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New-York tribune. [volume] (New York [N.Y.]) 1866-1924, January 05, 1908, Image 19

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83030214/1908-01-05/ed-1/seq-19/

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E%IKT.E %IKT. HAS COME ALREADY TO BE WELLNIGH INDISPENSABLE IN ONE PART OF OUR COUNTRY AT LEAST,
fr-AI- LIONS SHOT BY YELLOW
s~:ne gjards on skis
r\i skis.
P-tak^c his • --■ lessons-
NEW-YORK DAILY TRlßl'Nfc. SUNDAY, JANUARY S, 1908.
SKI RIDING WITH HOF.SES.
twenty rest booses or stations in th^ great pre
serve that must be kept in supplies. These sta
tions are maintained for the contort of the
patrolmen or keepers. They are simple "sha> ks "
or cabins, fitted with bunks, a stove, cookin?
utensils and a "gTub box." in which are stored
bacon, flour, coffee and dried fruit. These rest
houses are used by the men on patrol, since
they are so placed that anybody on dJty may
be able to reach one of them and stay for the
night, no matter in what part of the park he
may be at the time.
The "grub b"x" of each of these cabins must
be kept Oiled, of .-■ and t< carry supplies
from Fort Yellowstone— the headquarters — to
each of the "shacks" is par; of the work of
the novices. The men who 1; su essfully
taken the rough course of ski running and
jurr.l '.r.z on Capil >1 Hill an- laden each With
from forty to sixty pounds of provisions in a
..r.d sent out to supply the "grub boxes."
And so they jet out. only to learn that while
it Es uncomfortable enough to trip on a ski
down Capitol Hi!!, it is much more disagree
able to trip and fail with fifty pounds of pro
visions to help drii ne's head into a snow
bank.
The men on this duty are game. Otherwise
they would not be in the army. Hence they
pass through this stage of their development
ar.d soon are fit for the work of watching for
; ers. Such labor is the reason for the ski
letaQ It means plodding up hills and over
plains, sliding down inclines and keeping an
eye open for unexpected crevasses and canyons.
It means all night tramps over the flaky snow
•when the thermometer is hovering- about 30 or
40 below zero. And it means danger not oniy
from the guns of the poachers, but from the
very temperature. One of the results of this is
exemplified in a picture published herewith— a
photograph of a ski runner brought back to the
post on his own skis. He was frozen to dealh
wbOc doing Eight patrol duty.
Hardly a winter passes without some such
fatal occurrence, but the men spend no time
in reflecting on it. And so the teaching of the
neophytes— lt -wrould be hardly fair to call them
the awkward squad— goes on merrily every year
at about this time on Capitol Hill. The candi
dates for patrol duty swing down, shouting and
TAKING A CURVE ON SKIS,
OFF FOR A RUN.
Officers' children in Yellowstone Park.
waving their balancing poles, in a nimbus of
snow dust, and there is not a thought of the
long night tramps and vigils in the death!;
cold when they go on actual duty. The spirit
of the drill and the spirit of the army were ex
pressed when on of the new ski runner? said:
"Freezii g to death? That's what we're here
for."
TO MATCH MIS COAT.
ri Walton Goelet, at a meeting of the
Astor Trust Company's directors, in New York.
said of a certain broker:
"The man's nerve is amazing. It shocks me.
It reminds me of a money lender to whom a
friend of mine, a great rider to hounds, one-:
resorted.
• -Yes," said the money lender to my em
barrassed friend. 1 will renew your note, but
only on one condition, .-ir— namely, that during
the next paper chase at I> nox you scatter from
your bag these- five thousand pink slips bearing
my name and the words. "Money advanced on
easy terms." Is it a go, sir?' '
OXLY PIPE DREAM?.
Fp in the choir l"ft the row- of painted angels
which ornamented the apex of each organ pipe
stared down into the pit of frivolity below.
"Ah," g-ushed the tall soprano, as she gazed
up at the remarkable looking seraphs, "aren't
they dreams?"
"Yes," murmured the short tenor, as he dis
agTeeably spurned with his foot the double pile
of hymnbooks which he stood upon to secure
the dignity of height, "but, like ail the other
angels we know anything about they are only
pipe dreams.*'
ONE OF THE DELIGHTS OF SKI-ING
A FALL IN THE SNOW.
MORE NATIONAL FORESTS.
White Mountains and South cr\
Appalachians To Be Preserved.
Tribune Bureau.]
Washington, Jan. 3. — The first practical prog.
ress toward the establishment of great national
forests to preserve the Southern Appalai hum
and White Mountain watershed- from destruc
tion has just been announced by the Secretary
of Agriculture, who, under orders of the last
Congress, has completed a thorough investiga
tion of the two great Atlantic Coast park r roj
• ■ md hat now submitted to the present Con
gr< estimates of their cost, which, it appears,
will be comparatively insignificant, considering
the vast gain which will accrue to the whole
country. With the White Mountain forests the
readers of The Tribune are already familiar,
but hitherto the Appalachian region has been
little known. The timber lands of the WLite
' Mountains are in the main held by a few large
companies, nearly all of whom are engaged in
cutting- extensively on the spruce stands for
pulp or lumber manufacture, and the govern
ment cannot hope to purchase in those moun
tains more than small areas of virgin timber
surrounding points of special scenic interest.
Much larger areas in the South, where all ;h«
land is cheap and where the rivers will be
ruined unless great tracts around their head
waters are preserved, will have to be taki
mediately by the national government.
Secretary Wilson and the National Forester,
Gilford Pinchot, concur in the recommendation
that about five million acres should be pur
chased in the Southern Appalachian region to
cover the higher watersheds of the following
rivers: Potomac, James, Roanoke, Yadkin, Ca
tawba, Broad, Saluda, Savannah, Chattah bee,
Coosa. Tennessee, New, Cumberland, Kentucky
and Monongahela. They fix the limit of average
price at $3 50 an a< re and ask for an appropria
tion of $3,560,000, to be made immediately
available to begin the purchases. For the White
Mountains they recommend the a- quisition of
not more than six hundred and sixty thousand
acres, to embrac* as much as possible ol the
Presidential, Franconia, Sandwich and Carter-
Moriah Mountain ranges, limiting the average
price to $6 an acre for cut over lands, and ask
fur an appropriation of $1,230,000 for immediate
use, with an additional $250,000 to bu
tracts of especial scenic \alu>- aggregating not
!ii.>r.- than five thousand acres.
"National forests." say-- s Wilson, In
his letter t<> Congress, "will mean the develop
ment of the Southern Appalachian and White
Mountain regions beyond any point which would
be possible without them.
"Much of the Appalachan forest has been so
damaged that years will be required for it to
reach again a high state <>f productiveness Un
til it does we <an expect a shortage in hard
wood timber. The longer the delay in put tin*
this forest under control, the longer continued
uri'l more extn me will be the shortage."
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