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New-York tribune. [volume] (New York [N.Y.]) 1866-1924, January 31, 1910, Image 12

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RACE WAR AVERTED
(IB AX XKGRO PLAXS.
A frit 'a .<? Dislike Sanguih/s
Appointment.
Havana, Jan. ?4. Fears of a race con
flict growing out of the recent disorders re
sulting from the refusal of the management
of the principal American hotel in Havana
to entertain negroes have in great measure
abated, and the possibilities of further
trouble from this particular source have
practically disappeared. For a few days
the situation was threatening, and there was
n strong undercurrent of indignation
among the negroes, which it was feared
might not be kept in check. That not only
It was restrained, but that the difficulty, for
the present at any rate, was successfully
smoothed over, is mainly due to the per
sonal effort* of President Gomez.
The President sent his secretary to confer
■with th»* management of the hotel, and
rjmmoned to the palace General Cebreeo
and other negro leaders, with whom he con
ferred. He pointed out that the intrusion
cf negroes where their presence was
not desired was undignified and merely
.served to rouse the animosity of Americans,
with whom It was highly desirable that all
Cubans should remain on the most friendly
terms. He also reminded them how much
the, prosperity of the city of Havana was
dependent on the numbers of American vis
itor*, whom any danger of social disorders
would certainly deter from coming. It was
rxp!alned that the hotel people had no ani
mosity toward men of color, but that they
were compelled to recognize the prejudices
of the patrons of the hotel.
Th* press also appealed to all patriotic
Cuban negroes not to persist in enforcing
their rights at the cost of the rest of the
. community. The result was that the ne
tro leaders engaged to use all their influ
ence to prevent their followers from further
Interfering with the hotel.
In spite of this, however, the affair has
served to revive agitation, which always
comes to the fore at the least suggestion of
racial troubles, in favor of organizing a.
jrreat negro political party with the purpose
of controlling the government. "Prevision,"
th« organ of the Partido Independiente do
Color < Independent Party of Color), prints
the newly constructed platform of the party,
which contains these significant provisions:
The Independent Party of Color shall
be organized throughout the whole terri
tory of the republic, with a national char
acter, to maintain equilibrium of all Cuban
interests.
The republic of equality, sovereign and
independent, without race discriminations
r>r social antagonisms, shall be our ser
vir<\
We promise that all Cubans fit to be in
it shall figure in the diplomatic corps, and
that as a matter of preference and urgent
necessity citizens of the colored race shall
h*> appointed, but the republic shall be
represented as it is.
Th* 1 distribution into colonies of the
mate lands among native Cubans who lack
means, preference always being given to
i those lacking aptitude for government of
fice.
As a matter of morality, we shall work
for the revision and localization of all
concessions granted from the beginning
of the first American intervention.
To what extent the promoters of the new
i movement may be successful remains to be
>-<er,. but there can be no doubt that if the
organization of the negro race as a po
litical party should ever be effected it
would rule the Republic of Cuba. It is pos
sible that the party may cut some figure
in the elections to be held next summer,
for which th* first notes of preparation are
imw i.« i; ? heard.
The innortance of the Congress elections
to •«■ held in July can hardly be overestl
jnattd. It is not so much a question of
which party shall return the greater num
ber of candidates as whether the indepen
dent republic unaided by American super
\ -s-ion, shall prove itself competent to con
du't an absolutely fair and peaceful elec
tion In the general election conducted
under the administration of Governor Ma
goon the whole Congress, representing
firhty-two districts, was elected, and then
Ma were drawn to determine which Con
crcs*men should remain in for four years
and which for the t-lmrt term of two years.
Tii» places of tl)*»!»e forty-one outgoing Con
gressmen are now to be filled.
It Is at present impossible to make any
sort of prediction of the result, particularly
•• view of the confusion of party lines re
p';iting from the continued failure of the
negotiations to effect a fusion of the rival
WgueHsta and Zayista factions of the Lib
eral party. «•!!<■ of the results of this has
been » disposition on the part of both to
coquette with th« Conservatives, who are
pursuing a careful course under the direc
tion of Dr. Gonzales Kanusa. with the evi
«lent Intention of profiting by the Liberal
dissensions. So far the Conservatives have
refrained from carrying out their pro
gramme of open war against the adminis
tration, which was announced just before
i • *• opening of Congress.
President Gomez's appointment of Sena
tor Manuel Sanguily as Secretary of State
ends the lons suspense regarding that Im
portant office. it is significant that the
President should have gon.? out of the
rank? of all political parties to select Ben
- •<-„- S3nguily, who has ever been an inde
pendent of the independents. While the
Cuban press rally approves the ap
pointment. Fan;: being widely popular
as -a veteran of the Ten Years' War. as a
patriot, orator and scholar, Americans are
disposed to regard the President's choice
>>?■ unfortunate In view of Ranguily's well
known and openly- avowed ' hostility to
everything American.
The Senator was a resident of Harlem
during the War of the Revolution and re
turned to Cuba under th^ first intervention,
busying himself at once with protests
against the interference of- the United
States in the affairs of Cuba. He is the
author of several unsuccessful bills in Con
(ress to restrict the immigration of foreign
ers and to prevent their acquisition of land
in Cuba. In one of his impassioned ora
tions be denounced the influence of Ameri
ran settlers and bewailed the coming time
when a/hero now were Cuba's virgin for
. v ii, re would be clearings, "ringing with
the laughter of golden-haired Anglo-Saxon
children.** Senator Sanguily is ever for
"<"uba for the <übani=," no matter a? what
ecet.
January - >s » will mark the end of the first
year's existence of the new republic, and,
on the .whole, the country has much to be
The
Tribune
Almanac
1910
At Newsstands
or
By Mail
25 Cents
thankful for. The only instance of armed
resistance to authority was the abortive
uprising in February at Taguayabon, in
Santa Clara Province. "With the magnifi
cent supar crop now being harvested, Cuba
enters on her second year of independence
■with the happiest prospect of material
prosperity.
WOK IX NICARAGUA.
Estradas Representative At
tacks Rule of Madrid.
Adolfo Vivas, who is one of the repre
sentatives in this country of General Juan
J. Estrada, the leader of the insurrection
in Nicaragua, returned to this city on Sat
urday from Washington, where he has been
busy on his mission. Senor Vivas received
letters on his arrival here from Bluefields.
which said that Managua, the capital:
Chontales, Matagralpa. Masaya and Gran
ada are all giving th^ir support to the in
surrection. "Madriz, who is acting as Pres
ident." said Befior Vivas, "lacks arms, am
munition and money, and the feeling
against his rule is spreading over the whole
republic. Madriz is doing as badly as Ze
laya did."
Regarding the situation in Nicaragua.
Sefior Vivas said:
"There is no other way to have peace
and a stable government in that country
but by the triumph of General Estrada's
army. Dr. Madriz is only the continuation
of Zelaya's reign. He has excited to the
utmost the feeling of sectionalism In Nicar
agua, which may lead to anarchy and
threatens the life of the whole nation. In
this disgraceful work he is helped by
Irias, Zelaya's Premier, and Francisco
Baca. Madriz's Premier now, an enemy of
th© foreigner.
'While Madriz is trying to make tlie
public believe that he was going to prose
cute the murderers of the Americans Can
non and Groee. in an effort to gain the
sympathy of the United States, all the
press of Managua and Leon, under abso
lute control of Madriz, Indulges In undig
nified and savage attacks upon th«
United State?, with the purp 0^ of raising
anti-American feeling. At the same time
Madriz himself asks the United States to
arbitrate in the war, because he knows
that public opinion Is against him and his
downfall is near. He is Faying in his pub
lic speeches that the United States is en
couraging the revolution— the very same
words that Zelaya said in Mexico.
"Now Madriz has issued another forced
loan of one million peso?, which is going
to be extracted from the people of Granada
specially. This means that the period of
ransacking inaugurated by Zelaya is at full
swing to-day. The jails are again full,
with prisoners including some of the best
people from Granada. Managua and Riva?.
Why does Madriz jail these people? Be
cause he is aware that they represent the
best classes, who are in absolute sym
pathy with Genera! Kstrada. He hopes to
destroy by violence the already clear trend
of public opinion.
"By direct orders of Madriz all the laborers
of the different farmers have been recruit
ed, thus inflicting a severe loss on the coun
try by the impossibility of collecting the
crops. And not only this, but he has par
alyzed the commerce with the western side
of Nicaragua. There has been no mail to
the merchants here since he went into
power. All the correspondence to mer
chants or private citizens in this country
is held up by Madriz.
"Under the rule of Madriz there is no se
curity for life, property or any right what
ever. He went into power saying that he
was looking for peace. He has inaugurated
another system of plundering, oppression
and persecution. The triumph of General
Kstrada is a social necessity in Nicaragua
and will be accomplished at any sacrifice."
NIEDERSTEIN PAYS TO-DAY.
John Nicderstein, former County Clerk
cf Queens, will pay to the City Chamber
lain this morning the receipts of his office
for December, over which there has been
a delay and for which the Attorney Gen
eral's office threatened to take action. The
amount is more than $12,000. At Mr.
Xifderstein's home, in Richmond Hill,
where the announcement was made last
evening, it was sai.l he was too ill to be
seen. Mrs. Niederstein said that her hus
band was on Ins way to Manhattan on
Saturday to make a hut one
of his horses fell in the road, and he post
poned the trip until Monday.
BROOKLYN POLICE UNEASY.
Dire things for the members of the Po
lloe Department in Brooklyn are predicted
to follow the submission of the report of
Deputy Commissioner Reynolds to Com
missioner Baker. Mr. Reynolds has for
some days past kept the inspectors con
npcted with his office busy getting infor
mation for him to embody in his report
to Mr. Baker. Mr Reynolds's Inspection
trips have made the policemen, from pa
trolmen up, uneasy, and they await with
dread the submission of his report.
FIND FREIGHT THIEVES' BOOTY.
<;orKis valued at $5,000, and which wore
part of $76,000 wortli of booty secured by
a gang of freight car thieves that operated
last fall between Buffalo and Rochester.
were identified yesterday at Police Hond
quarters, Bayonne^ by detectives from
Rochester and the West Shore and Xew
York Central railroads. The police are
searching for the leader of thf gang, who Is
believed to have shipped the goods to
Bayonne. He is wanted also, it is said, for
arson and burglary in Rochester.
MUTUAL LIFE BREAKS RECORD.
The annual statement of the Mutual Life
Insurance Company, just issued, shows
that the company closed its sixty-seventh
year with an Increased amount of insur
ance of $1,441,323,848 and with increased
H-sfts of $560.122,367 61. According to
the statement, the company paid out $54,
f0P.648 &6 to policyholders and their bene
ficiaries last year. This is said to be the
largest amount *»ver before .so paid In a
single year by any insurance company in
the world.
TWO FATALLY WOUNDED IN DUEL.
Middlesboro, Ky. f Jan. 30.— 1n a pistol
oiK-1 at Kdg^w-ood, near hero, to-day, a
deputy sheriff. Gordon Givens, and Benja
min Gatliff. a miner, were both mortally
wounded. Given.- war: attempting to arrest
Gatliff on a charge nt disorderly conduct.
A CJomprchensivc
Little Volume
That Gives You
Practical Information
As Essential to
the Business
Man as an
Encyclopaedia
Full of Facts
>^^^S ■ ";- ■~ -• ■-: ■■>'»'.-"•» r-.- . ■ • , . ■■...■
MONDAY,
MOVING ON MADRIZ
Estrada Preparing to Attack
Govern me t Troops.
Bluefields, Nicaragua, Jan. 30.—Gen
eral Kstrada has learned that 700 of DM
M;i«iri7. troops are intrenching north of
Grey town, and in consequence he and
General Matuty are arranging to head
an expedition to that district. It is ex
pected that. the two generals, with; soo
men, will leave here to-morrow morning
on the steamers Senator and Blanca.
General Estrada will direct the troops
on the Senator, which was recently char
tered by the provisional government.
There are rapid-flrers aboard the Blanca.
Estrada has been waiting for an op
portunity to engage the Madriz forces at
Greytown. but up to the present they
have remained within the limits of the
city, practically under the protection of
Great Britain, whose representative re
cently issued an ultimatum that no. tight
ing would be permitted in Greytown. on
account of the large number of British
subjects there.
The United States cruiser Tacoma and
the British cruiser Kcylla are now at
GreytoTi n.
JAPANESE IN PULPIT.
leading Men in New York
Colony Speak in Christ Church.
Pr. Jokichi Takamin«, president of \he
Nippon Club, and K. Makamura. editor of
tlie Japanese "Commercial Weekly," spoke
from tho pulpit of Christ Church, Broad
way and 71st street, at last night's ser
vice.
The Japanese physician said that a
warm friendship is entertained by the
Japanese for America, and he cited many
instances to show that the Japanese In
American universities fifteen and twenty
years ago are now directing the govern
mental affairs of the island empire.
"The. Japanese youths now studying in
Tale. Columbia, Harvard, Cornell and in
the other American colleges and universi
ties." he added, "were destined to shape the
future of Japan."
The Japanese editor made a strong plea
for the naturalization of the Japanese.
He said that the exodus of Japanese who
had come here before the passage of the
exclusion act. while it might cause some
Americans to rejoice, really was a dan
ger, as "the fewer Japanese in America
the less friendly will be the commercial
and other relations between the two
lands."
Dr. Takamine said the Japanese began
coming to Xew York in 1876, and when
the doctor came to this city, in 1881.
there were, he said, only fifty of his coun
trymen here. The number grew to three
hundred by 1890. while in the next nine
years it ran up to two thousand, but re
cently has been decreasing and now is
about fifteen hundred.
Dr. Takamine said that the trade be
tween the two countries has been increas
ing at a wonderful rate, declaring that tlie
business in 1908 was 250 per cent more
than In 1898. He was glad to learn, he
said, that representative Americans from
business life, literature and journalism
will be invited to visit Japan next year.
MARINE INTELLIGENCE.
MINIATURE ALMANAC.
Sunrise. 7:12; sunset, 5:1«; moon eels. 11:84;
noon's age, CO days.
HIGH WATER.
A.M. P.M.
Sand y Hook 11:40 ,
Governor's inland 12:05 12:09
Hell Gate 1:55 1:68
WIRELESS REPORTS.
' The Amerika, reported as 735 miles 'am of
Sandy Hook at 4 a in yesterday, is expected to
dock Tuesday forenoon.
The Nectar, reported as 5.V) miles east of
Bandy Hook at Sam yesterday, is expected to
dock Tuesday forenoon.
The Columbia, reported as 3f>3 miles east of
Sandy Hook at noon yesterday. Is expected to
dock this forenoon.
The I^aurentic. reported as 323 miles east of
Sandy Hook at tt p in yesterday, is expected to
dock this afternoon.
T,.i Bretagne, reported an 103 miles east of
Sandy Hook at 8 P m yesterday, is expected to
<sock this forenoon.
Th Duca di Genova, reported as 260 miles
east of Sandy Hook at noon yesterday, is ex
pected to dock this forenoon.
The Kaiser Wllholm d<»r Gross*, reported as
785 miles east of Sandy Hook at 8:15 p m yes
terday, is expected to dock Tuesday forenoon.
The Umbria, reported as 198 mites cast "f
Bandy Hook at 9 p m yesterday, is expected to
dock this forenoon.
INCOMING STEAMERS.
TO-DAT.
Vessel. From. Line
•Columbia Glasgow, Jan 22 Anchor
•ITmbria Liverpool, Jan 22 Cunard
•LAurentic Liverpool. Jan 22.. White Star
•Stateiidam Rotterdam. Jan 22. .Hoi] Am
*Ija Bretagne Havre, Jan 22 Kren.-h
•Grotava Bermuda, Jan 29.. R M S P
•< 'oamo San Juan, Jan 26. N T& P R
•PTmudian Bermuda. Jan L"9 Quebec
Floride — .Havre, Jan 15 French
Italia Palermo, Jan \o Anchor
Mar Adriatic* Seville. Jan 14...'. -
Nancvl.ee Swansea. Jan 13 —
Louisiana — . . .Chrlstianla, Jan ]4..5e Amer
Duca d! Genova Naples. Jan 19 Italian
Oppurg Seville. Jan 14
("hlcapo r-ity Ssjnra. Jan 15 Bristol
Ottawa Sunderland, Jan 16
Vaderland Antwerp, Jan 22... .Red Star
Minnetonka Southampton. Jan 22..Atl Tr
Ni.olal II Dartmouth. Jan 17...
Zulia Ijß. Guayra. Jan 22. ..Red D
Antilles N^w Orleans, Jan 23. .So Par.
Xl Paso Galveston, Jan 28 So Pac
TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 1.
•Amerika Hamburg:. Jan 22..Hamb-Ani
•KaiperderG Bremen. Jan 55..N <» IJoyd
Trayali Barbados, Jan 24 Booth
•Havana Havana. Jan 20. Ward
•Gall-la Barbados, Jan 24.Hamb-Am
•Marowtjne Trinidad. Jan 25 D W I
•Slblrla Kingston, Jan 27..Hairh Am
Neckar Bremen. Jan 20 . .N O IJoyd
Arpentlna Palermo. Jan 1f» .. -Austrian
F.I Dia Galveston. Jan 28. ...88 I'.ic
City Of Cola robiM Savamiah. Jan 20.. Savannah
WEDNEPDAT. FEBRUART 2
•i 'row r. of Grenada. Trinidad, -lan 2ft. . Trinidad
•i Mierookee Turks Island. Jar 27. ..C1yde
Anna Oran. Jan 21
American Puerto M*x. Jan 27 . Am-Haw
San Marcos Galveston, Jan 27 Mal!"r-.
♦Brings mall.
OUTGOING STEAMERS.
TH-PAT.
Malt Vessel
Vessel. For. Lino. closes. calls.
Surinam-, Barbados, DW I. .11 :00 a. m 1:00 m
TUESDAY. FEBRUARY 1.
Navaho*. S Domingo, Clyde. .ll:oo a m 1:00 pm
Noordam. Rotterdam. Holl-Am 9:0 oam
Europe. Naples, I.a. V»>locfl...
C of ' Atlanta. Savannah. Say. - a;oOpm
Mohawk. Jacksonville. Clyde. 1:00 p m
WEDNESDAY. FEBRUART 2.
Umbria, Liverpool. Cunard... .''Jam 0:00 am
Celtic Azores. White Star... S:.*ioam 12:00 in
Bermudlan. Bermuda, Quebec 8:00 a m 10:00 am
Ar.con. -Cristobal. Paiwnia. . ..11:30 am- 3:00 pm
Bernard. Para. Booth 12:00 m 840 Pin
San Jaclnto, Nassau, Mallory 0:00 am 12:00 m
Orotava Bermuda. R M S P. — 10:00 a in
Italia, Palermo. Anchor
Finland. Antwerp. Red Star.. — ' 10:00 am
Comanch*. Jacksonville, Clyde- — 1:00 pm
Alamo. Tampa. Mallory 12:00 m
TRANSPACIFIC MAILS.
Clcse in N T
Destination and steamer. P.M.
Hawaii. Guam and Philippine Islands
'via Sail Francisco)— V S trans
port , To-d»y, 6 30
Hawaii and specially addressed corre
spondence for Japan, Core* and
Ch!»a (via San Francisco) —Man
churia F«b 8.6:80
Japan. Corea and China (specially ad
dressed only) (via Seattle) Ay
merlc F«b 8, 6;SO
Japan, r«rea. China mid Philippine
Islands (via Vancouver and Vic
toria. B C>— Empress of Japan Feb 4.6.^0
Sa moan Islands, New Zealand and
Australia 'except West) (via Han
Francisco)— Earl of Elgin . Feb 6. 6:00
Hawaii <\la San Francisco)—Ala
meda |>b 7,6:30
Hawaii. Japan Core*, China and
Philippine Inlands < via Kan Fran
eisooi— Chlyo Mam . ... Feb 10. fliSO
Japan. Corea nn-1 China (via Tacoina)
— AntHocbua-..., Feb It v.-d
Reduction of 20%
Diamond and Gold Jewelry
Pearl Necklaces
Old English and Modern Silver
Howard & Co
Fifth Avenue and Forty-Seventh St.
Thin offer i* for a limited time, and made in order t& facilitate
tbf settlement of the estate of the late Mr. J. P. Howard.
A fine bio chunk has been
taken out of all our overcoat
prices- — the final markdown of
the season.
That is, almost all—
tt.023 overcoats >Cere marked
down and 20 overcoats left at
their original prices.
Regular and fancy Winter
overcoats both included.
Men's and youths' sizes from
32 to 52 chest.'
The reductions line up like
this—
316 were $18.
399 were $20.
524 were $22.
63 were $2.5.
$15 now.
649 were $2.5.
632 were $28.
73 were $32.
84 were $35.
$20 now.
172 were $30.
540 were $32.
426 were $35.
69 were $38.
41 were $42.
58 were $45.
$25 now.
1212 other overcoats having I
been marked down from $8 to i
$20 are now priced $30 and $40. >
To-day's the day! ;
Rogers Peei & Company.
Three Broadway Stores^
at at at
Warren st. 13th st. 34th st.
FIJI Island?, New Zealand and Aus
tralia, (except West) (via Vancouver
and Victoria. B C) — Makura Feb 20 8:30
Tahiti. Marquesas and Cook Islands.
New Zealand and Australia (except
West) (via Pan Francisco)— Mari
rosa Mch », «:30
SHIPPING NEWS.
Port of New York, Sunday, January
30, 1910.
ARRIVED.
Steamer Te«sdaJe (Br), Edwards. Cienfuego.
January 22. to Funch, Edyn & in with mdse
Arrived at the Bar at 11 p m 2t»th.
Steamer Rotterdam (Dutch), Gie&eke. Amster
dam January IH, to Philip Rupreeht, in ballast.
Arrived at tho Bar at 4:30 a 111.
Steamer Saltwell »Br>. ScherlfT. Sagua January
23 and Matanzas 24, to the Munson Ss Line, with
sugar. Arrived at the Bar at 10 \> m, 20th.
Steamer Sicilian Prince <Br), Dunn, Rotter
dam January 16 and Halifax. N 8 27. to the
Northwest Transport Line, with 6 cabin ami 310
steerage passengers and mdse. Arrived at the
Bar at 1:30 a m.
Steamer Albano (Gcr). Kudenhold. Hamburg
January 12, to th« Hamburg-American Line,
with mdse. Arrived at the Bar at « p in 20th.
Steamer Prinz Sictamund (Ger>, Boldt, lion
tego Bay Januarj' 13, Kingston ir>, Cartagena
17. Savanilla 19. Jacmel 21. Aui Cayes 22 and
Kingston 24, to the Hamburg-American LJn«.
with 12 passengers, mails and mdsc. Arrived
at the Bar at 6 a m.
Steamer Cienfuegos (Cuban), Campion, Tampieo
January- 20, to the New York and Cuba Mail Ss
Co. with rndso.
Steamer Agcnoria (Br), Kirkwood. Philadel
phia January 21». to Barber & Co. In ballast..
Will load for River Plate. Left Quarantine at
1 p m.
Steamer Luisiana <I»ali. - 1 Senna January 12.
Palermo 14 and Naples 15. to C B Richards <&
Co. with 17 cabin- and 427 steerage passengers
and mda*". Arrived at th" Bar at 12:30 pm.
Steamer T'ller (Nor). Deinerara January 10, to
1.. W & P Armstrong, in ballast. Arrived at
the Bar at 4 p. m.
Steamer rynvilg' I*.1 *. Brunswick January 2R. to
the Brunswick Ss Co; with patsengers and mds#>
Passed in Quarantine »>:4.'» p in.
Steamer City of Atlanta, Savannah January
27. to th* Ocean Sb Co. with passengers ami
ni'lsf. Passed in Quarantine 4:2. > a in.
Steamer Coinanche. Jacksonville January 27
and Charleston 2S. to the Clyde Sb Co. with
passengers and nidse. Passed in Quarantine
11:30 a m. ..••
Steamer Hamilton. Newport News and Nor
folk, to the Old Dominion S s Co, with passen
gers and mds<*. Passed in Quarantine 1:05 p m.
Steamer Pawnee. Philadelphia, to the Clyde Ba
Co. with mdse. Passed in Quarantine 11 a in.
Steamer Lobelia i Br). Cardenas "January 15
and Caibarien B.*>. to the Munson Ss Line, with
Fuirar. Arrived at the Bar at rt;Os p m
Steamer Floride iFr). Havre January 1.". to
the French Line, with passengers and mdse.
Passed in Sandy Hook at 10:10 p m.
Sandy Hook. N .T. Jan 30. »>:3O p mm — Wind
northeast; light breez*-; raining, thick off
shore; light sea.
SAILED.
Steamers IrSQUOia tßr), London; Ktika (Gen.
Fayal. Tercira, etc, .Sniuga <Br). TMngUu via
Newport News: Julia Luckenbach, San Juan and
Arroyo: Vera (Nor). Port Morant via Norfolk;
Aspromonte (Ital», Port Tampa; Cltta dl Me»
ulna (Ital). Philadelphia; El Cid. Galveston;
Lyra. Texas City; I^arim^r, Port Arthur: .Trf
f. rson. Norfolk and Newport News; Chesa
peake, Baltimore.
STEAMERS AT FOREIGN PORTS.
ARRIVED.
Queenstown Jan r.O, 0:20 a m — Baltic (Br), New
York for Liverpool.
Southampton, Jan 3<i — Philadelphia. New York
via Plymouth mil Cberbonra;.
Madeira. Jan 30, I a m— Carmanla iF.r) New
York.
SAILED.
Queenstown. Jan 30. 10:55 a m — Mauretanla
(Br). from Liverpool (or New York.
Fort Natal, Jan 2* — Maroa (Br), from New York
and Norfolk via St Vincent, C V. and Cap*
Town for Hong Kong. etc.
I AMUSEMENTS.
■jULUHIAL Schoolboys .<• Girls. Dr. Her
** Tially Mat. 25c. man, Nat M. Wills, others.
JIB II A BIRD A ■' r:M:< ' 'Mann.
ALllMmDllfl Slmon-Uardner * «'■.. j as .
•* Dally Mat. Wr.l Thornton, other*
HIIMMERSTEIM'S ■ iia.', Btuarl Barnci, *tc
nmmr.no icm o Qnil UeKM nattkhl 4 „o '
r'ou;ei<, Lillian Shawv Etuarl Darncs. etc.
JANUARY 31. 1910.
AMUSEMENTS.
NEW YORK'S LUPIN'S THEATRES & SUCCESSES
CIIDIDC -•'•■ •■ and 40th St. Eves- 8:15.
tmrlnt Mats. Wed. and^t.. 2:15.
ETHEL N BARRYMORE
in Sir A. W. riXERO'S MIP-CHA>~yiX.
I VnPIIII 45 St.nr.BVay. Eves.at£:ls.
LI wtUnl Mats. Thurf. and Sat.. 2:15
"Held the audience captive. '—Sun.
MISS BILLIE BURKE >,^ dot
By W. SOMERSET MAUGHAM.
« lUftV B'way «• 34th St. Evs. 15.
OAf U I Mats. Tliur?. & Sat.. C:I.V
TO-NIGHT AT 8:15.
FRANK KEENAJM jJStn.
UflftCnU 44th St.. nr. B'way. Eve.B:ls.
nUUdtlil Mat?. Wed. and Sat.. 2:15 ; _
"The funniest person on the stage to-day."
-Alan Dale. - 1,.—1 „— "
Uflfl Ofil I ICD ln hls nPTV f arc *>
If nli CULLIER a t.vcky htar.
HUDSON THEATRE. Special Matinees
LAST Tfl niV and TO-MORROIV. IT Q
WEEK I U-Ufll also Thufs. & Friday A I 0
RUTH ST. DENIS ln D H £™£
ISJIDDIPIf Ssth St.. nr - Bwajr. Evs. 8:15.
UAsiSllUll Mats. Wed. and Sat.. 2:15.
"As lovable as Rip Vta Winkle." — Telegram
OTIS SKINNER !n ¥O g,J!gff ii
By Booth Tarklngton and H. I* Wilson.
Phla«!am B'wav & 44th St. Eves. 8:20.
UN llOn Matinee Sat. only. 2:15.
"As Tender as Little Lord Kauntl*r«ry
FRANCIS WILSON •Jftiffi?
THE BACHELOR'S BABY.
KNICKERBOCKER S^.^ s Lt^ ata
THE DOLLAR PRINCESS
CHARLES DELLTNGHAM'S Eve. 8:15.
GLOBE THEATRE %2°is,
B'WAY AND 46TH ST. Sat. at 2:15.
MONTGOMERY & STONE a d T> T '...
BURTON HOLMES: SICILY
s>nd AVIATION WEEK AT RHEIMS.
SHOW AVIATORS IN" FLIGHT.
TO-PAY & TOM'W at 3, LYCEUM THEA.
NEW AMSTERDAM SK&fIHf»,!L-
Mats. Wed. «• Sat.. 2:15. S-ats on sal«.
NEXT WED. EVE., FEB. 2nd
HENRY W. SAVAGE Tvill offer - -
"MADAME V"
The Drama That Thrilled All X^^
Paris. By Alexandra Blsson. <m JaY
Uoill Vnrlf THEATRE. B'way & 45th St.
HOW TUlßv:'" R 15. Mats. Wed.&Sat.,2:ls
TO-NIGHT. 8:15, Klaw & Erlan^er present
MAX ROGERS
and Maud Raymond
Mul^k^AT. THE YOUHG TURK
I IQCDTV THEA.. W. 42d St. Eves. 8.
LI DC II I I Mats. Wed. and Sat.. 2.
"Don't Mi«.s It at Any Cost." — Eve Sun.
Th« Fantastical Musical Comedy.
THE ARCADIANS
_ With Its Wonderful Cast of 100.
GAIETY THEATRE. 48th St. »nd B'wav.
5
THE FORTUNE HUNT ER
* With JOIIX BARRYMORE. ■
JOE ■Omv.'XS'i-i ££:•;>,!
henry lee's ;■;,■?«;.,,„.
THFNEW ®)THEATBE
Central Park W. 62-XS>/e3 sts.TeI.SSOO Col
NON-SUBSCRIPTION
PERFORMANCES
THIS TTEEK:
TO-NIGHT, THURS, & SIT. EVES,.
£; SATURDAY MATINEE
'^K ATS IN ALL PARTS OF THE
HOLSE NOW OX SALE
Tickets for All Performances. Two We-ks in
Ad'.ant-p. Ordered by Mail or Telephone, "
Will Be Delivered by Messenger to '
. Any Address in Manhattan.
TWELFTH m ~~
1 . Never Better Played in N. T— Tribune.
Edw. Sheldon's m Preparation
THE NIGGER THE WITCH
A Drama of the i A Play of the Salem I
l__Bout hof To-day. | WUeheraft Period
,' " ; % c :- s . '°. Twelfth nSS
M bEIB: NKXTTOK Th ' N1 ""
* Wed V'}- o V " S - Th< " Xi S«er: Tue,. Eve.
Drama. 52 to 50c; Opera. {."» to $1.
HIPPODROME
sa«yMats,.2. Best Seats $1. Ev.R "5 C .sl 50
HJCKETT JOHN HSSON .=s£*•
MLfSi-, MIXINE ELLIOTT,;,.;-
COMEDY SS rSSIsfiJTwifCHER
Tha City
Mais Wort and Sat . . :;., rOrDBS -Robertson
hi Ihe rin, of th,. Third Floor Bark "
BIJIIU - . naasra.
••"»' ....;»;■„■„,. -.'■i.^rs
MANHATTAN orr «-» ■•■■
To-night at S-TAT.KS OK ", otAVVv
rr-Kular . a.«t »»-nau«l ami
Tile*. <Bt 8:80) — First time kifktdi
D'Alvarez. MM. Dalmor*.. Pufranne "tc £?'
Ev«. (pop. prices)— ROllEMK Mm«
FOR nY" N i?n+"or'TS ATlc «'■
PARIS I'limiii rogram bn,, c pr-parM
€IU THE LILY
BELASCC lll v TßK^ l —
CHARLOTTE WALKER
SSpi, JUST A WIFE
y»ft Wednesday iM>t»ne« N> xt week
KKITII * PROCTOR 7 ! DElS^TxlTTHTim^iTsr
stm aye. kbj r;, • ' sag
•Mat. Daily .o & ftn : . Dancers, a Kc.itons.oths.
James McCreery & Co. 7;
23rd Street 34th Street ~
SILK DEPARTMENTS. la Both Stores.
"McCreery Silks."*
Famous over half a Century. ,
Printed Foulard and Liberty Satin,
single or double width. 75c to 3.00 per yd.
Rough Shantung Pongee in all make*.
Natural Ecru, colors and black.
« % 55c to 1.50 per yard i
On Monday and Tuesday,
January '.list and February Ist.
Sale of Twelve Thousand yards of
Dress Satin in a complete assortment of
■new Spring colors, also white, cream and
black. 1.00 per yard
-re!** t.m
WASH DRESS GOODS, in Both Store*.
On Monday, January the 3 1st.
, Mercerized Yarn Poplin Suitings. Col=
ors:— Sky, Cadet, Delft and Navy Blue,
Pink, Lavender, Heliotrope, Amethyst,
Wistaria, Old Rose, French Grey, Pongee,
Tobac, Reseda, Myrtle and Olive Green,
Brown, Old Gold and White or Black. j|||s
18c per yd
White Irish Dress Linen, grass bleach
and water shrunk. '**'* inches wide.
25c. per yd.
..;-'-. ' rain? SS»
DRESS GOODS, In Both Store*.
The latest Paris Shades in Hopsacking,
Diagonal Fabrics, Homespun, Natte Suit
ing, English Suiting, Scotch Tweed, Diag
onal Vigoureux and Coating Serge.
1.50 to 3.00 per yard
On Monday, January the 31st.
Sale of Black Broadcloth, — sponged,
shrunk and spot proof. Bright finish,
Spring weight. 52 inches wide.
\ - 1.45 per yard
. rale? 2.50
James McCreery & Co.
23rd Street 34th Street
— — - ! ,
James McCreery & Co.
23rd Street 34th Street
RUG DEPARTMENTS, m Both Stores.
Commencing Monday, January the 31st.
Smith's extra quality Plain Filling.
Eleven colors. 1 OO per yard
usual prtc* l.*S
! Beatty's. Smith's and San ford's extra
quality Velvet Carpet. 1.00 per yard
usual pries 1,5 d
Wilton Rugs, extra quality. Size 8 ft.
3 in. x 10 ft. 6 in. 25.00
usual price 3J 04
Tapestry Brussels Rugs. Size 9x 12 ft,
Seamed or seamless. 12.00
rains IS.3*
DECORATIVE LINENS. i a Both Stores.
On Monday and Tuesday,
January 31st and February Ist.
Lace-trimmed Center Pieces and Scarfs,
with hand-made eyelet embroidery.
Center Pieces. . 1.15. 1.65, 2.15 and 2.65
Scarfs . . . . . . 1.65, 2.15, 2.65 •• 3.45
Odd Tea Cloths, Center Pieces. Scarf*
and Doylies, embroidered or trimmed with
hand-made lace. At 33 1-3% less than
usual prices.
Damask Table. Cloths, with Napkins to
match, at reduced prices.
Size 2 x > yards . 2.50 and 5.75
•• 8 x 3 yards .. . .. . . 3.00 •• 7.50
'• 2x3yards. . . ... . . 3.75 •• 00
•» 2Sx 24 yards .3.75 » 9.50
Hemstitched Huckaback Towels
2.75, 3.25 and 4.50 per do.
James McCreery & Co,
23rd Street ' 34th Street
i AMUSEMENTS.
METROPOLITAN OPERA HOUSE
1- •T.ings at S iV atur<J »y Matinee at ••
mLZ "'^ IU . (llv » ll ' r) a Hu B tlci,ne, „1 l^gHaci.
Mmes. Pestlnn. Norla. " ■■•-■•■■ MM. Caruso.
Martin. Amato. -'' ly CO " a ■• Tan^o.
B '/ ft< at I:r '°-I'<"' R»n,j dcs NMbeluncen.
Forn. 11 ""?" 1 *; Mm<>B rt^dski. Homer.
n?n m, vt'"' £ Dark '» ; MM - Burrlan. White
hill Hlijckley. Ooritr. Cond.. Herti.
MM wPn Vl i"— ? OB ,r, r » lvl va >«'- Mm«. dl hMbll;
Vienna iv ;, *«*»«. Pint i-..r«l And Pallet
*':?"* \- • "*. On . dS- Tango and Ben«lix
Thurs. Xv B . at 7 rrKt,.n nnd Isolde.
Vlenlia W.iueV. <> ' ll>lUldrO StradfUa » nJ ba " n
Aft at 2:3<v_la Bohem^
V.enn. tfcmfSStoT *'* ™"* 1 * "' '
NEXT Will Mon. Xv „— r.ermanU.
Th«« *1 IE NEW rnr\TRK
Cl.m«n, V,' -*■«••• MlllM \I,U. Dubo.s. MM
iV b w* FJinlr (I'Amoro. Mr - „ ,•.
gg^M^gtM; M^B-ci Scotti. GUnot,-
, A Ki«*^* # Brook 'y«» Academy of Muilc.
•>ne b „,-u fr ,, m , h< K : ,,, hn% Vi^ JJJ
To-night 1"'?1 "'? DUtoI... Mines. -.\iten. Mau
. WEDER PIANO USED.
OAIt N B GIB if .\ 1. 1. .
PHILHARMONIC :,V,V\ ....
ThuMday ,] 1 " v '- and Friday Aft. at •_• SO.
gustav mahler Series.
GUSTAV MAHLER roidicVoi
Soloist. TILLY KOK.Vr,.\. Contralto.
AMUSEMENTS. .
|Q TflQ B "y- 4% ' St. Cve. '4:15- Mats. "•«.
flu lUn * Sat.. 2:15. Wed. Mat . 3"V.-sl3<>
•"H. SEVEN DAYS
ACADKMY OK mi xii . Eventn*, at S:li
lw.. CHAUHCEY OLOOTT^KK 1
Ooo«1 T>»'Vd Seats 50r. Mats Wed * Sat.. 1
Next Wfk — >oihfrp and .Marlowo.
WaNaHi •> Evs.^:ls. MaiTwed. Jt ~Sat.. 2:t.v
H.B.Warner-" A!idsi\m] Valentin
SSZSRSSI THIS afternoon
i RECITAL BY ASSISTED BT
: MR and MRS. HENRY I MR. ALWII
: HOLOEN HUSS I SCHfIOEIEI
I RESERVED SEATS $1 4 $1 ,\o *♦ Mind*?**? 53
i Mall and Luckhard & Belder-j. 1O E lTth •»
: STEIN WAY PIANO l>'Et»
1,, i J
! MKNUKLIvNOIIN HALL. Tu«s.Eve,. !•"■'•- 1. 9 2
Flon z ale %#
LON Z ALE V
Ql \KTr 1 ...
.-.Oc. to <tI.SO. Management of Loudon CPJlii^-;
I Dill II IS J Every. Eve.. >:13. the ireat :
Infflnu ■ ~ i"- > >T.t r r( .'
1 . \, \ .i'hrt«l I. the Kore»ter"»
lit \IK» I Sat. Mat.. - ' 1 ■ l.^fnl"""" +±
CIICIII MOKIr> 1V WAX. >^ VV H ri Mour.
EDEN I Ofo. Hold-n. M>*:criou3 ;la«u^

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