OCR Interpretation


New-York tribune. [volume] (New York [N.Y.]) 1866-1924, August 04, 1910, Image 13

Image and text provided by Library of Congress, Washington, DC

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83030214/1910-08-04/ed-1/seq-13/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for 13

SEB FOR BIS CONCERN
Mr. Olcott Takes Charge of
Ferguson Contracting Co.
ITS LIABILITIES $660,000
Death of President Said to Have
Been Signal for Creditors
to Press Claims.
Tb- Ferc-uson Contracting Company, of
v S7 'Wall cot, a. concern which has
had many lar?e contracts, among them
"time c^ the Raw York State "barge canal.
vent i^to the hands of a receiver yester
day with liabilities ol S6S<V*X) and assets of
SSW.OOO. besides, several hacaja claims which
ari> in litigation. An ....... company
attributed the present embarrassment to
the sudden death of Francis M. Ferjruson,
the founder, president and treasurer of the
-rsmpan-. In Denver. Col., on June 22. while
on a business trip, and the inability to
raise cash to m*** 'maturing- obligations.
An involuntary petition in bankruptcy
was filed yesterday against the company
to the - bad States District Court by Van
Ness & Van Ness, attorneys, for three
creditors, with claims aggregating: $?.2Tfl.
The petitioning creditors are the John P.
Gilbert Company, of Tonkers. JLOO3 for
timber: John B. Walker, of Cincinnati.
ssi.«v> for work on th* Ohio, Kentucky .v
Atlantic Railroad, and Charles R. Xeid
■.ir.eer, of this city. JWS3 ? cr premiums for
liability insurance.
man J.

-- . ■
— - - -r.pany
■ - •.

.i<Vr.n H. HKOgtmm. ■---■.-■ of the
company, consented to the appointment of
Congressman Olcott on behalf of the com
rsr>> He said the company ---■-.
(215400 a month at a cost of SIOO.OOO for
work. Tbe reason the company cannot
canthnie to do business, he says, is be
cause its estimates hay» been assigned to
Jan-? Talcott. of No. 10S Franklin street,
a creditor, -who pays only So . per cent of
the estimates to the corporation, and that.
together with the percentages retained by
the rafljtwd companies, is not sufficient to
rn~>r its fixed charges. He said farther
that nearly all of the /liabilities of the com
pany would become due within ninety days
htA that, judraents had been obtained
against it in the courts here and in North
i'arolina.
-
.... -
rt that 1
to the


Old coj-
■ ■

-. ■ ■
- ■■■
. - - - ■

_

:
WHEAT "CORNER*" INQUIRY
Begins in Chicago — Legitimate
Deal, Bays Waterman.
Chicago. Aug. S.— Preliminary federal in
vestigation of the "corner* In July wheat
T.-as beg-un to-day by the federal grand
Jury, which is als#* investigating' the Beef
Trust. John C. F. yerrill, vice-president
<f the Chicago Boarri of Trade, was ques
tioned at length by United Stares District
Attorney Edwin Sims and special Assistant
District Attorney Jcjnes H. Wllersoo. As
Indicated previously by federal authorities,
the information Bought to-day was solely
to jdve the attorneys material upon which
to base a thorough examination into mar
ket conditions before another federal grand
jury convenes later.
In the July wheat deal the Peavey Grain
Company was cperatinp. it is believed, for
Theodore H. "Waterman, o? New York.
The transactions covered a period of sev
eral months. Three million to five million
bushels were bought by the company at 93
cents or under a bushel in May and the
first par: of June. ICo efforts were made
to brjort the price on the Fhorts. At the ex
■p-.rats on of the July future the deals were
closed and the buyer? realized a larger
profit on their transactions
A J ban y. A us?. 3.'— "I "would consider it an
honor to" be summoned before a federal
grand jury t<« explain this whole situation,"
w*id Theodore 71. "Waterman to-day. •"But
th« federal srrar.d jury ought to investigate
th« shorts— the people who sell what they
have not got and never expect to deliver;
the people who are pimply selling and
gambling and who, it they show a loss.
are quick to holler •corner' and "manipula
tion.*
■ ■

■ ■ ■
- -
■-
PRAY FOR RAIN IN OKLAHOMA.
Mourt Scott. Okla_. Au?. 3.— Fearing that
it rain does not fall in this region soon the
cropa wIH b9 lost, citizens have hesrun a
■united prayer service, askin? for a down
• jxnzr. Th* 5 :-- triU continue to pray daily
until rain falls.
10,000 WORKMEN* LOCKED OUT.
"tvEsrhedp. llo:ia.nd. Aug. Z.—X dispute
w<iT na»fs herween the mill owners and
«mp!rrres cf the cotton roiiis, ■whi'-h form
the cfcitf lnduEtrv of Erisched", resulted to
is.y la 2. lo<:k<yit at the mills, aff<~-tirp
I aJi'l v.ork
. . ..
'
....
i■. • • -
-
I
IT" SHARES AT AUCTION.
Among the stocks *oi«i at the weekly auc
tion €a> of securities yesterday were forty
r#^-"en £harf»s ot Metropolitan Street Rail
way Etock. They brought I.'j a share,
"*■■ iirb. compares v. ith *4- a sharr-. tbe liigrh
'■'I-j* toucLed by t!ic stock !a:-t year. A
«rjc,La.t:on of rT*a sliart -was n.a<le on the
£toc> llxch.ii. s'~ tor Sl«tropclltaa stock sev
eral eelaf Af« It h&s hU« i over 4iCK> a
•Laj-%,
BANKS GET C. & 0. STOCK
Hawley Group Hit in Recent
Slump. Rumors Say..
For several days there have been rumors
In Wall Street that one or more promi
nent associates of Edwin Hawiey had been
hard hit in the recent slump in the stock
market and had Ben forced to liquidate a
large part of- their holdings in Chesapeake
& Ohio, Inlerboroush-Metropoiitan and
other stocks in which the Hawley KTonp is
interested.
The truth of the matter, it was learned
in well Informed banking circles yesterday,
was that two men who have been more or
less affiliated with Mr. Hawiey In some of
his deals had Ben obliged to transfer in
the neighborhood of fifty thousand shares
of the stocks mentioned to ■ bankins syn
dicate. The transaction, it was said, in no
way affected Mr. Haw-ley or his more
prominent associates.
One of the rumors that have been in cir
culation was thit Theodore P. Shonts. presi
dent of the Interbnrouprh-Metropolitan Com
pany and one of the most prominent mem
bers of the Hawley RTotxp. was one of The
men who had been, obliged To "let go" a
larsre part of his holdings In Chesapeake &
Ohio and Interborough-Metropolitan at a
loss of about $2,000,000. Mr. Shonts. when
asked yesterday as to th« truth of the re
port, ..;;frhinply said that it was news to
him.
"I never trade in the market." he added,
"and therefore could not have met with
any losses in the recent break."
The forced liquidation of their Chesa
peake & Ohio holdings by two of the
less important members of the Hawley
grroup, it was said, did not affect control
of that property, the total amount of
Chesapeake <£ Ohio stock involved not being
more than twenty thousand shares. •
It was the belief in the banking- quarters
that the takine over by a banking syndi
cate of this block of Chesapeake Si Ohio
and other stocks had pretty well cleaned
up such, weak spots of this character as
had existed.
AUCTIONS ICE SECURITIES
$3,000,000 of Face Value Real
izes Only $500,000.
Securitie? of the Knickerbocker Ice Com
pany, of Chicago, having a face value of
more than $3.000,0(*>. were sold at public
auction at the office of Brinkerhoff &
FieMer. No. 13 Exchange Place, Jersey
City, yesterday tor $500,000. They were
bought in by J. H. Harding, who represent
ed the E. R. Thomas liquidating committee.
The securities were in two lot.=. The first.
which was knocked down to Mr. Harding
for $430,000* consisted of 5209,703 preferred
and 52.932.Q00 common stock of the Knicker
bocker Ice Company, and all the right,
title and interest of the trustee to ap
proximately $32,G53 ca^h. heretofore paid as
dividends on the preferred stock. Th« pec
ond parcel, which was bought to by Mr.
Hardinsr for JCO.OOO. consisted of scrip divi
dend warrants for 526.306, itated January 1.
X3OS. and issued by the ice company on
common stock, with all Interest received
thereon.
The sale was held under the auspices of
the Hudson Trust Company, as trustee,
under the general and collateral trust 5
per cent mortgage of the "Western Ice
Company.
NEW DRYGOODS STOCK SOLD
Part cf Issue for Purchase of Lord &
Taylor Goes to J. P. Morgan & Co.
ssne of *
ftfae -
was n. ... for tb irpose or acquir
ing a _- Interest In the. cirye:ooa;=
a- been entirely
- ■
The new stock is equal to 15 per cent of
the preceding amount outstanding, and
was offered to stockholders under The con
dition that each holder would be given
the right to subscribe for 15 per cent of
his holdings
It is understood that part of the new
stock was taken by J. P. Morgan & Co.,
who recently made public their willingness
to buy all the stock that was not sub
scribed for by the stockholders. v .
U. P SPENDING 525.n0n.000
Improvements in Oregon Expected to
Take Several Years to Complete.
Improvements involving a total expendi
ture of $25,000,000 are under way by the
Union Pacific Railroad Company in Ore
gon. The work will take several year? to
complete.
Among the proposed improvements pro
vided for !s the extension of the system
from Natron to Klamath Falls, a distance
of 121 miles. This is known as the Oregon
Eastern Railroad, and will call for an ex
penditure of 53.530.000. Next in point of
magnitude la the construction of i. .a miles
of road, from the mouth of the Deschutes
River to Redmond, in Cook County, in
volving an outlay of 55,220.0u0.
Construction work and improvements by
the Pacific Railroad and Navigation Com
pany from Hillsboro to Tillamook about
ninety miles— will call for 53.500.000, and the
f-rection of a steel bridge at Portland will
cost $L»>40.0I». The proposed Beaverten-
Wnißborsr cutoff will call for $1,200,000 more.
and numerous other projects that are
under way will require outays of from
noO.OOO to ©00,000 each, bringing the total
up to about •»•■••■••
NEW NATIONAL LABOR UNION
Proposed Organization to Merge All
Miners and Steel Workers.
. form-
labor union of national scope,
I - • ■ • -,r\ of
■ • .; ed Mine v '-: ■ ■
rkers of I
: - tent ' irles i :
■ • - : .■-,.- ■
The formation of such a union was pre
sented as an alternative, of affiliation with
the American Federation of Labor in case
that oreranization declines to delegate to the
"fVest^rn Federation the authority demand
ed. The ffio.<t important of these demands
is that all men employed about metallifer
ous mines be placed under the jurisdiction
of the Western Federation.
FOUR DAYS' RUN FOR" MILLS.
Sanford, Me., Aug. 3.— Because of a short
age of orders for goods, notices were
posted to-day in th* woollen mills of San
ford. "bunk an.! Springvale announ.
ing that Tsntil further notice the factories
will bf- operated only four days weekly.
About two thousand hands In the three vil
lages are aff*=-ct<*U.
OLD PITTSBURG BANK QUITS.
.- Brothers,

• stabtlahed
Lay that f1 ■ .


of his
DU PONTS BUY NEWBURG PLANT.
Newburg, N. V.. Aug. 3.— The extensive
plant of thn Fabrikoide Company, of which
John Asplnwall was the h»ad, has been
sold to the Dv Pont de Nemours Powder
Company, of 'Vihnington, Del. The pur
chaser will continue the manufacture of
artificial leather and tro Jelly.
NEW-YORK DAILY TIUBIXE, THURSDAY, AUGUST 4, 1&10.
FOR ASSESSMENT SUBWAYS
City Club Maintains Principle Is
Right for Extensions.
The City Club issued yesterday a reply to
a criticism lately published on the subject
of assessment subways.
The reply refers to a memorandum ad
dressed to the Public Service Commission
by the City Club in October, 1908, entitled
"Building of Rapid Transit Lines in New
York City by Assessment Upon Property
Benefited." The reply says: "The conclu
sions (in the criticism) in regard to the In
ability of the taxpayer to pay are invali
dated for three reasons: First, by the as
sumption that he must pay for a covered j
subway, instead of a. connecting rapid
transit line; second, by the failure to con
sider on the credit side of the column the
enhanced value of the taxpayer's property,
and. . third, by the failure to distinguish
the cases to which even its friends do not
propose to appiy the assessment principle."
The City Club says that the assumption
that assessment rapid transit routes would
be covered subways costing $1,509,000 a mile
was wrong, as the assessment plan was
that ail trunk subways would be built by
general taxation, while the extensions were
to be built by assessment. These extensions
would be elevated or open roads, either of
which would cost approximately $500,000 a
mile, thus cutting down the critic's esti
mate of the assessment on each lot from
$150 to $50.
On the statement that cost of equipment
would equal cost of construction, the City
Club points out that it equalled in the
present subway just 50 per cent of the cost
| of construction, and that equipment for an
assessment rapid transit connection ought
not to cost more than $500,000 a mile. The
total cost would then be $1,000,000 a mile
instead of (3,000.600, giving a total assess
ment of $10f> a lot instead of: the estimate
of $300 a lot, the club says.
In regard to the second point, the esti
mate of $500 a lot does not take into con
sideration the fact that the value of the
lot will rise when the subway is put in. as
is seen by the actual rise in the case of
the present subway.
On {he third point, the assessment plan
was not intended to include any district
served even fairly adequately by existing
rapid transit routes.
The important point is. the City Club in
sists, that property enhanced in value by
the extension to it of a. rapid transit sub
way connection should pay for the con
struction of the line to the extent that the
increased value warrants it, instead of re
ceiving such increased value as a present
from the city
HUGHES NOT TO GIVE ORDER
Says Relief for Pollution of Hud
son Is Through New Law.
In reply to Edward Hatch, jr.'s, recent
communication in which he urged Gov
ernor Hughes to issue an order prohibiting
pulp and other mills along the upp»r Hud
son from defiling the stream with their
waste products, the Governor, through his
secretary. Georare Curtis Treadwell. says:
"Governor Hughes directs me to acknowl
edge the receipt of your letter of the 2Cd
instant. Th«« Governor is deeply interested
in the question of saving our streams from
pollution and has made the matter a sub
ject of repeated recommendations to the
Legislature.
"The Governor does not think that, tak
ing the law as it stands, the desirable end
you have in view can be attained by ex
ecutive mandate. Nor. in his judgment, Is
the cause to which you refer of a char
acter which, under the law, would justify
the issuance of an executive order.
"The Governor hopes that in the near fut
ure there will be suitable legislation deal-
Ing with there matters. Of course, where
the rights of riparian owners are infringed
they have their remedies in the courts."
Commenting on the Governor's letter, Mr.
Hatch said yesterday:
"Of course. I do not question the Gov
ernor's desire to abate the nuisance against
which he has directed 'repeated recom
mendations to the Legislature,' but, inas
much as these have signally failed to pro
duce results. I think he would be justified
in taking- matters into bis own hands, es
pecially when the health of the people is
at stake. "
;;:ion on the part of
the M< ■ •■ or its aili'"= to
zi\t- up th« - irainet the pulp mills
ither polluters for la^k of »ncour
ati^nieiit from the ifovernr.'r. They express
their determination to introduce r^r'or'-n
measures until the Legislature is shamed
Into passing them.
COMPANY'S HEAVY LOSSES.
Prr>videnc<=. Aue .3.— An average los? of
! - on each of the ?pven corporations
which it controls is shown by the report
receivers of the New Kn.i?land In
::t Company, th^ main office of which
Is a M m< best* •, N. H. The receivers state
that '• ■ muary, VW. and April 1?.
• c company paid out in dividends J^f'.
748, which. f ; ;p receivers declare, did not
come from I [8, but from 0
• ir stocks.
WATER POWER NEAR DULUTH
First Permit in Taft Administration
Granted by Interior Department.
Washington, Aug. 3.— The first permit for
the development of water power sites on
the public domain Issued by President
Taffs administration was granted to-day
by Acting Secretary Pierce of the Interior
Department to the Minnesota Canal and
Power Company. It is a revocable license
authorizing the use of public lands in the
Birch Lake drainage basin in the Dulutn
land district for power purposes.
The project contemplates the development
of more than SQ.GOO-horsepower near Duluth.
The water is to be stored in large reservoirs
near Eli, Minn., and will be used for the
development of electrical energy.
IRON PRODUCTION CONTRACTS.
"The Iron Age" Bays:
The blast furnace statistics for August 1
■ show plainly the contraction that is going
on in the Iron trade, In .July the produc-
I tion of coke and anthracite Iron was 2.142,-
I 442 tons, or a daily rate of 63.111 tens, as
' against 2.265,478 in,,.- In Jun<». representing
a daily rate of "..".It? tons. The falling oft*
i is chiefly In the output'Of steel works blast
furnaces, their production being 4,500 tons
a day less In July than in June, It should
he noted, however, thai steel product. or.
has not declined in the same ratio as that
of pig iron, hinre the large steel producers
are now drawing upon their stocks of pig
iron and scrap. These have own in re
rent reeks, and the accumulation has been
accentuated by an reaae in stocks at
merchant furnaces producing steel making
iron' In 'he Mahoning and Phenango val
1 jo-. ? then* was a very considerable increase
in* stocks ot Bessemer and basin iron In
July The United States Steel Corporation
is now operating 72.5 ..-.■■ blast
furnace capacity, having thirty-nine fur
naiVS out of blast, a.s against thirty-five
furnaces July 1 and thirty-one furnaces
T un" t
VVHIj -"■•' coke and anthracite turns • in
blast August 1. or T>~ lest; than on Feb
ruary i the country was producing pig iron
at the rHte of 25.ti0O.0tiQ tons, or -" pel cent
less than th* maximum rate of the year,
which was reached In February. The pres
ent rate is less than that <>f IM7 or l&fP. In
th« la.st week there have been evidences of
rather more pressure an foundry iron price*
A number of pullers have b*-en more acjtlve
lv seeking business and $11. Birmingham,
for No 2 Southern Iron is now not uncom
mon Business Is «till restricted and most
buyers are willing to wait longer In fin
ished materials the wire trade seems the
most active The sal of the leading in
tp-<>.st averaged about 7.800 tons a day In
Ttilv the total making a new July record.
The ' reduction in prices also stimulated
spf-ciilcations. which were at Mi.- rate of
4,t><>o ions a day.
•The iron Trade R*
Pie iron oroduction for July wa? 2
:, - compared with
igh July i
pig iron
, .ninues to sag »nd aalm are not v- 1
CENTRAL CLEARING HOUSE
Each State to Have One for
Postal Banks.
Washington, Aug. 3.— A central clearing
house in each state for settling a!l ques
tions connected witk the payment of in
terest and the care of accounts 13 a fea
ture of the postal savings bank system
adopted by the committee of officials that
will make recommendations to the board of
trustees. For a long time the committee
laced the necessity of providing some
method for the settlement of accounts of
depositors that would avoid delay incident
to the transmission of all such questions to
this city. The idea of having state central
clearing houses has been adopted as th»:
best solution of that problem.
Postmaster General Hitchcock, who ox
rived in New York yesterday from hi
European trip. is expected here to-morrow.
In a short time a meeting- of the trustees
will be held, at -which the recommendations
of the committee on organization will be
reviewed.
Because much of the information desired
from foreign governments has not been
received, the task of determining the exact
nature of the forms to be used will not
he completed until later. The general plan
for the establishment of banks, however,
has been worked out for the. consideration
of the trustees.
WORK FOR 35-FOOT CHANNEL
Staten Island Sound Deep Water Asso
ciation Ready for Business.
The Staten Island Sound Deep "Water
Association came Into being: yesterday at
a meeting of owners of land, fronting on
the sound." Its objects aTe the improvement
of Staten Island Sound '"by securing an
appropriation from the United States gov
ernment sufficient to deepen the channel
to a depth of thirty-five feet and to a width
sufficient for all governmental and com
mercial purposes," and "the advocacy of
sound laws and regulations governing the
acquisition of riparian rights. "
The meeting, which was held In a room
of the Chamber of Commerce, on Liberty
street, adopted a constitution and by-laws
drawn up by a sub-committee previously
appointed.
Richard M. Montgomery, of No. 27 Pine
street, president of the Tromley Point Cor
poration, was chairman, and James F.
Pierce, of the Armour company, was secre
tary. The officers elected are: President,
H. C Grant, president of the Grassoli
Chemical Company; vice-president. Charles
.1 Canda, of the Chrome Steel Company;
treasurer, Richard M. Montgomery. The
only paid office is to be that of secretary.
Contributing members are to include
owners of property along the sound. They
are to pay $1 a lineal foot of shore owned
in New Jersey and 50 cents a foot on Statin
Island. The money thus raised will be de
voted to furthering the project. A second
class of members will consist of boards of
trade, chambers of commerce and munici
pal corporations bordering on the water
way from Raman Bay to the ship channel
north of Sandy Hook."
FIRE INSURANCE STOCKS.
(Furnished by E. S. Bailey. No. 66 Broad^-ay.)
Aprx.
an- When , — Price. — *
nual pay- Bid. Asked.
Company Capital, dlv'd. able. P. C. P. C.
City of N. T.... $500,000 30 Q -- 205
Commonwealth.. 500,000 10 J&J 326 —
Continental 2,000,000 40 J&J 825 950
Empire City.-.- 200,000 8 J&J 128 —
Fldelity-Phenix.2.soo,ooo * • 275 2SO
Germ. Alliance. 400.000 15 .T&.T 275 300
German-Am. ...1.500.000 30 J&J BOD 670
G»rmania .10-1 . 1.000. 000 IS .74.-J 255 296
Glens Falls (slo> 200.000 30 J*j 1623 —
Globe & Rutgers 400.000 40 Q 456 —
Hanover (SSO). .1.000.000 10 J&J li"0 208
Home 3.000.000 30 .TAJ fISO BBS
Nassau (550) 200. 000 Id J&J 1«1 175
Niagara (SSO). ..1.000.000 20 J&J 800 305
korrh River ($25) 350.000 10 A4n JOB 165
Pacific <$25) 200.000 6 J&J 135 145
Peter ■.iopert.s2o) 150.000 « - J*J »0 105
Stuyvesant .... 400,000 IT) s&j 155 iflO
T'nitedStates<s2s> 250.000 •'".'--• 60 70
Westchester ($10) 400,000 35 F&A 458 —
W'burg Cit}(s."iO) 250.000 20 J&J 3SO 400
•No information.
BOSTON STOCKS.
(Furnished by R. L. Day & Co.. No. 37 .Wall
street.)
Aug. 2 Any.B.l AuE.2.Auy.S.
Br*t & Alb.22i> 220 ! Cal * H<"c!a..S2O 525
Boeton E!<»v.l22 122 I Centennial Ml 5 15*4
Fltchb'g pf.125 125 Cop Range MB 62
NYNH&H.ISO 150 Franklin 11.. 10% 10
Old Colony. *lß7 '187 ; Granby M... 32^t 32
"W BSt Rv -7 S7 Mass Con M. 7 -i 1 *
do pref.-.l'OO liKIU. Mohawk M.. 444 45
Mass Ei Cos 14 * 15 No Butt*> .. 2*% 24
do pref... li* 80 Osceola M...122 122
Am Pneum. 4** 4*5 Old Dom M.. 33 34 Vi
do pref... 15 IS I*' Parrot1 * 'Parrot M . . . . 12 12
Am T & T.131?i 131**IQuincy M 70 70
New Eng T.l3OVa 1304 . Tamarack M. 52 50
West T& T i.'i 15 Wolverine M.IOO 110
do pref... — "89 US Smelters 8«H 3«H
Unit Shoe M 4£ 4 48%) do pref 4<?4 47
do pref... 2t*m. 26'slT: S Oil 8814 334;
Arcadian M. 44 1 * 4H! Maes Gas .. . 70- 4 SO
Atlantic M.. « 6 j *> pr«:f 00 91
Shannon M. 94 &Vi . Utah 23? i 23
T'rfit Fruit.. I*6 137 I
•Ask»d. *
RAILROAD EARNINGS,
ABASH.
1910. 1009 IPOS.
I 4th tree* in July $757,549 5779.429 $713.15 ft
July 1 July 31.. 2.300,140 2^38.881 2,077.977
INTEROCEANIC OF MEXICO.
Month of June — ■
fJross earnings.. $830.tW4 $714. SMS.BS6
Oper. expenses.. 443,996 44tJ.13fi 408,«42
Net -arninCT. $35«,867 J268.864 $184,313
( July l-June —
Gross earnings.. $7,597.29S 17,400.403 $7,701,106
Oner, expenses.. 5.043.1P4 4.545.597 5.395.657
Net earnings.. 12.044.1 13 $2.5. r »4,506 $2,305,448
IOWA CENTRAL.
Month of .Tune —
Gross earnings.. $236,435 $248. $221,885
; Exr>. and taxes. 214,081 227.332 Ifis»7o4
Net earnlnss.. 552.354 $16,484 $22,841
Other Income... 4.388 «2,204 7.081
Total income.. $53,723 $14,280 $23,910
July 1 June 30 —
Gross earning. 58.581.281 $8,015,847 53.002.47.'. I
Exp an.l taxes. 1691.867 2.580.776 2,215,831
: N>t earninss $<^f>.4ir> $45f,87J $75«,fi44
Other Inc. (deb.V 89.241 «7.915 t30.747
' Total Income.. $630,174 $880,968 J517.391
•Debit +Credlt. <,
M EXTCAN INTERN »N
Month of June
Gross .-arninps.. *«30.«5« $897,048 $«n.SM
Expensea . 483.310 304.340 98OJBB
Net earnlnss.. $350,345 $288,898 $312,2?7
r,ro"i y [rnlnem.. $8,820,864 $8.963,3 M 8B,2«L86B
Expenses ...•■• 5,134.781 4,0*7.477 5.32?. 201
"Vet earning.. 88.7».«8B $&985,8n $2,963,384
ST. LOUIS SOUTHWESTERN.
Month or Jftma $SW,OI« JT55.510 5735.1«53
fjmee esrtlngs.. $566,01« ?^-j]" 'pS^
Exp. ana taxes. 726.757 573..5'-> 668.882
Net eafnlnps. $140,139 $211,751 $t0.2Kl ;
. arnSw* $10 08H Sl« 51" B*I.BBB 89.898.281
i Exp. and taxes. 8.^2^,272 B.OBWMW 7.879,110
Net earnings. $2.4r*.143 $2,263,033 81.719. 154 j
DELAWARE. LACK.VWANNA a- WESTERN.
Month of June— 1910. """' Increapei. j
• ; .... 9"0 - 1 . 1 "
Otir. t^vit.up... $3.i!M.J63 $2.882.982 $.111,210
|O;>er. — gfiniss 1,783.794 1.614.713 171.081
Net oner. r<rv. 81.40f1.589 $I.2KN.2^S $140,120
Outside op- «lrt>. ' 13.73« »26.168 '30.903
Total n-t n»v. $1,894,031 $1,294,403 $100,226
Ta3 3 itMßfl 91 180 20.250
Oper. income.. $1,275,031 SI. 108.005 $70,076
„, !V **?!•? "".'..<^7 $BS.BSB 438 $2,462 RBI
Operi expenses.. 1f1.292.709 477 713 815.056
Net per $16,718,218 $13,075,722 H.687.49K
Chitsidfi op. (net) 280.672 :W,iffi »28,3t8
!•.!«! net r»v $I*i-.'"-v; $1" 17».75fl $1,614,132
Tflxeg 1.316.000 I"T>4.4<«> 421.690
' Orer. income. $15,477. $14,286,888 81.192.382
•■ •■ rssai i-"■■■i '-"■■■ ■
NATIONAL FtAILWATB OF MEXICO.
(Mexican currency.)
Month of XOfa* „
Mil^aeo 5.261 5.261
Qrosa earnings.. 88.15b.62S $4,381,441 j-r.-v.:-4
Expenses 2.988.293 2^166.336 319.966
Net earning*. 88.304J81 $1,866,100 1338,428
Ttilv 1 .[un« SO —
1 Grcuu .-arnlnss. $32,562,298 $48,800,622 $3,786,771
r:xi..ns^3 ai,5f»3.65S 2ft,1«i ( 5,'»71f 2.426
Not csrnirißa..s2n.f,rtß,7::."i $10,038,643 $1,300,003
DENVER & RIO GRANDE.
ini<>. 1969
Fourth week in July $(57:>. »i»> $641.a0U
JulyWulyfil 2.012.1W 1.(M4,400
THE HUKEIS
TOTAL DOMESTIC RECEIPTS.
New York. August 3. ISIO.
Flour, bbls 7Jj»Z, Butl«r, pk«s ir.
Flour, sacks . . . . U>,598 i bees*. pk«s * •?;-
Ccrcnieal, bbls... 010 Eggs, cases "^JrSJ
lillllliml. bags... 6,324 I>rsd poultry. pkgs ls *?
Hominy. pk*s 200 Live poultry, cru. i«2
Wheat, bush 14.400' Oranjrea (Kla). <-■■• 35
Corn, bomb I*. 135 j [Oranges <<'*'■>, «•• -«•»•»
Oats, bu*h 42,70O!.Grapes i<'a!>. crts. 3.4-"
Rye, bush 1.150 Plume Malt. ■*». 2."''
Peas. bush.*. 3.4.101 Pears (Cal). crt»..n.l»
Malt, bush 10,500) Peaches <Oa».crt». 6,275
Rice, pocketa I.TOJ Apples, fable "*>
Kay, tons . .. 37" Potatoes, bMs ■ 2.085
Straw, tons '£> Onions, bbls.: - *•"
Mulfeed. tons .. «0 Rosin, bbls - 1.5"«»
Grass »H. bags. 200 Spirits tcrp bbl» »O
Beef, bbls OS Tar. bbls 1-
Be*( (canned), cs. 17 Oilcake, pkg« M*
Pork, bbi* rtnuwf bag* ° 6<>
Hams, pksrs 10!) (Oil. lub, bbls - 3*««
Baccn. pkss 21 «iOleo stock, pkgs... l|»
(-utm»-ats. pkps.. 21 ( > ' Peanuts, bass 1.025
Lard tierces 11*>! Tobacco, hhds »S
Lard. kees I.2oß i Tobacco, tierces... 1°
Lard. cases tt*t|Tohacco. pkss 1,363 :
Tallow, pkira Hl* Whiskey, bbls 240
Grease, pkes 7.". Cotton, bales ™
EXPORTS.
Wheat, bush ?.57O|Beef. tcs SO
Oats, bush . 1.293 Ba«-rn. Vb v24.<m> ;
Peas, bush :«J (Hams, Ib V l'J^Ji i
Beaas. bush.. 4>>o!Lard. Ib - t *- ! X;
Flour, bbls JMfliOrease. Ib 25t>.00U
Flour, sacks... 1.800 Butter. Ib V™
Pork, bbls 22|Lub oil, gals 20,550
CASH QUOTATIONS.
Iron. tt No 1 f.JIS 37 1 *! Cotton, middling. 15.45
Iron. 80. No 1.. Itirj". Coffee, No 7 Rio >>ti
Steel rails 28 00 | Sugar, granulated 0.15
Stand cop. spot. 12 12^, i Molasses, OK. p «
Tin 83 124 Beef. family Sl» 20
Exchange lead.. 445 Beef hams Z3 OO^
Spelter 600 Tallow, prims... <*
•Wheat. No 2 r 1 07* 4 Pork, mess •***,«.,
tCorn, No 2 71% Hogs, dr. ISO tb. I- s
Flour. Mpls. pat «23 Lard, mid "West. 11 SB
•F o b. fElevator. domestic basts.-
GENERAL MARKET REPORT.
New York. August 3. IMO.
GKATX — — Ir active th«; greater part
I of the day. but priors were flrni. and clo«ed
at 101 He net advance. Cables were consid
erably firmer than expected, with reports of
active buying in the future market due to
less pressure of new wheat, although crop
advice? from Europe were somewhat more
favorable. Winnipeg and the. Northwestern
markets -»rere firm. A government report on
the French crop made the yield 257.000.000
bushels, against 390.900.000 las'- year, asia "•"
porters seemed to be anticipating a removal
of duty en tbn part of France, which, it is
believed, -would result In a better demand f^r
American wheat. Cash wheat here steady:
No 2 red new winter. $1 00>-i In elevator s\\d
Slo7«i fob afloat: No 1 Northern. $125
fob CORN — Easier early but rallied in
sympathy with v.-heat and closed net un
changed to ! ,c higher. No 2 Western. 71?ic
elevator, domestic basis, to arrive, c i £
OATS — but steady. Cash oats steady;
natural -white., 26 to 32 Ib. quoted at [email protected];
clipped white, 34 to 42 n», 4S®soc. BYE—
Dull: No 2 Western, old. Ssc fob New York.
BARLEY — Steady; feeding. 65®70c c i i New
Tork
YEW YORK PRICES.
Tester-
Wheat: ' Open. High Low. dose. day.
I September. $1 074, $1 O" SI 07 SIO7HSIO6**
I December.. 109 110 ! 00H IW:i 10©%
Corn: '
September. — — 705* 70\
INTERIOR RECEIPTS.
* Wheat. Corn. r »ats. n
To-4ay . ... 1.761.000 62S.f«M> «W>.ftjfi
I^st week 1.357,0fH> 82O.OO"> 70G.000
Last year ...1.154.000 306,000 3«4.000
SEABOARD CLEARANCES.
Flour. Wheat. Corn.
To-day 4.000 73,000 115.000
Last week .. . i.e»i 28,000 99.000
Last year •».-«<> 100.000 2.000
COITOX — the Southwest drouth situ
ation was unrelieved, cotton prices wens de
cidedly higher, showing an extreme advance
on new crop positions of about 25 points,
while September at one tim« was up 27 points.
Commission houses were all large buyers, and
in the afternoon some of the heaviest buying
of new crop positions was for the account of
Wall Street interests who had unloaded their
lines on the government report and were
fored to replace them at a material advance.
Southern bulls were strong supporters of Sep
tember, one of thorn, in fart, offering to buy
all the September the market would sell at
14.36 c. They also bought new crop positions
trebly. Liverpol was fully 6(g 10 points better
than due before the local opening, and closed.
5&9% points net higher. A large amount
of fiKglit room has been engaged for August
shipment of cotton to Europe, some estimates
running as high as 100.000 bales, practically
ex'mustlng the available room. The local
certificated «toek showed a decrease of 8.600
: biles. Local contract prices.
Tester-
Open. High. Low. Close day.
August . 15.37 15.47 15.32 15.45(g>15.47 15.26
I September.. 14.21 14.39 14.21 [email protected]& 14.12
October ...J3.75 13,88 13.74 13.84&13.55 13. <»
November. .13.67 13.fi" 13.67 [email protected] 13.53
December. .13.64 18.71 V.I «2 18.72018.73 13.52.
January .13.57 13.t» 13.55 13.67911.89 13.44.
February... — — - — 13.68013.70 13.45
MarcTl 13.«5 13.75 13. « 13.74913.75 13.51
i May i::.67 13.7» 13.«« 13.773j13.7S 13.52
June 13.53 13.53 13.53 33.M©13.53
July 13.54 13.34. 13.84 13.!?2#13.54 ■
Spot quiet, -with prices 15 point* higher at
13.i5c for mlddllner upland and 15.7<ir; for mid
dling Gulf. Sales. 3.100 bales. Liverpool cables:
Spot In more demand; sales, 8.000 bales; specu
lation and export. 500: American, 7.000: imports.
11.000, all American; middling upland. S.2od.
■ Futures opened steady at H#2H points ad
vance. Closed steady at a net advance of 5^
•*- 3 points. August. 7.87 v »d; August-September.
7.65Hd: September-October. 7 30*46; October-
November, 7.24 d; November-December, 7.15 d;
Oooember-January 7.12 i rd; January-Februan',
February-March and March-April, 7.12 d; April-
May and May-June. 7.11Hd.
COFFEE- — active; saies. 34,966 bags.
an.i aft«rr op^nini* steady at unchanged prices ;
finan; off a little, dosing net unchanged 10 5
points lower. Havre opened *4 d higher, but
lost tho advance, and Hamburg- closed un
changed to Vi pfennig lower. Rio was 75
reis higher. Santos was unchanged, but cost
and freight offers wer« firmer, and commis
sion houses here said that Brazilian shippers
■r«r« firm, believing in the small crop theory.
Spot quiet but firm, with Rio No. 7 quoted at
S - S Ij-I^c. Local contract prices-
Teeter-
Open. High. Low. Close. day.
.\ - c -ic- — — — 6.90A&9C1 fi.no
Peptcmber.. . 7.00 7.05 « 05 6.93 7. 0n 6.1)."
October — — — T. 00©7.03 T.OB
November... — — --- 7.1<><g)7.15 7.10
December... 7.20 7.20 7.20 7.1341 7.20 7.20
January — — — 7.2007.22 7.25
Februay — — 7. 24© 7.26 7.28
March ' . . . 7.28 7.20 7.2S 7 2JJ „7-0 730 ;
April.. . — — — 7.3007.31 7.33
May 7.35 7.."0 7.32 7.^2 #7.33 7 15
June — — — 7.33©7.37 7.36
July ... 7.38 7CS 7.33 7.35&7.40 "88 ,
HOUR AND MEAL — Flour irfegular. and ;
i as Kansas grades are selling below a parity :
! with bath spring and winter flour, most of int 1
i bu=-in^ss was In this character of Hour. Spring !
! patents, $«@sß 90; winter staiqrhts. $4 7.". i
$4 00; winter patents, $4 90© $3 23; spring
clears. $4 7". 'a $•". ; -\t<i So 1 winter. S3 S3 ,7 ,
$4; extra No - winter, .*;' mi s.i 75; Kansas j
straights, $S 25 > $.". ■"" RYE FLOUR — Steady: ;
fair to i;(iod, $4 [email protected]|4 25* choice to fancy,
S4 40®?4 TO fORXMEAL KiIn, dried, $3 50. I
BAO MEAL — Kir,, white and yellow. SI 5541
$l«0; coarai $1 50 gisl 55.- FEED — Western
spring $24 10 standard mlddHng. >26 10;
flcur .in. fM«$29 red dog. $29 .v.i#*.°.o 25;
city bran. $23 bulk. 524 35 sacks; middling. |
524 500529 50: red dog. S3o©s3o 85; hominy 1
chop $34 50 bulk, $25 70 sacks; ollmeal. $S<>
aske<i.
PROVISIONS — Inactive hut firm owing to
small receipts of live hogs and an advance
of 15 points In the hog market. Traders
were nor disposed to favor the selling side. ■
PORK — Steady: mess. 125 50; family, .?-."■ a
$2«: short clear |24<9«25 50. BEEF — Mess.
$in®sls 50: ram;;: •'•'■:$-". packet, $1«Q
616 50 extra India nfess, $20 50 ©530. BEEF
HAMsU-Qulet ?22#524. DRESSED HOO3-
Steady; bacons. 12'ic: ISO Ib, 13% c; trtO Ib.
12%e; 140 ib 12"ic: pigs. 13».,c. CUT MEATS
Pickled bellies, smoking-, IS He: 10 Ib, 17 He;
1-2 Ib 16Vie- 14 Ib. ltlc. Pickled hams. It.- !
TALLOW— Firm: city, 7'i<-: country •; 3 »-3 !
-, „ LARD — Middle West. [email protected]>
City 'teady . ll^s&ll 1^^; refined firm. South
America 13 2Bc ' Continent. 12.45 c; Brazil
keiry 14 °5c Compound. 10®li , STEAR
lNE—Easv;'oleo, U^c: city i" l "''- *8%«
SrflXß Tho Federal rednced prices for I
granulated sngar to •">"'••- net, less l per cent,
cash for prompt shipment. "• 10 for 14 days
and f> 15c for 28 days. Other reflners wef* !
mill quoting •*> 15c net. less 1 per cent caali.
Business moderate. The, London market for
beet sugHr was unchanged to "Id higher, with j
\ugust at Ms 10'td and September 13a llVid.
and October to December nt Us THd. Raw;
here arm. with sal^s for August shipment at .
,"c basin ... tea ■■''"' and freight, equal, M
4 36c h p n». A limited quantity could bt- had |
at that with holders generally asking l-32c i
more Centrifugal. o*s test. 4.30 c; muscovado.
B0 '-St. ". We, and molasses sugar. 80 test. '
' HICK Firm and fairly active here, with
rood business at primary points.
METALS COPPER — Standard dull; spot
an.! August. 12.03012.20 c; September and ■*■■
..-,h^ ; [email protected]: November. 12.25*
12.27% c London dull: »pot. £55 ss lid: futures.
.'.,' ■- fid. t,»ke copper. 12.73 ; 12.87 ',c: eloo
trolytJc 1 2. 50 fi 12.62 '-ic; casting. 12.25-*
v';!-uc. TIN — tasy; spot. 33 1ff 33.25c: An- ;
gist ' ' 32.50.533 i"; September and October.
S™ 50 ©32.05 c. Sales were reported of I\\*'
tons September at 32.05 c. London dull: spot. j
Fial future*. €151 7» M London sales were
100 tons spot an-! 1.000 tons futures LEAD — '
Ehsv; fpot. 4.4004.00 c New York: 4.20® 4.30c
j.-', ' «{» ; >ula Imports. 18 tons. London. ,
•not" £12 torn. SPELTER— Easy: spot, i.40« j
5.50 c New York: 4.i>54?5.<>5<: East St Louts,
i'rndon. spot. £22 15«. Cleveland warrants, ;
4(^l 4Wd In London. Locally Iron was aulef. .
No l Northern. $1« 25©t1»l SO; No 2. *lfl 75® ■
*1« \o 1 Southern. r !.>:.« !'i 25. and No 1
Southern, -""ft. $15 75frr*l«2r.. Pig iron cer
iin,.iiii>s nominal.
MOL-VSSKS AND sVKI PS — BUMBm mod- ;
crate with ;.!'••••• uni'hunneil. T.in«t steady.
>' \V VI STOKKi* — Th<?r« was further •often-
Ins Of the market for spirits turpenttn* to
-ii'.'.p " owing to slight demand and larirer »up- .
pile's in first hands. liosln and tar steady and '
uni ha - .. . I
""oil »—lt» — It Is difficult to secure ronreiwions
from iln»*d oil holder*, and although there la I
comparatively light demand prices are firmly
mitntrtinud retrolcum without change.
(OTTOXKIKD .OlL— Strong and higher,
closing at a net gain of 4 [-•" points. Sales.
10 Son bbls. I-ocal contract prie-s:
Tester- ]
Open. High. Low. Close. day. i
Spot .... _ — — ».ni».jTio ft.lo
\7, c ,. st — — — ■' 1.1,, (1.,". fl.Ort
Stint ember" 000 ni ° °00 » io« »-12 iM :
OetSSSSSi 7,75 7.53 7.73 7.81© 7.83 7.7*1
November.. 7.08 7.tl> 7oi 7.17© 7.19 «-0J
December... «.'.'- « '■>- 6.!>2 6 970 6.00 6.01
January. . . . ♦».»<> 6.00 6.90 8 9«5® «•*» *'*'
February. tM '<>* « •*!• •..? a> 6.»» «.""*
March 7.02 T♦« 7.02 -<ri& 7.«*» *»»
COUNTRY PRODUCE MARKETS.
» ■ York. August 3. 191°-
B£AN3 AND FEAS— Trade continues dull,
i but price* about the same as of is*«- Feeling
I easy, except on choice j>»*. which abo» firm-
I ness because of strong Interior advices.
! BEA.VB — choice. bu«h«J. $" 1" * ,
1322%; medium, choice. $2 «:m?s2 45; P'-1
j$- 4£>; imported medium. I*-* 2<>©J2 30; pea.
: $-' 25 @$2 35 . white kidney, $3 15 ©$3 23 ; '" !
kidney, *4 70©$4 75: fair to good, *4 -"W
$4 50; yellow eye. $3 30 & $3 35: black turtle
1 soup. 93«8#f2T8: lima, California. $» lo«
$5 l."». PEAS— Scotch, bags, buab«l. *- i.O»
1 $2 32 Va- :
BITTER— 9,945 pkgs. Moderate
Inquiry for fancy fresh creamery, and wit. a .
' comparatively imall quantity offering th« tone ■
, la firm, with occasional sales exc«*dtns quo
j tations. Everything aiae la full supply »nd
i offering freely at about former rate*. Cream
ery, specials, Ib. 23c: extras. M#2»l4c; ftrsts.
260-'7c; seconds. 24H0-^> l ie: thirds. 24c;
state dairy tubs. finest. 27 ©27 He; a*** to
prime, 24 4 ©26 V»c; common to fair. 2207K;
process, specials. 25 4c: extras, — «• . ■■ts
-;;V»*i24c; seconds, 22&23e; Western Imitation
creamery, firsts. 24625 c; factory, firsts. 23* i©
23>,c: seconds. 22©224 c; thirds. JI*UI- .
packing stock. June mtko. No 1. 22 "4 'l-'-'z "
current make. No 1, 22c; No 2, 21Vi:&21**c;
No 3. 20 ©21 c. I
CHEESE— 6.614 boxes. Stead r for
full cream, and tendency to ask higher prices,
though buyers hold off whenever values are ,
raised. No change in skims. State, who.;
milk, specials. 14\®16c; average fancy. larsre
or small, colored or white. 14 % c: average
prim*. I3ai3>l4c; fair to good, 12 1 , ©13^=:
common. O^SH^c; skims, specials. _r.c;
average fine, 10«[email protected]; fair to good, \p ©
9Uc: common. s©fl%,c lull skims. 2»i5»4c.
EGGS— Receipts. 18,155 cases. F'.ne to fan.
| Western steady to firm, but trade Is dull ana
; values are weak and Irregular under strong
i pressure to sell. Th« average of sales is
i somewhat lower than last week- Sta^f^
! Pennsylvania and nearby, hennery whites. -3
033 i gathered. 3»#2Bc hennery browns,
fancy, O«2Tc; gathered. 2232,'k;; poor to fair.
15«20e; Western, gathered whites. [email protected] -
fresh gathered selected extras. 23 25 c; extra
flrots, 20^2itic; firsts. l*-sfl9c: see**** W
it.- thirds, i;ig:.v,c. very poor, case. *•> aa
«*4 20; dirties. No 1. candled. [email protected]: No -
ll«12u,c; poor. case. $2 50 *3 . checks, cur
j rent receipt* $1 r,C§s:>
FRUTS — DRIED — Evaporated app'" mal;
ket quiet on the spot: stocks firmly ■|'* la -
Futures 11 1 1 ml— l at 7\c on Novembers.
Nothlns doing in chops or was'-*
FRUITS — FKESH— Apples firmer. Fears in
good demand and choice stock sells promptly
[at sus:ain*ri prices. Fancy peaches selim»
! well, but most of supply out of, condition:
sales ate* a wide range. Plums quiet, duj
supply light. All kinds of berries are firm ana
tend slightly in sellers' favor under Jign. re
ceipts. Southern muskmelons moving rather
| slowly: quality rarely prime; Marvlands BBS or
i the buyer under liberal receipts: 1 ca 7 >. ■
| Nevada stock met a fair demand at $.. •>" s**
| a standard crate. Watermelons firm- Pineap
! ples doing better under lighter receipts.
I APPLES, new. bbl. [email protected] 25: half bbl ba?'-' 1 ?
50cg$l 50: bushel baskets. 50c#$l »] PEAKS,
Clapp's Favorite, bbl, [email protected]: Tyson and
Catherine. «2 3O9SS: Bell. $212-%~: Scooter 5
! «$2 7.->: sugar. S2SS2 50: Kfeffer. Southern.
SISOSS2: Le Conte, 75c^J4; PEACH^n.
! Missouri, carrier, $I«s2 25: Georgia. SOcigW;
i North Carolina, $1 25C*$1 73; Virginia. Hi
isl 75; Delaware and Maryland. $1351 ' 5 bas
| ket. [email protected]$l: Jersey. »O«T3c: PLUMS. Dela
! ware and Maryland, carrier. SOc#Sl: 8-l»
basket. 12!?18c; quart. 4®6c; up-river. «-.d
basket. 15g20c: GRAPES. North Carolina,
carrier. $1 50: CURRANTS, qaart. Ug l^c;
BLACKBERRIES, s®l2c; RASPBERRIES.
red. pint 79t2e; HUCKLEBERRIES. Qna.ru
6(^l2c: MUSKSIELONS, Maryland. crat». $1 M
12 00; carrier, $150012; Baltimore, basket. f\
5 $2. Norfolk, bushel crate. 75c -®*l 25; large
crate, $l v basket. $1«« 50: North Caro
j lina, crate. $1 25®$1 75; pony, .oc©M:
Nevada, crate. $3 [email protected]$4: pony $2 a *-_-;■
! WATERMELONS. Southern, carload, ?•■-> x
i $350; 100. *1O0*4,O: PISEAPPLES, Florida,
crate, 72c913 50: Cuba. 51 73^ $2 .5: Porto
! Ri™. $1-5J3 15. . ,^^
— With continued fair demand from
I brewers and unfavorable weather In Bnslasd
and or. the Continent there is a firm reeling
for 11*03 hops. . .
HAY IST) STRAW — Firm. •' 50 being asKed
In some Instances for large baled tlmotay ha*--.
New invoices show some increase, but supply
stir. short of demand. HAY. timothy, prime
| large bales. 100 Ib. $1 45: No 3 to No 1. J. II
1 (911 40: shipping, i.' ; clover and clover, aBM,
I as to quality; 75c&*l 15: STRAW, long rye. M
««i)c; short and tangled rye, oOc; oat and
wheat, 45 S 50c. „„ .
rOULTRY— ALIVE— Receipts, 28 cars by
freight and about 1 car by express. Good da
mand for broilers, but fowls exceedingly slow
and folly 12 cars unsold In the market. Other
liv» unchanged. BROILERS, nearby. Ib, 17
@13c; Western and Southern, ITo; FOwLb.
; nearby. 18 17c: Western and south«rn. lrtc:
j ROOSTERS, younff and old. lie: TLRIvF.\-->,
10914e DUCKS. 14c; GEESE. 12c; GUINEA
FOWLS, pair. 60c; PIGEONS, pair, Ot
DRESSED — Much of the western poultry due
to-day has been delayed. Fowls only .■•:•
erately active but supplies sot exct-salve and
holders fairly steady. FIBS Western broilers
in good demand and firm, occasionally exceed
ing quotations. Speculative buyers for fre.--z.n3r
are willing to pay 18c for choice dry picked.
! Nearby in moderate supply. Nearby spring
ducks in good demand. Western rarely desir
able Squabs steady. Frozen poultry quiet.
Fresh kiIIed— TURKEYS. Western. ft v /7?f
hest hens or toms. 20c; fair to good. 16|fl!>c:
broilers, Phlla. fancy squab, pair. Jfl C '
fancy. 4 Ib to pair and trader, Id. 25«24c:
' Fe.in 2ft^-2lc: Western, dry picked, l.ttl-s:;
.Michigan, scalded, choice, large. M«: West
, crn, scalded. [email protected]^c; Southern, scalded. It*::
I FOWLS, Western, boxes, dry. ** Ib and over.
I dozen. ISiic; 36 to 42 Ib. 17-il7 l i e; iced. dry
, picked. 4 to 5 Ib each, IT -c. barrels, small.
i 17c Michigan, scalded. ITHc; Western, iced.
' fancy l"@17 1^c; Southern anil So-itJi western.
, 1712i7'.2c; other Wearern. [email protected]; COCKS,
old 12i".c;. Dt'CKLINGS. spring. liOng lalajia
and Eastern. !b l»e; Perm. 18% #11 W?st
«rn. 8© 14c: SQUABS, prime, large, white,
dozen. $2 50Q<8TS: poor dark. $2: culls. .>r>l
! 77,.- TURKEYS, your.? 'orr-.s. IM
' 27c: young hens. lS<32">c; old toms. 2*c;
. mCKEXS, broilers. corn ten, 18©lbc;
chickens, roaming, milk fed, 20® 24c; ifyers.
171- Ml9c: corn fed. 18#21c fry*** [email protected]
POTVTOES AND VEGETABLES— Firm on
white potatoes. Sweats Steady for fine stoc».
Cabbages Higher Cucumbers steady. Market
Irregular on green corn, average of sales
slightly lower. Lima bearj easier. Oruona
quiet. Peas' and string bears «o!r.T off in
quality ana fearer sai-s at r>uiai«U quotations.
Tomatoes dec!ir.inr on Jersey stock; off r «1
heavy. POTATOES. Long Island. SuUc bbl.
SI $175: Jersey, ion?, bag. «1 3T#ai so;
ro«nrt. «16."><35175: Maryland and Eastern
Shore. No 1. bbl. $150#5175: SWEET PO
TATOES North Carolina, yellow. ' It S^?*4.
r»d $°ti?SSO- Vlncland, old. basket. 750351;
i white yams. North Carolina, bbl $1 30^
<; -,o BEETS. 100 Irancnea §\nZl -> n ; CAR
ROTS, new. btsl. *1 25€-$2 50: 6*«ltei' lalaad.
$1 7'.i3i52: old. 75c»Sl; IQO Imiiebe* 81: CAB
BAGES, nearby, 100, $5 5$T V- -. .*<--i* ■.
Baltimore. >b1 or crate. XtcQwi- r M*»V
state Hnd J«r»ey. dozen roots. l'.itf-y_c; '-1 -
CUMBERS. Jersey, basket, 60c -»: b^>
4<VSSI- Delaware and Marytand. basket. isc
■«$125; Norfolk, bbl. «l«*180: encumber
piJkle.. afraey. bbl, $!«s.:;•. E( GP o I^ 1 -I S '
Jersey, basket. 730«f51: bushel crate. SO IJ.Oc;
Norfolk to quart. $1 25 2>?l »*: Southern,
basket or crat.. Sl«?l -V GREEN COII-V
j.. <>- 100. COc#s2; Delarvars and Marj-iand.
T".cffi'*l2S LIMA BEANS'. Jersey, poiato.
basket. $a«>*2 50: flat. $1 aSI 60; LFrrTLV«E.
Western New Tork. dry. 3 dozen box. l|
3137- stat". basket. 25© 515 nearby, hfil ... •]
"c; basket. 10«t45 C : OKRA. J«r»ey 100 to®
20c: peach basket. ".c'tfslso- rmall. W bbl
basket 52 50®$^;- carrier. St.Vl-ffS-. Nar-n.
Caroflna, carrier. 51 a« v tS ONION?. Orawre
r.inrtv red. bag. [email protected] -5; Connecticut
VaUl»y v-ilo*. 100 IB bag. $1 Cs^sl 75; Shelter
Island. yeUow! bbl. |20$| 30; j" r^-,, wtl ' : ;.:r
vHlow. ba-ket. *[email protected]; red SI -j. BaKi
more yollnw. pony basket, 6SQ?oc; .ia.f bbl
basket. 75??00c: Maryland and Tirrml* red
or yellow. basket. 7.->€W>c: PARGET. U ' > - 3 '
crn Xiw YorK be« »1#»1 . Western
Nt „v Yo-k bag ">r bask- ! * PBPPEKa,
$"■ rheese Jl M imei $2®?-o«l; STRINt,
BEANS Western New York. wax. basket. $1?J
i\ 4'— : -een •TwwflTS; BQCASH. marrow,
hi.l sl"U<l 50 d". S1«-S1 50 box MTQ
7.V. nearny. white, btl. |1#»1 5 bushel box.
-oif^c: white. Southern, bb!. .'.Orfl-Jl: TCR
VIP" rutabaga, hbi. 7:.-.- :$: white. Hat. *_ i
$2 5€ : white, giobe »2 SOO*S; TOMATOES
Jersey. bo«, 55c©si33: Baltimore, crate «r
carrier. «l#TSc
LIVESTOCK MARKET.
New York. August 3, 1310.
BEEVES — -ipi" !t4 cars, or 1.7t>5 head. |
Including 29 cars for the market: 3>J cars on |
■ale. Trade slow; steers I*B lsc higher: bulls ,
and cows in light supply and steady. Yard* •*•-;
cleared. Ordinary to prime steers sold at $•"> 15$
$7 40 per lUO It); a few statd scrub*, $4. oxen.
$5 .ifSSfl 20; common, to giX>d bulls. $.130-5*4. no I
cholc* bulls offwed. cows. J2«*4 70. msMst
bn?f dull and unchanged. No la:er cables. Ex- '
•■. rts to-day. 1.600 quarters of beef .
yales—McPherscn & Co.: 19 Virginia steers.
115.; !b average. $7 per 100 Ib: 19 UM tb. $7
18 1254 Tb. $*Jl»; 18 1304 IT). |6 90: 19. 1204 Ib.
$«">*) 18. 13:57 Ib. JHS<>: '-. 125S Tb. $6 s.> IS.
ISIS It). *«MO; IS. 1220 Ib. $«•«. 1?. 1248 To.
»«C5- 15 Ohio. 1222 n». $7 13; IS. 1213 Ib. S6 73:
17 1205 rb. $« 40; IS Virginia, 1407 ib, $SBS; i
21. 1164 IT>. $8 30; 3*. DM to. $6 25; 23. 10SO IS. :
$.*"> 41'
' - Anders: 2?. Virginia stesra TfWO rb $s*):
■•- 1175 rt). $5 70; 21. 1112 n>. $5 88: 3. 1020 D. ■
$515: 17 Ohio. 1135 B», $>'• 70: 26. 1056 Ib. $5 20:
4 Pennsylvania. 1050 !b, IS 20; 2 "tt, 1415 TTj.
$8 20: 5 bulls, 774 », >>•*; 2 cows. $«» Ib. $2 SO.
J Shaniber)? i Boa: 22 Ohio steers. 1341 »
*7 40: 14. ÜBS a $7 10; -'■ '•' •' lt>. $« 40: rt.
1175 tt $« 4O: 3. ICM3 n>. $3 SO: 20 Indiana. 1125
Tb 40; 22 Virginia. 12S0 Tb. *♦'. SO.
Kerns Commission Company: 33 Virginia
st^rs. 1200 ID. SB.
S. Judtl ■ Co IT bulls, 91S Tb X S3.
Jelllffe. Wright & Co.: •'• bulls. 323 DX $4. 9. (
-— n |Sa»: 2. S«ls rb. $3 75; 8. 614 rb, •: I
4 cow i 852 rt,. $2 50; 2. 525 IS. $2 10; 4. S«?0 i
tt> $2
J li Curtis A Son: 3 mixed cattle. ft"« •*>. $4;
1 bull. «30 tb. »3 s»>: 8 cows. 010 It.. $4 70: 13.
7*l» rh' $3 35- 2. 7«3 tD. $3 20; 3. m n>. $-•? 13;
1. «70 Ib. 1138: 1 500 It). $2: <* fresh cows. $33»
$70 • at head •
Androw Mullen: 2 oxen. 12*> Tb. $5 »; .'» bulls.
04* ft. S4: 12. 758 Tb. $.175; 2. «.<O Tt». $3 03: t
cow. 7T.0 Ib, $2 23: 3. 4W IT). $2: 10 fresh cows.
$2T."iOss7O p«r head
W R Hume: I bull. 1050 Tb. $4: I cow. $00
Tb «- -* 1. 740 TTi. $2.
VWVK^ — 1,«T2 head, tncludlnrr
•-r for th« market; l.Oai) on aale. S.?O at «»th
street and 7«) at Jersey City At tns upper 1
vu.r! *eaJs went firm to a fraction higher, on
Ight receipts; «i Jewsaaj City *liiw and lower,
closing steady. Orsjssjers and buttermilk* In
poor demand and 90#78e lower: Western calves
hard to ■")! and generally jo.- off. Tie "rr^rln^
•»«i-e cloned out. Common to choice vema sold
a* |7iisl<> per 10° Tb, a ' ewr heal $10 _.' cul!a
and throwouts. fß©** 50; good to choice West
ern calves. *<> TT l - I*7 . grassers and butter
milks. MM439 City dres*ed veals slow at 12©
150 BS* B 4t*assd graasers and buttermilks
li.wer at 7 l j«Tf»<t.
Sales— W. R. Hume: 1« veals. li» It» a\era««,
flit 25 per UK) n>, 67. 161 Ib. SID; 5, 2lhJ Tb, 19. >
10 culls. 164 rt, $S; 3. 143 rr-. 9988) 12 graaaasii
213 Tb. $4.
■ -..._.. & Co. : «5J veal«. 150 p». $lf>: S.
158 Tb. Hi 75; I*. • ■» ». $T> 5O: *, HI R>. **« '•(*:
». I4tl n>, (-; 12 call* 199 m. ♦«, 8, S3 m. $4; •»*
bottercnincs 153 Tb. $4.
J. G. Cnrtla & Son 81 veau». I*l Ib. *!•>. •*•".
188 !t>. $!»75: 4. 232 B>. $.Sso: 8 .-nil*. t%% T>.
$« £0; 12. '.•56 lt>. «5 3«>- 9« bottenr.ilks. 140 TB. 54-
Andrew Mullen: IS Teal*. 164 » $!>SO: «, 123
TT $»; 3, 133 R BBSfl 5. IIS n>. $7; •"» cufis, 215
n>. $5 s<> : 2. 125 IT>. $5; <?. 998 rb. »4 5O; 4H but
twrnt;kß. 183 rb $4 25.
B. "VV. Otis *. Co.: « v*«I». l«2 Tb, $10; *
cntls. Ifi2 R. S6.
Nelson & McCabe: IS real* M I>. tl*: 5
cuKs. 298 Ib. $5.
Tobtn ,v Shannon: «> v»al». 152 Ib. 53 25:
29, 136 n». $'J; 19 coHs. 135 Ib, $8; GO Ohio
-a.-. 186 Ib. IT; 2. 28 Ib. *•" .V>.
3. .Ju.:.! A Co.: S3 veals. 14a ... $3 5O: 4*.
M Ib. $3 25; 41. 182 It. *» 20 cull". li 3 Ib.
96 90; 22. l.> Ib. .«(?. 7. I*9 Ib. ?5: 140 Western
calve*. 187 Ib, $7 16. 21* Ib. $« 50; -- 243 Ib.
$«37V».
?. Sanders: 2K veals. 141 Ib. $9 25; 7. 143 Ib.
$8 75: II caiiii. -. Ib. *."..
SHEEP AND I.VMB. 1 * — Receipts. 2rt'* rar».
or s.»Ki.> head, inciudinx si» can for th>s mar
ket; 11 : 3 cart on saie. Lambs more active
and prime and cholc<» rrarfea 25^f.17 s^<: hlrSer;
common an.! medium Tainba ftrong to a abaato
hftrher. Sh<>ep almost nominal and steady.
The pens were cleared. Common tr> pr!m»
she»p sold at $3934 .vi per 100 Ib fair to
choice lambs at $»: 25* is 7 »52 ! -»; 1 car extr*.
Samba, $7 75: a few culls, $4. Dr«*se<l matton
quiet and steady at 7Jfft«- per Ib; <lres»*d
larabs. ll®irU;; a few at lav,.;.
Sales — Tobln .t Shannon: 250 K»r.fa«-kT
lambs. 73 Ib arorage. $7«2»% per mo it.: 217.
70 Ib. $7 82 7 --- 7« Ib. $7 62'-i: 23». ~7. Ib.
$7 50: 235. 70 Ib. 91 50: 4O sta.te. 75 Ib. $7;
Kentucky she*p. !>2 Ib. 33.
Kerna commission •"'ompany: 233 Kentucky
l^mbs. «9 Ib. $7 6*; 221. »M Ib. *« 75: 227. «5 !b.
$♦$25; lrt culls, 45 !b. $4; Il*I 1 * Kentucky s"3e«p.
»1 Ib, $3 96t
S. Sa.nd«ra: 68 state lambs. " in. %.: — 1
Tennessee. M ib. $8 ■*.">; 2 state, sheep. 223 Ib.
$4 50; II Tennessee. (W) Ib. $3 75.
Ne-srton & Co.: 203 Viryinla laiab». 7O Ib. $..
J. Shambers & Son: 225 Kentucky lambs.
73 Ib. *7 75.
9 Jndd & Co.: 22 state lambs. " • Ib. $7 25.
W. K. Hum- 13 Per.asylvania lambs. S« Ib.
$7 50.
HOfiS — Receipts. 2" 1 - ears, or 3.237 read.
Including 213 for sale." Market SgtOr [o-w*
for heavy hogs: Ilghtw«'s*!t [email protected] "-■
Prime heavy t/> Msrht stat^ and Pennsylvania.
boss *>■< i at 18 75JJ5»23 per 100 Jb.
— Tobin & Shannon: IJ> state ho«* ISO
Ib average. 99 29 per 100 !b; IS. 217 Ib. 89 73;
1 roush. 380 Ib. $7 50.
5. Sanders: «4 P-ncsy'.var.ia hn«r*. 149 IX
$9 25; 27 stat«. 205 Ib. $? 75 2 roa;jna. 32f> Ib.
$7 sf»: 1 star. 310 ib. $3.-
S. J-;<M & Co. : 54 state ho?». "¥1 ' v $? 90.
17. 217 Ib. $S 75; 1 roueb. 330 Ib. $7 75.
OTHER CATTLE MARKETS.
Chicago. Any. 3. — CATTLE: Receipt*. I?*.
000; strong. beeves. $4 50-513 20; Texas
steers, $.: M 55 60; Western. $4^s* «5; rtock
er» and feeders. $4t?srt2s; ca-*s aa<l h«ifers.
»2«o#V>3s. calves. .s•< jO-JSs &\ HOG? — ■
Recsipta. IS.00O: strong ear jr slow iater:
light. 38 35938 85: talx««l. $7?3'^5575: t»avy.
$7 60'? $% 35; roTi;h. $7^oes7SO: fso<i f-»
choice, heavy, [email protected]; pi^s. $5 253*^95:
bulk of sales, ft-^3^3 " n - ?HBE? — Eeceipf?.
24.000; steady to 10c !il«rher: native, %Z (jtig>
$4 <?0; Western, $_".-• /earUnsa. Si [email protected]
#5 75: lambs, native. $4 30'?$7 10: West-ra.
$4 50® $7 10.
East Bali An?. 3 — CATTT^E — Receipts.
400" -I-!" V^ALS — Receipts^ 4i'»; active: 25a
higher: $6 50-3 53: heavy ca,:ve» slo-wr. SOGS — ■
Receipts 2.00**: active: p'.?s steatfT! other*.
"31?35c higher: hea%-y. $^ 55352. ~r\Ui&. 5- 9f
*%.» Torkers. $3 10559 25: roTij^s. $7 2.".©
$7 50: stars. $«©8« 75: dairies. $MS?»K
e-HJEEP AN: LAilBS — Raceipta. SO«j; staady;
lambs and handy weight sheep a'-t'.v*; heavr
Claciaaati. ah* 3.—CATTT.E—B-r-ipts.3 .— CATTT.E— B-r-ipts.
665; steady: fair tn a-"o<1 sMpp-rs. »«-3S*..>;
coznzaoa. $3T3©«S« HOGS — R-r-»spu>.
1644- strong, butchers and shippers. SSff>O
18 75; common, i* 3^47 25. ?HESP-Re
ceipts. 2.490; steady. $1 751?54; lambs active.

Kaasa* City. Aa;. :.— tattle — Rec«ipt<».
7.000. including I.2ft<> Southerns; stror.i;
calves. 12»[email protected]<- higher; dressed beef a-.d w
port steers'. *-J3s'gs«: fair to good. U^W
StiSS: U'esterrr. $4i?S7: stokers and feeders.
$3<3s«: Southern. 33 5»«»-] Southern cow.
S- chi native, ?2 25«54 25: heifers. £• •• < l'f
$6 7.1: bulls. $3®*4 50: raUe» 94fi$.o>>.
HOG 3 Receipts, ».0'i0: [email protected]"«" hi=rher. bul»c
of sale! $hV$« 40: heavy, J.S4JS 20: pack?r<»
arAutcherl $S 10fi$* 40: V.^'-. *»)»»»»«=;
SHEEP— Receipts. 2/>00; steady: UtsZis. **&
$6 75: y«ar:is=s. -. -JsffSs: aether? .S3 ...®
$4 50: e^ves, 93 25 ft $4; stockera an.t feeders.
$2 COS S4.
[By Telegraph to The Tribune. 7
Loti'svUle. Aus. 3— 3HSEP AND T.AiT3?--
Receipts. 2.575: for thre« days this *•*!*.
10 946 against 24. t» for the same days last
week. 13.100 last year, and 11.773 two year*
arc. Market steady: 6^c for top larsbs, ..^^
for seconds, and 3^4c for sails Fat »h--p
a shade higher at 3»i'340 do^n for t ha best ,
common sheep dull. Fair demand for fancy
stcck: slain and common *»» alow.
CHICAGO GRAIN AND PROVISIONS.
Chicago Ail?. I "Bans to realise "^6ta» em
prevails snort selling of wheat re-suited in a.
net advance of T»c to l l ic Thcr-s -was a.so
rood liiijlaa as th«« part of spreaders hers asu
in the Northwestern markets. Th* lalest quo
tations showed corn '-» - hijh«r to -%c !o»e a= .
oats Utcbass to He up. Prmrtsiasa fln'sne.i
at last Eights level as DJII above. Ran?* o*
prlC#s: Te,tar-
UTieat: Open. H:^- lent. Clos*. day.
September . .$1 01 51 02H $T 01 ft »l\ $1 «£.
Dereaiber . ..1 «9* 104*. 1 V3'i I O4t, 103',
May ' ■ * '-* '■ OSVj 107^ 108,4 1 07 I*.1 *.
sep^mber... ■ ■ am mm mi «2*-i
SSs£s X S5 5?- |i; S*
Sep^mber im%, S^ l^ 3«H 3*% 36%
December 37"* 3* l t S7^i 4F4 37 r »
Miv 40H 4^)^ 4O=S ■■■ 40^
Lard:
September... 11 03 1172 11 «T !1 70 11 flO
OctoN-r ....1157 11 «O 1157 1157 1143
September... 11 «> II «3 11 !55 11 *> H»>
October . 1113 1115 1107 1110 llt>o
Poxk-
September...2l7s 21 ?•> 2137 2157 2157
October ... — — — 2O »o 2t> 65
FOREIGN MARKETS.
Liverpool. laa — '.vhkaT- dalli
No 2 red Western Tinter, no stocl:; furur«9
steady: September, nominal: October, 7s 4^sd:
December. Is s^id. CORN — Spot Bra: o!d
American mixed. 5a f>V;d; do via Galveston.
no stock; new Kin dried, no stock; f^tar»a
quiet: September. is sHrf: October. *• 8-4 d.
PEA 3 Canadian. 7a. HOPS in London (Pa
cific Coast). £2 Si* 10SL FLOUR — Winter
patant3 30s 3d BEEF — Extra India mes*.
Vila •*(« PORK — Prime mesa "Western. 107s
fid' HAMS — £hort cut. 73». BACON — Cnm
berlasrti cut. 71s 3d: short nb. "fts; cl»ar be:
liea\ 71«: loni? clear middles, light, .-s;
hea^•T. ""* 9d: short, clear backs. 655. SHOUL
DER?—Square. 89a LARD — Prirr.e 'Western.
tUrcea. "•* M; Araencan raflned. palls, 5-»s
M CHEESE — Canadian finest white and
colored. usrw. 34» Hd; white, old. 60s: cotevO.
3Cs TtrRPE?^TrN*E — Fprr!t!«. 4>?. nO^lN^—
Common. -j, 3d. PETROLET'M Refined. 7L
LINSEED OIL. Its. TALLOW — Australian -n
London. 315«. COTTONSEED OlL— Hull F»-
Bawd. opot. 30s "'. '
London. ana t— SCOAR— Bm*. cer.tr.ruxnT.
11s 6d" muscovado. .■.••* be&t. au?us^
'15 10 ~.* LTXSEED — Calcutta. Aoyrjur-S-T
rember." 80s Sd. LINSEED OIL. r,-a 9.?.
SPERII OIL. £32. PCTROr.ETM—^merlca.i
reSnetl. 6d: spirits. 7d. TUttrE^TTNE—Spir
its. «Ra 9*. ROSIN* — Amsrtess strained. 14*
Od: fine. 1"« 3d.
i ,ii m a sit 3.— PKTTTOLSI'M'. 19 franca
30 centimes.
BALTIMORE STOCKS.
(Furnished by Van Bass al & Co.. No. 7 Trail
street.)
Bid. Asked. } "Bid. A3kei
Unit*! Ry.. 14H 15 ICctfon T>uc*. 4 «
do incomes 5S^» X^ T «| <J«ln«m««. W 22
,-•.> •».,... M 9-*** INRy&L 3* »• 99%
GB <* 3V T I 2 !Li at P->w pf M >6
do incomes 9 1" t do 4^». . . •*!> fti
do 15t5...40 *- C '"- Ry S».10O I>V»
Seaboard Co I^^ 2» •' O° ns K1 3s ** i.i
tin Ist pref 72 7.U Confl Trt;st.l-"> Z!3
•1o 2d pref ♦<) 4- i Cnion Trust. - ■ --»
sa,b vL4« 82 S3 i Third Nat E. ll<» l.in
*" d.-)l"i»-yr3s OTS 9»%|FI<W A Dex>.l4« It»
CoasalGaa.. — VXi : Maryland rr. TO 78
fc> sa 100 l'X>!»INo O-nt Ry.121 315
When You Go
to the Country—
Arrange to receive
The Tribune
If the rural news agent
will not supply you,
send your name and
address direct to The
Tribune office.
We can send by mail
in time for breakfast.
New -York Tribune
Circulation Department,
154 Nassau St., New York.
Daily only, one month, . . 50c
Daily and Sunday 70c
13

xml | txt