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New-York tribune. [volume] (New York [N.Y.]) 1866-1924, June 09, 1910, Image 9

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■■ COLLEGE DIAMONDS
-,^-ton Shuts Out Holy Cross
with Ease.
es£ enbaum in FINE form
g oj Visitors to Five Scattered
m % its^Tigers Make Only
Three and Win.
r~MnT OF COLLEGE. BASE
BAU GAMES YESTERDAY.
_ — - . .. * Holy Cw»...--.-« •
rrSW* 10 " •• . s VaSe 1
c«*^V^"' .. 2 Harvard 1
»%r •" """ •• I F*nß#jl<rmnlc 1
•a* f" m . - .mdoin 1
f'L-.illf " I'eddie Inrtitnte .. 1
i**ZTT .4 i*f*r**+ *
jaflF' 1 -^ - _____^ — ________
r*r - ayiajaßß «• The Trihyn*-.!
' tc . n. J.. June e .-OwJng t?» the
T Z^ c BliiTitnr cf C.re«nhaum Princeton
■*V ,'.' t tb^ Ho!y Cross baseball nine this
**\L by a km of 4 to 0. On account
iSZei *-»«* of lk * rriTlcetori team
d c- Tale at S*ew Haven --' Saturday
*^ JUpay M Sim White, the regular
there was a Mg shake-up in
* fc '..- : T o^d»r and make-up of the home
S-^«r«a tWrfl baw. «M« Cunnir.g
■ ■",, itdftea "re.m CPr;tre r.e'.d to short-
Li 'aooil* whs rl«iced in centre field.
gnp *.^^ BBikteß improvement in the
c of the team, only three- hits being
*"!.* bff Fc!?y. The?? all " ■* at ■•••*■
''^ffi**. however, and. coupled with the
2!^~"' errorE. >-le!ded four runs.
nsfr Cro?s rr.scie five saretie?. but Green
* ' m them well scattered and was
!^Btcl of 0« Bttnattoo a^ »U time?, not
fi^ reachir-F third base.
. ■
c-« fair Da^fon and Cur.nirgrham and a
SwoOM 87 b >" BUarett scored Prince
•5 '--Ft rsa in the fecond. One more
2 j-^s* tn the. sixth when Bard walked.
"c S eeor.d an<s scored on D. ilahoney's
f^. tle c* Woodie'e grounder.
"I^er I>awson haxi been retired in the
■__Q> Llilliili Hl |lnl sJ^f le d- went to third
"• Vi-^'- s €rrcr of Sterretl ' s flounder and
tjrt's en BeM** at ftr?t - Sterrett
«j . uii'nM later on a wild pitch. The
!T-<-r cl Caidey. the visitors" third base
lax *ra? " t.^re highest order throughout,
*^~j b-a l>r-in«r cut oft by his brilliant
MM
*T» score follows:
'™-\tto.v i holt: cross.
rK * .hrlbr-o »«' • arrlbpoae
... it *{>(* 2 0 o!>J!ihon;y.sMOM 2 31
Jrj-,r'Sw. 3 ft«rratg. rt>.- 401 1 32
KLtt£««« S l«Tw»-d. 1b... - OT>l2 10
25*2 a!« 2 00 Burn?, rf... 2«>l 1 <«0
T%l.'*ll 4 20 Kennedy. If 40 « 1 00
SSt^IlS * SllCawJey; Sb. 4 <■- 1 3 SO
E^T-b ClO:<> Oo;JMahoncy.cf «02 4 00
S3r«^ Sfl« : 3° Sweeney, r. 200 4 10
!!!LX-S'>o « iOFo'.ey; p 3^o 0 1O
£ --- " ■ '
"v-< 3»527161! Totals . . 31 0124 14 3
J^X- "" ".. A1O«« ■12 ; O — *
f^fSsf 0 <♦ 6 <\ O t* ft 0 o—©
' i . <- . ba«*!— Ba!!:n. Bard. Cunningham.
„I^-T c.Ar:f.r h:tp— Bard, Sterrett. Struck
;"•»; oSartjatna. 5: br Foley. 4. Bases on
ETl&4«neuTß" i: Foley. 2. Hit by pit«her
fpTZSr. WUtl plich-Foley. Pa £^4
Samb Dwifcle plaj*-Coanto«Bani to
Ts-rrv is Etßrxett: Cawlev to Do-svd ta Ca«
wTn>v to B. Mstsr.ey to Bow*. First ba^e
m mm* filuurtiin, 3:' H.->ly Cross. 1 Left
c tjj*f-Prai*ton. 2; Hely Cross, 7. Time—
DARTMOUTH BEATS HARVARD
Jew Hampshire Nine Ends Sea
son with ■ Victory.
[Ej Telegraph to Tte Tribune.]
ichridge. Mass.. June S.— Dartmouth
t»i b- hasetall season to-day, beating
Ernri fcr a score of 2 to L A hit, a
rrJS ta« folfcived by a mild throw of
itt-BJ-asCi ar<i ■ sacrifice fly "by M' -
1 t-fH^i in the irst inning-, gave Harvard
£ t ciy run.
Drnnouth tied the score in the second
S=r Hiban ar.d Cha6boun:« hit safely,
ciercrs by Hicks. Marshall and Tours'
fc^-i the or.c rur. across the plate.
fisc\o-i out two men with eecond and
£A tejw Etaj occupied. The winning
EBttttfllfid i.i thp ninth inning, when
£22 dropped jJitcheH's liner, ajid Chad
fcra brought the runner h"ne with .a
■a*
Ta ksa« rune rr.afl*> thr«e hits off Jllt-
Afl £ c! vhirh came in the first three
isrfTi i-Be Darrmouth found Hicks
*- sft Eicks struck out ten men to
SkSjCs «ye. Harvard's loose fielding
*"** rtt^rjsjiyj for Dartmouth's victor>".
"■ Crsscp _i^e will meet Fordham on
■■'■*.'. m McLaug-h!:n will pitch.
Hick? t2 probably not pitch again until
j&e Tsie ohk.
"* wore fulloTrs:
IU2: 2CrrH. 1 HARVARD
v— . rlbpoae. rlbpoae
•-••a. ».. fl 1 lelßowera. cf 12 300
"2r.lt.. .«Glo 0 0 McL-ughlin. lb OO 700
grtf.....«j 1 oCHicka. p OO 23 1
r~ at r.. :<i 2 «.. potter. 2b 01 i 2 «•
£*£". 11 2 Or> Minor, rf 00 101
gnMiMj,«S fl 2 1 Lar.lcar., 3b... 0 0 00 0
tt..(tO 3 11 "Marfhal. «...- 1«1
r* k — ..<»«> <i <.ft yr.jr.jr c o't &21
tO 2 29'Babaoo. if 0 0 300
■•••■ 28-7 102' Totals 13 2774
S3", r - 9 1 r, .... r 0 0 I—2
,* !B 1 0 o o o o o 0 o—l
£_*£ ■ fait— Brady.
32_S_*ir* 4u * JjaiL first *<**+ on errors
:r£Z:\ J D Kanar4, 1. Left on bas-*
s^-.- * : Hanart. C Stolen hasw— Daly.
Jirij, • ** s - £ as»s na t«I!s — By Mitchell
£. a «*r,"_ 1 Srmck c-ux— By Mitrhf-:;. rj- br
I? ** -«ae. 1:43 Urr.pire— ilcLaueilia.
■HEBE TO DINE
. *£»VEIXERS- CO..
*£or court, at VCmt S4 th Bt
» Cant Ttft.. Table d'Kcte Din.
L. Lunch,
B*FE BOULEVARD
••urn fina T«atfc Street.
~^°>s *£ r,;.," ;o-jr 5 « of cosßtncdaa.
H^* I™ss*.1 ™ 55 *. GRILL
•**TTT7 % T »«> BANQItT BOOK.
VTjr .-* .*- MUSIC.
.'iiRLBOROUCTr
CrrrrZ-^ZL-tL*'- Theatre Suppers.
SMSr^^^^^ATiSNTT^T
=iH?*tJt^Be« Eve "Tel w cra.Bi.~
JORETTI
- «'!• ATM
ftKJ IS TOWJ Wl£) 65e
I'CMOBSLE TOURS
•^Cexr *™ia town Keo^JSd*^
ti-ti"" * «ir^,a f'm" Tarbl «>e Steel
r?W^~- Foid-ms. hotels and
CONSUMERS-P-ARK
»6|»- ■-_
feZl --"■
VDtt iv
i>-2^" «X RO £ . X 26-STiel.
>tf $^ ara for r . Brut
5 a tOr C4u» IWJ:nc Quality
BROWN WINS CLOSE GAME
Defeats Pennsylvania by a Mar.
gin of Only One Run.
[By Telegraph to The Tribune.]
Providence. June 8.— Pennsylvania went
down to defeat before Brown to-day by a
•core of 2 to 1. Browns victory was due
directly to well nigh flawless fielding. The
visitors pot five scattered singles and a
three-ba»^r. while Bchultz struck out nine
Brunonlans. Tho Brown players caught
two men at the plate and fattened their
fielding averages by two pretty double
r'ayf A three-base hit by Nash on the first
ball pitched was followed by a sacrifice by
Giles. In the third Hennessey walked and
scored **n a wild throw by shortstop to
first. Woods" s three-bagger in the eighth
after A Tnayer had sinul*^ brought the
latter home for Pennsylvania's only run.
The score follows:
BROWN ! PENNSYLVANIA.
lbpoael ih po a *
Nash. «• ..1 3 50JA. WISIII. cf..2 1 00
Giles, Ik.. 1 13 1 liAldendifer. 2b .-.« 1 2«
Kegnier. 3b o<> 2rtjTl-«ad. If 1 1 <>«
Staft. if... <> i o ?hu:iz. r 0 0 ••
Snell. rf « 110 Smith, rf .0 0 0 0
ilannir. 2b 0 3 st»!Hayden. lb Oil 0 0
Taylor, cf 0 1 lOjPeacon. a 5 ..... .2 111
ni|iw— 0...0 R OO|Ccrren«. c.. 1 I 20
Bliss, p .> A 3 OiE. Thayer. Bh. .0 0 12
Tntsi!« 22720 II Totals 62410 3
Bro-si-n . 1 A 1 O O O « 0 x — 2
Pennsylvania •• <■ • • 1 0 0 1 o—l0 — 1
Runs made — Ev Nash. Hennosry, A. Thayer.
Three-ba*e hits— Nash Wood. Sacrifice hits —
Olies, E. Thayer. Stolen bases— A Thayer.
Smith. Deacon. First base on balls — Oft Bliss.
3: eff Shulu. 1. Struck out— By Bliss 3: by
Shuitz. V. Double plays— Nash to Msnsur to
Glle*, Mansur to Null Passed ball— Hennessy.
Wild pitch — BJi«s. Hit by pitched ball — By
Bli««. Hayden ■_'■ Time— l:4o. Umpire—Has
san. Attendance — 3.400.
SYRACUSE DOWNS YALE
Three Runs Scored After Ball
Takes a Bad Bound.
[By Telegraph to The Tribune.}
Rest Haven. June S.— The Syracuse base
ball nine defeated Yale to-day by a score of
3 to 1. Ted Coy pitched a sterling game for
four innings, but with two cut in the fifth
he weakened. Two passes and sinples by
Poa-frs, K!:rpr and Hand netted three runs.
Powerp's grounder bounded badly Just as
Merri't was about to stop it. end the fielder
missed what would have been an easy out.
Tommers. who relieved Coy, held Syracuse
without a hit for the rest of the game, but
the visitors had a lead which Yale could
not overcome.
Cottrtll kept the seven hits which he al
lowed well scattered and received errorless
support. Yale scored only ■■• run, Logan
banging out a two-bagger in the third and
romping hcrae on Murphy's single. Two
sensational catches by Schoepflin. the Syra
cuse centre fielder, were features of th»
game One was a circus catch behind sec
ond bate The other was a running catch
off Stevens's bat in the last inning, spoiling
a two-bagrger.
SYRACUSE ! TALE.
abrlbpoael aorlbp° a?
Xash. if 411 20 0. Badger, cf. 4<' 1 1 0 0
Ptwer. lb.. 411 EOO Corey, rf... 300 A „ 0
KMrifr. ef... ."ill 3 3fl Logan. 2b. . 3 1 1 0 10
Scully. 3i>.. 4<M I KHMorplty lb. 402 14 - 0
Holmes, c. 20 rt c 0 0 Mclntyre, :.. 30 0 2 50
Hand. 1J5...301 5 lO.Lcutr*!. m. . «4»0 I 01
Frhoepfiin.cf 4O«i 3««"i Mexritt. rs. 300 1 3 0
Trnax, rf. .. 200 20 0 i Stevens, if.. 40 2 O OO
Oittrel], p.. 40 0 120 : Taylor, c... 100 6 10
Carhar- c. 100 2 ■ 0
I Coy. p 2«> it 0 50
Toniniers, p 20 1 0 10
TOtala . . .32 I ■ 27 7 0 ' Totals SO 1 7 27 IS I
Syracuse 0 0 0 0 3 O 0 0 —
Yale 0 <• i .... a 0 o—l
Two base hits — Logan. Scully. Murphy.
Stolen v a»^f= — Ba~te<-- Ljßaau Murphy. Merritt,
Nash. Holme*. . First Safe on balls — By Coy. 4;
by Cottrell. 2: hv Tomrners. 3. Struck out — By
Coy. 4: r>y Cottrell. 4 by Tommers. 3. Wild
pitch — Tommers. Time — 1 :50. Umpire — Beecher.
Attendant* — I.£oo.
RUN WILD ON THE BASES
West Point Cadets Wind Up Sea
son with a Hollow Victory.
'V Telegraph to The Tribune.]
"West Point, N. V. June i Wss< Point
wound up their baseball season to-day with
a whirlwind finish, defeating the Colgate
team by a score of 20 to 4. Hyatt, the
Army's star pitcher, did not go into the
bos to-day, but assumed a new role In the
final : sme by taking Lyman's place be
hind the ba.t, Riley doin^ the twirling.
Hyatt, the first man up, started the ball
rolling with a home run, but that was all
the scoring in the first inninK. and with
the score 5 to <» in favor of the cadets in
the fifth the game still had some inter
est; but in the sixth the soldiers, with
twelve men coming to bat. pounded out six
singles, a three-bagger and a home run,
scoring eight runs.
Such run-gettxr.g- was enough to rattle
even the Colsate boys and was some ex
case for the time errors they made in
the next inning, which, combined with five
i-ingles, sent the cadets' stock up five more
points.
The score by innings follows:
R. H. E.
TTe*t Point. l 0 0 2 2 S 5 2 x— 22 2
Colgate 0 00001102—4 6 5
Batteries— "SlTest Point, Rlley and Hyatt; Col
gate, Hararncn<i and Leonard.
NEWARK JUMPS TO FRONT
Louden Helps to Victory by
Pounding Out a Home Eun.
Newark Jumped into first place In the
Eastern League yesterday by defeating
Providence by a score of I to 1. in Newark,
whH" Rochester ivas beating Toronto.
Sline pitched in masterly form until the
fifth inning when, with first and second
bases occupied, Louden sent the ball sailing
over the ltft field fence for a horrver. .
"Iron Man" McGinr.ity held the visitors
eafdy at all stages.
XEWAPJi. I I'HOVJI.ENCE
ahrlbpoae! abrlbpo le
I^>u4er.. as. 4 13 2 1 1 I Phelan. cf.. 500 2 0 0
Merer r1... 300 i " aiz. Si -4" - 0 SO
SdU&Sy 2b. 4 113 2 liElston. 1f. .. 115 00
j>!|y 'if.. . 401 3 0 o'Jioflman, rf 30 •■ 0 OO
(fettmaa cf 300 SOOiCollins. 3b . 40 <> 141
Zimrman.3b 2 1 0 2 3 1 j Courtney, lb 303 12 o••
Acler lb .. 800 10 00: nock, a . . - 401 0 21
Siprvc c. 221 41 01 Peterson, c. 300 3 00
McGinnltr. p 31 O 0 2 oiF:lr,<-. r 20 1 1 1O
Thompson, p 000 " ° '
' Lavender p0 0 0 0 10
i-Axndt . 100 000
♦ WVMay . 100 0 Ort
jiFltzgerald. 100 0 0 0
Totals £56627»3| Mi 3 . 1724 11 2
" •Batted for Sline hi peventh Inning. tßatted
for Peterson Jn ninth Inning. JBatted for Laven
der In ninth Inning.
Vewark 0 0003 120 x— 6
PrS'taui I ..:. • • • 1 0 • 0 0 0-1
Ptolf-n basef-Schlafly. louden pa^ifl^hitF—
G*ttm*n. Hoffman. B*^S^7Z"£ss3?£:
Tw.r^-t,s>H« hit Courtnev. Home run — J_ouacn.
iv£-n£ q/n. s!n « Innings; off Thompson. »•
-.. H r.;.r.;:?
- Pa«^ P ba»-
K^van,B,v.e.
Attcndanct— 2.ooo. __^____^^_
BALTIMORE, 11; JERSEY CITY, 5.
The Orioles had a batting M at Jersey
City yesterday and won by a icoreoi
H to 5. They knocked Bltton out of the
box in the second inninc and piled up eight
™ nXLTIMORE. j l***?*J?gia a .
ab r lb jio i« B \'V»i <tO
Slarle rf 6 1 2 3 0 0 ■ Clement. If. 3-- « « »
? 1 ■' 4 0 0
! ■ I
®|w|!
VI. K^
,„..
Totals. 42 11 lS2Tllli Totala ■»•••* I:: 2
~^T,ted fo- Crtst in r:n.h inning. Wf«JL*£
F*-rry in ninth lnnln«. TNlchola out hit bj bat
te<J ball- „ , n „
S sFS:i j 2h &l
: .^crr'V^ °1 SSSSiSsSS
&i ; iby Ferry. 8. Home run— Absteln.
ThSi' hIL-Wal^h. Byer.. Hall. O^^-
T»^SL fclt^Pelnlnjer ■ Stolen bM«- B >JSi
Vjchols Double -plays— Dunn anil CUnes- ~ tmß
—1 :50. rmptree— Himt aw<i Byron.
ROCHESTER, 4; TORONTO, 0.
B^Jr at V tOOO ,• 0 SE 0
Hatterl«-««»-:aa:« and Malr:_llgga^ aO4
Eiattery. Umptre»— Ftavr*»<l ••« Murray.
NEW-YORK DAILY TRim .WE. THURSDAY. -H'XE f>. 101 ft
Of Interes
THE VOGUE OF BELTS
It Is Part of the Revival of
Primitive Styles.
The h-lt or girdle has played an impor
tant part In th* "Oftuming of humanity
since the earliest times. When garments
wer* more simply constructed than now
it was almost indispensahle for the con
fining of loose draperies which without it
would have impeded the movements of the
wearers, and it is not strange that the in-
. LINGERIE GOWN OF M'HITE FRENCH LAWN, WITH EMBROIDERY ON
NET OVER ROSE TULLE BELT KEADED IX AN ORIENTAL DESIGN.
TUSCAN STRAW HAT, TRIMMED WITH CHERRIES.
fiuence of ancient ideas on the clothing of
to-day, as manifested in the peasant styles
and gorgeous Oriental colorings, should
also have brought the waist cinoture into
unusual prominence In the fashionable
world
Th* belt that the woman of to-day wears
with almost every dre«s may easily •
most striking bit of ornament, and it de-
Btaods no smail degree of attention. If
not made especially for the costume with
which it is worn, there must at least be
Fom? connprtii'.er link between the two, a?
In the gown Illustrated, in which touches
of the rose color that lines the trans
parent embroidered portion appear in the
beading of the -belt.
Such a variety of belts is shown in the
shops that one can hardly fail to find- what
is required for any given purpose. The
patent leather belt, which in its most se
vere aspect cannot be worn by every one.
is beautiful in a hundred different ways. I
It may be adorned with insets of Persian
silk, edged with gold, or with strips of
leather in almost any color one prefers,
applied with stitching. Some are pierced ,
along a part or the whole of their lengths
by large eyelets, through which are thread- J
ed soft ribbons.
Very effective are the belts in which, pold
or silver Is intermingled with many love
ly hues worked in silk. Some of them
have delicate cut steel buckles and are
lightly studded with little ornaments to
match the buckles, which seem to take on
a new brilliancy with such lovely back
grounds. :
Crush belts are shown in many different
materials, and these will be chosen by
many women to whom the stiff band is not
becoming. Some are of EuSde, in the mo
dish shades, or of soft gold ribbon belt
irrits. in which are woven little squares and
other patterns. There are silk ribbon belt
ings. too, in diagonal weaves, with Incon
spicuous self-toned figures, which come in
many lovely colors, and t..e Persian rib
bons in the darker tones used with dull
gold buckles are exquisite.
GATHERED HERE AND THERE.
Colonial glass candlesticks may he kept
clean much more easily than those of all
ver, brass or copper, for they do not ne<'d
burnishing. Therefore, they are the best
for the rountry cottape
Directoire satin and Liberty satin are
beautifully soft fabrics between which the
unenlightened usually fail to differentiate,
but there Is a distinction with which Ax. Is
well to be familiar when ordering things
by mail. While the two fabrics are much
the same in texture, the Directoire has less
of a metallic gloss than the Liberty. In
black the Liberty gloss is suggestive of
stove polish.
Seen tn t.
Inlaid barrettes and bandeaus of imita
tion' shell ■witfi rhinestones sell for from fl
up to $I^so- ■
Velvet ribbon I.anilfcaus with rhinestone
buckles and small ornaments are JIT SO each.
Bteamer chairs at $5 have leather cush
ions «••• i '"-' 1 - " r "' '" thr "* Btctlrinß . t!iat
lit when not In us© Into a leather ba K . TiM
set of cushions costs <»>&>■
The new wardrobe steamer trunks that
dusl, under the bed are most convenient
and cost «5. When opened the dress trays
In* hangers ««and braced by a foot «
That the compartments below are readily
accessible.
«'<,«< rnhe hat trunks are another travel-
U Z .omfort. and they hold six hat, T!,
are 135- .
Th . re is a new jasmin© perfume in a
triangular bottle in a leather case, selling
at HOI a bottle.
. hath and Khampoo outfit with shower,
aralp end ,«« rubber face attachment*, in
«. box, coet# » •»■
V«alet IK*""* bath «oap in a wooden
bow? with »»* brush ' costs » 350 ' &nd 1S
very'refreehing to use.
to Women
WEEK-END CATERING
Expensive, but Not Difficult
When One Knows How.
To the hostess whope resource? are not
unlimited the pleasure of week-end enter
taining in largely modified by the labor and
expense of catering for a large party of
guests for the better part of three days.
Expensive it always mupt be in these days
of advanced prices, and aiso ?nmewhat
laborious, but it is a sreat pleasure, and
both the labor and expense can be ma
terially reduced by knowledge and system.
The wise hostess will sit down and plan
from the Friday night dinner to the Mon-
Luneheoo. when the last stragglers ot
the party wil! be leaving-, and she will place
a written menu before the cook and have
one for her own ready referenc?, so that
when tin? buying is done and the deliveries
are checked in and each thing properly
stowed away nothing will remain for either
■k or the mistress to do but to follow
in. It ought not to be necessary to
it during the entire time of the
house party. There should be no occasion
for hurry calls and no jarring of the house
hold machinery should be felt by the
guests.
On Friday morning al! supplies should be
;arder. t-x-'ept thoso> that rnme daily
■ c ki'chen jrarder.. which is. generally
speaking, the pride of the host One ice
box should be kept for the dairy products
and the '.jottled good? and one for the un
cooked foods and delicacies. Fish wrapped
in linon cloth? uive out no odor. Lettuce
in linen refrigerator bags may he lnid
right on the ice. Clams, crabs and lobsters
may be kept in a wicker hamper on the
cellar bottom and sprinkled with cnrnn.eal
and water if th-y seem inclined to dry out
toe much. Soup stock and bouillon may- be
stowed away in glass two-quart jars on Ice
all ready for use. One idea is to invest in
two eld-fashloned wasbtubs, have the local
• r nt them with rovers and Imre
a hole well down to one side for a spiggot
to draw off the water. They may be used
lo: cooling ma tons and other fruits, and
bottled goods which take up so much room
in the refrigerators.
In August light meals with fewer course.-*
th;m are provided at other times should be
planned, for not only ai« appetites more
>>r I^ps Jaded during this month, but the at
mosphere is usually so eIOM and damp that
food Is likely t" mildew and sour. Old
Imniaiimsiiiri say that it is the most diffi
cult month in the year for their business.
Boasts are too heavy and heatins. fresh
fish is not always available ar.d shell food
1.- reftrtcted in variety. It is the time for
cold cookery and "made dishes."
As a summer house party naturally
spends as much time as possible out of
doors, one or two of the meals may be out
door picnic affairs, and these in some w.ivs
are easier than the more formal meal
served indoors- The question of decor., i ecj
is easily solved at the country house, since
Nature provides all that any hostess need
ask for beyond what her own garden sup
plies, and charges nothing for her treas
ures.
HOW TO SERVE PINEAPPLE.
A dish of plain sweetened pineapple is
often improved by the juice of a lemon.
This is an especially desieable addition if
c Shops
The Colonial homespun rues in soft mixt
ures of colors. in 9 by 12 size, coat $22 50.
Pure cast lie soap for shampoo use sells
for 69 cents a bar, and i- shaved into hot
water and nek for use.
A little comb an.l brush with mirror In
a leatherette ease- for the pocket costs 50
cents.
Scotch steamer rugs or shawls with heavy
fringe come in attractive colorings and
rank'; in price from $1,130 to $10.
Algerian porch rugs, 9 by 12 feet, cost
$18 75 in the plain solid colors and $21 in
the bordered and figured pattern?. They
etand the weather and are very desirable.
A cane rocker for a child's use, with wide
arms and flaring bark, costs $4 and. is very
comfortable in shape.
Reproductions of the, old French mirrors,
lone and narrow, with picture at the top.
sell for from 75 cents up to J4 50 each. Some
have gilt and others have wooden frames.
.—.. — ., — ~ .
The name* <-.t »hop« \»-here articles mentioned
ou this pa(« were seen can ba obtained by send*
I in« a. stamped am H<t,ir«a*«-ti envelop* to "Been
ia th« Shops,' 1 N'«w York Tribune. (
the "pta«" leeou to s« lacking; in flavor.
A few pieces of pineapple combine well
with bananas or strawberries or with both.
The shell of a pineapple makes a pict
uresque receptacle for a fruit salad or
macedoine. The shell retains some of the
fragrance and flavor of the fruit and Im
parts it to the salad.
French chefs often serve pineapple with
rum. Put a peeled pineapple that has been
divided into small pieces into a bowl, add
three ounces of powdered sugar, half a gli:
of good rum and half a jrill of cold wa4er.
Gradually mix all together for about five
minutes. Cover the bowl and let it stand
for thirty minutes, and then serve.
The Porto Rico and the strawberry
"pines" that are tn market now are nice
for desserts and various culinary purposes,
but they are not as good for preserving as
the sugarloaf. which will be more abundant
a little later on.
THE TRIBUNE PATTERN.
The dress that gives a slender effect to
the figure is liked by the younger girls as
well as by the older folk, and this one is
all that could be desired In that respect.
It is made of blue linen and embroidered
with white mercerized thread, but em
broidered banding could be used or the
space between the box pleats could be left
plain. The square Dutch nerk is a favorite
one for the cummer. but the dress ran be
made high if preferred and t> ith long,
plain sleeves, so that it can be made avail
able for the cooler days as well as for the
NO. HSR— TISSUE PAPER PATTERN OF
GIRLS DRESS. FOR 10 TENTS.
warmer one?. All materials that can be
pleated succwsfunj be utilised.
The quantity of material required for the
medium size (twelve years) is 8 yards 24,
5 yards 32 or 4^ yards 44 inches wide, with
5U yards of insertion.
The pattern. No. 6,687, i? cut in sizes for
girls ten, twelve and fourteen years old,
and will be mailed to any address on re
ceipt of 10 cents.
Pl*aF» eive number of pattern and age
distinctly. Address Pattern Department.
New-York Tribune. If in a hurry for pat
tern Fend an extra 2-cent stamp ami we
will mail by letter postage in sealed en
\ elope.
RESORTS.
■iUff"'— m f>* mm
"Quaint Cape Cod"
Send for this Book
Cape CorTs the place where you would
enjoy yourself this summer.
We've a beautifully illustnrted book
that tells about the summer pleasures
that await you on Cape Cod — the yacht
ing, the bathing, the fishing, and the
social life.
Before you decide where to go this
summer, send for "Quaint Cape Cod."
It's Free.
H. L. Stock ing, C. T. A..
171 Broadway, New York.
The New England Lines.
Berkshire Hills
THE MAPLEWOOO
PITTSFIEX.D. BERKSHIRE CO.. MASS.
NOW OPEN.
Send for 1910 Booklet and Auto Road Map.
_ ARTHUR W. PLOMR
THE. NANEPfiSHEMET
MAKBLJEHCAD NECK. MASS.
Opens June 15. Finest location on North
Shore. Every room ocean view. E. O. BROWN.
CONNECTICUT.
THE GRISWOLD
EASTERN POINT
NEW LONDON, CONN.
Open Jane 21th.
FINEST SEASHORE RESORT IN AMERICA.
2^ hours from New York.
Unequalled Sailing, Bathing. mo btlln«;.
Driving. Tennis. Golf. Dancing.
Lone distance telephone in every room.
For Booklet. Rates. &<• . Address
W J FLEMING, M(?r . 71 Broadway. Room
901. New York. Telephone, 3430 Rector.
MM Mgr- The Bellevlew. liellealr. Fla.
EDCEWOQD hvN
(Greenwich on the Sound), Conn.
Season May 28th to October lath.
New York Office. Town and Country Bureau.
3St> Fifth avenue.
2S miles from New York; 43 minutes* rids.
Superior stables and new, up-t«-dai» saragtt
this season.
New Colonial Tea Rooms; Casino: Golf;
Tennis; Bowling; Music Daily.
D. V SIMI'SOX. Manager.
OTEI. BEKKSIfIKE. 1,800 f»*t abova sea
level. Opens Mar 1. spring seajwn. He
duced rates I.ak« 5 miles ton*. Golf, tennis,
flshinsr danrlnfr. -woods and music. Writs for
pataUTg^Addreas Lttchfield. Conn
PENNSYLVANIA.
WfITER 6flP HOUSE
The Mountain Pnra<lls<»,
lIKIAHAKK « \TH{ HAT. r.\.
Remains open '•' 1"" * '*" 1 ' l'n<iu>'Stlonably
th- lfßrtlne anil finest lio*«l in this r«-«i<>n for
those who Bi-ek the i- •••' in appointment,
cuisine, service, comfort ami locution. Every
Indoor ' entertainment and outdoor pastime
Siierla.l early season rat'-e. Booklet of crinnra
'vf, \\h and Auto Mapa mailed- Fourth Beaaoa.
\itw» «»» J, .UN PURPT COPS.
THE KITtfITSHNY
Th» leodlng ii ■<• i at Delaware Water Gap,
Pa Every convenience and amusement. Sad
dle horses "nil Instructors. Writ* for bookUt
• lit win* hotel, auto inapt*. etc.
* <; FRANK COPE.
THE KITTATINNY Is not connected with
any otlwr.ho tel »i the Wafr Cap.
MAM'NKA CHUNK llOt'tiK. on a beautiful
island In the Delaware; always cool: -\•■hi
it-nt table; m"ii»-i i cnnv«nleiu>«; kus: no
mosquitoes. I>ancinK. ftshlnic. liuthmp. boatlnic.
dool $li> a w»ek up. Further particulars,
v ' Ml:- BRISBANE n.-thel. pa
' " KS^irK Ml I«. HTM, i*KNNA.
THE ESSICK— 2.S*Hi feeL. In th « Alleihenlet;
cottage*, steam heat, electric light; coif, caalno,
wnnls. nshlns- Hooklet.
H. M. ESSICK. EsslPk Heluhts. Pa.
mi jr.!*-* \
HOTEL SCARBORO
UOXa BRANCH. N. J. orr.v JUNE i.
Tina* and particular* on appit-.ni'n
t/nria v. kaiix. • rait,
THE ALLAIRE, **"??. S mtL *-
Directly on beach. Booklet, S. M. niehariWon.
RESORTS.
NKV* JERSEY.
MOXMOUTII BEACH INN,
MOXMOUTU BtAIH. XBff JERSEY.
QEORQE W AVERT, Manager.
Late with Hotel Aator. New York.
Entirely new management. Delightfully lo
cated in an exclusive cottage colony: com
pletely refurnished and brousbt up to date.
New elevator: new private baths; new $20,000
bathtn* paviUon with awiminloi pool. Ca*tno
with dancing- floor and ataje. New Creproof
rarape; new steam laundry. new ice machine;
new Grill room, open until midni«ht. Excep
tional French cuisine. Artistic orchestral mu
sic All amusements. New tennis courts.
Rcoms in annex at water's edge. Twe!v# cot
tages for private occupancy. NOW OPEN.
GALEN HALL
rtoTEL'SANAToRI U M
Owing to our Tonic and Curative Baths,
our Elegant Comfort and Exceptional
Table and Service, we are always busy.
F. L. YOUNG, G€n'l Manager.
N. Y. Office,,. 1122 Broadway.
Come to Atlantic City and «n>oy th« deitjrht3
of the Sea Shore in June and July, combined
with the comforts and conveniences which this
famous Al! the -year resort has to offer.
Hotel Dennis
with everything modern. la atway- open and
maintains an unobstructed ocean view.
WALTER J. Bt-ZBT.
HOTEL OSTEND, tll c clly
Whole Block Ocean front. >'ew throughout:
enlarged and <li)»rtallr<l Capacity 600; hot and
cold sea water bath»; spacious porches overlook
Ocean and Boardwalk. orchestra: table an.l «er
vice of highest standard. Special June and July
rates. Booklet. Electric coach meets trains.
D. P. kahter.
HOTEL MORTON
VIRGINIA AVI., NBAS BEACH.
ATLANTIC CITY. N. J.
Open all the year. Fln« table. Suites with
private bath. Handsomely furnished. . Perfect
sanitary arrangements. Elevator to all Coor*.
Special rate* for winter. Capacity 230.
lira. N. R. HA INKS. Owner and Proort>»tar
flDarll)oro«gl)-!£lenl3ciin
ATLANTIC CITY. M. J.
Jeslah White & Son* Company.
THE FENIMORE, is
Now open fox _ftth ssaaon. For booklet, rates,
etc.. address TH' .- NOBLE.
HOI BRUNSWICK
ASB CRY PARK. N. J.
NOW OPEN FOR THE SEASOX.
Highest standard of excellence maintained.
For reservation*, rates, booklet, etc.. address
MORGAN <% PARSONS.
HOTEL MOWIOCTH,
ASBI'RY PARK. >'. J.
Will Open June Sal
Directly on the beach. Modernized.
Booklet. ffM. A PIT EG ATE. Prop.
BRISTOL and Belvedere
Foot of Fourth Ay* . ASBURY PARK.
Nearest the Beach.
T>l. 207 Anbury. BANTA & HTLL.IARP.
Grand Avenue Hotel SSS^S. 52
Accommodations for 200 guests. Special
rates for June and S»pt»mb«»r. Booklet. Phone.
JOHN HUBBARD. Pr«p.
VERMONT.
The Center of Summer Golf
EQUINOX HOUSE
MANCHESTER. VERMONT.
Open June II to October IS. On
THE IDEAI, TOUR.
X T. Office. The Oshorne. S7th St. and 7th Arc
VERMONT VACATION RESORTS.
130 Page Illustrated Book. Full information
In re«rar<i to Summer ReMirt* in Vermont and
shore* Lake Cbamplain with hotel, farm, and
village home actmmo'latior.s Prices $7 per
week and up. Send •'-' stamps for mailir.gr.
Address SUMMER HOMES. No. 37, 355 Broad
ffislienwood ss'»ss«.
ThsGlenwood l^
HydeviUe. Vt. Rates $0 to $14. W. C. MOUNT).
."-•r ' l_
LAKE BOMOSEEN*. VT.
PKOSPECT HOr?*E.
Sanitary plumbing; electric lights; garage.;
milk, craam, vegetables from hotel farm.
Booklet. H. P. ELLIS. Mgr.
SEW lOSK
fQilr &<**
IJU* 3etrms>
NEW YORK—MONTREAL
Through Pullmans to Montreal, the
gateway for Ottawa. Quebec. Murray
Bay \benakis Springs and other Can
adian Resorts, via D. & H. R. R. from
Grand Central Station. Direct Con
nection with Hudson River Steamer
Lines.
All Resorts on the D. & H . including
Saratoga Springs
Lake George The Adirondack*
Lake Champlain Au Sable Chasm
Cooperstown Sharon Springs
are illustrated in "A PT'MMER PARA
DISE."—« cent, postage. Address
A. A. HEARD. G. V. A.. Albany. >. Y.
Information Bureau. Li."> 4 Broadway. N.Y.
AmßO> PACKS.
TREMELEAU HALL,
Hi Lake Champlain. Port Kent. N. Y.
Id*al location; 60 feet above lev-. «..
take pine grove; broad piazza; rooms .arc*
and 'well furnished; all modern conveni
pnees excellent table and service : bont-
Insr bathing anil fishinc. rai=lno; also cot
t&eea to rent New addition; remodeled
throughout; n^w dining room; prtvat.j
b«th»;n-w milea. FARRELL & ADQATE.
PAUL SMITH'S
IN THE
ADIROND
OSGOOD AND ST. REGIS CHAIN OF
T AKTEB. Through train service ii.iv ana
night ""New York Central Lin** — Paul
fmith's Ratlway. Direct wires — New V««k
Stock Exchange. ■' ":.-
wistport \m
AT WESTPOnT. >*. V.. ON
LAKE CHAMPLAIN
ADIRONDACKS
Attractive cottages In connection.
BOOKLET. H. P. SMITH. .IXaoag-r.
Xlan Manager The Foothills. Nordhoff. Cal.
" TlllHOM) V< X MOl n't'\!N>
THE WAWBEEK
(Hotel and Cottages)
Will open on June -Uh for the Thirteenth
„ under same management. Most com
fortable and Homelike. Private Cottages
with hotel service. Table will be kept at
„-,,■,' high standard. Rooms with bath.
Special terms for full season. Rustic drill.
so nd for ho<»kl't tT .vr»~*~*._X. T
ivfORLE Y'S
iiotol ii.. i att >-;••' In the heart of the Adiron
dacks overlooking two «f the most beautiful
fakes iv tJX region. Trout fishing, boss fishing.
SKtni bathing bowling, pool, tennis, music.
hnuU DhyslL-lan. Fanitary i.lumbinK. jmresprlns
water. ' No pulmonary Invalids. Artisitc cat*-
MORIiET'S Uik* Pleasant. Hamilton Co.. K. T.
— "tHE WINDSOR
AOIKONDACKS.
* i i/ \mi iii i>'\\ v X. V.
A modern hotel In the most beautiful see
»inn of »li- Adirondack*. Rooms «a suite, with
.>,iv«t« bath. Orchestra. Oolf link*. Clfflclal
h iVI A C A. und A. A. A. Lars* Garage.
it-nitrated t,....ki i on application.
ILustraieu »" orl \M»« KEI.; ' •<;,; .* SON.
if- UEKU's iIKAJO INN. 1
■ i a itiv Heart of tho Adirund<iv:ks. |
f Eli^betbtown. K« V. 2
■ Famed tor healthful and Invigorating ■
I climate. No malaria. Station for niem- I
I b"r^ of A. A. A.. A. C. A. and T. C. A. ■
I) t .r*« •:'»raa;» < . Finest naif eours* tn ■
I nw^infatn. Op»n June 1 t« Nov. 15. ■
| v kl.tlT * * HTKTSnN Crop |
I«^ISFTHH fiLGOaOUiS"
ON LOWEK &UL4NAO LAKE.
Oven June 10th tv Oct. Ist. Small mouth Clark
«*.. fishing betlns Juno 13th. Th» finest In
the" country. PostofKcn and T»lecrarh Address.
JUil> lIAHDINO. AUunquin. X. Y. Booklet.
RESORTS. ___,
NEW YORK!
BHB ■ H ■
Everyone ha* a
Splendid Vacation at
SARATOGA
SPRINGS
Raw TatkSMa'tßsaanl San* SeatmtSsa
SO Hotels, 200 Boarding Places,
400 Furnished Cottages.
40 Mineral Springs Pure, dry
mountain air. Beautiful Parks
and drives — perfect roads.
A free convention hall seating
5,000 people.
Reached via New York Central Ltast
sad Delaware & Hudson R. It.
We will find you a famished cottage,
boarding place, send you literature
and complete information. Address
PUBLICITY COMMISSION
Room 4. The A.-cade, Saratoga Springs, Hew York
&■■■■■
THE GRAND UNION. »AJtA*OGJL
OPENS JUNE 25. For particulars ad£r«w Hotel
Man* Antotn«tt«. >;Hth st- and Broadway, N. T.
THE
Catskill Mountains
noted for picturesque and romantic
scenery. The glorious air. the m«ni!l
cent views ana comfortable accommo
dations are. a jrear attraction in this
mounrain region which is a paradise tor
children and a sanitarium for every
body.
THE ULSTER I DELAWARE 8. R.
in connect iwn with West Shore and
Pennsylvania Railroad* form the only
all rail through car line between Phila
delphia. Jersey City, New York and all
points In this famous mountain region.
THE RIP VAN WINKLE FLYER wtU
make first trip from New York, via
West Shore R. R.. Saturday. May 21st.
leavrn? Desbrosses St.. 12.43 p. m.. an*
W*-^t 42nd St.. 1 o'clock p. m. dally ex
cepr, Sunday. ■>
The summer time schedule for season
of 1910 will go in effect Sunday. June
19th. i .-.-
An illustrate** riimtner Book with
map of the Catskllia and list of botala
ana boarding houses will ie sent free an
receipt of 8 cents postage.
N. A. SIMS. '"; "...
General Pa«»s«nar<»r Agent,
Kfnsstan. N. Y.
THE GRAND. HOTEL
CATSKILL MOUNTAINS'
will opea
SATURDAY. JUNE 25th.
Tiif- hotel 13 located an mala line of
the Ulster & Delaware R. R. Altitude
over 2.CCO feet. Throu»;h roach and
drawing room ear service from SJe»
York direct to hotel grounds.
Passenger elevator to all floor? Rooms
singly or en suite with private bata.
Service and cuisine unexcelled. Booklet
For terms and full information apply
to Mr. Frank De"Wolf. Town and Coun
try Bureau. 389 Fifth Avenue, corner
S*th Street. New Tork. Telephone Mi
Madison.
After June 25th address Th» Grand
Hotel Company, Hlghrr.ount, N. T.
_ _jk " 'Queen of the Catskill*
iSaVsaw E>vation 1..5T0 f"t. Ceo!. <i-y
<£C£^ eltmate. Pure r^iounrain water. «i
F!d^.i^g, golf an.l baseball grounds; mil rQ* •
amusements all city imprwemwrs. Cff
&>ok!et3 anil inrormatton of hotels. Ai,^
co:ta->?. routes, -re. ar 11^1 Broadway, S^\
N»w York. L. E. TR!MM, R?p. Phone 0
47-* 1 * Vad ' .
nniilT UnilOr The Hn(i!«n'3 «n«st r.fort.
ililA 1 i Ii JU L Fur- mi!* and water.
Now Open. Fruits ami vegetable, from
CAT?KII.L. N. T. Rote! garden. A!I outdoor
spo rts. Special June •. ■-*. $■* _ <tO -"<* 9V2.
XHE XLAREMONt, ESJB
houae; for 73; electric !i?ht: tennis; eolf. Clr
cular. S.43irEl> E- RISK * CO.
THE COL I'M BIAS*. — Finest location in th*
Eastern CarskilU- Lar^» shaded prounda;
grand scenery; refln»4 jruests. Send for book
let. Terms. $9 to $12 a week. This pl3Ce will
pleas* you. H. K. LYOX Prop.. Purling. N. Y.
WHERE TO GO
THIS SUMMER
"Long Island Peaorts." a book con
taining information about the various*
resorts en the O^ean and Round Shcre
and the Ontral section of Lon* Island,
with local capacity, attractions and
charges of the numerous hotels and
boarding-houses, iree upon application
at Lon^ Islin<i R. R. city ticket office*.
)«C Fifth AT.. 120 B'way. at East iTtfi
St.. N. T.: XX Fulton St.. Bklyn. or
will be mailed on receipt of €c. postage
by the General Passenger Ajent. 253
Fifth Ay , N'aw York.
ED6EMERE CLUB HOTEL,
KDCEMtCRB. I* l-
AMERH'.VS JIUST SELECT RESORT.
announces as th» Date of Opening JUNE I*.
Pirectlv on tne Ocean. On!r 30 mlaures tram
New York. Cpon request a Representative.
wilt call to explain the club feature. *o. Or
may *>«• .««" i n at
Hotel Woodward rEookin* OfScej.
iJ'vray at ."-"th St.. N-w Tort.
T. D. GFIBSN. Mana«er : .
The CUFFTQN
ON WATER FRONT
-BO^AIBB," rATCHOGCE. V. X.
NOW OPEN". American and European PUa.
Address W. M. JENKINS. Pro*.
THE COLUMBIAN
1000 ISLAND PARK. St. Lawrea«« Hirer. N. T.
— The best l«eat«d aad most attractive hotel
among th« Thousand Islands; excellent cui
sine. Orchestra and all am— o*«ttta Op«a
jutm 15. Booklet. 1.. A. JOII>3Qy. FTopw _
ALEXANDRIA BAY. >'. V. .__
TBO'dSASD V HOUSE
O. C. STAPLES. Prop. MM June 25.
For enjairrn.eat ©f rooms apply W
HAP.RY J PEAKSOX7
Prince Qeorge Hotel. 14 East sSth St.. IT. T
CEDAR CLIFF INN.
MO.NROB, ORANGE CO.. N. T.
A delightful resort amons the hilt* aa<*
lake I*'1 *' new modern house. *ultw wftii bath.
■team' heat. SOU feet elevation. 49 miles from
city own garden, 100 acres if ground*. faM.
lenn'ts. boating, i-.hm« fishing, music, drives,
c-rasr. no moK!i:i'«» n"r malaria. Booklet
' _ w. m. n* to ht.
THE COLONIAL
Kltrhswan-on-Croton Lake. N. ¥.
32 mi — from New York, his* altitude: «tean»
heat: c^en fir*p!aer_; r<»>n=» with fcath: jolff ani
' ternl*- Kitrage; #«I«-t r*t runa * e O;>«m» iusm la.
Bol«iet._ H. S. * A. F..WUITS.
riIOI "STAIN ASl> LAKE KKSOKTV
ls the name of the t.aek.i*ann._ lUtlroad *
< beautifully Illustrated Summer Book. Fr*e a;
; Lackawanna Ticket otSees In New \ot\i.
i Brooklyn nn-< Newarlr. __
XKW UAMPSUXBC
Social Mi
Scanio
Centre
lo Hay FeYar
Wil
Horns
Motor Gars
far Him
Many New rH-»tr Bath*. Al»o «— lihn
PKIV COTTAGES TO RENT.
Itooklt MAPLE BBTHLBUEM. .V. H.
x?v: hm ■•»-■• Leon "• c»i«r. Mar
WAUM BEX
A.ND I'OTMft&i,
JrfftrMia. N. II- la '•». **"»«• Mountain*.
Open* June 25.
** hcl* rolf e«ur»«4 on timwi .c«nl© aatn
routts. Det_ch«»l Cjmlly cottage- -^aipUUiy
furnished with hot-t •ervtc*. A.ldr»s»
CHAUUks \ MLRTMT. Nhmw.
V
6qs Gjab
. Gasiaa
I i m
Sfinp'aaaj
Crcaastra
Jans to
Qcts.sr

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