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New-York tribune. [volume] (New York [N.Y.]) 1866-1924, June 12, 1910, Image 5

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■f.iBL? WIMS COP
a* Famous Grays Victorious at
London Horse Show.
|||r0R S FOR JUDGE MOORE
Parade of Fonr-in-
Hacfis from Hampton Court
It Olympia.
rp, Cab.'c to Tt« TriVj=* 3
:^sTj« c 11-S^xm* <* rich
*' -_._.- - - — ■-.■-»-> have attended
**o-se -*'— afternoon and evening.
~*,"che£re£ jTidgre Moore and otaer
» gjstJe exhibitors, and eagerly
C * = T^ des* contests between him and
» ■■
¥ . VT:n«T! c
Kni FrogT£ffiT3e to-day had two «t-
i arictiens Ore was the spirited
S^r-attta" * cr Kin^ Edward's roM
2ssf' cv? for Jumping by teams cf
<-d*rs, e~d the other i-ae the
SLm jjaxitboa race from Hampton
j£?ty>*j of Pt-shey Park, Rich
~- -Bf.itt and the Raneia^h Club
fjr** The route was l?n»d with
•L-^Tds cf spectators and the parade
"" VT iVij-« ere, with eleven starters.
££jYG*yns« Va.=dcrbi!t won the
■TTci£~£= re —P to tila M2-2thcr:
*Z J» the race last year
! * =e 1~~ "which Riven by J. E. Wid-
Jgfrf Fhi^celphia. new becomes his
'"' . ur. Vanderbilt drey* the
Swai cf Frays, and covered tb«
*!_-,--••" £50 or.e-half "''"' from
."_ Cecrt tc Orrmpla In forty-one
*-
■MBjSl
"J-lct yix-* '"- c — '■-: tiro t&s *~
'V^-** *"^e: second, end
trsreeii third prize Though i time
L'-Vas plic?-. ~- condition cf the
jj,;^ ar.f Eppearar.ee of the coeches
Ml peters ta fletenninrng the award.
-ffny is 2.1 a hir'ner standard than
• 'rr - ::u£ competitors, and these an-
J- jvjjirj az<r developing Fup*rior
-
- - - .. -
•jbJbb, J* c 11.— I H. --.- -rbee s
mjß GT9 vss s£ - =nfi — **>• class fcr
e _^».' 1 >-un' r ers. four years eld. or over.
wSk c^r-1=? frcrr. IS* t 0 196 -cu-ds
sJssssi
jbsce Hoer* 5 Lcrd ?eaton -"■ 2-ady
. T .3OK sercr.* in ♦_>.* class far pairs
£«3Cks. ria>*a tc — .-—a stanhope
5 gjem arrc-T~.er.ts to count. Jadg e
Eaert V«ta White TT£!lariel took
__- jnf *- r ps.:rs cf hcrses ever fourteea
'^i rat* «I«~ r-S'r -S' 2fteea hands. Judge
£l£3 «raa — *- honors in the ia&tJOS
r 4^ cf borsw Bfcotra to a toonsMrrnJ
<5 Wtflewtete Eoa Bobto Hcofl.
""*■•£:-* Efl**rt YJI c£:2."er.ee cnc. fcr
pfflccrs cf a!! nations driven
Bttite ccurse. went to Belei'jn. France
■naeostfl ts& Engl»wS third- Only thre
es? ccr:?e*ec
■, TAFTS TRAVEL PLANS
Bate Pa" c at Yale Ii Com
mencement Week.
Tasisr=. 2—« '.'-.— President a aft «fl
rps:i -.tree cars s.t New Haven in Yale
czrxz.ztZitz.\ weelt He win leave Wash
£■93 cr Eu-day r-.f!".', Jur.e 1?. and on
tt '.z'2 l :vr.-z C 2" " tr "--' attend a meeilr.p o*
•±» Ta:e DnrperaSton. He irfH remain in
Vpt E*ve- en Taeaflay. the Set and will
nt Ins sen Robert graduated en TVedr>*s
&7. tit SI Ifci Taft wflj go with the
>kfErt, sr.2 c~ the morning of the 233
iiy bci «43 ec to Beverly, where lbs.
*jft her dasrhrer Ht'^r. and the two boys
t-- --a- Jot Gx tmnrcer. The President
*S » ba:k ta Washington the morr.ing
ftsS&ta rcrr.a:n antH the adjournment
-
• - 1


...
.- ■■ txm
. ■


PASSION
PUY
PICTURES
-gain Next Week
I JHE TRIBUNE will resume
!* s attribution of the litbo
| Paphtd
I
i'BSBI PlfiY PICTURES
L-_«fflfcy,Jun c 19th.
1 TV •
i-^- , at tractive illustrations,
IggSg °n heavy paper, are
£%s**s Interesting at this
|SS 2ccour - f - of the rendition
I £ -^-'-s religious spectacle
j^ *ramme. rg£u . The pictures
! CCUrcd ABSOLUTELY
i^^ 1 J KE SUNDAY
j g , t v ; r%£ " *Hcb will be deliv
!>^/ y ?"' r hotr ' c b y c nearest
[^teOcrcn request
h:T^\ yoi:r ord er with
?*&. d direct to this
KLFRED G. VANDERBILT A*D HIS TEAM OF GRAYS
'"■^v-mpia Horse Show tn LonA "
T HE'D AX /A WASHIJVG TOJV
TTrtrs. Th% Tribute E^irean.]
"Washington. Jure 11-
LXBEB3AN SlTUATlON.— Condiaosa are |
going from tad tc «form in Liberia, and j
Great Britain has taken occasion to call
the attention of Secretary Kncx to the
situation, with a polite Inquiry regarding '
the success of the effbrti of Mr. Knox to ;
induce certain tankers tc refund -c L- ;
berian debt. Mr. Knox has informed the j
British authorities that a representative cf I
Kuhn, _.-.-. Co. Is new In Europe on this j
errand, but -«■ cannct state the success
with which this agent has met Mr. Kncx,
It will i>e recalled, met the j-uggesticn of i
the Committee on Foreisr; Relations that |
it might be well ----- good of- :
fit'i-s o* the United States tc promote ths ;
negotiation of a joint treaty between Great j
Britain. Germany and France for the 2d- i
ministration of Liberia's debt and the gen
era] supervision of the affairs cf that re- ;
public with the assurance that he believed ■
he could induce certain bankers to perform \
this work without cal.'ir.g In the European ;
powers. Tri-at proposition was entirely j
agreeable- to the members of the Foreign j
Bdatkms Committee, and since then the i
Secretary- has fc-een devoting me effort to |
furtherance cf his counter proposition, j
Until the agent of Kuhn, Loeb & Co. Is |
heard from probablr nothing •p.-Il! be knevn ,
here cf the success he has had in inducing ;
foreign bankers to join with the American j
firm for the purpose indicated. If tLat j
scheme should fall through it will protably J
be necessary to adopt that £u^rgested by j
the Senate committee, and seek to induce j
Great Britain, Germany and France. &s the j
colonial neighbors of ana the countries '
most interests In Liberia, to take fome j
steps to remedy the unfortunate conditions ,
wnich bow exist in that republic
RAILROAD SECURITIES. - President
Tart's proposition for a special commission i
to consider and recommend to Congress I
some practicable method of federal super- j
vision of railroad securities is hardly likely j
to alarm the railways or to upset the in- j
d'jstrial world. The broader minded rail- i
read men long ago made up their minds j
:hat such supervision was inevitable, and. j
or Ftndymg the idea, concluded that well
managed railroads had mcr<; to srain than ;
to lose from it. Wildcat management and 1
speculative control -»ould inevitably be j
greatly curtailed by such supervision, but
those roads which are managed on sound
burners principles would profit by the j
stability afford*^ their securities by what
would practically amount to a government
guarantee of xh» soundness and value of
their stocks and bond?. But quite apart j
from the principle Involved is the question
cf method. Th<>re i« hardly anything more
intricate than The system of railroad Be- ;
entities, and the Prudent and his advisers
fully rea'iz** the gravity of any mistake,
not only from the point of view of the rail
roads and m* holder? of their securities,
whose fortunes mipht be jeopardized, but
from that of th« government itself, whlchii
when it assumes supervision of such stocks
end bonds, must b* prepared to place on
such a 6it approves a hallmark which will
be accepted as a by ail who in
vest therein
ADVANTAGES OF A COMMISSION—
The President and the oonferrees on the
railroad bill discussed the situation to-day
-...-■ In view of the importance of
tee subject, that It -ptouM be wise to pro
vide fcr the creation cf a commission to
consider the best method for the exercise
cf federal supervision ovir railroad securi
ties, and it is probable that the conference
report wW contain such a pro-vision. A
commission could hear all sides and give
full -weight to every argument for and
every contention against the method pro
vifled m the House bill and to ever- other
method which might be suggested. Afi a
result of its deliberations the subject could
b« laid before Ccngreps with a com-
P^h^nslvenefs impossible to attain at
this time, and many objections presented
to the plan o-.ntainfd in the H-juse bill
either could be proved ground!es<- or be
m*-t President Taft i* convinced, pre
ciFely as was Tresident Roosevelt, that
noe method must be four.! for
this supervision: that »h« operations of
conccienceiers Fpeoulatora in railroad prop
erty mutt h* checked, and that innocent in
vestors must be protected from the con
tinual marketing of s-.tocks which in larg*
! part represent only water. As has * been
-aid The best railroad operators are in ac
cord' with this proposition, and after dis
; cuiftlnc the subject at length there was
i little difference of opinion betue'n the
I President, the Attorney General and the
I conferees on the bill that the wisest
| course would be to create a competent com
! mission and d^egate to it the duty of thor
j oughly invert! §-3 tin«r ' v i- ' r - tir «" s ' JWect
i with a view to reporting to Conpre.-s nest
j session.
I TAFT AND THE PLATFORM-T^The £im
• pUcity of Fre*id*-tit Taft ;s a constant or-
I carton of anuzentnt to members of bis
! part- For instance, he persists in recarfl
• •« the blank* of the platform as pl«d«««
SndtaC on the party, ouch a view is no
V c .jn" generally ■ by practical
*'*o have been at l*«-t prone to
Ire-ari the platlorm v somethins w«»
NScJi to make the cairraigi*. but 1^
Ide'lwmtlon id 9**?°** ******** of *fcac b
XEW-YORK DAILY TRIBUNE; SUNDAY. JUNE 12. 1910.
would constitute somexhlziz closely s.kir: to i
party dishonor! ' That view the President
cannot see. He insists that the Repub
lican party is solemnly bound by every '•
plank la the platform, and he simply can- [
not understand those leaders "who take
a different -•>-» Thus he has not re- |
garded It as any favor to himself lor the |
leaders to pass those measures which he j
placed on his legislative programme. "They !
are all positively promised by the national
platform," he has said over and over again.
with something akin to amazement when ■
leaders have expressed themselves as op
posed to this that or the other measure, j
or as at least lukewarm on the subject.
This is the view he takes of the statehood •
promise, and the argument thai it- enact
ment may mean the addition of four Dem
ocratic members to the upper house has no j
weight whatever with the President. He
regards the party as pledged to grant
statehood to Arizona and New Mexico, and J
that therefore, it has no right to take into
consideration the possible political com- '
plexion of the delegation which may be ;
sent to Congress. And the same argument j
the President applies to every other pledge j
In the platform.
'„ - i
INTO THE OPEN reference of j
President Halbert of the Roosevelt Club of :
St. Psul, where ex-Forester Pinchot spoke :
to-night, to "an unnamed new party, the ;
leaders of which are Roosevelt, Pinchot j
and Garfield,"-news of which reached here ;
this evening, is taken to be the first ap
pearance in the open of the anti-Taft con
spiracy which was first described in The
Tribune of November 10. 190?, and which i
has obviously been tne chief factor in the
entire Ballinger-Pinchot controversy. The '
idea of such a conspiracy was ecouted ,
■when it was first announced, and. of course. j
its promoters were prompt to laugh it j
to scorn, but gradually the truth has !
dawned on one observer after another, and ,
no inconsiderable part of the press of j
the country assented to the proposi- ,
tion that nothing else could account
for the attacks on President Taft through '
the Interior Department, the Department |
of State and other channels when the in- j
vestigation of the Interior Department
ended, though those chiefly Interested in tne i
movement have all along denied that they
Had a:--- such purpose. Coming from the '
president of the St. Paul Roosevelt Club, j
however, and on the occasion of Gifford I
Pir.chot's address, and Just after Plnchofs j
visit to ex-Secretary ■'-- . at West j
Mentor, the incident la regarded by po'it!- ]
eal observers here as of far more than j
ordinary significance, and it i? assumed
that the idea of the new party was brought j
out into the open at this time with a view I
of exciting the enthusiasm of the admirers '
of the former President just as he was !
about to arrive in this country. "For Presi- j
dent. THeodore Roosevelt; for Vlce-Presl- {
dent, James R. Garfleld, and for Secretary j
cf State. lord Pinchot. is. I suppose, the j
way the ticket will read," laconically re- •
marked on* 1 politician who saw the St.
Paul dS«patch this evening. G G. H.
DENNETT EXONERATED
Charges Pound Baseless — Meet
ing of Ballinger Committee.
Washington June ::— A complete vindi
cation of Frederick Dennett, Commissioner I
of the General Land Office, from all the
charges of reckless expenditures ought
against him by Representative Hitchcock,
of Nebraska, will be announced in the re- j
port of the majority of the House Com- ;■
mittee on Interior Department Expendi
tures.
If there is a minority report it win prac- j
tically be based on the ■.negation of fa- :
voritism and unauthorised expenditures for
"Jack" Ballinger'? trip across the conti
nent from Washington to Seattle, where !
be left the government set nice to go into !
private service. "Jack" Ea!linger Is a |
nephew of Secretary Ballinger, and Mr. ;
Hitchcock asserted that the young man
intended to resign when he left here, and ,
iha» the allowance ooff f his travelling ex- i
penses and per lien pay, under a deslgna
i tion of "special temporary Inspector" of
f offices, was "a flnal rake-off* and "an out-
| ra-g* on the Treasury.*" The majority re
■ port w jn gay that R. A. I lallfnger was not
I tnen in public office and nobody ha-1 any
I Idea that he would be Secretary of the In
1 terior.
"Without foundation." is the. ws the
\ committe-i will stamp the allegations that
j th J, re were exorbitant expenditures for fur
niture for "a certain large hrick chimney"
I erected In Washington for the Land Office
I building unauthorised employment of a
! , ertain corps of clerks, etc , out of the
! appropriation of Jl.CWtfW* far protection of
I tn e public domain, as well as numerous
i otner charges.
* meeting was held behind closed doors
!bv th* tfalHr.ger-Ptnch.ot igating
i " _ir!<^> to-day. It was anr.oijn.-ed that
)) CC ° m ™ -The triers which the threi attor
j non £ the rase wer* expected to file had
i Tilin received, snd therefor no action had
I , e , n taken beyond 11*5 next Saturday as
: , .ie < or the next meeting Tin- briefs
' ," te in the har.Js cf tho committee's.
: mU&t , \,y Monday next, and he -was ln
• to make them pubUc at that time.
JSn^tStiw ProsPCCUve earl;- adjourn
the American Vice-Consul, W. B. McMas
ter, whose Imprisonment has been ordered
by oae of the courts. The State Depart
ment received advices from Minister North
cott. at Bogota to-day, reporting that the
court had reversed the verdict rendered at
the former trial,- and had ordered the im
prisonment cf BfcMaster. No attempt has
ret been made to arrest him, and the
Colombian Minister for Foreign Affairs has
given his assurance to the American Min
ister that the government has done and
will do all that is possible to insure- fair
treatment.
The trouble concerning which the present J
verdict is the second to be given occurred
about a year ago. McMa-ter was summoned ,
f rC m his house by two natives, who at- |
tacked* him with clubs. The vice-consul, j
however, took away the weapon of one of j
the men and beat both of them severely. ,
The men were arrested and found guilty |
of assault, and the Colombian government j
apologized to the United States. The pres- j
ent decision is riven on an appeal and com- j
pletely reverses the former verdict. The j
court orders the release of the men and the ;
imprisonment of McMaster.
There has been much ill feeling in Colom
bia against the United States for several j
years. Some months age, in a street rail
road strike, the American Legation was j
stoned and several Americans were at- j
tacked. The Colombian government has so
far refused, also, to ratify the .treaties with j
Panama and the United States.
It is believed at the State Department j
! that the present incident is the result of j
! popular rather than governmental animosity
toward Americans, and It is thought that
i the authorities will obtain proper treat
ment for McMaster.
LEASING FRIAR LANDS
Favored Persons Reported to
Get Tracts at Low Prices.
Washington, June IL— Friar lands are
again being leased to favored persons in
the Philippine Islands, including one offi
cial and the nephew of another at from
8 to CO cents an acre, according to a re
port sent to Congress to-day by the War
Department, in response to one of several
resolutions introduced by Representative
Martin, of Colorado. The information is
contained in a report prepared by Direc
tor Sleeper, of the Philippine Land Office,
and it involves in the transactions Frank
TV. Carpenter, executive secretary of the
Philippine Commission, and E. L, Wor
cester, a nephew of Dean C. Worcester
member of the Commission. The report
says:
It v said that Edward L Pook
purchased the San Jo=e estate in Mindoro,
represents Mr Welch, but th<
wae made in his own nam e " Mr •■
according to Mr. Martin, is an »<■<
of Horace Havemeyer, of the American
Sugar Refining Company.
The report shows' a special lease to
Emilio Agulnaldo of 1,050 hectares on the
Imus estate and of 2,067 hectares on the
Tala estate to Frank W. Carpenter. All
the special leases, the Philippine govern
ment reports, are "for -the express pur
pose of extending cultivation on unoccu
ied tracts of friar lands on which the
government is raying 4 per cent interest
a year "
"Frank W. Carpenter, the executive
secretary of the islands, 1 " said Representa
tive Martin to-day, "is shown by this re
port to have leased to himself 5,688 acres
at 8 cents a month «n*scre, with a right
to all the rest of the estate as fast as it
becomes vacant. These leases are really
options to acquire.
"E. L Worcester, the nephew of Dean
C. Worcester, Secretary of the Interior of
the Philippine government, the depart
ment in charge of the government lands,
has acquired 3,000 acred for twenty
five years a' '."" cents an acre a year. All
that is good land. E. L. Poole, who
bought the San Jos4 estate for the Have
ineyers, is now shown to be buying public
lands in Mindoro for two California cor
porations. I have other information that
eoes to show that other officials of the
Philippine government, including the In
terior Department and the Public Land
Bureau, have sold themselves Philippine
lands."
A cabl*; dispatch from Manila received
to-day by Representative Martin fays that
a mass • ting was held there 'yesterday
to protest. againsi th€ tale of friar lands to
the Sugar Trust.
HOUSE PASSES CLAIMS BILL
Bennet Gets Allowance of $1,200 for
Engineer's Widow.
[From The Tribune Bureau.]
Washington, .Tune — After a hard fight
Representative Bennei secured the passage
et a claim bill amounting to $1.1 for
Elizabeth G. Martin, •' New York. She is
the widow of James P. Martin, who was
killed by an engine of thfc ! thmlan Canal
Comml while he was em ploy wl in
Panama. th« measure passed the fcenate
rarrylne $5,t>00. but th* House committee
or. claims reduced this amount to 11,200.
The Hous* passed a numl>er of claims
this afiernoon and will not «rant any more
at tti< present session. From now on until
thr conferenoc report on the railroad MM
1-= ccnfi.l^rfe.l It will do little more than
mark time. Monda^ will be District of Co
lumbia day, Tuesday the General Deficiency
bill will be taken up tor debate, and on
Thursday it will probably be considered un
der the nve-minutf. rule. All bi^n^ point
co an adjournaaaat la about two w--cks.
STORMY TARIFF DEBATE
Hale Reads Riot Act to Yoimqer
Senators.
MANY TART COLLOQUIES
Aldrich and Beveridge Discuss
Authorship of Tariff Board
and Further Revision.
[From The Tribune Bureau.]
Washington, June There was a stormy
tariff debate in the Senate to-day. It lasted
nearly five hours, and finally got on the
nerves of Senator Hale, who was doing his
best to expedite consideration of the sun-
I dry civil bill. Just before adjournment the
Main© Senator delivered a characteristic
j lecture to the younger members of the Sen
! ate who were delaying the public business
' by Insisting on talking about a tariff bill
! that was not a year old. Mr. Hale's stern
' rebuke provoked smiles on both sides of
the chamber. In the end the good humor
' became so contagious that Mr. Hale him
•elf was affected by it, and his abrupt
motion to adjourn met with no opposition.
Senator Dolliver will speak on Monday in
: favor of a tariff commission, and unless his
= references to the Payne law stir up Repub
j lican Senators who supported that bill, a
vote will be taken late Monday afternoon
ion the sundry clvi! bill. There is no doubt
that the provision appropriating 5250,000 for
the use of the Tariff Board will be. adopted
i by a large majority.
Senator Hale was anxious to dispose of
the bill to-day, bur. gave up hope when
Senator Heyburn took the floor Mr. Hey
burn talks long and Icud and often and his
■ speech tc-day possessed all these features.
: He was on the point cf closing when he
made a reference to the insurgents which
j aroused Senator Cummins. The lowa Sen-
J ator arose to ask a question, when Mr.
, Hale shook his head and said In a voice
loud enough to be heard in the galleries:
j "Don't stir him up again." This observa
j tion was resented by Mr. Heybum, -who
; turned quickly and poured out the vials
cf his wrath en Mr. Hale. The Maine Sen
ator did not reply. Mr. Cummins asked his )
; question and Mr. Heybum held the floor J
; half an hour longer.
GaHinger and Do!!iv*r Cis«
This was only one* of several instances
that enlivened the proceedings. There was
a sharp clash between Senators Galiirrger
an. Dolhver over a remark by Mr.
; Gallinger which Mr. Doiliver did not quite
; catch. Earlier in the day Senator Bailey
' remarked that the Indiana Republican con
vention avoided reference to the Payne
I law. and Senator Beveridge. In his speech
to the convention, attacked this '.aw. Sena
j tor Johnston wanted to know if Mr. Bailey
I had heard of a telegram seat to Washing
ton in which a certain Republican Senator
• said he fad "kicked off the epidermis from
the abdominal region of the Payne bill."
Mr Johnston had reference to a story cir
culated on the floor of the Senate at the
j time of the Republican convention in Ind- j
iana to the effect that Mr. Beveridge had
; telegraphed to one of his insurgent col
leagues: "I have kicked the stomach off
| the Payne bill."
'It went into the bill on my motion," Mr.
j Aldrich said, "and my motion was not In
stanced or controlled by the Senator from
i Indiana or anybody else. It went Into the
bill in the precise words in which I wrote
it. We were not bulldozed into adopting it
: by the Senator from Indiana."
Mr. Aldrich reviewed his conferences on
this subject with Mr. Beveridge and a rep
' resentative of the National Association of
Manufacturers. Senator Hale chuckled
1 when Mr. Aldrich referred to one confer
i ence at which both Senators Beverage and
I Hale were present. He said Mr. Hale re-
I marked at the time that the newspapers of
' the next day would say that Mr. Beveridee
. had drafted a provision which the members
; of the Finance Committee had accepted.
He said such a statement appeared in a
Washington newspaper the next morning,
and before his breakfast he received a
I facetious note from Mr. Hale regarding his
! prediction.
Mr. Beveridge replied at length and de
i clared that Mr. Aldrich had confused the
Tariff Board provision with a resolution of
inquiry which was being framed about the
same time.
Aldrich vs. Beveridge.
One of the most amusing features of the
debate was the long colloquy between Sen
ators Aldrich and Beveridge over the au
thorship of the Tariff Board provision of i
I the Payne law. Mr. Beveridge said, in
effect, that the Tariff Board provision had
been forced by the friends of a tariff com- ,
mission, and intimated that he had a large
, share in framing the language of the pro
: vision. He gave his recollection of his con
ferences with Senator Aldrich on this sub
ject, and then Mr Aldrich gave his version.
He said he had written the paragraph in
question, and not a single word had been
changed from bis draft.
1 Defending the tariff board appropriation,
Mr. Aldrich said it was simply 'a business I
position. The Payne law placed a con
tinuing responsibility on the President to
I investigate discriminations and alleged dis
criminations against American products,
I and Congress would be remiss in its duty
1 If it failed to give him the money necessary
to make a full investigation. Mr. Aldrich
said that recent political events showed
that the people of the United States are :
more devoted to the policy of protection
to- day than at any previous time in their
history.
Senator Clay wanted to know if Mr.
Aldrich was in favor cf tariff revision Mr.
I Aldrich replied that he favored revision
vrien conditions warranted it. Conditions
did not warrant It new, md the peop'.e
•■ ere surely entitled to a rest from the dis
turbance of business which always attend
ed ... revisions. Mr. Aldrich declared
that the Investigations of the tariff board
cculd not be too wide. These mvestlga-
Uions would Justify the Payne law and
j show the people of the country how ground
j less are the accusations which have been
made against it.
MAY NOT RATIFY CONVENTION
Costa Rican Congress Balks at Bound
ary Arbitration Plan.
Washington. June 11.— Official reports have
reached the State Department from Costa
Rica that strong opposition has developed
in the Congress of that country to the rati
fication of the convention signed in Wash
ington some months ago by representatives
of that country and Panama by which
their boundary dispute was referred to the
Chief Justice of the United States Supreme
Court as arbitrator. The opinion is ex
pressed that the convention may be re
jected.
The State Department officials are at a
loss to understand the attitude of the Costa
Rican Congress in view of the fact that the
good offices of the United States to secure
some settlement of the differences were
extended at the special request of the Cos
ta Rican government a;- well as that of
Panama, which were most urgent. Acting
or their requests, the .Secretary of State
susgested that representatives of the two
governments meet in some friendly capital
and If possible reach a decision among
themselves. Washington was selected, not
by Secretary Knox, but by the governments
of Costa Rica and Panama, and after *
long discussion, during which the repre
sentatives were in constant communication
with their respective governments, a con
j ventlon * s signed naming Chief Justice
I Fuller as arbitrator
B. Allmcitt & (tn.
sth avenue. 34 and 35 th streets, new york
ANNOUNCE FOR MONDAY. June 136,
AN UNUSUAL
SALE OF MISSES* SUMMER. DRESSES
comprising 803 white and colored batiste,
gingham and dimity dresses.
at $4.85, $7.50 & $14.00
•WOMEN'S- WHITE LINGERIE WAISTS
IN NUMEROUS EMBROIDERY AND LACE-TRIMMED MODELS
WILL BE OFFERED ON TUESDAY. JUNE Mia,
at $1.75, 250. 3.25, 3.50, 4.00. 4.50, 5.75, 6,75
BEING FAR BELOW THE USUAL PRICES.
.♦' - -
i§. Altatan & (EH. HA^ received A NEW SHIPMENT or
IMPORTED SILK MARQUISETTE
COMPRISING THE LATEST PARIS SHADES IN PLAIN AND
CHANGEABLE COLORS.
ALSO WHITE AND BLACK MARQUISETTE.
ON SALE IN THE SILK DEPARTMENT.
WOMEN'S DOMESTIC UNDERWEAR
NOTEWORTHY REDUCTION? HAVE TU?T BEEN MAR t l^
THE PRICES OF A NUMBER OF INDIVIDUAL PIECES
OF WOMEN'S MUSLIN UNDERWEAR.
COMPRISING NIGHT ROBES. CHEMISES. DRAWERS. COMB!
NATION GARMENT?. PRINCESS SUPS, PETTICOAT? AND
BOUDOIR AND BREAKFAST JACKETS
TRAVELING ARTICLES, a complete stock ts
SHOWN. INCLUDING OUTERGAFMENTS IN VARIOUS
MATERIALS FOP MEN. WOMEN MISSES AND CHILDREN.
RAIN COAT?. STEAMER RUGS. SHAWLS AND LOUNGING
ROBES; AUTOMOBILE CAPS. BONNETS AND VEILS;
FITTED TRAVELING CASES OF LEATHER.
HAMPERS OF WICKER AND LEATHER: RIDING AND DRIVING
EQUIPMENTS, GLOVES, UMBRELLAS AND PARASOLS:
STATIONERY AND TOILET REQUIREMENTS
INTERIOR DECORATIONS FOR AUTt
i, Altmait $c Gill. ARE NOW PREPARED TO TAKE
ORDERS FOR THE COMPLETE FITTING* P OR THE
PARTIAL REFURNISHING OF TOWN HOUSES AND ARE SHOWING
FOR THIS PURPOSE SAMPLES OF NEW UPHOLSTERY FABRICS.
LACES AND LACE MATERIALS FOR THE MAKING TO ORDFR Of"
WINDOW HANGINGS. DOOR PANELS. BED SETS. SCARFS
AND COVERS. ETC
RUGS MADE TO ORDER IN ANY ?IZE. AND 'N DESIGNS TO
CONFORM TO SCHEMF. or DECORATION
SPECIAL DESIGNS AND ESTIMATiS SUBMITTED ON REQUEST.
IT IS SUGGESTED THAT ALL ORDERS FOR FALL DELIVERY
BE PLACED AS EARLY AS POSSIBLE
SHIPPING INFORMATION
PURCHASES OF $2 50 OR OVER SENT FREF TO POINTS
WITHIN 1M) MILES OF NEW ORfc CPPi
PURCHASES OF $300 OR OVER SENT FREE (TO THE NEAREST
FREIGHT OR EXPRESS OFFICE) TO POsKTS E AST OF THE
MISSISSIPPI RIYFR
MAILABLE PURCHASES OF $b.OQ OR O\TJt WEIGHING NOT
MORE THAN FOUR POUNDS. SENT FREE TO ANY PART
OF~THE UNITED STATES. ALSO TO FOREIGN COUNTRIES
WHERE PARCELS POST RATES APPLY. *
PURCHASES OF $25.00 OR OVER SENT FREE (TO THE NEAR
FST FREIGHT OR EXPRESS OFFICE) TO ANY TART OF
THE UNITED STATES
NOTE: UNDLR THE FOREGOING CONDITION? METHODS OF
SHIPMENTS ARE OPTIONAL \l ITH B. ALTMAN ft CO..
AND NO DISCOUNTS ARF ALLOWED
ALL EXPRESS CHARGES FOR GOODS SENT C. O. D. AS
WELL AS FOR HEAVT OR BULKY SHIPMENTS. WILL BF
( COLLECTED ON DELIVERY
fiftb Hi»<nu?. *4!b ana *stb Struts, n^p Vsr&
5

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