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New-York tribune. [volume] (New York [N.Y.]) 1866-1924, December 19, 1909, Image 5

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AIRSHIPS FOR ARM I
rrench Energies Largely De
voted to Aeroplanes.
Paris, . December 7.
The problem at military aviation Is of
vital importance for Fran. In regard
to arable balloons, France is greatly
inferior to Germany. The report on the
ytcneh '"ar budget submitted to the
Chamber "of Deputies by M. Cleraentel,
chairmafl at the Committee on Military
Affairs, shows that France possesses
only three, dirigibles, the old-fashioned,
worn out Vill»- de Par!*, the Colonel
Rennrti and the Liberte. On the other
hard. Ormany has twelve steerable bal
loct.s. each of two motor?, and four of
tfcxjar are already at their gheds near the
front ier.
General Brun, Minister of War. is by
to mtans discouraged at this, because
tv !n? opinion the next year must be
purely an experimental one. <I«ncral
fjrvn declares that 'no ste«?rabk- balloon
exists to-day in France or in any other
;-r>untry that meets the requirements of
war." Moreover, this opinion is con
firmed by the highest military authori
ties here, including General Bonnal,
autbfT of authoritative works on ftrat
«gjj- arid tactic?: • n*ral Hegron. for
merly commander in chief, and M. d*
mentel. chairman of th" military com
mission of the «ar budget. Tlt* board of
offiTrs convened to report on the utility
*»f gteerable balloons came to the follow
ing conclusions: "The dirigible war bal
loon, to b*» of real service in a campaign.
must be capable of rising to th» height of
I. .Vm metres and of travelling at that
■ iiifjd' 1 for several hours at an average
*D~-d of fifty kilometres an hour, and
mot have a range of at least two hun
dred kilometres." These requirements
ha-.* been embodied in M. Cl*m»ntel"3
report.
General Brun states that the experi
ments made a Kb the Repubtlqae during
Ore grand manoeuvres, shortly before its
trJ?:c erd. showed that the dirigible bal
'<?on was of but slight practical value.
General Bmn's reasons may be sum
marized as follows: Th» st«*»rabi" bal
loon offers such a vulnerable . tarsret.
with its immense exposed surfa^. that
it could be surely destroyed by projec
tiles from 75»m!Hbnetr« guns at an alti
t id*- less than t-<o thousand metres;
that steerablc balloons must now en
eonster ne^ 1 enemies in the shape of
jTopianes. which "would attiiok the vast
balloon very rau^h 'da - flotilla of tor
pedo boats might attack a battleship,
b'lt the aerial battleship is defenceless
tor ia-k of armor. • •
Th<? French militarr authorities, al
liiost fritbout e\<^ption, consider that
- ast steerable ballo«ons could not live ten
ir.tr-jtes if opposed by the fire of the 7r»
minnnetr* quick riring gun. which can
-o" 1 be discharged vertically, or if *x
r-os*-d to the aeroplanes armed with the
n^w light mitrailleuses. Experiments
•rlth aeroplanes armed nith ad rail
;<";*«=« hsr<? been mad<» here. a n<l an
s-. ia»--.^ attained a L»iebt of "75 metres
with his aeroplane carrying a mitrail
leuse urA a supply of ammunition. Gen
eral Prun ■laces imp'li«Mt confidence in
the aeroplane.
fh.*- technical report of the French
engineer officer?, extracts from -which
sr~ made public in the report of M.
'"■;»-mentei. thrrE setn forth the refjuire
rr^nts for the idea! military aeroplane:
"It must b*r provided with two motors,
one of wtiich should suffice to support
the aeroplane in the air. and in the
event of a break-down of one motor
•would make it possible to effect a safe
adding. The military aeroplane should
nis^j b*> able to operate at a height of
ai !<*ast live hundred metres and must
be abie to man«£uvrc against a wind of
llie velocity of forty-five kilometres an
hour. The aeroplane should be capable
of carrying two men. the pilot and a
military observer.** ,
General Bra has already ordered*
BereraJ aerop'anes of th^ right, Far
man. Voisin, BMriot and Antoinette
models. A great inllitarj- workshop and
trial srounde are to be established on
the government property at Brogues, at
the mouth of the Riv^r Var.' between
Xk-e and Ar.tibes. Construction yards
are to be built at Vincennes and at
Malcoo Blanche, and a school of pilots is
to be created at the Croix d'Hins aero
drome, near Bordeaux. It is interesting
to note that while Germany is going
ahrad UJ^roing her fleet of steerable
balloons France, on the contrary, ■ con
c^Riratiag her energies on the develop
ment of the aeroplane, which the techni
cal authorities here regard not merely as
nieans of exploration, reconnoissance
and quick communication between the
w ;rigs of armies or forces detached for
*pecia! purposes, but also as an engine
of attack and defence of Inestimable
value. -';,: C. I. B.
— ♦ —
PA TA CD A "KIXG' TOO.
Incidents of Manuel's Visit in
Par'iK.
Paris. December 1.
Parisians— -even partisans of the mat
tf-r-of.fa.ct and somewhat unpopular
Iresident Faili^res — delight in royalties.
Plumes, panaches and the glittering at
tribotea of monarchs. King Manuel of
Portugal. <* ho celebrated his twentieth
tirthday on November 15. and who, radi
*Tit with youth and enthusiasm, gazed
upon Paris with clear blue eyes and a
Pi'a*int, captivating smile, has won ail
aarti I saw him at the Auteuil
«"«*e.plechas<3 races on Sunday, when he,
■canned the racing card and selected
American horses — Stokes, belonging
to Therms Hitchcock. jr.. and Ben Ban.
tile property of Hermann Lmryea — and
backed them both to the extent of $110
••eh. to win the big event of tan day.
the p r23t R:rf.ard Hennessy.
Th* result Justified the King's choice.
fair Stokes won by half * length, and
th« winner left law other Am«r
(/ "an rival tar behind among the field of
fourteen M King- winnings amounted
"tact:? to 1137. After the races the
King returned to his hotel, where he re
rivedr'ived a few intimate friends, and dined
J r the evening with President Fallieres
a * the Elyee** Palace.
The Kin*- in a very ear?y riser. He
«**aa a cold bath at 7:SO o'clock. cits
4bci;t in hia maroon colored, loos« and
If you are
looking for a
Good Position
read the Help Wanted
advertisements this morning.
For Love of
the Children
help us not to disap
point them Xmaj morn
ing. We know many
suffering homes whose
address Santa Claus has lost.
Please send check at once to R. S.
Minturn. Trea... Room 212. No. 105 L.
— 2d St.
R. FULTON CUTTING, PnsM»mt.
N. V. ASSOCIATION for IMPROVING th«
CONDITION ot thr POOR.
j comfortable dressing room suit, opens
! his post bag, dictates telegrams and tat
j t*i-s and usually writes a long letter or
i telogram to his mother. Queen Dowager
< Marie Am«Ml<». sister of the Duke of Or
i le::ns. King Manuel has an excellent*
arpptite— it Is the traditional appetite
I of tli~ Bourbon*. The first thins after
: his coM bath he eats a. couple of eggs.
; soft boiled or poached, three or four
t--lic.es of buttered toast and a bit of
; lacon and drinks a large cup of tea.
He visits Versailles. th« Louvre and
; Th* Gk>bf>|tn tap«»i»try manufactory. He
; dismissed his automobile in the quiot
I fttw in HHd*»r on Monday, and. with M
i Soma Ro?a. the Portuguese Ambassa-
I dor. walked tirai innlnwl among th*»
j crowd, alone ' the Boulevards and the
\ Rur de V- Paix. He looked in at ■ smart
I tailor's and ordered half a doz«>n suits
: of clothe. He stopped at a „•„!, known
j jewHWs in the Rue de la p a ix and
thought a dozen gold watches, several
: han<Jpr>me bracelets and a score of scarf
pins, purchases intended as souvenir
pr*>s«>nt3 when he leaves Paris.
King Maine! was highly amused -when
a friend told him all about the little
I episode at the Op€ra during the perform
: ance of "Faust." at which he was pres
: when, owing to a strike of elec
trlciattfl made at the suggestion of the
irrepressible Pataud. the auditorium
; ■ '"i 1" very nearly being plunged into
■ darkness.
During the drat entr'acte the discon
: tTted electricians, who had long been
clamoring for higher wages, suddenly
cro«=«?d their arms and said: ■<";<-> ahead
with your scenery, if you like, but you
j won't have any electricity!" Every one
! knows that electricity plays i very im
i portant part In the second act of
! "Faust."
The electricians w»re obdurate. The
i director of the Op#ra. M. Broussan, im
! plored them not to make the perform
j ance impossible, on account of King
; Manual. "Arrange with Pataud," was
j the only reply. "Send for Pataud." an
i c-. »-,-.; M. Broussan.
Pata<id was sipping a beverage of hot
i water and spiced rum, known as *'le
j grog Americain." in a drinking «hop
around the corner. He soon came upon
the scene with a contract ill drawn up
ready for signatures. M. Broussan
j signed the paper, thereby living th«
■ efectrlclans all they asked for. Forth
' with til*' riectridty worked and the per
! formance continued after an entr'acte
that had lasted nearly thrpe-qu;irt<»r» of
an hour.
Pataud. jubilant ami triumphant, re
turued to fin'?'- his "grog Americain.''
"Wh^n ask"d. "Why did you seise this
occasion, during a gala performance for
a king,, to make yourself so churlishly
riisagreeabl"?" Pataud replied. "What
nonsenre: I am not embarrassed about
kings. I am a king myself. King
Pataud has quite as much power as
' King Manuel: I look upon him as a '■•■>!
league!"
All thip was related to Kins Manuel,
• who laueh^d heartily, and who seemed
; to think that the director of th* Op£ra
had been far too ready to comply with
' the strikers' demand e. Kin? Manuel *»n
: joys thoroughly Ma visit to Paris, and
I whenever he la recognized loud shouts
of "Vive I*» Roif rewound on all sides'.
c I. B.
THOSE ASTOR PEARLS.
Reason Why Imitation* Were
Used in Xecklace.
f The apparent mystery of "he presence of
j ninety Imitation pearls In tho $51,000 ne<*k
i lace of Mrs.' William Astor. which was
appraised with the rest of her property,
[ »a.« cleared yesterday by the statement of
a pearl importer. He said that it was not
• unusual to use imitation pearls in valuable
i necklaces, it often being necessary hi mak
ing up one of four or five strands because
1 of the dlSiculty In matching the genuine
' pearls as to size and shape.
"I know of many cases," said this dealer.
' "where It was necessary to use imitation
; pearls to complete a string when it was
' impossible to obtain the genuine Oriental
: article of the symmetry of the other stonea
on the string. Diamonds are more easily
; matched and it is not necessary to use
• substitutes for them."
From the report of the Tax Appraiser it
' was learned yesterday that the men who
j had appraised the interior furnishings of
' Mrs. Astor's house had placed very lovr
', values on many of them. Norman ii
j Price, an employe of a drygoods firm.
' testified that the piano in the sitting room
i was worth only $73, as It was dented and
j scratched. The hangings in the drawing
! room he valued at $70, tbe ninety silt chairs
i in the ballroom at $I^s. or about ?1 .• each.
The appraiser also said that the hall car
! pet was worth only Bat that four paintings
i after Boucher were simply the work of an
■ amateur and worth only *¥>. He said the
i low valuation on the furniture *• <v- because
; it was old and dilapidated.
: NEGROES ATTACK PATROLMAN.
Officer. Who Hap Had Many Escapes
Centre of Small Riot in Harlem.
Patrolman Boylan. of the ■Feat >th
street station, is not a favorite with the
negro population of the section of Harlem
near Lenox avenue and 7.34 th street, and
sine* last August, when he dodged I bullet
aimed in his direction, has had many nar
row escapes from being seriously Injured.
He ordered nine negroes to move along last
night, and when they did not comply placed
Frank Adams, of No. 227 Fifth avenue,
under arrest. The others immediately went
to the rescue
The patrolman beat them off with his
club, but the tight was gulng against him
when the motorman of a southbound
L/?nox avenue, car Jumped into the fray
with his controller. For a moment the tide
of battle turned, but. come one hit the mo
torman over th« head with » club and
knocked him down. When he recovered he
ran back to his car and continued his trip.
By this time, however, reinforcements had
appeared, rd later other patrolmen ar
rived. Adams and Richard Robinson, of
No. 24 West 13Uh street, were arrested and
char*'"d "Ith disorderly conduct.
MACCRATE FOR DIRECT PRIMARIES
John Mac Crate. Republican candidate
for Senator to succeed the late Patrick H.
McCarren in the Tth Brooklyn District, In a
letter to the Citizens Union has announced
hlm*elf in fa-.or of direct nominations and
alert in favor of ballot reform, though he
do« not specifically advocate the Massa
chusetts -a..
XTrrr-TTTRK DAILY TRIBUNE. S( vnvT. rfECEMBER 10. T9ofl.
a Jaecke[$ o
/»• <?=iftMccnu^ *Q
importing,' (Manufacturing*
Important I" ~ ~~
W* l . One exquisite Ermine Opera Wrap, new and ex- a aaa
mia-SeaSOn c i vs model— sß inches long, was $1,150; Now $900
UcLie at One Fine Caracul Wrap. Finest skins in an d»r|w\
Substantial Exclusive French Model, was $750; Now $500
D^J.,^* One extremely fine quality, Exclusive French + - -_
KedUCtlOnS Mode!) Chinchilla Coat, was $4,000; Now $3,250
One Eastern Mink Coat of Perfectly Matched CAA
Skins, was $4,500 ; Now 53,500
LONG COATS 50-54 INCHES
Russian Pony $50, $65, $85, $100
Hudson Seal $125, $175, $250
Caracul . $85 and up
NECK SCARFS AND MUFFS
in Skunk, Fisher, Lynx, Raccoon and Australian Opossum
at most attractive prices.
Special Department for Ladies* and Men's Fur-lined
Overcoats and Auto Garments
384 FIFTH AVENUE be^Sts and
TELEPHONE 2044— MURRAY HILL
GIRL PICKETS BAIT,.
Mrs. Bclmont's Offer to Attend
Night Court Cheered.
The news that Mrs O. H. B^lmonr
would attend the night court to giv<» bail j
nnen necessary in cases where girl pickets
were arraigned in conneetton with thp [
shirtwaist makers' strike, was received with !
cheers at the strike beadquaxtera In Clin
ton Hall jrjßtwda It waj announced by j
Miss Helen Marot, secretary of the Worn- i
an's Trade Union L.-a;;-:» that a center- >
ence will bo held to-day by the iawyeni it j
has Bjcured for Hie strikprs to arrange on
a plan tor prompt application for appeal
when strikers are sentenced.
"One of the girl pickets who has been i
sontenc^d to th«> workhoi-s<*." she s;i!d. "was
to havo b*">n married to-morrow. Boa is
st!U in Jefferson Mark.-t prison, and we i
arc moving heaven and earth to have the
sentence suspended or changed to a line."
In the Tombs police court Ann* Albert
and Rose Terr, two strike pickets, uere ,
sent to th* workhouse for BTe days for at- '
tacking non-union workers.
The executive committee of th* Af»«oci- !
at»"l Dress and' Waist Manufacturers- met
yesterday at th» Hoffman House, where
the officers of the association reported that
Nathan Lepow, waist manufacturer of So. •
111 Spring street, who left the association !
and settled with the union, had gone back
to the op«*n shop. The union ctrls eni :
ployed had struck the day before.
J. M. Rosenblum of .7. M. Ro«enblum A
Co., No. d West 2Sti: street, whose failure .
a few lay* ago was ascribed to the strike, '
made a statement yesterday as to tlie
causes leading up to *;;«> strike. The open ,
shop was maintained by the firm until No- J
veniber 33, he says, when the linn, having ;
larrre orders on hand, was forced to recog- j
nize the union to do business, as very
large stocks which- could not be carried
to next season had to be disposed of.
The strikers have proposed an open de- !
bate on the issues of the strike, with |
Mayor-"lect Gaynor or some other promi- i
nent man as chairman, whose decision is to
be final. • '
An attempt will be made to-day to extend
the strike to Philadelphia.
MRS. BELMONT ASSAILS POLICE.
Also Says That Foreign Women Are
Ahead of Ours.
Talking to a club of teachers and bu.si- .
1 ness men, "recently organized by Mrs. A. !
Farrell, at the headquarters of the; New
York Start? Woman Suffrage Association. !
No. 505 Fifth avenue, yesterday afternoon. ■
Mrs. 0 H. P. B»-lmont expressed the opin- ,
(on that the police showed marked disre- ;
sp^et for the shirtwaist striker*. Sn.- used
the word "bruta!" in d*-s«TU>ins: their con
duct, adding that having watcher) the police •
on picket duty and hi the night court she ;
knew that the presence of some of the ',
better dressed volunteers who are helping j
the strikers made a great difference in '
their treatment.
Alluding to the way the strikers told j
their stories at the recent meeting at the i
Colony Club, Mrs. Belmont declared "they
showed they understood the situation and
were too clever '" be Imposed on by the
fallacious arguments of their employer?.' 1
Mrs. Belmont also said in the course of
her remarks that th»>re was no occasion I
tor the self-congrat ulatlon hi which Amer
ican women ro frequently indulge.
"We are always patting ourselves on the ■
back." she observed, "MM the women of \
other countries ire far ahead of us."
PRIMA DONNA TO SPEAK.
Mm*- Lipkovska Will Address Suffra
gette Meeting in Union Square.
Mme. Lydla Lipkovska, a prima donna at j
the Metropolitan Opera House, outlined her !
plans yesterday for spreading the propa- '
panda of the suffragettes among •;,•■ sin,;- ■
era and stage hands at the Opera House, j
and announced that the would speak for I
th» cause at an open air m^'tinu which I
win be held in Union Square next Friday j
afternoon. ■
She has joined Uie Equal Suffrage Union j
and intends to enter active work, her eym
pat 1 being strong for th« radlcale.
TO CELL FOR STREET SPEECH. '
School Teacher Aiding Shirtwaist |
Strikers Arrested.
MIM Violet L. Pike. win said she was a •
teacher In a. nrlvate school and ■ suffra- ■
gist, was arrested In front of No. 4* West i
35th street, about .1 'In o'clock last evening, j
where she was making an appeal for aid I
for the shirtwaist strikers to a crowd of |
several hundred men and women Mlaa i
Pike wan taken Into custody by Policeman |
Ahrens. of th*> West 30th street station, for |
causing a crowd to collect and speaking In
the street without a permit.
Mlrt Pike was sandwiched between two
big cardboard etgnu, on which were legends .
declaring that thirty thousand girl shirt- •
waist operators on strike needed help.
Miss Pike orotest»-d against her arrest, i
telUncjhc policeman that -..■,. cttl- '
Lord & Taylor
Women's Silk Hosiery
for
Holiday Gifts
Women Purr Silk
in all colors; plain lace ankle and embroidered
effects. a special prices.
Si. I 5 per pair. Openwork Instep Hose
c r -, „ M 44 New Process Embroidered
?- V. 0 ? Black and Colors
$1-3,5 " {t Plain Black and Colors
$1. 9 5 " *' Black. Hand-Embroidered
52.00 " " Evening Shades, Embroidered
$2.85 " " Black. Embroidered in Colors
An Endless Variety of
.Embroidered and Lace Inserts
in Black. Gold, Silver and the New Opera Shades
now in vogue, at prices up to
5.00 per pair
Broadway & 20th St.; sth Aye.; 19th St. \
<:►-:. and had a rmht to speak where t>h>3
pleased.
"All right." said Aiirens; '"you can speak
if vii have a permit. If you haven't, you
will have to sret one. move on or be arrest
ed."
"1 haven't a permit." Miss Pike replied,
"1 don't Intend to Ret oni>, and 1 don't in
tend to stop speaking. >;., ahead an<i arrest
me. If you dare."
At the station house Miss Pike said she
was twenty-four years of age, and that she
lived at No. 43 East ."J.t street. She took
her signs with her to her cell.
THEORIES OF AMERICAN BOY. j
Suffragist Decides That He Is No Re- I
specter of Class or Sex.
Prof.\«sor Frances Squire Potter, zecr*- •
tary of the National Woman Suffrage As- j
sociation. has decided that the American .
boy is by nature no respecter of persons. ,
and ha.s to learn what eiaae and sex distinc
tions mean. Talking to ' ■■■' Women's Press
Club at tlie Waldorf-Astoria yesterday af
ternoon. ehe said .
"The average American boy would rather
play with a pickaninny in the, park than j
with a little Lord Faunfleroy In a nursery, j
Thlf may be duo to hi« natural proclivity [
to love darkness rather than light but It j
is a fact that many mothers find it difficult i
Ui break up then intimacies.
"It Is the same way,"' continued Trot"*
■or Potter, "in his relations with girls. It
never occurs to him that he should not play
with girls, or even with a particular girl.
until some one. teases him about It. and it
would probably be hard to make him un» j
derstand that Mary, ho can outrun Mm '.
now and da him up generally. Is fated to
become only a m'.ld reflection of himself J
in later years." I
Professor Pott, took the place of th« '
Kfv Anna Howard Shaw, president of th«
national association, who has been obliged j
to break a number of her r»c»nt engage- '•
men's on account of Illness.
.
TAXICAB RUNS DOWN BOY..
Taken to Bellevue in Machine That
Caused Injuries.
Joseph Sta'oholi. ten years old, of No. Si j
East 34th rtreet. wan knocked down and
run over in front of his home yesterday by !
a taxicab driven by Victor H. Slicker. He ;
received a probable fracture of the skull. j
Two women who w«re in the cab got out !
and hurried to the boy. They ordered ■
Slicker to take htm to B»-llevtie and carried I
him back to the. machine.
Patrolman John Knlpchen put the chauf- :
feur under arrest and went with him to the
hoapltal. The women went away in a ,
•-.•'-1 The chauffeur was locked up In :
th* East £lb street station on .1 char;? O f
aasaulu
TRIES SUICIDE AT EIGHTY
Woman Found by Grandchildren Un
conscious from Inhaling Gas.
Edward and Frank Kosslk. eight and
twelve years, old. ran upstairs yesterday
afternoon to their home on th» third floor
rear of the tenement at No. 334 East i.th
street an.i found their grandmother. Mrs.
Mary Jaspar, eighty years oli!. huddled
against the sras range in the kit.-hen and
inhaling gas from a. rubber lube v-hich
had been attache*! to the stove. She was
then half conscious, and the boys, fright
ened at her condition, ran down stain
asrain and told Ferdinand Clbuley, who
owns a saloon on the ground floor, what
they had seen. Clbuley hurried with the
boys to the apartment, and then had an
ambulance called.
Dr. aw— eh, of Flower Hospital, re
moved Mr?. Juspar. She la in a dangerous
condition and will probably die. The old
woman, according to her daughter. Mrs.
Mary Ko>Hik. with whom she. lived, had
been .suffering tor six months with cancer
of the head. Within the last month the
pain and increased grauly. and Mil.. Jospar
paid reputedly that she could not live any
longer In such a condition.
FIGHT TAX ON THEIR YACHTS.
Owners Hold Foreign Built Boats Ex
empt if Registered Abroad.
Eight nan of foreign built yachta fll»d
answer yesterday through W. D. Guthrie,
of tli. ! d v timi if Outhrie, Bangs * Van
Stnderen, to the government's action to col
lect taxes under the new lav., brought re
cently in the United States Circuit Court.
James Gordon Bennett, William L. Hark
ness, J. Borden Harrlman, Oliver Harri
man. Charles A. Starbuck, Francis L. De
land. Window IV Pierce and Harriet W.
Goblet wen? represented tn the answer.
which states that their respective yachts
have never been registered as vessels of
the United States, and that th»y do not be
like their yachts entitled to any right.*.
privileges or protection from this govem
mwt. They assert, therefore, that the tax
of $7 a ton on their repectlvc yachts, or
any tax on the vessels, which, they nay,
arc registered aa of the foreign countries in
which they w«r« built, would be unconstl
1 ai-inai.
CANT ADMINISTER ESTATE.
Surrogate KMtcham. of Brooklyn, banded
down a decision yesterday in which he re
voked letter* of administration iaaued aotne
time ago to Gertrude 3. Higgmk. permit
ting her to take charge of The estate of
her husband. Thomas C. Higglnn. Mr. Htg
glna died on May ft, leaving $3(V\,ono, The.
letters were revoked on the ground that
Mrs. i| rglni never received a divorce from
h»r first husband whtch ' ••« York court*
would accent ±z legal, - ' • .. i
5. Altaian Sc (To.
IN THEIR VARIOUS DEPARTMENTS, HAVE LARGE
ASSORTMENTS OF ARTICLES PARTICULARLY
SUITABLE FOR GIFTS, SUCH AS
MEN AND WOMEN'S AUTOMOBILE GARMENTS
FUR AND FUR-LINED COATS. NECKPIECES AND MUFFS;
LEATHER AND WICKER HAMPERS AND TRAVELING CASES. -
MEN'S FURNISHINGS. LEATHER GOODS. STATIONERY;
REQUISITES FOR THE DRESSING TABLE.
FANS OPERA GLASSES. SILVERWARE AND JEWELRY NOVELTIES;
-
WOMEN'S LACE NECKWEAR. SILK HOSIERY;
FANCY FURNITURE IN SETTEES. CHAIRS. PEDESTALS AND TABOURETSi
ELECTRIC LAMPS. BRONZES. CABINETS AND PORCELAINS;
JAPANESE SCREENS. PERSIAN AND TURKISH RUGS;
DRESSER SCARFS TIDIES AND COVERS; FANCY NEEDLEWORK
ARTICLES. INCLUDING SEWING STANDS.
TABLES AND BASKETS. . .
FURS AND FUR GARMENTS
THERE WILL BE OFFERED TO-MORROW (MONDAY). DEC 10*. -
HIGH-GRADE FUR AND FUR-LINED GARMENTS
NECKPIECES AND MUFFS.
AMONG WHICH ARE NOVELTY PIECES OF FOREIGN MANUFACTURE.
AT GREATLY REDUCED PRICES. AS FOLLOWS:
WOMEN'S FUR GARMENTS
of mink . . . $290.00.. $550.00
of broadtail . . 600.00, 300.00
OF ALASKA seal . 5450.00. ©50.00. 850.00
of Hudson seal . 150.00. 290.00, 350.00
of karakul . . 425.00, 550.00, 600.00
of pony skin . . 75 00. 1 10.00. 150.00
WOMEN'S FUR-LJNED GARMENTS
$55.00, $85.00 $110.00
ALSO NECKPIECES AND MUFFS
OF CHINCHILLA. ERMINE. MINK AND FOX
WOMEN'S PETTICOATS
ATTENTION IS INVITED TO THE ASSORTMENTS OF PETTICOATS.
OF SILK JERSEY CLOTH CHIFFON AND FOULARD SILK.
IN SOFT CLINGING EFFECTS. ALSO THE MORE PRACTICAL MA
TERIALS. FOR WEAR WITH ALL DESCRIPTIONS OF DRESS
BOUDOIR PETTICOATS ARE SHOWN IN A NUMBER OF STYLES.
WOMEN'S EVENING SLIPPERS
OPERA SLIPPERS OF SATIN WITH GARNITURES TO MATCH. IN
BLACK. WHITE AND LIGHT SHADES. TO CORRESPOND
WITH COSTUMES; SATIN SLIPPERS EMBROIDERED WITH BEADS.
ALSO STYLES IN SU£DE. BRONZE OR BLACK KID
BEADED OR PLAIN. r
EVENING SLIPPERS OF SATIN. SUEDE AND PATENT LEATHER.
CONSISTING OF THE REMAINDER OF SEVERAL
DISCONTINUED LINES. WILL BE PLACED ON 5 ALE
TO-MORROW (MONDAY). DEC 20*.
AT AN ESPECIALLY LOW PRICE
. LACE. BATISTE AND CHIFFON NECKWEAR
A SPECIAL SALE HAS BEEN PREPARED FOR MONDAY. DEC 20*,
TO INCLUDE THE FOLLOWING:
JABOTS OF BRETONNE LACE $1.75
STOCKS OF IRISH LACE ... - % 1 25
STOCKS OF BRETONNE LACE. WITH JABOTS ... 2.50
SCARFS OF CHIFFON 2.00
SCARFS OF SPANGLED CHIFFON .... 3.00 & 3.50
ETON COLLAR AND CUFF SETS OF IRISH LACE • . 4.85
JABOTS OF REAL VENISE LACE WITH BATISTE.
usually $15.00 & 30.00 - . . . vr $8.50 & 15.00'
SEVERAL THOUSAND YARDS OF
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BLACK AND COLORED DRESS MATERIALS
ARRANGED IN LENGTHS SUITABLE FOR GIFTS. WILL BE ON
SALE TO-MORROW (MONDAY). DEC 20*.
AT PRICES CONSIDERABLY LESS THAN USUALLY OFFERED.
m AttNM. MID 114 Iff* prm> l)fw m.
. V

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