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THEORIES OF SOCIALISM
ji\ 11. KJLLOCK LECTURES.
English Economist Begins Course at
Coin m bin University.
W. H. Mallock, English economic writer, au
thor of "Social Equality," "Property Bud
prcgrrss." "Classes and Masses" and "The Re
construction of Holier," gave the first of a series
of lectures on socialism and economic questions
under the auppices of the National Civic Feder
ation at Columbia University yesterday.
The professors present Included George W.
, W. IL MAL.LOCK, M. A.
Of England, who lectured on "Socialism" at Co
lumbia yesterday.
(Photograph by the Pictorial News Oomptuiy.)
Kirchv.-ey. derm of tho law school; Nathan Ab
in of the law school "f Leland
Stanford, jr., University, and P. H. Giddings,
who, thougl ■ it ■ nt socialist on the Co
lumbia faculty Socialist ticket only
aid C. A l■• a rd, the
other < • . ssors uli.i are looked upon
us fa-. b absent.
Mr. llallock's ! I rday was in the
lon to those to follow. He
gave an exposition of the theories of Karl Marx.
Those • | the basis of all Bo
ther lectures will be given to
ri and Friday afternoon, Satur
day morning: and next Tuesday afternoon. Mr.
Mallock said In part :
I think I may venture to pay that a large num
ber of highly educate*] persons who. actuated no
doubt by generous and unselfish sympathies, are
anxious to cla'tn for themselves the r.ame of so
cialists have never submitted themselves to this
discipline of preliminary scientific Inquiry- They
.•-• <- that under the existing order of things many
evils exist. They are persuaded that these evils
are due to the general constitution of society and
that the evils would disappear wire thai general
constitution altered. i=uch being the cape, they
lean to the curious conclarfcn t >.: the only alter
native to the existing staU- ">f thi-.gs is socialism,
and that. by leaping Into the are. we shall free
ourselves from all the evils of the frying pan.
They am like men travelling on a road rough, hilly
nnd'flnnfrerous. which interposes many dimciHleH
let ween them and the point which they desire to
reach, and who. Impatient of these difficulties, j .r
■pcpe. instead of Improving the road, to take a snort
cut toward the point desired across a quicksand.
SOCIAL PRINCIPLES DEFINITE.
Persons whose min^s are j n n condition so vague
cf this may be admirable in respect of their sym
pathies, but their opinions with regard to HOI . '. ■:i
as a practical programme are valueless. Nor is
mere, any legitimate excuse fur this vagueness. If
ftociallsm represents socinl principles definitely and
iderjtiriably different from those in operation now,
it is idle to talk of the progress which socialistic
opinion has made «• the practical consequences
which may arise from it; but practically this is not
the case, "whatever may be the fallacies invc ived
in th" socialistic gospel, it at all events represents
principles which, so f;.r as \'.'.cy ar~ definite.
"\Vt.at we have is no question of mere verbal cl< flnl
lion It is a Question of historical fact. Any body
of opinion which U-rvis to have a practical influence
Is. as .■. ■ fact, those distinctive principles and prom
ises !n virtue of which it .-nlists the mass of Its
believers and adherents and ;jj;i.'.« them together
as a party distinct from and opposed '" others.
And what socialism X v. hen estimated In I his way,
it Is very easy to :is;»r'.am. Finding that. In the
modern world no less than in the ancient; the fow
sire possessed of more wealth than tiio many, it
proposes to alter ibis arrangement by a Melinite
reorganization of society, by '.leans of which tho
many, without any additionil exertion, will find
their position revolutionized anil their wealth In
definitely increased. So f:ir. the promises of <-.ocia!
istn m< r»' coincide w!th :» dream which has haunt
ed th<- iinaginmion of intiltifj.]<s ever since civil
ization began. They nviv have Mghed for Utopia
as a plai;i woman miy *!«h for beauty, but they
have never, except on passing occasions at.d on a
restricted scale, organized their aspirations' into
anything like ;l practical demand, i.ml th'^ reason
J« "that though the proap«>:t of Utopia w.13 p'eas
«r,F they secretly regard it .is inaccessible. It
-ffected 'them as little aa the promises of .1 quick
cioctor would who offered to sell th *m ,1 pill wnich
wou'd -ij:;tke them all Immortal. It X Indeed, ■.
universal truth that r.o desire for any desiretia
object becames practical, unless the cond'tiens
t,r knowledge prevalent among those desiring it
nre BUCh as to enable Sh..-;n to believe that the
desired object is attainable.
WATCHWORD OK POPULAR SOCIALISM.
The practical outcome of the scientific economics
(<t Marx is summed up In the formula which is the
■watchword of popular socialism, "All wealth Is
due to labor; therefore all wealth ought to go to
th«» laborer*"— a doctrine in itself not novel, but. pre
sented by Marx a< the outcome of an elaborate
•yet* -m of economics. This formula, whatever may
In t it.i Intrinsic truth or falsehood. Illustrates by
| I, illustrates by
Its success as an Instrument of popular agitation
*h« fact on which I havo been just now insisting,
that desire becomes practically ;;ctive when ac
companied by a belief thai its obje.-t is capable of
attainment. But it does more than Illustrate this
general fact. It crystallizes and gives promise to
■ most important economic truth. The truth to
which I refer is this— that the possibility of redis
tributing wealth depends on the causes by which
wealth is produced. Wealtn, says irx, not only
ought to be. but actually can be, distributed among
;i certain class of persons, namely, the laborer? ,
.-ii.'i why can it be? Because these laborers cont
prise. In the acts of labor everything that is in
volved In the production of It. In other words,
wealth is like water pumped up Into -i reservoir,
and thence conducted by pipes Into Innumerable
private houses. If the men who draw it off at tho
»a.p« have nothing to do with the quantity that Is
pump«d up— lf. for example, the whole is imped
up by angelx, who can pump up as much or as lilt
»s they please— ••■••■ • the amount which
the m^n consume and the manner In which they
apportion it will depend in the last resort not on
the men, but on the atis«ls; for if the angels dial p
prove of the men's u«e of the water tney would
pimply cut 'ff the supply. If the men themselves
are to determine the distribution, without refer
ence to the will of any one .-is.-, they can do so only
because, as a matter of fact, th. •. do till the pump-
Ing themselves without external assistance. Such,
in an expanded form, being the aplicatlon wnlch
Marx mak's of hi.s doctrine that labor alone pro
duces all economic wealth, lei us consider this doc
trine, itseir. which remains the fulcrum of the so
clalistic lever. In view of this- fact you will not.
T hope, find i( uninteresting if I pive you a brief
account of the general argument of Marx.
The doctrine th.it labor is the source itf all wealth
Is likely to strike many people at first wight as
obviously incomplete. Capital generally, anil in
especial machinery, must, they will say, contribute
•something, but to such objections Marx has a
nv>s=t Ingenious answer. He tarts with th^ f/ft
that In Ihe m>derr. world, where labor Is minutely
divided, eacii producer or group of laborers pro
duces only one commodity, of which the producer
himself consumes little, and very often notnlng. A
man, for example, may not himself smoke, and yet
hie whole Industrial business may be to produce
'■Igarr The products of his industry are, there
fore, to himself valueless. They possess value
for him. or are, in other word", wealth only lnso
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FOLlowrNG^— ° TODAY> AT THE OPEN!NG OF MY NEW ESTABLISHMENT, I PUBLISHED THE
MY ASSERTION IN THE ABOVE CARD HAS PROVEN TO MY SATISFACTION THAT I UNDER
STOOD EXACTLY THE WANTS OF MY PATRONS. THE GENERAL SUPPORT AND THE INCREASE
OF MY BUSINESS HAVE JUSTIFIED THE LARGE EXPENDITURE IN ERECTING THIS BUILDING
WITH ALL ITS COMMODIOUS AND LUXURIOUS FITTINGS, WHICH IS ENTIRELY DEVOTED TO
TH E
AND ALL THE VARIOUS BRANCHES CONNECTED THEREWITH, THE DEPARTMENTS FOR
HAIR DRESSING.
HAIR COLORING,
DERMATOLOGY,
FACIAL MASSAGE,
PEDICURING,
and in particular the
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VOTED EXCLUSIVELY TO LADIES.
A CORDIAL INVITATION FOR INSPECTION IS HEREWITH EXTENDED.
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398 FIFTH AY. 36TH AND 37TH STB.
fnr as he can exchange them for other commodities
which he personally requires and can enjoy. I Its
wealth, therefore, la measured by the quantity of
assorted products which ho can X t in exchange
for the total of the product which he himself pro
duces.
1 say again, th-n. that in the minds of the masses
the attraction of socialism Is Its promise of an
equal distribution of wealth, and what makes them
regard such an equal distribution as possible Is
thai theory of production which the genius of Karl
Mars Invested with a semblance at all events of
sober scientific truth, and which as rll es all wraith
to that ordinary manual labor which .brings the
sweat to the brow of the ordinary laboring man.
WILL. REFUTE MARX ANALYSIS.
This theory of production, then, being the imßls
of popular socialism, l propose to. take as my Btart
lng point, and to examine it, not now, but <>n tho
occasion when I next address you. I then hope
to show you that, in nplte of the plausibility with
Which the Ingenuity of Marx invested It. this basic
doctrine of so ailed scientific socialism 1h the
greatest Intellectual mare's neFt of the century
that has lately ended, and. not confining myself to
any merely negative criticism, I shall endeavor to
put before you what the human factors In produc
tion really are. We shall then see thai the analy
sis of Karl Marx bears as little relation to the
actual facts of the case as the old analysis of mat
ter Into (ire, water, earth and nlr bears to the
actual facts of chemistry as modern science lias re
vealed them to us.
To a considerable number of people, without any
formal examination of It at all, this doctrine that
labor Is the sole producer of wealth will miKK^st
many ohvloim difficulties. If all lab( hour for
hour, produces commodities of equal economic
value. It will occur to many of us to ask how any
enterprise which sets lubor in motion can fall. If It
were true, any one employment of capital would be
Just as successful a.« any other. Every enterprise
would meet with equal success which found em
ployment for an equal amount of labor. A ship
which sailed Indifferently would b« Just as good as
a 6hJp which sailed well, if only the same amount
of labor had been expended on the construction of
both. Or, if the merit of the crews were In ques
tion, we could tell which was the most efficient
by discovering which had worked Itself Into a
Htate of the most violent perspiration These ob
jections. and others of the same rough and ready
kind, will HiiKgeHt themselves to the doctrine that
tliH wealth represented by a product depends <>n
the amount of manual labor that Is embodied in it.
And yet. In spit'- of all this, we are confronted by
a very curious fact. This (ioetrine with regard to
labor has been adopted, and is constant!) enunci
ated, not by socialists only, or by persons of detec
tive education, but we find it explicitly or implicitly
dominating the thought of oth< rs— of highly placed
politicians and celebrated philosophical linkers,
who look upon socialism .is a practical programme
with abhorrence B iskli for example, who re
pudiated :ill sympathy with socialism is never weary
of declaring that nothing produces wealth but labor.
Lloyd George, a member of the present liberal Brit
ish government, .■:••■ some months ago. declaring
that he was no socialist, but that he did -leslro to
fee more of the wealth of tho country tindlnK it"
way to the laboring classes, who alone produced
the whole of it. Again, let uh take Count Tolstoy,
who. whatever we may think of his eccentricities,
i« at all events a man of genius. Count Tolntoy
begins ono of his recent publications thus: "There
are a thousand millions of laboring men in tho
world. All the bread, all the goods of tho whole
world, all wherewith people live and are rich— all
this is produced by these laboring men." And If
v.c wish to bi perfectly certain what Count Tolstoy
means by laborers, he tells us that there is one
pure test. Ar» the palms of their hands hardened
by manual toll?
ORTHODOX SCIENCE OF ECONOMICS.
■ w many ar<- the objections which
ordinal) common sen- suggests to tl
all wealth Is produced solely, and m<
solely, by labor, we are naturally led to ash how it
• iany eminent men can stHl ac ; i and
.■!•• tViIK doctrine an an axiom. There are
several answers which I shall point out hereafter;
but th<-r.- I- one, and perhaps the most Important
to which I must call your attention now
This consist* In the fact that the doctrine h q •
tton is embodied, and Is every 'lay repeated, It: the
language of whal Is called th*- orthodox science of
economics: and the teaching <,t the orthodox
economist has, In this special respect, never been
rendered definitely obsolete by any denniti
thoritatlve and popularly accepted correction of M
Let us open any textbook of orthodox economics
we please and wnat win it t«*l! us an io the agen
cies bj which wealth Is produced? It will tell us
that the«e agencies are three land, capltHi and
labor. SOW, by land in meant all thf> forces and
spontaneous gifts of nature. Ah to these there i»
no dispute. LMflj.ute arises only In connection with
the aj?em !es supplied iiy rr.im Of these, capital Is
one; but capital, whatever may be Its nature, repre
sents human agencies that ar> past, not agem les
that are actually operating In the present, and
would \*> absolutely sterile unless living human
< ffo! t made use of it. It iR, therefore, on th«
nature of the living Industrial effort Involved in
the production of wealth that the whole discussion
t'lniH. anil this living Industrial effort if, by the
orthodox economists, Comprised under th" slnsrln
name and the single category of labor
If lal.or be taken to Include Industrial effort of
all kinds, to say that labor 1" the source of nil
wealth Is a platitude; and to Bay that nil wealth
ought to po to the laborers In liko saying tbsi all
wealth ought to X" to the human race. We hay«
DO foundation l.r-re for any Of the distinctive doc
trines of socialism. Socialism becomes a definite
distinctive doctrine only when th<- word labor
Is taken lii ;m exclusive s<-ns<e, and stands exclu
sively for thosw ordinary manual efforts by which,
as Count Tolstoy snys. the palms of the hands are
hardened, all other forms of effort und the claims
on them i.<-i i;« Ignored. H<> soon as labor
becomes definitely understood In this sense and
if In this sense appropriated by socialism as a
militant school of thought. It is Impossible to argue
with tlipm and nsk whether th^lr theory be true
or false, so long as we jiersisr in using the asms
:,■■'■ and considering under the name category th«
kin.', i.f efTot t which the socialists mean by the
word, and which t'.ey recognise, nnd thos.- other
Vinos of effort which th*>y definitely Ignore and
exclude The truth of the matter Is. as i shall
point out when I next address you. that the varie
ties of himuin effort involved In the production of
modern wealth /ire not one. but two, and that
these differ not only In degree <>f productivity, but
in kind !n th<» very nature of their operation; and
Ihf»t economists who attempt to explain the pro
duction of wealth to-day while Riving a single
name to two different kinds of effort, are like a
man who inslstn on puttinsr his hands into boxing
gloves, as a preparation for taking to pieces the
delicate works of a chronometer.
NEW- YORK DAILY TRIBUNE. WEDNESDAY. FEBRUARY 13. 1007.
t/v?. Qi)'VwiO'YbQ<yvi
A CARD.
rI V "^Y,V>"'? 'Al.A 1 . ■• Ul: , r ' T ° ANn DE ALT WITH THE MOST FASTIDIOUS AND FASHIONABLE
rni-V- . t' Ti'/u-Vi.^t.^ MY LIFETIME. I FANCY THAT I POSSESS THE FULLEST KNOWL
at -iV,- A HE" 1 I; , Kl *'' I!tKMI;N " rs AND IN ANTICIPATION OF THIS FACT I HAVE ERECTED
Tv it „■,■,.- A RESS A BUILDING AS COMPLETE AND QUITE AS NEAR PERFECTION
-y.I. IIS DhIAII.H AS ARCHITECTS AND BUILDERS WERE ABLE TO ACCOMPLISH.
ax 1 iw.-i^,,-,, , SATISFIED THAT MY NUMEROUS PATRONS FRIENDS AND THE PUBLIC
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COAL FOR GOVERNMENT.
Privilege of Hinting in Competition
Denied by House.
[ From The Trihur.* Ilur^ati ]
Washington, Feb. 12.— An unsuccessful effort
was made in the House to-day to grant to the
government the privilege of buying coal. In com
petition open to :(;•• world, for those of Its naval
vessels which may have to coal in the Philip
pines, and also to eliminate that provision of
the present law which makes it mandatory that
all coal transported to the Philippines, even for
tho navy, must be carried in American bottoms.
Although this proposition emanated from the
Democrats, It received the cordial support of
Chairman Fobs, who takes the same ground
taken by Senator Bpooner In the upper house
yesterday, that th.- government, being In no
sense a competitor of any Individual or Industry,
and l'l'liiß. further, the representative of the
whole people. Is clearly entitled to grant to ltH.Mf
privileges which would be Inequitable or which
might be Inexpedient if granted to private in
dividuals or corporations.
Underlying the support of this proposition in
the House is obviously discontent with the pres
ent tariff, which is regarded as too high by
numerous protectionists, who declare their be
lief that the Dingley schedules should be re
vised, although conceding not one iota of their
loyalty to the protection principle properly ap
plied. Tho proposition, which came up in the
form of an amendment offered by Representa
tive Kitchen, of North Carolina, was lost by a
vote of 51 to 84, the point of "no quorum" not
being raised.
Mr. Kitchen's amendment read: "Provided
that no part of this appropriation shall be ex
pended for coal In the Philippine Island*, except
for coal purchased from the lowest bidder, and
provided, further, that no part of this appro
priation Khali bn expended for the transporta
tion of coal to th* Philippine Islands except to
tho lowest bidders for such transportation in
steam vessels, and to the lowest bidder for such
transportation in sailing vessels, whether such
steam and sailing vessels .shall bo American or
foreign "
while the advocates of the amendment based
their contentions on the allegation that Ameri
can shipping Interests have taken the govern
ment by tho throat and are extorting money
from it, the rank and fllo of the. Republicans
would not accept that view. Members from the
extensive coal Reids were quick to rise in de
fence of their industries in the first place, and
to Join the mass of Republican members who
believed thai the protective principles of the party
were being assailed. There was also a patriotic
resentment to the suggestion of a plan whereby
the navy should. In a crisis, be caught depen
dent upon foreign countries for cool.
Those most alarmed at the earnestness with
which the proposition was pressed were the ad
vocates of ship subsidy legislation. As the da
bate concluded General Orosvenor. who Is mak
ing a final stand for ship subsidy, demanded
in a dramatic manner that this blow should
be struck. Chairman F<>sh was assailed by
the members on his side of the House, and with
some hesitation ho replied that they were taking
matters too seriously, as this merely applied to
a single appropriation bill. When it came to a
vote only two Republicans stood by Mr. Foss.
They were Mr. Perkins, of New York, and Mr.
Crumpacker, of Indiana, both believing that
they should support the Committee on Naval
Affairs.
C. M. SCHWAB'S BROTHER ENGAGED.
>Hv Teh-graph to The Tribune. I
Cleveland, Feb. 12.— The encasement of Profes
sor Edward H. Schwab, of Notre Dams Uni
versity, Notre Dame, lad., brother of Charles M.
Schwab, to wed Miss Edith Mi (torray, niece of
Sheriff McGorray, of this city, was announced to
day. The wedding will be In St. Patrick's Church
in the middle of June. Mr. and Mrs. C. M. Schwab
vr«l ouenA __-.:- ■ '■o--'- ~- —
OPPOSITE TIFFANY'S.
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Greek and Roman Gold and Silver Coins,
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DIES FROM FOOTBALL INJURY.
East Hartford Youth Suffered in Secret for
Nearly Two Years.
[By Telwgrapb to The TrlbuM.l
Hartford. Conn.. Feb. 12.— a result of an In-
Jury on the groin. while playing football two
years ago, John Alexander Crowley. son of J^imea
J. Crowley, of East Hartford, died yesterday at
his home. In that place, from Intestinal trouble.
Growler, who wan seventeen years old. was a
Junior in the East Hartford High School and
was captain and manager of the school football
team. He suffered secretly until he was obliged
to give up two weoks ago. He was an excellent
basketball player.
PREMIER BOND'S CONTENTIONS.
Outline of Newfoundland's Grievances Re
garding Fisheries.
St John's. N. F., Feb. 12— an exhaustive
speech before tho Newfoundland Legislature
this afternoon Premier Bond made a response to
the Secretary for the Colonies regarding the
modus vivendl with the United State* The
Premier explained the position of the govern
ment respecting the question, and said that cer
tain vital clauses of the Foreign Fishing Ves
sels act were introduced at the request of tin-
Imperial Cabinet to satisfy American complaints.
Accordingly, he said, no greater humiliation
was ever heaped upon a British colony than
was imposed on Newfoundland when the Im
perial government subsequently held in abey
ance the very act which enacted its desire.
Premier Bond regretted that the imperial
Cabinet would not permit publication of all cor
respondence which has passed between the
colony and the mother country In relation to the
agreement, but he gave a succinct history of
the complications. The Premier's speech was
not completed when recess was taken.
Store Closes at 5:30 P. M.
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Greatly Under-Price
This Is an unusually fine offering of the very best Imported Corsets, in
numbers that we shall not continue, because oi the many new varieties that
are coming in. They are shapely, graceful, splendidly made models, of beauti
ful materials, made by the best French Cor-ct makers. Now priced as
follow * :
$7.50 Imported Corsets at $3.75.
Sin Fancy Batiste Corsets at $7.50.
$12.?0 Six-pore Corsets at $8.
Fourth floor. Stewart Bulldlnj.
More New Spring Hats
At $5 to $8
TTTK pretty hats, shown in the Basement Millinery Store, have been ap
preciated. Women have bonghi them by the score, btrt we have more
stylish ones ready for your admiration today, at the same prices — $5 to $8.
Fashion has decreed several sizes, many colors, an<i a variety of new
shapes and new tilts— they are all here, in an unrivaled collection oi charm
ing Spring Hats, at remarkably low prices. Come and see the bright
display .
Basement Millinery Sa'..>n. Stewart R'.if.
The Finest Bedding Display
In This Country
Large Economies in the February Sale
On the Eighth floor of the now Wanamaker Building is an exhibition
of Bedsteads, Mattresses and Pillows, the like of which has never been seen
in any store anywhere before. It is the talk of the trade all over the United
States, and every housekeeper who sees the display is amazed by the assort
ment presented, and the varied beauty of the bedding.
During this February Furniture Sale we are MAKING IT THE BED
DING TO YOUR ORDER at the very radical reductions on prices shown by
the lists below. We have the cleanest, most sanitary and best equipped fac
tory in the business. Here are reasons for your giving us your order XOW :
HAIR MATTRESSES HAIR MATTRESSES
At *?? worth S2S— Filled with extra black At $9.50. worth $12.50— Large single bed
drawlng horsehair full-bed size. 54x78 In. size, 4Jx7S in.; 30 pounds,
orfe or two parts; 40 pounds. _ At $8. worth $10.50— Single bed size. 36x
,At 4Sx.> In.; om $^«w7'pirt:;^SS At n s 9 . 2 -or, H n n »S-Fli:ed with elastic felt:
Flze. 48X.8 in., one or rari. t ,^_ & p^.
At $16.50, worth $21- Largo single bed white ticking:.
Size, 42x78 in.; 30 pounds. Smaller sizes at proportionately lower
At $13.75. worth $17.50— Single bed sizr. prices.
36x78 in.: 15 pounds. SPRINGS
At 51950 worth $24— Filled with pure At $17.50. worth 931— Upholstered with
South American white horsehair; full bed Pure South American! horsehair; tufted
flze ",4x78 In: one or two parts, 40 pounds. top: al! dressed lumber; eighty spiral
size. •" A '° . | springs: full bed size. 04x75 in.
At $17.50. worth $21— Three-nuarter bed At $13 5Q Wt(nh $16 _ rpholstere(! with
size. 48x78 in., one or two parts; .1,. pounds. hajr; tut t*d top; elsrhty spiral springs; full
At $15. worth $19.25— Large single bed size. 54x75 In.
size 42x7S In.; 30 pounds. The above springs made la smaller sizes
At $12.50. worth $15-Slngle bed size. 36s at Proportionately lower prices.
78 In.; 25 pounds. Wanamaker T-ri-rail
At $17, worth $22— Extra black mix 1 Steel Woven Wire Springs
hair; full bed size. 54x78 In.; one or two At $6.75, worth SS.Srt — The best woven
parts 1 40 pound*. ' wire spring manufactured; suitable for full-
At $15. worth $19.25-Three-quarter bed J"!*™ 1 three-quarter- sixe metal bed
size. 4SX7B in.; one or two part.; 35 pound* "
At $13. worth $16.50— Largo single bed wire Springs; all sizes,
size. 42x78 in.; 30 pounds. LOWS and BOLSTERS
At $11. worth $13.75- Single bed size. :.;x , At $225 worth .2 . Selected geese
78 in.. M pounds. feather Pillows. 22x30 inches; 3 pounds.
At $12.50. worth $16. 50— Filled with special At $2.65. worth $3.lT— Selected sreesa
black mixed hair; full bed size, 54x78 in.; , feather Pillows, 24x30 inches; 31-,3 1 -, pounds,
one or two parts; 40 pounds. At Js> worth $4.s^— Selected geese
At $11. worth $14.50 Three-quarter bed ! feather Bolsters, 20x56 inches; 5 pounds,
size, 48x78 In.; one or two parts; 35 pounds, | Eighth Boor, Wanamaker Building.
JOHN WANAMAKER
Formerly A. T. Stewart Se Co..
Broadway, Fourth Avenue, Eighth to Tenth Streets.
MOEGAU'S ADIRONDACK PURCHASE.
Supporters of Water Storage Amendment
Urge It in Favor of That Measure.
I By Te!«'ura|>h to The TlTll— ]
Albany. Feb. 12.— The f.u-t th it J. rierpont Mor
gan has Just purchased another large tract of
Adirondack forest land was seised on to-day by
the supporters of the constitutional amendment
permitting the flooding of state lands as an argu
ment In their favor. This purchase was of 1.200
acres in Hamilton County adjoining the present
Morgan camp site. For It Mr. Morgan paid M 5.000.
\Vh«n Aj»embl>-maa Merritt, who I* ia.tharlr.jc
the water st->r:i project, heard of It he said:
The friends of the constitutional amendment
would naturally like to know how the Society for
the Protection of the Adlrundacks and the Board
of Trade and Transportation justify their antag
onism to tne water storage Idea in view of Mr.
Morgan's connection with both bodies.
They say that *«>•■•»> wage earners journey t;>
the Adirondack* for health and comfort, and that
the forests should be held Inviolate for this pur
pose. ■ ( agree with that thoroughly; but there 13
plenty of evidence to prove that pleasure seenera
— or. In fact, any men- are restricted by law ream
putting up a camp either on state land or a private
preserve. In view of th« 792,-lOt acres owned by
private Individuals and the 3.500.000 acres owne«t
by the etate. I can't sets where tha wage earner or
pleasure seeker can possibly be more excluded
from participation In the beauties oX the Aiir«a
flacks toan *i« la now.
IT

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