ELECTION.
v
I Constitutional Democrats Sweep the
Larger Cities.
Odessa, Feb. II, — The election returns, a« re
; ceived up to date, show 8 sweeping victory for
; the Constitutional Democrats. The Moderates
j have been hopelessly crushed, and not a pin*?ie
■ lerationlßt elector ha been chosen. Fear
j Ing outrages by the Black Hundreds, only <Vt
! ptr cent of the voters visited the polls.
Moscow, Feb. 11. -The city elections here yes
j terday renuUed In a tremendous triumph for tho
; Constitutional Democrats, mho parried every
i electoral district and the '-.inttoi of every mem
j ber " the city doctoral college except nineteen
; workmen. In most of the districts the • 'onsti
' tutional Democrats have an absolute majority
j over th. combined Monarchist, Octobrist a'vl
i Socialist vote. Out of 37,280 votes Hie Con
j Btituttonal Democrats polled 21,140, the OctO
; brlsta 8.743. the Bociallsta 1,077, and the Mon
i archlEte 2.726. The latter failed to pet a single
i vote in one of the largest; wards of tin city.
! Th< result Insures th* election to parliament of
| Prince Paul Dolgroroukoff, M. Klsavetter, and M.
, Maklamoff, a lawyer, it is understood the fourth
i ?"^at "ill be conceded to ;t workman^ M. Mat -
| vieff, who was supported by thf nineteen Social
! Dcmoctatic i. tors.
j St. Petersburg, Feb. 11.— The cities of <■■•>..-
I lensk at d Voronezh have been carried by th«
; Social Democrats. Vladivostok has elected three
: Soiinlisf electors, two of whom are In Jail. The
third is in exile. The Liberals have also car
! ried Minsk, but the election has been <-ane<--;;ed
{ or the petition of the Reactionists.
: Returns from Kursk show ■ sweeping Con
! stitutlonal Democratic victory. Advices from
j Kazan give the Octobrista 40 and the opposition
3". electors. Discord between th<s Coiistltutlonal
Democrats and Socialist! Is responsible for this
poor showing.
SHAH YIELDS TO PEOPLE.
i All Demands Granted— -Quiet Re
stored at Tabriz.
Teheran, Feb. 11— The Bhah to-night Rent a
message to Parliament granting all the popular
I demands, Including formal recognition that the
i country i- under constitutional government
I This message was telegraphed to Tabriz, where
i the people had seller] tin- arsenal and closed the
j government I'fflce* All i.; now quiet-
It Is still doubtful whether the Shah's eleventh
| hour recognition of the country as a constitu
■ tional monarchy will avert popular outbreaks.
Parliament sat .'ill ,l.i long awaiting the de
j cision of the monarch, while excited crowds
■ surged outside the building. Ii was known that
I Tabriz had threatened to elect h new Shah
i unless the demands of Parliament wen granted
; and rumors were ourrent of preparations for in
: uprising in all the large towns. The flrßt ilgn
; of yielding .va« the i!itiinlss;ii by the govern
: ment of •!;• •■>•■ Belgian official*", MM. Naus
'■ and Prlem, and then <jame th«» news of the fac-
I tional tishtlng at Tabriz, together with a re
: port that the Governor of Tabriz had been im
: prisoYied. This evening the Shah sent a meusage
• to Parliament accepting It* demands, with the
i exception of that ■« -rning the monarchy, to
| which his majesty declined to accede, paying
: that he feared the next demand would be a
! republic.
Parliament thereupon sent a circular to the
i foreign legations in Teheran, warning foreigners
i to avoid thi dangerous quarters of the city.
! Finally, at a late hour to-night, the Shah pent
■ his full acceptance; and upon receipt of this.
I news the tltlng crowds slowly dispersed.
I AMERICAN SURGEON SENT TO PRISON.
Dresden, Feb. 11.— Major Gustav Sieber, said
to be a graduate in medicine of the. University
: of Pennsylvania and to have served in the
i Spanish-American War. ivas sentenced hero to.
! day to eight months' Imprisonment for misrep
j resentation and deception In connection with a
( commercial school. .
c
LEON SERPOLLET DEAD.
: Paris, Feb. 11.— Leon Serpollet, the wall known
French motor car driver, died here to-day from
i cancer of the liver.
GUEST OF ADMIRAL ANDRADE DIES.
;< ■:<■■ medical assistance could be called, Mrs.
Annie C. Allen, sixty-five years old, of Philadel
• phia, died from heart trouble late yesterday aft<r
noon at the home of Bear Admiral Cipriano \n-
« rn(le V. B. N " retired, at No. m West Mth street
Mrs Al!«-n was Islting the Hear Admiral's daugh
; tcr-ln-law. . •
RICHARD CROKER. JR., BACK.
Richard Croker, jr., returned yesterday on the
C'armania from a two months' vleit to his father.
"■" said he left his father at Nice In good health!
He does not believe he will return to New York
aoon. "My father is greatly attached to his estate
outeidi of Dublin." hi said, "and is farming it
with • pood deal of satisfaction. He finds the
winters In Ireland very severe, and for this rea
son goes to a milder tllmate for a few montiis
each year."

DAMROSCH TO CONDUCT FESTIVALS.
Walter Dararoseh has accepted the c-onductorshlp
; of the music festivals to be held this spring ut
Louisville. Syracuse and at Rpartanburg. S. c
A large, festival chorus has been organieed in eat h
, one of these citle*. and Mine, Sembrlch Is to be the
I print lp;il aololnt. A Bach cantatn. Verdi's "Re
(iiiiem." Mendelsohn'* '.•Elijah" anil £>nlnt-Bai!n»'»
' 'Bapson and l»eii]ah"' ar- among the principal
! work* to be perform - - A \
*EW-YOT*TC DAILY TOIBUNB. TUESDAY. FEBBrABY 12. 190 T.
STATEMENT BY WILSON
Says He Ordered Old Issue of Stock-
Tax Stamps Destroyed.
A statement was made public yesterday after
noon by William C. Wtlson. ex-State Controller, in
relation to charges made by Controller Martin H.
Qlynn reg-ardinp stock tax stamps. Mr. Wilson was
the A 'ting: Controller from May to November, .190*.
and for a month prior to the time Controller Glyrin
took charge of the offi< — Mr.. Wilson was In entire
iharge, having been appointed to the office of Con
trailer to fill -i vacancy caused by the resignation
OttO Kelsey.
The statement laaued by Mr. Wilson, who i» now
a practising lawyer at No. 100 Broadway, follows:
I have noticed by this morning's' newspapers that
State Controller Glynn hue mads certain state
ments regarding th»» printing of stock tax rtamps,
and i take It that he lias been Incorrectly quoted
The law '-Hine Into «fffrt. wlifii my predecessor,
Otto Kelsey. was In office. He made a contract at
that tim« with Quayle * Bon to manufacture these
a tamps, who wrre put under bonds He also made
a contract with the bank of Manhattan of the city
• ••' New York for the sale of these stamps. Quayle
it Son, under thel contract, were to deliver all
«tampa manufactured direct to the Bank of Man
hattan, and .to no one else, who were to receipt for
the tarn», arid all prbc**ds from the i «le or said
stamps were to be delivered by the bank »o the
Controller.
Mr. Watklns, who was the Chief Clerk hi the
Controller^ pfflce. In eharga of this department,
checked up »; ■■•• priiitine of the stamps.
Th'- plates for printing tampa were always In
the popsension of the State Controller. Quay!* <%
>•■ print e<l from these plates always under the
supervision of Mr. Watkfns. When printed, th«
p!at"s were retur t'i th^ Stale Controller, th*
[■•tamps printed w«sre counted by Quayle & Bon and
■ •:•• Controller's representative. sealed in park
hkcs Bnd placed in a vault provided by Quayle *•
Hon. tli" combination of which was kept etolely hy
th'- Stnfe Controller.
The stamps printed that did not meet the star<l
ard required were Immediately destroyed In the
resell 8 of th« State Controller's representative,
tho lofta falling upon Quayli & Bon. and nOttupon
;.;.• State
ft was discovered about March. isM, thai the
.-•■tanips then .■■ use were being washed and reused.
S eps were at once taken to set up ■< stamp lhat
couM no( Ij'! washed. After many experiments i
finally decided upon a tamp whivii has proven
succ»F.«fti:. ani was issued on or about October '.
1906. This n.'w furni of utamti v.-a» entir'ly dis
tinct from the old issue.
The old twin of stamps -was withdrawn «ml tit
once became worthless. The reason that the old
issue of stamps was not at that time destr<»»'« d
w.-ih l'ecaiiHe I wanted to i- - ira that ih«- t.«"W
issue would ir.pfi the reiiulrontcnts for which the
stamps were made. As soon i* this wai definitely
determined I cave Instructions to have »h" om irsur
destroyed. The method of their destruction was
left entirely with Quayle & Son, who had entire
charge and control of the name, subject to the *u
pervlsion of the Controller, who destyi ■• I Mr
W^tkins to look after It.
The entire responsibility of, ■:• manufacture a.i<l
delivery of »i >• ■ ttampa to the Hark of Manhattan
rested upon Qua • A Son, i«ubj< nimbly to mi
pprvlslon by the Controller's office: the <niirp re-
Bponslblllty. after tl-'.- 1 delivery rested upon tlie
Bank »' Manhattan.
Charles M. U'atkins, who formerly was chief
lers in tho tran^fT t<i bureau of the Controller's
office, now holds ■< position under the inspectors
of elections of the New York LJfi [surarice Com
pany. He if what is known «s a "VlrssifW" of
votes and pets about $W a «lay. when wen tlit-re
yesterday he, said that of lh« stamp*, valued at
$5.«J1,555, to which ■..•:«..,:.. 01/nn refers, SI74.CM
•.•.■■■•■ i>f i ■■«- nttunpa that had ben accepted, but
Inter were found to <■>■,:■ b*en b«low the standards
aiifl rejected. About ?. ;■• ■■■■ were of stamps of the
orlgin&l ts^iie. which were nl»nnii<jn« > d ■«i ;i ■•«<• they
were superset! I hy the new issue Of th it amount
$1,256,211 had been pent t«. th«s Bai of Manhattan.
They ««>"■ leturnei] to Albany on October t nnd
placed In h safe deposit vault there until, on De
cember 29 they were -.::>•! wit th.^ test ■■ ' t!'*>
old •■ .i- .
GLVNX HAS MORE TO SAY.
Part of Examination of Watkin*
Published at Albany.
Albany. Feb. 11.— Controller Olynn talked further
to-day on the stock transfer tan *twmp c-a»i\ In
which he held yesterday that stamps had been de
stroyed without adequate record of the fact. He
told of n. book having befn taken by Charles M.
Watklns. ex-chlrf clerk In the stork iransfor tax
bureau, from the . ■ ii trailer's oftVe and of <"tri>«
mail- In one of lh«m whlja It araa »way from Ihs
onV°. ;<•■ Mid thnt whlltj entrlen v.»-:e r.iiide In the
'■ntsirr.,-s account*' book <>? ■he destruction «f
enough stamps to balance the'aecount. Mr. Wat
kins had told Uim t> at when th> »tnniji« w>r'
barrel he did i>.>r count • <m. No charges of d!-
honesty are rr.nfl* by Mr. c,;\nn In connection wlt;»
this affair. H Is tnaklt i further Investigation
of it.
'"l ha Times-Union," Mr. fJiynn'H rwj>er. prints
to-night question and nnsiner extracts from the
examination of Mr. Watvin-! by Controller Glynn
relati\o to tlie removal of books from the Control
ler's office. Bom< of this testimony Is appended:
Q.r-Why 'i;.l you tfik« the b'.ok« to New York it
all? A.— Well, because I was going to make cer
tain entries for Mr. Quayle or the ftan'i^ ii hand
make ttiem thfre. 1 went away In it hurry and i
did not hay« Umi to :■ ike then They were in mv
room.
Q.— Why make t-nti <• for Mi Qua la of the
Ftampa on hand? A.— i -•!..■.. no record of
Lhem
<..' Whj did you do It? v, ■ ■ you supposed to
do It? Were you working for Mr. Quayle rr the
Mate. A.— why, no; I wasn't working for M-
Quayle.
Q.-Thfree two book? th«< we are talking about
these two that you sent Mr. Quayle from New
York, these two books, were they provided by this
'i onti ollei ofn. <• a.— Yes sir
Q -And •'• state paid for them? A.— Tea .jr.
Q— And they contain entries that you made and
no one mad* any other except for you; then in no
question about that, la there? A Well. I wouldn't
ray they were mad.- entirely for me. They might
have been mad* for anybody that wanted thenl
Q.— Who else would rant them? A.— i don't
A— rM OU si re:)r ' S6nted lhr ' Controll «»" 'I .ttt there?
Q.— And th< Controller wanted tiie^« Daurea they
*hTO:n'tfelle 3 rV h A.- OlO l '
Q— Yon didn't keop a record of the far* value ..f
llw ' ■tamM "X-No! 1 "" I " >ri " lrh " , •-.. w appear. In
til IB ••* '< 'ai .\ . A' •.
That Mr. Watklnn did not actually know the
value of the more than two million dollars' wurth
of stock transfer utanipn destroyed under hin dl
recUon on Dfccemter 2&, hul "arrived at the value
by ■ king the difference between the debit and
crwJlt aide of 1.!.-, books'.'^ and not by counting was
asserted to night by Controller Olynn In «... extend
ed statement In r*;»iy to statements published to
night as coming from Lho two former controllers
"To-day." said Mr. Olynn. "I took th . testimony
of Prank Leland, who Himit* a *eii.g hi burning
or stamps on December », hut hoi not 1; .. i,, M
notion ""• their vnlutt H« farther states that
he tailed th" authorities- attention to the laxity
of the syatem, and urged ipoi them lh« necessity
ot adopting the system used in Washington In the
printing and destruction of atAmps >■ ,i money.
These euggestlona were never adopted.'/
Replying to Mr Keltey** quoted statement thai
the ■o-called "old sumps'^ were useless. having
t»e n withdrawn fr-un circulation, Mr. Glynr said:
, N«jnc of the stamp?, had ever be«il called In All
Diet was ■'■■'■ ■ was that th. Controllers office ex
changed new Ptamps with the Manhattan Bank
Company for what old stamps they hurt on hand
and no man alive could compute how many. of tho
old stamps were In circulation at the time of the
exchange with the. Manhattan Bank
If what Mr Wilson pay a I? true that th ri^
structlon of Etamps was left to Quayle. the system
if even more careless than ! nave contended! for It
turns the whok business *onipi*t#lv o\t>r to tha
prlnttrs. jllnilnatlni altogether ref.Vonslh.litv "*
the part of th,- Controller In the. converting mere
pai-tr into »tanuw repreaenting millions of doUars
Both Mr VI Usor; and Mr. K*lsev talk «• .• th*
wily destruction of »tampa was that of th« oM
Issue, whereas; la <).■ course or construction of the
new issue. Watklns'a records that $993 042 fa
worth of stamps were deatroyefl. and vVatklna ad
mits that ha can produce no witnesses or evidence
out his own that lit destroyed the •tamps.
Mr. Olynn quoted at length the law and the re
vised contract with the printer, to show that the
Controller had entire authority over the manu
facture »nd care of the stamps.
Ho denied thet lift was. preparing to ask in r
more employes declaring that he could maua«;e
the stock transfer bureau with the "force
HOSPITAL EMPLOYES DISMISSED.
Commissioner Hebbard it the Charities Depart
ment dismissed John Remote, for three years as
sistant utorekeeper nt the City Hospital en jmack
wells Island, yesterday. According to a statement
by th.- commissioner, Kembte'a dismissal came as
the result of an Investigation of charges that lit,
had been engaged In pllferlns from the \ iTt ,li \ \>
the hospital and doctoring the books The r.r I
miss oner also aceepteal t>.« r»algiiaUonji i Will lain
McPUeraon. heart atiirekec|i»-r at th^ Cliv h ii?
and Mrs. Mary B. Buckley. \hV nul^ in ,^tVj"\i
the raocpUoD I»iivlli,.n. "arß^ ..f
GOVERNOR REFUSES TO COMMENT.
Albany. F«b. U-Govemor Uughea refused to
comment to-day on the story of alleged negltgencu
m handling and destroying the »to<k transfer i«»
Valentines
Novelties and Favors.
Valentine Novelties
for this children's
holiday in the greatest
variety > & &
E. P. BUTTON & CO.
31 West 23d St., New York.
'LAN MACLARGN' SPEAKS
How the Good Men of "Auld'- Scot
land Managed Their Kirk*.
The Re . Dr. John Wat .son— "l. in Maelaren" —
B pok« at the mveting <■' ''•■ Presbyterian T'r>ioi
it the Hotel Savoy last night. HI? addresi on
•The Evangelicals <.<i" the Kirk In th«> Eighteenth
O'ntury." was Riled with delightful -.■>-' of
the church In thai period.
President H.nry T. Brona presided, •" rili '■ ■'■■- •
present Included Mr. and Mr?. F. 11. Dodd, Mrs.
Hugh O'Neill, Mm. Mend*> nhalU Mr. and Mrs.
Frank a. Ferris, Jam's Talcott tin- •'•' Dr.
Howard Dutßeld. Dr. Robert JeVKenste. Mr. ami
Mrs. EdVarda Rowland WlllifT E. r.nuK*e. Silas
F. Bailor*. George H. Hyde. Bcbtl Foster, wuiiar:
>: rr r ane, the Rev. John Bancroft Deylns. Uw Rw
James H. load ley nnd Churl** Otla KtmbaH.
After the opening prayer by th* Rev. Donald
Saga Mackay. Miaa R«na Laselle sans "Bonnie
Bw«m>« Bfssle." "P. illy in Our All«y" and "Annie
am l< " Late . with Miss Caroline Hudnon, she
t-nn* "Th* Marriage of Figaro." ' by Mozart After
tin- lr»M MM 1*?1 *? Hudson nng "Oh. • onv ? l*h
M*-" and "Oh. if I Had Lovers In l'!rnt>.
A mws.iag* of greeting was Bent to ' in* layman fi
ml*»lonary movement meeting at th« Waldorf,
.■.vii i li« f th« Presbyterian I'nlnn whs with t:
In full • ilthough prevented from being there m
body.
Dr Wataon to!« lof the muscnlar activity of. some
«f the ministers in th*» eighteenth century, and
r lated a rtor: of twelve mmii I w!,.> ran!" •«»
the front of ii valoon in Scotland. Some <.-f those
irathered th»r»> Inslm^d ' hat the ministers firlnk.
When th* mlnlai»»r.s (Ir-.'l'.ni'ii ilu otli»-r« undfrtooK
to uae forc< but 'hey chang«Kl their tune after
ih» goo.l men hid Ml. I out 0v» or th«"m. Another
time tii«"T<- was a certain m«n »••':<> declared ih.it
he would nfver *<• »o c-huroh. The iiiir!.~t«- «> nt
thtfp elder* aftei hi] T.i'y brought l^m t..
church, lif.und him fa^t with mpes ;ii.'l maae him
llmtn to tl:<' ,-frrnon.
The n»v. ■••..■ le» }'. Fajsnanl. of the Lnion ra>»
lorical Seminary, gave the benediction, after which
a H.ipiH r wan served.
C, S. FAIRCHIhD BACK.
Sere York Life Man Ucturnit to
Face Indictment.
Charles £. FairchilJ, former Secretarj* ...'■'•
TrraMiry. nho, with George \\\ Perkins, Is ur.(l«-r
lnUl< Inn: I for hl. a connection with the so-called
"dummy" ptock li biu fera while a«-tiiiv ;>>■
ii trustee, of the N' York Life Insuranco
Company, returned fp>rii Rurope on t!i«»
steamship Cedrlr «>f »!i^ White S it Lin«> yes
terday. Lr.»<?r in the ilay E. P. Whitney. •>*
the law firm of Mccfarlan.e, U*hllriey & M ••. -
r< fr. Q?ked District Attorney Jerome if the latu-r
wanted Mr. Fatrchild i« give bail Immediately.
The Plstrlot Attorney w«td he 'vouM not take <:j>
the Insurance ca«'s« unl !l after the Thaw trial,
an 4as !i" <ii<l u>-t ihir.l; "■ ralro!>i!rl woitid
make any ait^inpt to Irav«- the Jurisdiction of the
court thfrr n*-*«l a nn hurry aNnit ■ „ t:i>
th» ball.
Mi. Fatrchild, who was accompanied by M%
wife. **lfi h«« had • »it li!« nJ>roa'l nhort by
thro* 1 montha In ci-dor '<> r^ttsrn in r'ac* 'h«» in
<i!< tment. H^ ".v»)\;!rl not iiinkc any fr«rr:sni pfat'
nient, ■"!'•> say anything now would be mani
festly unfair to myself nntl th»« others con
cerned." he said "I shall ula-: when this
thing In r|f?nrr'd up."
Mr. !":■<]•' !ii' ! wa« met down the bay t>y .l
number of hi» i»-r."t'n.".l tr\f:\<\f. ?v>} Jamea
Byrne, his counsel, wa«< .'it th<- r<l«»r.
Mr. Falrchlld >!;«** 1 «» .->rs nway ?inro Thankfslv-
Injt Dny. The Indictments agatnst htm nnrl Mr.
Perkins were returned on T)*-i ember ->. They.
:..•■ members of the finance committee , h a caused
to be trrincff rre<l from th» hr.nk« of the New
Tori Life to the books nt tt,<> Sew York Security
•lid TrUFt Company stocks "' the Chicago A:
Northwestern and Chli'agn. Milwaukee A- St.
Paul railroads, amounting to - IV ••"•'. follow^
mr an order from the Prussian government «-x
<. ludlng the Insurance company from that ooiin
try while it heM railroad stocks. This transfer.
It Is said, was ma<le for the purpose «>f deceiving
the InpuraiK'i; Department, and was .. transfer
111 n.imc only.
Ql'lTS INDUSTRIAL FIELD.
Columbian National Transfers It*
Policies to Metropolitan.
The Metropolitan I-if^ Insurance Company haa
taken over all the Industrial Insurance written
by the Columbian National Life insurance Com
pany of Massachusetts, with head offices 5n
poßton. The Columbian was organized ':;■! in
corportited on June l."«, 1902, to carry on both
straight and Industrial Insurance. The coat of
:!.• latter part of the business l^mmf.- so gre;;i
thai It was tin-ided by tho sto<-khol«l*ra to tir- >r>
I' entirely. Most of ;ho stock It held by the
policyholdei's.
Nofjotiattona for the Metropolitan t-> tak< over
the industrial part of the business have been
In prog i www for some time The amount carried
In thla kind of buirtneaa !>>• th*' «'»iluiililn:i com
pany was about $7,000,000, representing about
«l> thousand polh y holder* In New England,
Philadelphia, New York md Southern New Jcr
•ej'. Bonn tnon.tlis go th*> C ,|uml>i:m c-ompnr.y
cut ltn force of collectors from fivn hundred In
one hundred and fifty, after which It was ■!< -
elded »<» drop the industrial end entirely.
A large force of rlerku, under .T. M.XCralg
the rh el actuary of the Metropolitan; has t.^.-n
working on the pa pen of the Massachusetts
company for nome time, . nd the ta k will prob
ably be completed within a few days. It i<
pec ted t hat pretty nearly everybody will re
insure In the Metropolitan.
Mi ''.rig said yesterday that ■'■..- sort •■•'
•-i-,M..^ was the best kind, as luarly every one
taken over in auch rar?a continued the Insur
ance. He aatd that thi amount of the policies
taken over represented about the normal amount
of buclneaa done by the Metropolitan In six
\» eek«.
STJPT. KELSEY HAS NOT RESIGNED
Further Than Thh Statement. Declines to
Talk — Investigation of Count Method.
Aaaerablyinan Jamti T. Roger*, who m .i mem
ber of th« Armstrong insurance eamlnittae, was at
the New York Life Insurance Building yesterday
Inspecting the method of canting the votes in the
trust** eleetlcn. it i« understood that he did this
at the request of Governor Huyhea and th>- other
members of the* committee, which la to meet in
Albany to-night to diseusn Informal!' possible
amendments to the Insurant luw.i " poawow
hA^i^'?K 8 U e fJ WW ißltyi Blty ts ■ mm '' r ' ■«mpi« 1 method of
JL*)f IM ba|teta at such elections, but there la
wide difference or opinion as to lust how that tnrt
of the law should be modified. Aasemblyman Rogera
■aid he oou d not discus, tho war th« vote wa i now
being !-.andl*d ... his views on amendments to the
nsurar.ee law. "We thought, however.'^ j- «a!d
•that wo qhmild know at first hand Inii how"hi
present -.-;.-.. is working. None •»( our committee
have been here before, and we only know what wa
have •<( • is in the papers." ' *
morning. Us will return later in the week Dosslbly
with other membera^of the old committee. and will
make a careful nudy or the method of ' eounilna
v Ot ''^ i*, 1 . lho Mutunl LA** ••»» well ix* at l\l " New
lork Life company. w lI " * >ew
Bupsrlntendent Kelaey of th«- State Inauran.-p
Denannumt returned t.» Albany ia*t nigh ™£n£
i.n Inspwtlon of the work in collating the e^-ctlon
ballots. He said he hud nothliiK to Pay about m«
visit, except that h« w»* satutfl«-d that the In-
Arkt-d If he contemplated reHignhijj, Sui»e-j«!tenil
not ears to replied: ih«t Vt> ,f ot resigned?" I "dn
jiot care to di«cu»i th*t matter.'
Store Closes at 5:30 P. M.
Special Concert
For Lincoln's Birthday
TODAY'S Concert hi the Wanamaker Auditorium will be quite elab.>
rate, and thoroughly patriotic iw the musk render
An Orchestra and Quartet wiH r«*ii<!rr patriotic instrumental and
selections; and the audience will also 1-;- invil >in in t!ir singing
under the leadership of a competeni choirmaster.
The Program will be rendered tour times during the day — 10 to 1
A. M., 11:15 to 12:30, 1 :M) to 2:45, and 3 to 4:30 P. M.
Tiit- Auditorium will seat I.s<;<> people. The public is im
Auditorium, Second fl^ >r. Wanamtktr Building.
Turkish OUCHAK RUGS
In the Old Yap Rac Effect
WE have just received a large and unusually attractive collection of
these celebrated Oriental Rugs. They are distinguished for their
thick, soft pile ami rich red and blue colorings These Rujjs are particu
larly adapted tor use. in halls, libraries or living rooms, also for offices,
board room's or lobbies of public buildings. Sizes range from Bto 12 feet
wide by 11 to lf» feet long. Prices. $93 to 5215.
We also announce today a special offering oi
Persian and India Rugs in Room Sizes
Ttiev are in serviceable qualities, in dark or medium coloring! mostly
blue?, reds and greens, in plain grounds with medallions or small or medium
sized figures. About fifty rugs in the collect* in ?i/c< ranging from
(> to 12 feet wide i>y Bto 17 feet long. Here are a few representative values:
B ft. 4 in. > I ft., at $45. from $1~:
!3 fr. .": in. •; • '• 9 in., mi $90, from 5-'>".
\2 ft. x S ft. • in.. M 590, from $130.
12 ft. 5 in. x P ft. 1 in .. at $110, from 1130.
14 ft. r» in. x 12 ft. a in., at $165, from ??:».
12 ft. r, in. x 8 rt. 3 In., at $120, from ?i:»».
It ft a In. v 10 f». fi in., ■♦ $135. froni *•»•■"
Fifth floor, Wanamaker Building.
Put FURNITURE In Your House
While You Can Get a Half More
Than Your Moneys Worth
R v f '
shoni . to \.X \MAKER"S an er this
..._.. ] urniture.
■ read aboui fun
am i>nu' r in the paper, bni
the true spirit ol th« Kebrnan
• ' ' . ■
fi> re arc immense vari
tin house-^every piece ! n> t-> ti;o )> : i:'\ Wana
maker nualii \ bandar Is, it AN
wkr \<".! r s \vi w. « >F \ rnikf)
Hut. come and m?c th<
\otic< them price-hint?
Parlor Suites
At | th. from $30 — Thi plrc<««: mnhngany finish, velnnr t«>ver.
finish, tapestry cover. At $:■:>. team f? 1 " I—Five1 — Five ri"^??: rnahbgany
.\x *."2, from $4 — Three pi.^-^c; mahogany j finish, velour cover.
finish, tapestry cover. At 56f>. from ?S5 — Five plpoe?: mahogany
Al $42. rropi i^S — Thr»'«» pl^c^c; maboganv I fln'«h. tape^trv cover.
finish, em bowsed velour cover. At ??<"'. Irom 511" — Five !*>.-».-: mah^grvnj-
A 1 J4'. from $6.". — Five pieces; mahogany j finish, tapestry cover.
flnl«h. tapestry cover. ' At *»7."-. from $>*-- Fire pieces mshoga'-iy
At $t v frini $75-— Five ricces: mahopany l finish, tapestry cover.
Odd Pieces
At $If>, frr.tn 1 2»~ Hncl;«"r: mahogany fin- i It £3i'. from ?4G — Sofa; mahogany; d»nim
ish. silk plush ovsr ' j cover.
At 916.75. from -«.-■.• i At $10. from $«•>— Arm Chair; veloar
mahogany; damask rnr^r. cover.
\t 117. frurti $2T-'nenrh: mahogany; j At $47.50. from JSS — Sofa: mahogany;
ila;i,;isk e«Vf»r. j damask cover.
At %2 n . <•■:•.■,■ mahogany; ; At Ss'"". from *7." —^ofa. mahogany; <lar.i-
* ' : • ■ 1 1 1- cover. ! «.<k i-r.ver.
At $51. froi *■"—s, •• -<■ mahogany; ; At S.V\ fr<ir.i $100 — Chippendale Sofa; frw
(lamnsk rover. hogany; <l»n-.a*k cover.
Cabinets
At 923, from $35— Verhi»-Marttn CaMnet. ' At $115. from $ITs— Mahogany P3rlor
Ar HI fr.->™ $9V-n-Mahogany Tarlor I 9 aWll t t> bra*»-tnmmea
Cabinet; marble »op V» At Sl?s - f " ir " *l!><h-Vio*et wood Parlor
.. „-.- , ... ... «. . ' '.'rblnet. bras>-trirnn;?'l.
„,--; n . ■ "in»al.l n ' $90 ~ MahOKany Un " A ' *«5. from $:cr. --tMro^iar, walnut and
I ablnet, inial.l. j r Vl , rh^ T rablnet .
At $92. from 9146 — Circassian walnut Tar- At $27.".. from t- in RoseTrood Parlor
lor Cabinet, brass- trimmed. ■ Cabinet.
At $95, from $120--Maho{rany Parlor Cab- iizth. Seventh an«l Eighth doors.
Inet, inlaid. \Vanamak?r Huildir.g.
"Crown" Table Linens
New Importations
These superb Table Linens are confined exclusively to tho Wanamaker
Stores, They represent unusually fine ftmtlity anil beautiful patterns at vein
popular prices, In fact, they have «ol«l .<o rapidly that we have not been able
recently tn say a word in the papers about thcni until tht receipt thi> new,
large invoice just received. Among; the newcomers are -ix exceptionally
artistic design*.
A rose pattern Mfith dots.' another rose pattern with satin stripes, a beau
tiful iris pattern with spots, fleur dc Hs desijin with diamond figures, a •graceful
tulip pattern with dots and bunches of t:r:i!»».s with vine.
The sanH' linen i- shown in damask by the vanl, pattern t.il>li cloth- and
matching napkins. Si/e< ami prices as follows:
54-Inch Damatk, >."..- v. yard. Tlxlos Inch Table ♦•loins *.".:::. each.
•VMii,-' Damask, !■:..• ;i y.u.i. ; Xapkiru*. »2-21"a dozen.
7t-m.li Dann.sk. »1 ii yard. 32-Inch Xnpklm 11.75 » <\<w.
:ix72 In. T»i>] Clothe, *L.2:. c«. h. 24-Inch Napkins, IS jr. a dozen.
Tlx'.h* In. Table (^.th*. .Ul'.(>u each. "»i-inrh Napkin.*, ?:.;:. n t!".":i.
Linen Store, Second floor. Stewart lluthitn*.
Oil Paintings
Under-Price
Her* are a few suggestions from an
unusually large st<->ck of fine Pictures
ottered under-price during this Feb
rtiary Picture Sale: Wat Now
Ph'^p ami Ltiniisra;-"*
V. Peri i 51^r..tH> Xs't.iui
Marine ftom $C7.?.f> «4. t ..i'f>
Barnyard V«uvttl< $«&.oo $45.00
'at tic and Landscape
M. iiarillet %;s.•<<> WO.M
Marine .. .W. Webber M».(HI $40.09
Landscape. . Baraatinl .. . $55.00 JSO.OO
Shw;i ar ,a ls*ap«
K. Olivier $75 •■" $30.00
Spanish Scene. . .Janlinei .. MS.O4 $30.00
Landscape ... Bos»f,ir . 575.00 $60.00
Mnrin^ W. Webber lltß.<H> fIQO.OO
Dutch I«m«l?cape
Van C'ouver $150.00 $100.00
Sheep and Landscape
11. I*. Fletrg S3. r mi $C"-. fl •
Lan«lscnp« . . Boston ... **'•• M $45.00
Ninth floor. Wan:im«ker Building
Have You Seen the New
Printed Irish Dimities
A late shipment has just been un
packed. These pretty stuffs are in
checks, plaids and stripes, and are ex
quisitely printed in floral and staple
designs. Dainty possibilities here for
cool Summer gowns at small cost.
At 22c. 25c and 300 a yard.
Second in Stewart Building.
JOHN WANAMAKER
Formerly ,1. T. Stewart «t Co..
Broadway. Fourth .1 venue. Eighth to Tenth Street*.
Chat's th»- argument you'll nee«i
American Indian
Baskets, Blankets,
Etc*
> ».'• American Indian Sterc pre
sent* today some remarkably low
priced Basket*, Bcadwork, Pdanket>
: and Ciiri.'> that ought t*-» prove very
interesting to collectors and lover* of
Indian art :
! Pitao Ba--"k-Mj. $3.50, «ci»- $-j; $6.25, were
• Jli'.So.
P2?ket«. 17.50. were $15; $10. were
Attu Baskets, $7.50, wsaaj *: to S3*.
Pime Water Eottlef. $1 to $2, were Jl M
i to sr..
Xayajo Blankets. $17.50, were $25.
Read^J Papoos? Carrier. $25, was $15-
Porcupine Qutll asrtdse $4, was t] •
ilorsehair Brirtu and Whip $35. was $105.
Baisement, Wanamaker Building.
Valentines.
Thursday is Dan Cupid's busy day;
j hut don't allow humanitarian ideas to
! make you neglect sending the meS
[ sage that the day permits, and the
j recipient undoubtedly expects.
Valentines, from a wnnv to a pound— ls
j to $4.75.
' asasMaaent Stewart puiUling

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