OCR Interpretation


New-York tribune. [volume] (New York [N.Y.]) 1866-1924, July 24, 1910, Image 15

Image and text provided by Library of Congress, Washington, DC

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83030214/1910-07-24/ed-1/seq-15/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for 3

77 > SILLY TO BE DUOUXED
A Sill: Hal. Toy Balloon or Bicycle
Tire C in Preserve Life.
Experiments by Professor Kistler, swimming
Instructor at the University of Pennsylvania,
havo proved that many practical means of pre
serving life are reasonably sure to be at the dis
pusal of any one on board a marine craft or
within hail of a swimmer or bather suddenly
seized with cramps or in danger of drowning for
any similar reason.
Iv mad " preser\ ers is a
- - - Pi : : the tire Is air
• Ir.a:\ •r. In
f a .t. ■ ■ ..- .: r .:. •• ■ of tin so tubes
• crsons in U ■• water, and the
inner . 1 tire will even sus
■ ■ I
s used at
b .:. l! the wearer of a
; _ the water fa oks if he cannot
- . s t. That will remain afloat
se turns H over and per
- ... . .-,- :t: t A gjiic i 2at is
• as 1 • -' as it is kept
.:. . ■ :-. 3:" the brim is held as
■ •;• accompanying: photographs
: - ] by the water in the crown
• jh air there to sup
porl in the water.
lr. • n manner an ordinary bucket can
be ns is a ?.-od life preserver
if us ■ ■ -■ : way. It should be opened
aad ;' the handle in the water. The
A HIGH HAT WILL KEEP A MAN AFLOAT.
. - I beneath the outspread ma-
Da will make it impossible
Is it to sink. Two of the
■ thai the expatriated noble-
D <. ,r city thoroughfares will hold
.. water as long as the air
-' ' ■ -ns.
ft tier has recently introduced a
r the 1 , balloon. The diving c0n
.:....•.-.';•-.« have been de
: their spectacular features for
• • The water coskoeaia the wherc
■r. The spectators naturally
tctly where the underwater
If tbe diver carries a balloon
a he dives in the balloon
r and shows just where the
ir the Rater is at the time.
ors are need to denote
. .- < ; t:.«_ different men in a con

HOUSEBOATS IX THE AIR
Dream of the Future Which May
Con < True lie fore Long.
While scoffers at the practicability of airships
are legion, anybody who has faith in the in
genuity of man and will compare Fulton's little
Clerm<,nt ■■.■}'. the giant liner Lusitania can
hardly doubt that the future development of
the aeroplane into something vastly more splen
did than the cranky machines on which aviators
ar«± risking their necks to-day is only a matter
<jf time. The recent disastrous attempts to carry
uassengors with safety in huge dirigible bal
loons, which <•::< an immense surface for winds
to thrust against, have done much to turn the
world's hoj>es to the planes — monoplane and
biplane.
Already the Wrights are beginning to Epe
ciaMze ■■• the manufacture of their biplanes,
building some specially for sustained flight,
others for passenger carrying capacity and a
third type for speed, A French inventor is hard at
work on a monoplane the wings of which can
be shortened or lengthened, tele <opieally, m to
speak, while the machine is in mil flight, thus
changing it at will from a racer to a weight
carrier, a thousand bright minds are busy on
this fascinating new sport and industry com
bined, and, like so many other perfected ma
XEW-YOKK DAILY TRIBUNE, SUNDAY, JULY 24, 1910.
climes that are doing their work steadily and
satisfactorily in factory and workshop all over
the world, the airship of the future will consist
of a collection of numerous small improvements,
each one comparatively insignificant in itself,
maybe, but when combined making one more
notable triumph of mind over matter.
When the day comes that an aerial houseboat
is as reliable, safe and practicable as a steam
yacht is now the range of human happiness will
be considerably enlarged, and people who like
living in close quarters and know how to keep
tlieir personal belongings "shir**' ;pe" could
perhaps dispon.se with a settled habitation alto
g ■ r, being independent of railroads or nav
igable water? so long as they were sure of a
USING AN UMBRELLA AS A LIFE BUOY.
landing accommodation whenever they needed
to alight fT repairs or provisions or for the
transaction of business.
HA RD ON HALL.
Apropos of Hall Caine's recent lawsuit, a New
York playwright said:
"Hall Came is always talking about his health,
his ruined nerves, insomnia, and so forth. He is
as proud of his invalidism as Sandow is of his
muscles.
"The last time I saw Hall Came was in his
bedroom in the Hotel Walton, in Philadelphia.
The little thin man. with his domelike forehead
and weak, wispy whiskers, looked more like
Shakespeare than ever.
" 'Mr. Hall Came,' I said, 'I hope you're well.'
' 'Well?' he snarled. 'I'm far from welL I
haven't slept, sir, for two weeks."
" 'Then,' said I, 'you're ever so much better,
for the last time I saw you you hadn't slept for
a month.' "
THE SHIFTLESS WAY.
Professor Woodbridge Riley, of Vassar, sug
gests that young women should regard marriage
as a profession. "Of course, I don't mean by
that," said Professor Riley recently, "that a
young woman should sell herself. I mean that
she should use her brain in marrying. The sen-
DIVING WITH BALLOON ATTACHED UY
LONG CORD TO BODY.
timental idea of marriage bo prevalent to-day
—letting marriage come about of itself, so to
speak that idea seems to me as shiftless and
foolish and lazy as the old lady's idea of
spelling. This old lady, as she sat on an At
lantic City pier writing letters, drew a line
under a word and said: 'You know, my dear,
when I don't know how to spell a word I under
score it, like this. Then if it la spelled wrong
it passes for a good joke, and if it is spelled
right it doesn't matter.' "
DIPLOMA TIC OOBSIP.
An KngliHh diplomat at a Ifctner in Lenox
said of Mrs. Langtry:
"When she was at the BUOUnH <>f her beauty
and her fame -when crowds followed her in
liond street and the Row-she net, at a M «l
royal dinner, an African kin.?. Mrs. Langtry,
dazzling in her beauty, sat beside this king.
She was in gcvu] spirits, and she did her very
best to amuse and plea.se him. And sho must
have succeeded, for at the dinner's close he
heaved a deep sigh and said to her: 'Ah,
madam, if heaven had only made you black and
fat you would bo irresistible!' "
DEAR LIVING.
Apropos of Xew York high prices, a story is
told at the Tilden Club, in New York, about P.
Augustus Heinze, the copper magnate.
Mr. Heinze, playing billiards after the theatre
!n a well known hotel, got hungry and ordered a
Af* INVERTED BUCKET WILL SUSTAIN
A MAN IN THE WATER.
plate of sandwiches. They came duly, and they
were delicious — nut sandwiches, mayonnaise
sandwiches, chicken sandwiches — tiny and
superb mouthfuls, for which the bill was $4 75.
They were soon gone, and then Mr. Heinze
summoned the waiter again.
"Some more sandwiches, please," he said.
"Yes. sir. How many, sir?" the waiter asked.
"Seventy dollars' worth this time," said Mr.
lleinze. "I'm rather hungry."
THE CALF.
Judge Ben B. Lindsey was talking to an audi
ence of Denver gamins about repentance.
"Too many people," said the famous judge
"repent the wrong way. Now, the Prodigal Son
repented properly. He came and stood a long
way off. He waited in all humility till his
father saw him, and ran and threw his arms
about his neck and kissed him.
"But too many prodigals nowadays swagger
right into the parlor, throw themselves in the
easiest chair, put their feet upon the piano stool
and growl:
" "Say, hurry along that veal!'"
THOUGHT IT WAS RECENT.
Sir Ernest Shackleton at the luncheon in his
honor given by the Pilgrims in New York, said
of a piece of geographical ignorance:
BALLOON FLOATS AND SHOWS WHERE
DIVER IS.
"It was incredible. It reminded me of a little
waiting maid:
"As she brought me my tea and toast and
bloater one morning I said to her:
" 'What a rainy morning, Mary! It's almost
like the Flood.'
" 'The Flood, sir?" said the little maid. She
looked at ne with ■ puzzled .smile.
"Tea,* said l. The Flood— Noah, you know —
the Ark Mount Ararat.'
"i^he shook her head and murmured apolo-
X- tic ally:
" 'j ain't had no time to it-ad the papers lately,
sir.' "
FEAR OF REVENGE.
"Why are you crying, my little man?"
"'t'o.s i don't want to go to .school."
"Hut why not?"
" 'Cos Bister Jilted the schoolmaster last
night!"— London » opinion*
GUNNERY FEATS OF NAFTi
Ships* Marksmen Make Remarkable
Records Under Adverse Conditions.
TSiis year's naval target practice with heavy
guns has been productive of remarkable results,
surpassing, under the circumstances of the fir
ing, anything hitherto achieved in that direc
tion. The navy has made a record which places
it in the first rank of the world for accuracy in
heavy gun fire.
This is the first year that the conditions at
tending the target practice have approximated
tho?e likely to prevail in battle, in other years
the target practice has been condui ted with due
regard for the weather and water. Care wa.s
taken to have the firing at a place where there
was the least amount of motion. The targets
were at known distances and were fixed. It
therefore simply became a matter of adjusting
the guns and blazing away. Now the ranges
are those which it is assumed would prevail in
a naval battle, about 10,000 to 12,000 yards.
The ship from which the firing is done is under
way and the target is also in motion. The fir
ing is done when there is a "swell" on. Under
these exacting conditions it is most difficult for
the gunners to hit the target, but it was folt
that something of this kind must be done if
marksmanship was to mean anything in time
of battle.
"When Captain W. S. Pirns was on duty in the
Navy Department as inspector of target prac-
A BICYCLE TIRE MAKES AN EXCELLENT
LIFE PRESERVER.
tice, as well as being naval aid to President
Roosevelt, he pointed out to the authorities thaj
the conditions of target practice were altogethe]
too tame, and that naval gunnery with heav|
ordnance was likely to be effective only whej
the sea was placid and when the enemy eoul-J
be persuaded to line up within the prescribed
distance and remain motionless, after the lash
ion of the target at which the gunners werf
then firing.
Of course, it is out of the question to expect
any enemy to assume any such complacent at
titude for the purpose of promoting its own de
struction. All sorts of devices are bound to be
resorted to by the foe to minimize the effect of
attack, and it was considered that if naval gun
nery was to put the enemy out of commission
and drive him from the seas it would only be
after a preparation which would make target
practice as difficult as possible. With gunni ra
capable of tiring with accuracy from a moving
ship, jostled around by the waves, and tiring at
a target similarly unstable, and proceeding,
moreover, at a speed unknown to the gunners,
they would be able to do something of Hl3
same sort when it came to the real business of
hitting the foe.
The experts have speedily realized that tho
next naval battle will not be any such summer
day scrimmage as occurred off Santiago when
Cervera's Beet emerged to its destruction. At
that time the range was almost a reproduction
in some instances of the rail to rail and hand to
hand fighting of the old belaying pin navy. Cut
even under thode most favorable conditions tim
hits made were not greater than i!' : per cent of
the shots fired, as against 80 per ceni ot hita
nowadays. More than that, it was considered
a good rate of tiring when the gunners placed
one shut in five minutes. N'..w the 12-incb tur
ret guns are Bred so as to make nearly three
hits a gun each minute.
The best showing this year with the lL'-iivh
r LIVER UPSET? Try T
Hunyadi Janos I
NATURAL APKRIBNT WATER. I
Cnscrnpnlong Druggists!
3

xml | txt