OCR Interpretation


New-York tribune. [volume] (New York [N.Y.]) 1866-1924, June 26, 1910, Image 9

Image and text provided by Library of Congress, Washington, DC

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83030214/1910-06-26/ed-1/seq-9/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for 9

DALMATIAN NOW ON TOP
Turns Tables on The Turk, to
Surprise of Crowd.
ROUND THE WORLD SCORES
Defeats Strong Field in Stirring
Drive for Rich Great
Trial Stakes.
t:aa turned the tables en The Turk
r-j^r.ir.r of the Coney Island Jockey
Is t»*" **
... tes. at Sheepshe.td Bay. yesterday.
- way j}. iß t *** little short of shocking.
°>Ue Bound the World defeated Iron Mask.
*■■ and other? in the Great Trial
- „ in » wav that was refreshing and
gufcge •'■
r ■--. to those who love a good horse.
fjil.*"* l "^
T he co ° 3'3 ' » racJnK air and excellent card
rved to attract one of the biggest crowds
f the season, and judging; from the en
lU slasrr. th€ "P Ol " 1 was !■■■•* enjoyed
asi the face of Th Turk's poor race
-d *j]« slighter of six Quoted favorite*.
lixats B. Ketw. an infrequent visitor this
" . pa^| down to the track for the ex
-esf purpose of seeing Iron Mask run In
,j- e Great Trial, and he expressed himself
n- highly p'iea^ec with the performance of
♦he colt, even thouirh disappointed at los
* the rich prize by the width of a hand.
Tfce surprising- and ur.looked for change in
term « stowr. by Dalmatian and The Turk
'air*t overshadowed the brilliant race and
t;r l2jjj «nish in the two-year-old stake.
Hotfw* 11 shook their heads, and all sorts
of exP'S.' at ' or were offered to account for
the rssy tkiWT of The Turk in the Tidal
ctakts •■ Wednesday, when he beat Dal
matian four I-ngths. and the galloping vic
tory of Dalmatian yesterday, when he
zz&te The Turk Jook like a cheap selling:
plater- They met at even weights In both
races and the extra distance had little
tfarlrig. Much depends on pace and jockey.
»vi Fo:ne contended that Dalmatian was
Marty handled by K. Pug;an on "Wednesday,
'^.^t, he practically forced a sizzling pace
B .ti had nothing left to finish with, and
thtt The Turk was badly ridden yesterday.
v ifir Povers appeared undecided between
ratting or coins to the front.
B* that as M may. it was Impossible to
reconcile the two races, and the question of
three-year-uld supremacy is harder to solve
than *rrr. Dalmatian is now on the top
for the moment, whereas before the run
ning of the rare yesterday The Turk was
railed.
Powers did not shine as a rider -in fact.
Us (Sorts or: Th« Turk would have dene
fiiscred'.t to a stable boy. He waited under
wraps rounding the first turn, then changed
hi* mind and rushed the colt up in the mid
dle of the backstretch. only to take him up
again a.- Martinez raced to th«» front round
to? ■■• far turn. Dalmatian also went by ;
before Powers decided to move again, and i
■••• he dropped Is mount's head and al- :
towed Mm to swerve over to the rail when {
ttrsiehtenei out in the stretch. Such hand- '
ling leas quite enough to beat the ' best
hcrse !r the world. In the mean time I>aJ
TOatlan. showing marked improvement un
d*r Shilling's skilful handling:, came away
to Tin as be pleased, while even Satrer beat
Th» Turk in a hard drive for the place.
■Round the World won the Great Trial
Stakes for two-year-olds at six furlongs In
c way that stamped her a filly of the
hi*be<r class and quality. Meeting some
of the be?t co'.ts In training at even
irei?ht£, she shared in the paeemakine; and
foucht out a p;!rr:n«r finish with James R.
Hose's Iron Mask and R. T. Wilson, Jr.'s,
Nausrr-r. to win by a short head. It was
i -. -.r.: race, as Round the World and
fen Mask raced head and head practically
fi.l! the way. while Naushon joined them at
the last *ixt«>*»nth pole for the final desper
ate drive. The horses faced a strong wind
•riich blew directly up the stretch, and
which accounted largely for the slow time.
"Without detracting in the least from the
credit due Round the World, it may be said
that Naushcn was the best horse under the
conditions. He was in the rail position at
the Mat, but was shut off soon after the
barter went up, forcing- Butwell to pull to
the outside. He overcame this handicap in
'■".<- iiilibjtl to have won. but swerved
Slightly as Butrrell dr*-w his whip inside
the sixteenth pole, and this proved fatal.
If anythin?, he was running the strongest
of the three placed horses at the finish.
Iron Mask, too, proved himself a good
MR. a? be fought out the finish to the last
etride in th* gaznest fashion.
'W- G. Yank*, a Western horseman, who
cwt.e and trains, Round the World, was
out or. the track patting: his good filly as
who, by the way, rode a masterly
rac*. brought her back to the' stand. He
had reason to f<^el elated over the victory.
as the lit dm takes rank with the best
of her ape la training.
Round the World may be described as a
hi* little filly. She is short legged and
»ther small in the way oi height, but
* 0r ' 44 ' < "' de<p through the heart «nd bo
bit MM that the looks as If she could
eiaad one ' ■■m^«alKT;!ng. She has now
*<« lour straight races since coming Bast.
™i if «':.<* trains m Is sure to hold her own
Jor the M of the season.
Round Dm World is a chestnut ally by
tte English rtallion Lackford— Nellie Bly.
Wxi "he har proved her ability to run on
wtt a fast and a heavy track. The Great
UM Stakes had a guaranteed value of
BMOS, but was worth close to $12,000, so
tt« Mr. Tanke can count himself fortu-
in winning one of the richest plums
of the racjng season.
•VMtet met his first defeat through
™; Md when Sanctus beat him a head in
we Beacon steeplechase after a race that
*** studded with action from end to end
* tte two-and-a-half-mile course. Dono
tc* totfi, a careful, patient race on the
*!=i>r. ■M timed his run to a nicety,
eeactur has been away a long time— since
•^f cf lact year, to be exact-but Ed
eter« ! « t him to the pest trained to the
*.••■ •*
«Jl* b ° r * °" ut at practically every Jump,
J* hereby lost valuable ground, but
■M straightened him out quickly each
?*j. and waited and waited until it looked
« he would nevtr turn his horse loose.
»«>aehJr. ? -he * ar turn Sanctus was six
•" Eht tenglhii b«lJnd the leaders, but
*ly Donohue called on his mount.
jp slo *' ! >' but surely he moved up. so
coming to the last Jump he challenged
•or * Rllll? ' * rdr ' d a lon & drive to th wire
which set the crowd shouting and
j*^ ll^. Butetaa gained an advantage of
r~* a ■■SOl turning Into the straight.
1 tlreo in the closing «t rides and won
""rf a thort head.
•lei" 131 ™ ran in th * ntmt and colon
»i «1_" Tc= '''.' 8. who purci>aj»ed Mm
fcri-I* 1 * **** trorr: Thomaa Hltcbcoclr.
4 £T^ «m*h of thm UtUrt tetiMr
ic^f l ***** WM *l« •» «Mlly !n their l*«t
tkf" ' ''■'♦' •V'n^e^lng twelve pound*.
t ,'. ***' u-pu -p Garry Herrmann colt turned
C J ,_ **•■ te the ?<rirt race. In receipt of
tJH^t* 9 Pounds, the form students
lvi ' II was * clear case of Warbler
fifteen pounds at least over the
course. He was up with tie pace
ferl * *ay. and came away In the last
«h*rDi S a? r cutllnK across Whist rather
ttc v at the stretch turn. The latter
etn, " Kht at the end. so that Herodia
*£* "* mm
E rco , E - Panshawe. who owns the Silver
r £* nt*.blt, ha» decided to part with The
Hi, • Th * Bon or Heno wfll be sold at
to«, 0 L!!' Jt3ly 4 to » *»p» p with mm *•«>■
*** by Mr. nyorttaw* -
ROUXD THE WORLD WINNING THE GREAT TRIAL STAKES.
FIX ON MEADOW BROOK
Internationa! Polo Matches To
Be Played Here.
PHIPPS INJURED BY BALL
Harry Payne Whitney Leads His
Team to Victory in a
Fast Game.
Meadow Brook's . polo field will be the
scene of the International matches between
the American holders of the championship
cup and th© British challengers, the Old
Estonians. This decision was arrived at
yesterday, when the field was Inspected by
p. committee. . Several j thousand lovers of
the spectacular and hazardous sport like
wise witnessed the inspection and Indorsed
the selection, following the exhibition of the
newly Installed $10,000 water supply system;
with Its compressed air pumping apparatus,
that allows the field to be kept in perfect
condition even during the . torrid weather
that scorches the Hempstead plains of
Long Island during the month of August.
The regulation scheduled match for the
"^"estbury cups was forfeited by New
Haven to the first team of Meadow Brook
because of the Injuries to L. E. Stod
dard, who still suffers from his left leg.
that was wounded at the Lakewood tour
nament. : nd H. Drury, who is unable to sit
a pony since his fall at Great Neck. The
Internationalists, therefore, took' the field
against a picked four of rovers, with the
result that the latter were beaten by: 15%
goals to 7. In this match Harry Payne
"Whitney, captain of the international polo
team, displayed wonderful proficiency both
with the mallet and pony. In the first five
periods he alone scored Fix goals.
More than two hundred automobiles were
parked about the field and a greater num
ber of coaches, drags and other equipages.
The five thousand spectators saw fast and
furious polo, with the thrilling climax of
J. S. Phipps being unhorsed In the fierce
charge of a Fcrimmage by a cracking blow
in the mouth from a mallet.
The accident occurred In the fifth" period,
and as all of the players were bunched
over the. ball at the time It was Impossible
to determine who accidentally struck the
unfortunate blow. Phipps was laid out for
fifteen minutes. His mouth bled profusely,
but with the usual polo pluck he pulled
himself together and finished out the game.
The line-up follows:
INTERNATIONALS. ROVERS. '
H'cap. » ca P-
No I— J. S Phlpps.. 4 No. I— L. Waterbup-. »
No 2— J. M Water- No. 2— J. E. Cowdin. S
buryT Jr. • No.S-Rene La Mon- ,
No 3— H. P. Whitney*! ta«ne. . Jr <
Backer. Mllburn. . . 9 Back— J. B. Thomas. . J>
Total 'handicap. ..'. . 31 ! ' Tots.! handicap 29
Goals:. For International*— Harry. Payne Vhlt
rry 6 James. M. Waterbury. Jr.. 4; Devereaux
Mllburn. 3; 3. S. PhTpps. 1: R. If *&'!££&
♦> Tv.Kt by nrnalty— v goal by foul by T Milbum.
Met Bcore^WH «o*l«- . For Rovers-Lawrene*
WSg'J&j+fS; Time of r»-^r »-^
Sheepshead "Bay Summaries.
WEATHER CLEAR: TRACK FAST.
Owner, Qu.ncy B^ '
• •' SS 00 * 1 ' st. U Vi %' Str. Fin. Jockey. Open. High. Clo«e. Place Show
Warbler.. " » '■ 2*| "• i 4« 3' ,3» g. Garner ....8-6 2 9-6 7-10 1-4
fill j II ii IPS II
■lliiiiiiiHllii
Warbler .howed improvement . «n« the winner down. Whl« '""
with the p.c^ all th« way. H^joaia ma-™ »n fln.l drtre. Col , t&n wa . on the outs)de all the
CT owae£ .ll^tlr .« d -^.^rVu -bear watching. , ■ - ;
w » r - • The ."P« " " •,\__ ' KPI FCHAPE for three-y«*r-old B and upward; $1,000 added.
SECOND KACE.-THB BEACON STBfcPUEaßAßE^for^hr. > p;iN 9anie . Time. ; r,:U. Win-
Owner. P. J. Hain^
r^.w, s 2 , * VV 2 <.- :i r™- y ue..°To- H^r% Pl 7j shc^
■liliiiiisliSii
t«t S on ££». Waterway tired cha.ln* the pace.
ran hie usua. rood ra. a ~ iKKS - fo , tw o^y«ar-<.ld« fruaraoteM value, $10,000.
THIRD RACE -THBOREATJRI^JTA^S.^ Tlme . l:l3H . W in
p- w«. *. « » r, r-^r -^ i?2sr- .°n H " hßch 8 c^ PlaM Ish1 sho i w i
R »w MU Sg l : g Kr-^ 8 1 8 1 &
Iron Muk f 12 2 fl iiili fd* 3 8 1 1 1
Mauaiion » 130 7 J! '* £, ?h? h Archibald 20 B0 40 32 6
•Trap Rock •» 122 c 6^ 6 «• B^ ./> 30 20 7 8
T«tU« 3 122 3 ♦; * «■ G»rn«r 7 12 10 4 2
Meridian 7 12 2 B 6- C» 7> I, ££™ or ;; ... 20 SO 30 10 0
B*th « 122 » g I I 9 wSlltai:."- 3 6 6 2 1
?£f£rv*?* •'•"•'•' * I A the World and Iron Maak fought It out w.r practically
teenth. Meridian joCKFT CLUB STAKES: for three-rear-olds; value,
**• c " J Po « t „ v a; Btr . in. Jo-key. Open. High .Show.
Poa. Wt. St. * 2* jt j. BMUIn« ...8-« 5-2 11 fi 3-5 —
Hor**. . r °f 12 a 4 V , I 3« 2" Butwell.... 8 .20 20 4 1
l»nnatl»n * nH 2 ■ 6 » | k S ]t rower. ..7-10 4-5 13-20 - _
Ba«er ■-• 1 129 1 3,■ ni 1« 4* 4* DavU .... 30 60 60 10 6-2
The Turk J 118 6 4' 8 *, « 0 Archibald.. 7 8 7 8-0 1-2
M*rt»«e« •••-•••; 8 a i 6 8 a _^ , th . , tr€tC to win •• h» pl*M«d.
** l S£2tf^««% 1 5g8 l #Kifc:^wfiffiSS^^Km poor hmdW Itathnr and
«J£s,«i war* to **** on nfl *'^ C *V^^ Ma war«; |SOO added. On. mil. ac<s »a •l.hth,
-Ivmfw Toekey. Or*n.Hl»h.Clae«l > lao«. Show.
Po« Wt. Bt - Vi il V« 1» I 1I 1 Thomas ...»-« &-0 l*-10 2-6 —
Hort«. F 2* •» 1 J ? «" »« i, i, Butwell ...3-0 6-6 *-5 2-8 —
Super.tit««»n ■■•••• :2 0 § *\ ' Ju ,• a«. K«t«p 10 12 10 6-2 —
BcmnS* Ke1*0.... g 4 2 . 2' 2H » *, Han^ yer ._ CO 300 100 30 6
ZSer^D ••/,••••*': s •• 5 -Su 2» 0 3 6 Oli»s « 10 5 &-6 v —
KilllecranKi* ..- • 10 ° 2 ■» ht-Mirr and held Bonnie Kel.o safe In final drive. Dull
™' su^r-UMon K.»A««" IW-** for * "^
„-,« «»* nex-er <sai.K»rr,u-! - °" „ ... UDWar d- »SOO added. Slit and a half furlong*.
S3 S*sa( ';-""!-»;«-' if Tlm "- 1: " "■"""• * h - w
main s°"? Teatro. Owner, r'. D. r - r Betting ,
Rt ' rCr Po , t „ j, RtT Fln . Jockey. fn.en.Hlgh.ClOflf.JMace.Show.
Pos Wt. St. . V> % £ "• l" Power« 4 8 5 86 4-fl
Horse.. *2 ||i - 2. 0,5,?; 7i 2* Gamer 2 I I 11-2
Ttl»lto ..- : i JO" 4 1* 2* I* ' 8 « Thorn*..... 10 15 8 # 8 7-0
filxty I 95 .6 V'!i'-fk 3. 4» Bhllllnn ...6-0 8-5 11-3 —
.Soon- -•••••• 'V- 3 30« I *» *' * k Si 8«» Du,an C 10 10 4 8-8
Hampton Court., a IOJ> j 4 , 3. «, £ 8 Koemer.... 10 15 12 4 a
K i r Alveicot..--- $ H3 8 2i2 i ' 1 /* -rorgly In l««i furlong and rar. to his b«*t
Berwick ""tiiUr outrun for half a mil*, c lo»«d ■• ■,* w.H. H *mpu>n Court ran a dull ra.;*
t^*^^''^^; iatairliS^ « tl^^t"uS: »«^ rtow^a act, ,p-4. h»t •U»pp«d
>»ollif *1* ""
XEW-YORK DAILY TRIBUNE, SUNDAY, JUNE 26, 1910.
Left to right— Trap Rock, Naushon, Iron Mask and Round the 'World.
"Baseball Fight in Three Leagues.
NATIONAL, LEAGUE GAMES TO-DAY. AMERICAN LEAGUE GAMES TO-DAY. I EASTERN LBAGCE GAMES TO-DAY.
St. Loul. at Chieaco. Cleveland at Chicago. j Buffalo at^^ tt CC r !t Jj Newark .
PUtabur* at Cincinnati. Detroit at St. Lools. " Montreal at Providence.
RESULTS OF. GAMES YESTERDAY. RESULTS OF GAMES YESTERDAY. RESULTS OF GAMES YESTERDAY.
New York. 4; Philadelphia, 1. " ; Jersey City, 2; Buffalo. 1.
Boston 8- Brooklyn 1 New York, "'' Washington, *. Jersey City, 2; Buffalo, 1.
* St Loul »- 2; Detroit. 1. Newark. 8; Rochester. 7.
Plttsbors, 8; Chicago, *. PhH»delohla I: Boston 1 Toronto, 2; Baltimore. 0.
• St. Loul», B; Cincinnati, 1. PhHadelp^hia, £, Boston. 1. Providence. 3; Montreal. 2.
• St. Loui* 6; Cincinnati. 4. Chicago. 4; Cleveland, 0. , Providence. 3; Montreal, 9.
NATIONAL LEAGUE STANDING. ■ AMERICAS LEAGUE STANDING. EASTERN LEAGUE STANDING.
wxT c , WL. C . W.L. P.C.I W. L. P.C. ; W. T . PC. W. L. P.C.
1 hl-»»n 'Sli'lM Pblla 25' 28 472 Phlla 86 19 .655 Chicago ..24 29 .453 Newark 3' 2i .603 Baltimore. .28 27 .509
Newark 8* 21 eiliitLoaYn".' 27 81 466 New York.. 83 20 .623 Cleveland. .21 28 .429 Rochester. .*8 U .560 Jersey city. 23 30 .434
PitTithW 28 »i MS Brooklyn . .23 81 426 Detroit.... 37 24 .607 Washington 28 85 .397 Toronto.... 31 24 .VSO Unafalo .... 22 31 .415
UnHn^k I* 28 491Bo»ton^ 20 38 845 805t0n..... 30 28 .545 9t. Louis. .13 39 .278 | Providence. 27 23 J>:>. -ontreaL. . 17 31 .354
LACROSSE SEASON ENDS
Crescent and Tecumseh Twelves
Wind Up with Tie.
Lacrosse for the season came to an end
at the Bay Ridge grounds of the Crescent
Athletic Club yesterday with a tie game
between the New Moon twelve and the
team of the Tecumseh Lacrosse Club, ol
Toronto, Canada. After beating the visitors
by a score of 4 goals to 1 at the end of the
first half, the New Moon players went to
pieces in the second period of play, and the
Canadians were able to score three more
goals and tie the score at 4 goals all.
Neither team was anxious to play off the
tie.
The game was exceptionally clean and
very fast. The weather and the gTounds
were both right for the sport, and as a
result a record breaking crowd saw what
was undoubtedly the best match of the
season. Throughout the first period the
New Moon players kept the ball almost
continually in the territory of the visiting
players, notwithstanding the fact that the
Canadians were the first to score a goal.
The excellent work of McClain, the Te
cumseh goal, alone save his team from be
ing slaughtered.
During the second half the visitors sprang
a big surprise on the followers of the
Brooklyn team by forcing the play from
the whistle. Bo fast did they play that
there was a grave suspicion that they had
not been working in the first half. Al
though the Crescents tried hard to save
the victory, the Canadians were too clever,
and succeeded in tleing the score Just as
the half was ending.
The line-up follows:
Orescent (4). Poaltlon. T « cum9e £ c # aln
&'Sini^:v.-.v.?3it 7.7.7. 7 filbert
Cvnict Cover point... Camplaln
£&:::: "......First S^enc* ■ r; -- c i r " s
Kellev Second defence Ram shaw
£ e 5..........-Thin 1 defenCe --T. 7:: I l on
Pl Kennedy.. .. '.Third a«ack: Gordon
Worker ...Second attack -. c ,°. lter
V Kennedy ..V- - -First attack "Wallace
Wall . . . .1 •• - . .Outside home B. Gilbert
O- K./urke Inside home Boehm
Referee^ll J. Doyle. Crescent A. C Goals-
Wan % Walker. Taylor. Boehm (3). Gordon.
Time of halve*— minutes each.
NEWARK BEATS ROCHESTER
Losers Give Winners a Scare
Near Close of Game.
When it appeared as if Rochester, after
pulling up from behind, was on the eve of
winning in Newark yesterday by dint ot
hammering the benders of Wyatt Lee,
"Iron Man" McGinnity went to the resc c
and saved the day for Newark in one of
the most interesting finishes of. the season.
The flnal score was 8 to 7.
In the fourth and fifth the local players
cut loose on McConnell's curves and heaped
up four runs. McConnell stuck to his task
even after two more runs were scored, and
In the eighth came near winning his own
game. A sacrifice fly that he hit out, with
the bases filled and two runs across, came
near going over the left field fence.
The score -ollows:
NEWARK. I ROCHESTER.
ab r lb po a c ! ab r lb po a c
Ztm'm»n,3b 8I 0 0 40: Moran, If. . 3 0 0 2 0 0
Galley, rf . 51 1 2 OOlTooley, ss. 4 0 2 1 4 0
Kelly. If.. 433 3 00| Mealier, rf 5 2 2 0 0 0
Oettman.cf 32 1 3 OOjOsborn. cf . 5 0 1 0 0 0
Mueller, bs 40 1 2 30j Alper"an.3b 5 2 1 0 00
Sch.la.fly. 2b 20 2 4 21 j Ppenc«r, lb 1 0 0 8 0 0
Agler, lb.. 200 11 00! Holly. 2b.. 31 1 4 20
Crisp, c... 400 2 00j Blair, c... 8 1 2 8 3 0
Lee. p 211 0 5 OlMcConnMl.p 3 0 1 0 20
McGln'ty.p 100 0 0 0 Batch, lb.. 01 0 1 0 0
Patte<\ If. 0 0 0 O 0 0
♦Ganzel... 10 0 0 00
Totals. . .80 89 27 14 1 Totals. . .33 710 24 11 0
•Batted for Moran in the eighth Inning.
Newark 0 0 0 2 4 0 2 0 x— B
Rochester 1 0 0 2 0 0 0 4 o—70 — 7
Paerlnoe hits— Holly, Tooley, Hpencer, Zimmer
man. Sacrifice fly — McCcnnell. Two-base hits—
McConnell. Kelly. Three-bap* hit — Motller.
Double play — Zimmerman, Schlafly and Asler.
! Hits— Off Lee, 0 in 7 2-3 innings. Struck out—
By McConnell, 6; by McGinnity, % Bases on
balls— Off McConnell, 5; off Lee. 4. Hit by
pitched ball — Zimmerman (by McConnell'). Passed
ball — Blair. First bass on errors — Rochester, 1.
[ Left on bases — Rochester, 7; Newark. 6. Time —
12:15. Umpire — Stafford. Attendance — 4.000.
SKEETERS WIN DOUBLE-HEADER.
Jersey City won two games from Buffalo
yesterday, the score In both contests be
ing the same, 2 to 1. Ferry, who pitched
the first game for the Skeeters, showed fine
control, as he fanned eleven men. It
looked biue for the Jersey men at the
opening of the second game. Sittin was in
the box and the first two men caused his
early retirement to the bench. Starr
banged him for a double and White for a
single. Rube Kissinger, recently trans
ferred from Buffalo to Jersey City, was
substituted and went against his former
club mates. Despite their excellent start,
the Bisons failed to score In the first in
ning. Henline was retired at first. f Cor
coran walked. McCabe put up a fly that
Clement pulled down and shot the ball back
in time to catch Starr at the plate. The
score follows:
FIRST OAME.
JERSEY CITY. BUFFALO.
abrlbpu aei abrlbpoae
Clement If 40 1 0 00J Starr, ss 411 330
Hanlfan'.2b 303 0 41 1 White. If 30 1 100
D'ninger.cf 40 0 0 00J Henllne, cf . . 400 010
'Hanford. rf 3 1 1 0 11 1 Corcoran, 3b. 40 0 13 0
Johnson, ss 3113 2 1 McCabe, rf.. 400 400
Absteln lb 300 10 11| Smith. 2b... 300 100
Esmond, 30 20 1 0 ll|Deal, lb 3 0 110 0 0
Butler, c 300 10 1 0 Wllilams, c. . 300 320
Crlßt c... 000 2 0 <>' Yowinkle. p. 300 010
FVrry, p. . . 80 0 2 30 j
Totais.. .28 272713 4J Totals 82 1324 0 0
Jersey City 0 10 0 0 0 10 I— 2
Buffalo 00 0 0 0 0 0 1 o—l
First base on errors — Buffalo. 3. Left on bases
jeraev City, 4; Buffalo. 4. First base on balls
Off Kerry, 1; off Vowlnkle. 1. Struck out — By
Kerry 11; Vowlnkle. 1. Three-base hit—Han
ford Two-baae hit — Johnson. Ba>-rince hit—Es
mond. Stolen bases— White, Smith. Passed ball
-Williams. Time — 1:40. Umpires — Halligan and
Flnneran.
SECOND GAME.
JERSEY CITY. 1 BUFFALO.
abrlbpoa^l abrlbpoae
Clement. If 42 2 2 10 Starr. &s 30 1 30
Han If an. 2b 40 0 2 0 0 White, 1f.... 30 1 20 1
Dnlngercf 40 1 0 0 0 Henllne, cf.. 4 10 20 0
Hanford rf 20 0 1 01 ; Corcoran, 3b. 30 1 10 0
Jo neon, as 30 0 2 3 0 McCabe, rf.. 40 1 200
Absteln. lb 300 13 0 0 Smith. 2b... 300 220
Esmond. 3b 30 1 2 4 1 Deal, lb 3 001001
Crist, c... 300 5 2 0 Woods, c 300 40 0
Sltton, p. . 00 0 0 OODubec. p 80 1 120
Kleslnger.p 30 0 0 7 0 tKonlck 000 000
Total*. . .28 2427 17 2 Totals 29 1024 7 2
•Betted for Henllne In the ninth Inning.
J«r»ey Cfty 0 0 0 10 10 0 o—2
Buffalo 0 0 0 10000 0—
First base on errors — 1 ; Jersey City. 2.
Left on bases — Buffalo, 5; Jersey City, £>. First
base on balls— Off Kissinger. 3. Struck out — By
Pubec, 3; by Kissinger. 4. Two-base — Starr,
Clement, Dlnlnger. Sacrifice hits — Henllne, Mi 1 -
Cabe, Smith. Stolen base— Clement.., Double
— Clement and Crist; Esmond and Absteln;
Smith and Deal. Time— l:3s.
TORONTO, 2; BALTIMOPE, 0.
At Baltimore — R.il K.
Toronto 0 0 0 0 0 O 1 1 o—2 7 1
Baltimore ... 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 it o—o 3 1
Batteries— Newton and McAlliHter: Russell and
Ffean,. Umpires -Boyle and Hurst.
PROVIDENCE WINS TWO GAMES.
At Prorl<!«Doe (flr«t g*m«)— R.H.E.
Montreal... 0000200000 6— 3 0 I
Montreal... 0000200000 6—2 0 I
BtttariM — Bllne. Lavaader and Fitzgerald;
Wirgs and Krlche.!.
Second gam* — R-H E.
Providence ... 02008001 x — 3 0 0
Montreal 00000000 o—o 4 5
Batterlea — Crowley and Fitzgerald: Cleary and
Curtis. Umpires— Byron And Murray.
NEW ENGLAND LEAGUE RESULTS.
Lynn. S; Haverhlll. 0.
Brockton. .3; Lowell. 0.
Lawrence, 4; Fall River, 0.
Lawrence, 13; Fall River, 0.
New Bedford. 5; Worcester, 4
(10 Innings).
New iledford, 3; Worcester, 2.
AMERICAN ASSOCIATION RESULTS.
Kansa-i City, 4; Indianapolis, 2.
Minneapolis, 8; Toledo. 7 t!2 innings).
Toledo, 4; Minneapolis. 0.
MUw*uke«, 6i Ix>ui«Yllio, 0.
ONE RUN FOR BROOKLYN
Not Quite Enough, However, as
Boston Doves Score Three.
Boston, June 25.— The Boston Doves de
feated the Superbas here to-day by a score
of 3 to 1. In the gam© between the cellar
department teams the home nine had de
cidedly the better of the argument. A bat
ting rally in the third inning gave Boston
the game. While the two teams hit equally
well, Mattern managed to keep the hits
scattered, while Bell let the Doves bunch a
few in one Inning, and then his support
gave out, letting three runs across the
plate.
Errors contributed largely to the run get
ting. Lennox walked In the second inning,
advanced on a sacrifice and scored on Mat
tern'a out and Sweeney's wild heave to
double Bergen at first.
In the fourth inning Herzog walked.
Sharpe bent out a bunt and Miller sacri
ficed. Shean uncorked a timely single,
scoring Herzog, and Sharpe crossed the
plate on Jack Dalton's poor return. Shean
got around to third in the mean while and
tallied on Beck's single to centre.
The score follows:
BOSTON. BROOKLYN.
abrlbpoaei abrlbpoae
Collins. If. 400 3 OlJPalton. rf.. 40 1 1 0 1
H<;rzo K . ab 110 2 2 o!Purch. lb.. 40 2 8 10
Sharpe, lb 21 1 11 It', Wheat, If.. 400 2 0 0
Miller, rf.. 20 1 0 0 0 Hummel. 2b 40 1 1 10
fchean, 2b. .112 4 «1 ' I^nnox. 3b. 21 1 2 10
Beck. cf. .. 30 1 3 0 o:r>avldson, cf HOO 2 10
Sweeney, bs 30 0 2 4 I;Hmlth. ss. . .-.0 1 3 2 0
Graham, c. 80 1 2 1O 1 Bergen, c. 80 0 R 2 0
Mattera, p .i o o o ao^Beii. p 300 o so
(•McKlveen. . 100 <• 0 0
Itßrwln 100 0 0 0
Totals. . .24 362717 3i Totals 32 162413 1 j
*Batt*»«l for Berg»n In ninth Inning. tßatted j
for Roll in ninth Inning.
Boston 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 0 x — 3
Brooklyn 01000000 o—l0 — 1
Two-base hit- — Hummel. Sacrifice hits —
Davidson, Miller, Sharpe. Stolen bas-- —
Bweeney. Double playn — Davidson and Burch;
Herzog, Shi an and Sharps. Lfft on bases —
Boston, 2; Brooklyn. S. First base on balls-
Off Bell. :'. ; off Mattern, 3. First base on er- ]
rors — Brooklyn, ». Struck out — By Mattrrn, i
2: by 8011. 1. Time— l:3l. Umpires— O 1 Day ;
and Brennan.
DEVLIN APPEARS IN COURT
Baseball Player Pleads Not
Guilty to Charges of Assault.
Arthur Devlin, third baseman of the New
York National baseball club, was ordered
to appear at the Myrtle avenue police
court. Brooklyn, on July 1 to answer the
charge of assaulting Bernard J. Rossler,
jr., of No. 464 Carlton avenue, by Magis
tiate Naumer yesterday. The assault is
alleged to have occurred at the Washington
Park ball grounds on Thursday afternoon
at the end of the sixth inning in the game
between the Giants and the Superbaa.
A warrant was issued for the ball player
on Friday, but never served. He heard
about^it and went to the court with Willie
Keeler and Dr. Charles Wuest. of Coroner
Brewer's staff. The magistrate- paroled Mr.
Devlin after he had pleaded not guilty to
the charge. The date was arranged to
make allowance for the game schedule.
Thomas J. Lynch, president of the Na
tional league, suspended Devlin for an in
definite poriod for his actions on Thursday.
Devore and Doyle, two other players, were
fined $50 apiece for their part in the affair.
Mr. Lynch stated that Devlin undoubtedly
r.ad great provocation, but that the rules
of the League compelled some punishment
for such an act.
SHEEPSHEAD ENTRIES MONDAY.
FIRST RACE— for two-year-olds- SSOo
added. Five and a half furlongs. Futurity
course.
Name. Wt. | Name. wt.
Sigurd 112 ! ♦ Warbler . . 104
White Wool 112 *Llttle Rajah 102
Fred Keene 109 1 Janet 101
Feather Duster 107'Lndasette !!101
Dixon 1071 Summertime I! 101
Flora 106|The Hague 101
Rye Straw 106!»\Var Jig 99
SECOND RACE— Steeplechase; Belling; for four
year-olds and upward; f7OO added. Short
course, about two miles,
Thlstledale 149, Harold A 139
Essex 144 1 Bound Pro- ' 130
Hallucalla 144 ! Tickvt or-I^ave KM
Sanctus 144 Gold plate 1™
Delc&Dta 142 ' Hostile !.**llW
Aunt Jule 140, Brendan !.!"!!130
Jin, i. LAN. . . 13! *i&ystic 1,1 .-.-. 130
THIRD RACK- Sellwic; for tttree-yvai-olds and
upward, non-wlCnera at thf meeting; $r.«*>
'. !>■<!. Seven furlnnc". main course
Lteario li" Ethel D no
Cohort 120 j*.^ar.«lrlan 107
Homecreat IIS Noon 100
John A. Munro US »Oxer 105
Greenbrldge IIS Bang 105
Jupiter Joe. 117 Tom Melton 104
Royal Onyx 115 Intrinsic 108
George W. Lebolt. . .115 Big stick 103
•Miss Perigord 113 j Crossover 100
Adriuche 113 t »Our Hannah 98
FOURTH RACB-THD ADVANCE: for three
year-oldi and upward: weight far age; guar
anteed gross value $3,000. One and flve-aix
teenths miles.
King James vilamhnla 128
Hallot 12"?lR*>stlpouche 125
I>orante 128|Ma*k«tt« 123
Fauntleroy lilt
FIFTH RACE— THE THISTLE: :^l!init; for
three-year-olds ami upward; $"m> added.
On« and one-half mil*", turf course.
M nt ji niM-y lll!n-[ 101
Superstition 11l Odd C'rafr M
•Charivari 'Golden Fl' ra 84
The Peer 1(0 .....
SIXTH RACE Handicap; for three- > ear -oils
an<l upward; $000 added. One mile.
Fir John Johnson. . .123! t.ar.<l!eberry , 105
H**ptignuche 1-2| I.'orante N't
Czar »11 Nlmbua I<>4
Dreamer 100 Guy Fisher 101
Prince Gal 100! Hampton Court 05
King's Daughter. >. .10© Unca« Chief 02
Pretend IOCS
•Apprentice allowing ; 1
GIANTS POUND THE BALL
With Matty in Rare Form They
Beat the Phillies Easily.
DOYLE SLAMS OUT HOMER
Terrific Drive Clears Bases and
Puts Home Team Ahead at
Crucial Stage.
"With a home run to centre field. Larry
! Doyle scored three runs .at the Polo
1 Grounds yesterday afternoon and won the
I gam© between the Giants and Philadelphia
by a score of 4 to 1. There were two men
on bases and two out when Doyle recovered
his batting eye. The terrific smash skimmed
the ground through Shortstop and got by
Walsh In centre field, rolling to the un
explored and virgin territory beyond. It
looked for a time as though there would be
a close decision at the plate, but Jacklltsch
dropped the ball after Larry had made a
beautiful slide and wan «afe anyway.
Mathewson was king of the mound. The
Phillies we're up against a hopeless propo
sition and seemed to realize it. In six in
nings they were sent to the bench In order.
Matty allowed five hits, which were
bunched In three Innings. The situation
was dubious for the Giants In the first
inning, when, with one out. Knabe doubled
and Grant singled. Matty found In Magee
a dangerous batsman facing , him. but he
calmly struck out the leading hitter of the
league, and Seymour brought the crowd to
its feet by a beautiful catch of Ward's long
fly, retiring the side.
In the sixth Inning the visitors bunched
a couple of singles on Matty and tallied
one run. But they never got a hit there
after. As soon as the Giants had taken the
lead and Matty began to extend himself
there were some who began to sympatnlze>
with the visitors and thought that they
ought to have half a chance at least.
Matty passed Knabe. with two out In the
third Inning, but he went the way of
many predecessors when the big pitcher
tricked him Into taking too much of a lead
and caught him flatfooted off his base.
With one out in the ninth Grant walked,
but Magee hit into a double play, which
retired the side and ended the game.
The Giants continued their good hitting
and Foxen was unable to stop them. The
home nine pounded out nine- safe drives.
Seymour singling thrice out of four
times at bat. Snod grass and Doyle got
two hits apiece. Matty still has his eye on
the automobile which goes to the season's
best batter. While he did not get a hit, he,
was legally only once at bat, drawing two
passes on his other times up. He was on
the bags when Doyle cut loose with his
home run.
The contest was fast ami well played, the
Giants giving an errorless exhibition and
putting up a snappy game in the field.
Seymour played well in the outfield, while
Merkle showed his tn:e calibre, p.t first.
Four hard grounders came his way, which
he handled perfectly. Meyers caught his
Invariably good game with Matty In the
box.
The Phillies drew first blood In the sixth
Inning. With one man out Knabe singled
through short and took second on Grant's
sacrifice. Magee smashed a single to centre
field and Knabe scored. By a fast bit of
play the side was retired here, however.
Matty Intercepting the throw-In from Sey
mour and whipping the ball to Doyle in
time to catch Magee, who was trying to
take second on the play.
The Giants had several opportunities to
tally which they failed to make use of.
Doyle passed up a chance in the third in
ning with two men on the bags, sending a
weak erounder to Doolan. Snoidfass and
Doyle led off in th* sixth, however, with
scratch hits. In attempting to sacrifice
Murray rapped the ball into Foxen'9 hands,
but Seymour connected for his third sharp
single to left, bringing SnMgrass home.
Foxen threw the ball to left field trying to
catch Doyle off second, and both runners
took another base. Although Bridwell
walked, filling the bases. Fletcher, who
was playing in Devlin's place, hit into a
double play, Knabe to Doolan to Ward.
With the score tied Merkle opened the
seventh with a single to right field and
took second on Meyers's sharp bounce to
the pitcher's box. which Grant fielded in
time to catch the runner at first. Matty
drew a pass, Merkle made third in a
pretty steal and Mathewson went to second
on Snodgrass's sacrifice. Doyle then
smashed out his home run and cleaned the
bases. Murray singled to left field, but
was out stealing second.
The score follows:
NEW YORK. j PHILADELPHIA.
abrlbpoae ab r lb po a c
SnoiKi •'ss.lf 4 1 I' 20 0! Tit-js. rf 40 0 1 '. 0
Doyle. 2b. . 4 1 2 2 1 01 Knabe. 2b... 3 12 6 10
Murray, rf. 4 0 1 00 0! Grant. 3b. . . 20 1 1 50
Seymour, cf 4 0 3 4 1 OlMagee, If. ... 401 0 00
liridwell.ss. 2 0 0 X2*(Waxd lb . . 300 10 0 0
F!etcher.3b. 4 0 1 05 0 Walsh, cf... 80 1 1 0 0
Merkle. lb.. 3 1 1100 0, Doolan. ss. . 300 1 TO
Meyers, c. . 30 0 70 0' Jacklltsch. c. 300 3 4 0
MatlTson.p. 110 02 01 Foxen. p 200 1 3 1
(•Brannfleld.. 100 0 0 0
! McQut'.len. p 00 0 0 0 0
Totals.. 39 41027 »0! Totals.. 2*1524171
•Batted for Foxen In the eighth inning.
New York 00000130 x — ♦
Philadelphia 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 o—l
Two-base hit —Knabe. Home run — Doyie.
Sacrifice hit— Grant. Stolen base — Merkle. Left
on bases — New York. 5; Philadelphia, 3. Double
plays— Knabe, Doo'.an and Ward; Doyle. Brid
well and Merkle. Struck out — By Mathews--n. .1.
by Koxen. 2. Bases on balls — Off Mathewson. 2;
off Foxen, 3. Hit by pitcher— By Foxen. 1 1 Brid
well). Hits— Off Foxen. »in 7 innings; off Me-
Quillen. 1 In 1 Inning. Time — 1:45. Umpires —
Klem and Kane.
CUBS LOSE STORMY GAME
Object to Leever's Pitching, but
All to No Avail.
Pittsburg. June 25.— Plttsburg ' won an
other game from Chicago to-day which
was full of Vwrangles and objections by the
players. The score was 8 to 2. After hit
ting two batsmen L>eever was requested by
the Chicago players to leave the rubber.
The players appealed to the umpires, claim
ing that Leever's wildness might prove
dangerous to life and limb. Moran ordered
Leever to pitch several balls over the plate
to demonstrate his control. He did this
and continued In the game.
Stelnfeldt and Chance were ordered off
the field m for protesting too vehemently.
Pittsburg won in the third inning, In
which Reulbach was hit hard and often
and five runs were scored. Th© score fol
lows:
PITTSBURG. -. j CHICAGO.
abrlbpoael abrlbpo a «
riyrne. 3b 4 1 1 2 111 Ever*. 2b. . 30 1 2 3 0
Ltach. cf. 410 2 oOjSheckard. IT 40 1 1 '• "
Cmpb'lLur 5 1 2 4 OOfScbulte. rf. 50 1 00
Wagner.?* 42 3 0 ti 0 IWumnnt.rf .4 O 1 0 o<>
Miller. ZpftS 2 2 3 o!stfinridt.;:b 010 •> 0 0
McKie.lt. 2«> 113 1 1 : Kane. 3b. . . 300 0 30
Wilson, if 4'> 2 2 OOlHofman. lb 40 1 12 <> i>
Gibson, c. 2 0 0 '2 OO Tlrker. us.. 40 1 2 . i 0
Let?vrr. p. 4 1 1 03 0 Kiln*. c . . .10 C 4 1
i P.eulbach. p •>«> 0 0 0 0
j Richie, p... 20 V 0 10
- !»Luderus.. . 11l 0 .00
Totals.. 81227 14 2 Totals 35 2824 16 1
'Batted for Rlchlo In the ninth- innin*.
Plttsbur* 0 0 6 0 10 2 0 x—
Chicago 01000000 I—2
Two-baM hit — Hofman. Thr«*-b««» hita—
Byrne, \Vagnar. Luderui. Sacrifice hit — Me
•Kechnle. First base en ►>*:'.» — Le*T«r. 3; off
Reulbach. Ii off Richie. 6. Hit by pitched ball —
By I^eever. 2. Struck out — By Leaver. 2; by
Reulbaeh. 1; by Richie. 2. First base on error*
Chicago. 1. Left on bases— Plttsburg. 8: Chi
cago. 11. Hit* 1 Reulhach. 6ln 3 'rr. ngs; off
Ki< h'..\ 6 In 5 innings. — 2:13, Umplrwi —
Johnstone and M •ran
VANDERBILT WINS IN FRANCE
Boulogne, France. June 2.%— W. K. Van
derbllt's colors were curried to victory in
tma races here to-day. His Ramesseum
won th« Prix de la Porte Maillot, 01' $1,000.
distance five furlongs, and his Oversight
won the Prix de Seine et Marne. of *4.o>\i,
distance on« mile and a half.
Mr. Vanderbilt's Messldor 111 also came-
In second In the Prix de Courbevois for
three-year-olds, of 13,000, distance on* mile
•vail MYin furlong*
YANKEES SOLVE JOHNSON
Oldtime Foe Proves Devoid of
FoVmer Terror.
WASHINGTON EASY VICTIM
New Yorkers Climb to Second
Place by Means of Seven
. . to Four Triumph.
Washington, June 23.— The Yankees threw
on me clutch and went at hlsrh speed here
j to-day, easily defeating: Washington by a
score of 7 to 4. While they were walloping
[ the Senators Detroit was losing to St.
I Louis, and th« New York nine consequent
i ly climbed Into second place. Johnson, th«
I arch enemy of the Yankee*. was driven
j from the box by an avalanche of hits, the
visitors piling up a total of sixteen safe
drives, which tells the story of the scoring.
Bvery man on the team with the excep
tion of Wolter shared in the merTymaklnsf.
Knight was the bright particular star.
making: a triple and two singles in thre«
times at bat. while Chase grot a double and
a single.
Warhop pitched effectively, although In
the last toning the Senators started a rally
which looked dangerous for a. time. War
hop did not allow a hit for three innings,
and then he carefully parcelled out four in
the space of the next few frames, only one
run being: tallied. In the last session, how
ever, two singles and a double, coupled with
a pass and an error, made trouble. Three
runs were scored by the home players be
fore the Yankees pulled together and
stopped them.
Two new players made their debut in bl?
league circles. Daniels, the n*»w Yankee
player, went Into the game for the first
time, taking Chase's place at first during
the last Inning. Heinrich, a new pitcher
that the Senators have corralled, relieved
Johnson and pitched the last two innings.
The Yankees took to the latter kindly, get
ting three singles off his delivery in the
eighth inning and drawing one pass; but
they tallied only one run. Three more hits
were made in the last inning and another
run was scored.
The visiting outfield was a prominent
factor in the game, covering territory In
good form and getting ten put outs alto
gether. I^aporte fumbled one fly. which let
In a run in the fourth inning, but cut off
five promising hits and had one assist to
his credit. The Infield had something of, %
day off.
The Senators took particular pains to
keep the grounders away from Jack Knight,
and the big boy had only one chance to
show what he could do, and he made the
most of this. Although Gardner was cred
ited with the other error which the
Yankees made, nevertheless he put up a
fast little game at second base. Austin was
the original "speed boy" on third, while
Warhop fielded his position well.
The score follows:
NHTV YORK. | WASHlNGTON
abrlt>poa*v abrlbpoa*
Hem'lll.cf 50 2 3 1 0 Milan, cf. . «•• 1 10
Wolter. rf 4 1 » 2 OOjLeiivelt. If . 3 1 2 1 0»
Chase, lb. 5 1 2 8 1 9 Elberfeld.2b 310 1 2•>
•Dan'ls.lb 010 1 OOjGessler. rf. 422 1 22
Laporte.lf 40 2 5 OllMcßrlde. ss 40 2 7 3 0
Gard'er,2{> •* 1 2 1 I|Conroy. 3b. 200 3 10
Knight, ss 5 3 3 1 lOiUnglaub. lbSOl 7 11
Austin. 3 b 30 2 1 SOi Street, c 300 5 4 0
Sweeney.c 30 2 8 10 Johnson, p. 20 0 1 2 0
Warhop. p 4 0 1 1 3 0 Heinrlch. p. 100 0 00
Totals. .37 71627 12 2 Totals . 29 472718 .1
— —
•Ran for Chase In the ninth inning.
New York 01001211 I—7
Washington 00010000 — 4
Two-bas* hlt3^ Chase. Gassier. Three-baa* hit
— Knight. Hits — Oft Johnson. 1O in 7 Innings; off
Heinrlch. 6in 2 innings. Sacrifice hits EJberr«ld.
Oonroy. Un^laub. Import*. Sweeney. Stolen
bases — Hemphill. Knt^ti . Double plays — Kr-isrhT.
Gardner and Chase; Moßride and Unslaub. Left
on — Washington. 3; New York. S. Bas«
on — Off Johnson, 3: off Heinrtch. 1; off
Warhop. 2, First base on errors- 1 - Washington. 1;
New York. 3. Struck out — By Johnson. 4: by
Heinrich. 1; by Warhop. 2. Passed balls — Street.
2. Time — T':r.p!r??--Hir:in and Sheridan.
RED SOX STRIKE A SWAG
Face League Leaders and Lose
a Hard Fought Game.
Philadelphia. June 25. — Philadelphia won
the opening- game of the series from Bos
ton here to-day by a score of 2 to 1. Brill
iant fielding by Barry was a big factor in
the home team's success. The score fol
lows:
PHILADELPHIA. I BOSTON.
abrlbpoae! abrlbpoa*
Btrunk. cf 40 «> 2 0 o! Lord. 3b... 40 1 2 3O
Oldrlngr. If 40 2 1 Oil Hooper, rf.. 30 1 O 01
E.Col'ns.2b 4•> 1 0 2 I>Eng!e. cf 400 1 o•>
Davis, lb. . 411 7 OOtStabl. lb. ..20 0 I 2«
Murphy, rf 30 I 3 10; Gardner. 2b 41 2 20')
Barry, ss. . 20 1 3 4'< Lewis. 1f... 402 2 ••
Donahue, c 20 010 :(O '.Vainer, ss. 4*4 4 10
Plank, p.. 311 «> 1 OlKlrinow. c. 30 1 7 30
Roth. 3b.. 000 • OS K. Collins. p3OO 1 2 1
Laker. 3b. 10 1 1 0 0
Totals. . .27 2827 11 3 Totals . 3! 1724 11 2
Philadelphia I 1 0 0 0 0 O 1 x — 2
boston 0 00000 0 0 I—l
Two-base hit — Gardner. Sacrifice hits— Hooper.
Barry, Donohue. Baker. Dodble plays — Plank.
Barry and Davis; Donohue an.l Barry; Murphy
and Donohue; Kleinow and Wagner; Kleinow
and Gardner. Stolen bases — Hooper. Lewis. Left
on bases ßoston. 7; Philadelphia. 5. First baas
on errors — Boston. 2: Philadelphia, 1. Struck out
—By R. Collins, i>; by Plank. 0. First base on
balls — Off R. Collins. i: off Plank. 3. Wild pitch
— Plank. Time— l:s3. — O Loughltn and
Perrine.
STONE BALKS THE TIGERS
Makes Circus Catch and Saves
Game for St. Louis.
Detroit. June 25.— Stone's sreat one hand
running catch of a line drive from Cobb's
bat in the fifth inning sav^d to-day's game
for St. Louis. There were two men on
bases, and both wooM have scored had the
hit counted. St. fiTtitl won by a score ef
2 to 1. Both sttss fielded brilliantly. Th*
score follows :
ST. LOUIS. \ DETROIT.
abrlbpoaej abrlbpoa*
Stone, if.. 40 O 4 10 Sfelntyr* If 40 1 • 10
Hartzell.3b 4<> t> 1 ml Bush sa . 413 2 3 0
Wallace, ss 310 2 4d;'Cob'o. cf 402 2 OO
Newnam.lb 301 9 00! Crawford, rf 400 3 OO
PchWzer.rf 302 1 00 D«!eh'atjr.2t\ 4 0 1 10
Hoffman. 40 2 I 10>Mcriarty. So 20 2 2 20
Tr'sdale.2b 411 4 40 T. Jopsa, lb2oo 11 20
Stephens. c 30 1 3 2 o'Stanage. c. 400 4 0 1>
Ray. p.... 300 0 Jo Summers. p3oo 2 5 0
•D. Jones.. 101 \> 0 0
Totals. . .31 2727 13 • Totals 32 1927 14 0
•Batted for T. Jones in the ninth inrins.
St. Louis • • 1 10000 o—30 — 3
Detroit 00100000 o—l
Two-base hits — Bash. Morlarty. Three-baa»
hit Cobb. Sacrifice hit — Hartzeli Sacrifice fly —
9tone. Stolen bases — Schweitzer. Hoffman. Mort
arty. T. Jones. D. Jon^s. Left on bases —
Louis, 9; Detroit. 7. first base on balls^ —
Ray. 3: efT Summers. 3. Struck c>ut — By Ray.
1; by Summers. 4. Time — 1:23. Umpires — Con
nolly and Dtneen.
CHICAGO, 4; CLEVELAND. 0.
Chicago. Jure 25.— Chicago made it three
straight from Cleveland by bunching hits
off Young in the third and fourth Innings
to- luy, winning by a score of ; to 0. The
veteran Young was hammered for three
singles in each inning. The score follows:
Chicago i CLEVEL-OTD.
abrlbpoael abrlbpoas
/elder. 20. 311 I <>l Turner, ■<>< . 4•■ • S tiO
Browne, cf 4•• 1 3 OOlGraner. rf. . 4«• 2 1 o<>
Collins, rf. 10 1 2 10;stovalI. lb. 400 Id Oj
Doush^ty.lf 411 001-»«ote. 2b. 40 1 2 0
GandU. lb. 412 12 0 «.»• Easterly, c. 40 1 1 0 0
Purtell. 3b 20 0 O 2 0 Lord, ir .. . . 300 0 0 0
Bkburae.93 300 2 3 0 Bradley. 3b. 30 1 1 XI
Payne, c. 312 3 10 Wrm'ham.cf 30 1 1 0 0
Scott, p... 300 0 20 Yours*, p... 800 0 40
Total*.. .30 4827 11 1 Totals. .. .33 03 24 I
Chicago 002200 O0 x — «
Cleveland 00000000 O—<\
Two-bast Gandll. Sacrifice hit— Purtell.
Stolen — ZeWer. . 3: Dougherty, Gandll.
Double pl-iy»— Ootlins an. I Gandil: Lajole. Turner
and Stovall. Left on bases^ — Chicago, 5. Cleve
land. 6. Rase on balls— Off Young. 2. First
base on errors — Cleveland. 1. Struck out — By
Scott. 6; by Ynunjr. 1. Time — 2:42. Umpires—
Evans and K»rl:
ALDRIAN BRINGS A FAIR PRICE
Only fairly good prices were realized at
the sale of horses In training held a?
Sh**pshea«l Bay yesterday. The top price
was $3.10". whl~h the Beverwyck - Stable
paid for Aldrlan, a bay colt by ruryear D—
Bohemian Lass.
Bourbon Beau brought C2OO and was
purchased by A. Lennan. Gold of Ophlr
went to J. W. May for E.l-CO. whlla J. W.
B*rU«tt p*!d H.OCO for Top Not*. - .^
9

xml | txt