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New-York tribune. [volume] (New York [N.Y.]) 1866-1924, August 17, 1910, Image 5

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Baseball
KB. ALL THE WAY
Two-Year-old Fiiiy Wins the
Spinaway Stakes.
ggNS AN IMPRESSIVE RACE
ai - ■
gjperts Consider the Horse One
" of the Best Youngsters of
»^ the Season.
£?■■ - : ? "- v
*: B; Tel««rraph to The TMbmsm I
g :.if» Pnrinjr?. X V.. A up. 1€. — Bashtl
v^ hr r .... _ ... the Spinaway Stakes here
»o-dsy ROt alone captured the title of the
C«*t cf the fiHles but. in the opinion of ex
, -. jtarr.ped herself the bob* of tile sea
•-. -•-:r-~"..:<= colts included. She
y*X fcfi" Scld a couple «* lengths as soon as
♦»■• barncr was sprung:, and for the re
saino^ 5 " cf the journey the only question of
im race was which of the others would be
f * —
i- was in receipt of five pounds from
Eoand the Wor!d, but tJie beating she gave
Ihis £ Hy -was so pronounced that there ran
•' r oxr be no further Question as to suprem
fifff between them. Housemaid she met at
"eVes Treig"iits. and to the others made con
- csssioa of four, seven and ten pounds. If
It ha 3 b*en a handicap she would certainly
v.»vc had tc make even jrrcater concessions.
£~» the result would have been the same,
.... lot that she ~"T to-day could not
rtzT.y make her run to her best notch at
jar stasre-
jErr.e? Ti. Keene must have been very
tniious to win the race, for he sent to the
the post three - BBaMHa] Spin and Love
yety ct TTith thf trio he manaped to capture
-jyrHjr.fi a"d third money, but at no stage at
■^ jOTi— ey <~"-Jld the friends it the stable
*sve eera visions of victor^-. It was simply
.* ca-sP of Eashti ail the -way. and never fu]ly
«tmded
This ffily if included in the lot thai ere
ir t?e sold by the - --> .-.-•' Stable on Bat
. av> j jr tniT it will b" a surprise if she
cis^e^ Quartets, For soc "•• the men In
terested in tts partnership tain pride in a
zr^ o^ bcrse, arsd have the means to keep one,
* »m<2 this is beyond all question the best that
they iave ever o^ried.
"H 1 * sar.*?r^ Stable asrain scored a double
r.«fidcr. Herktaer winning the opening race
- and ------ E first •• ■ field of Dine
ii^BßX r«"o-year-oJd?. non-wlnn*r? since May
"--_---< winning was a surprise to
trrs< . thas fitrzrr- chances, for^ in place c>f
■^j i: _ cr » of the choices, he wa<= rated
«?:ncs£ ih* ootsiders. Just why no leeriti-
T^at* r^ascr. could *v» ri\en. He ran the
Fi\ - -. . in 1 :'i- 1-5. which is the beat
. -- has i 1**""!i 1 **""! bang out rlnar the meetinK.
HeSaet. which w«lb whispered about as a
T^aJ food t!i:ris. vas k^pt very busy to land
ts" short end of the purse.
Woodcraft earned first money in the BBC
cA race fifr c r Th" ' - .----•*■ of Black
1 Mar». ard the <iecisiori w-a? one that no one
• could even ijuestkni. At the turn for BBC
1 Black Mst« was in front, and looked to be.
fl-- — l b-jT at Th c furloss pole Shill-nsr
! ■•rir < »d teue mith "^\'<v>drraft. Opposite The
' irntTT end of the grandstand Black Mate
v«a^ to bear out. carrying Woodcraft with
ria, and when they cam** to the finish with
tJv? latter !n front- •^ wer° but a Jew
It*t from The outer rail. Shilling, after
rssfcing bis weight, hurried into the Ftew
t-ris' stand tc lodee hi? complaint, but was
jatenptJy dismissed, for tl>e •--...■•
■Khom -aas Thomas ClydeJ h*>d :-•- r. what
ted har'peri'^'j. and. ■••■"■■ ijuefctiou
r G:a?s. the rider of the offending horse.
fls^najlfied him jmd pa.v« firrt _ money to
• Vgcdcraft. This" r;inv«»d Th» Squire into
'econd pla^e and gave t^rri money to Do
■ aste.
The "v\"estch=ster Racini: Association to
«iy ajinounc<>d that the Matron Stakes, for
T*p-year-oIdE. o»i° of tho fixtures of i:s
fall meeting, 'wli! t^is yeax -. run .- r:m
2Sco during the meetinc of the Maryland
Jockey Club. The race Is run a3 a double
went, on* part being for fillies and the
other for colts.
The summaries follow :
FARATCX^A SUMMARIES.
■^-»aTh«T ckfody: track fast
. r?3ST RAOS — Har!dic-5.p; for ail ar«; ISO*
_ accfi. Six furlonp^. t^tar' good. "Won.
•SF-!" pls'-e driving. Time. 1:12 1-". in
•n*r. b. c by Chuctanunda — Asriesrille.
Owiier, .T. SanfcVd.
, — Bet —
I I B Wt. \ Str. Fin. Jockey, tiasr
■ ;-.., - ... 102 -' 1' I s Koerner-. •
'.' B*r^2 no l 1l 1 2' - z Shilling — 3
. H«ii~* "."."■".'. Ill* -" •"•' " J Nott-r - ;
OwstiesE 10"- : 515 1 ... - 2(»
EffJ-Jotason lrjn i~- 4' 5- Powers.... 5
Hartrirs-., .. 122 6« 616 1 *<' Herbert... ■
acrtsm 102 V 7 ~~ ■"aisu 3O
•-«. rl— 102 i , *•' Gani - 10
Toadti Me S» '■_ 11 11 "* K*r*v M
I-^r^- lop 10 10 M>= Gf>l4st« 1 4n_ 12
Bbj L«ya; . i>"' S k » " Thomas.:. 4O
EBCOKD RACE — Soiling: for thr*- 1 - rear-olds
s.t: sr-n»""d: ?- r rf«> a'id'?^. On» mile. >tart
gr^ Won ririvjns. via'-* ram*. Tin • I : 4< >-
Whnw, b. br Octa«oa — Wood Nj-mpn.
OsrTfr, ~. C. HOdreth,
BH
Utrt* TVt % 6tr. Fin. Jockey, ting.
;*E^ckl?s^» 1«3 ?r 1' 1* «;!ass S
! -!'>s *i 4 : 212 1 Shiilinr .11 ••
{"UsEoniT* 103 1* 3» 3' raia •■
I Ccras-.» 11<» I . r >' l : Archibald. <•
t - ... ...» 2' "•- Knapp "
llDjeYO- iui 4» »; «' »t?p 1°
;I>sha-j'.'.l . vn 7 T 7 McCahpy.. "<>
THIRD KA'-E— THE «PINA"«'AT. of $■"'.'■">: f " r
Sr.!»«i t»t> y»an» old. Ftv« nd a half fur
kn«s. .-tan e-yyi. Won *asi!y: place driv
fag. Time, 1 :<*» 4-5. Wtaaer. br. t.. Adam
— r>!sadvanVa<re. Owner. --•• . casts* stably.
H**t—
Esv wt M Str. Fin. Jockey, tins
j^HttJ K= I* I s I" ShiMinK .. «-!«
"le« Not.. . vr.> 4' 2> 2" STotter ..- *;-»
•?»»;»wjv. iT2 5H =t> JS'Wihh il-«
|*S««aaE«lL. •..-," 7 ** K^CKh X*
j 'ffis j<o r,i> r. 1 T. 1 Glai«« U 5
s *'3!:rjLn<Ta 11H "■*• >• fi " IT— mi '•"•
ZOWs 109 '.< -■ Powers... *"
Dosa ■ 3*
iWte.V.: 113 11 11 9 Goldstein «>
}'<:• 12 12 K> Thon:a«... '""
■S=-i.-Ji«"Sr-,4 ;27 7* «:' 11 Herbert... M
I»JS 6* 10 12 ArchibaicS W
*
POVRTIJ R.4'"E— Jlandicap: for all ases: MM
*Cdt"i. One rriile ar,-3 .•■■--■■ r°°r.
Woo cnv.r.g ... kiw. Tim«. 1 :•••"--3
a"tew?r. b. •_.. by B«n Strorr.e — Passion FJow
»r. C">ner, Osceola -•able
Kotsp Wt. '* Str. Fin. Jockey, tinsc.
ts-aa Ch;»f ICS • 1 ■ 1 1° Buz** ls
123 , • 4' 2' ShiHing ... 4
: *Bcb R " :O2 11 -V -■'." Vi - a'!=h «»-2
il»liUhtttT >-7 3' 2'- 4« Eftop IS
« :8o!ffl.» K--so 111 T>» •-' »» P0w0n..... 52
; *UF»r*T:-ior. .. I<n. 7' 1« '- b Thoma?.... 12
V-Jmv... :>- V 7 7' McCah-y.. IT.
'Kiijrsfcip' i<»6 919 1 :: ; >•' Scwrtll*.-; 15
i Stshor.'. 145 f.' >• ?» : Brady 60
j SS<si^i "i(ifi 2'- <» h '<•' Hoyle s f*f *
j r «r...! 11" I'l*- s>» ii 11 Paris 4
. riFTH BACE— oellinx; for nro-y«ar-0.U5 which
bsr* not won elr-c*- Ma" 1: $-**> a<id-d. Five
*-=-J s \.a.f furlongs. Start po"JJ^ 'V\ r on drlv
h«; r^c*" Tirr«. 1 :07. " br.
>■ Rockton— AOriutha. Owner. John
Kealora.
Bel
Kotse. 'U't. -i Str. Kin. J<Kkey. tlnr
yagltr- * ( ;v ii i> i' Kcwrntr... 8
3 I-*»ca...i in 2'- 2* 2' Krapp..™.:. *
ij* Rascal.. 1«* S 1 3 1 .".' Dark .... •
J*r Par j<»; j«> r.- *' ArchibaKJ. 15
***aia lOT. i: 1 4 r." Martin.... SB
L>4era. .'. irr. 41 r. : r.s Mc«>h«»y.. 40
i~*wnee 1<««* t 7' 7 Fhillini?... *
S r <! fe* r... no T) V * Powers . *
! J-*nphiy Lad — X » S I^san 12
• vs n 10 i«» G!a*s • •"?'>
.-.-aj,» vv ., 1^ j;, 7] j-, Brunn*>r... fin
i *zs Rj-ar, _ -j^rt j2 12 'Warren... 10
' T> r| * ln ? F** : ■ I*** 12 IS 13 Htrtf rt. .. •: 15
, ;•'«; ta*r:<-.. UiS 14 H 14 Thomas.... IS
j '■•JtSrur.ning. I* 1; IS 1"» Butwell.... 1^
.?"<>«! 51* i« '1« irt «:rancl . '*'
t <srt Carre; !..!<*; 17 17 17 ami : "
[**W4 Narta. 10* X« l« I)' Wal*h M
• 306 • — — Htovillr.... H
• r V^ ft « Poit.
CeQins: to* 1 m»]<lrn>> thr^ yf*rs
• ■ ft M am 3 upward- *4<«» .Tidf-d. One milt.
*tan r«--0.1. T\"on"caFilv- pla"'- samf. Tim*>.
yV>. Wir^»r. h. f..' by Plau.lit— ilareio.
0,-s-r. IV . P. Burch.
-pr, „; Str Fln jockey, tine.
£?*■ «»< T 1* 1> Ti<-iTias... 1*
. r **-«lar:. .... n3 7/ 21 ■_• «;i b »f ="
u^""* "Ha; -. m 4' .... -jo
u urrr) it* •»» 41 »» MrCah*=y.. 1
*.k raber --- 10 2 1«> s ."■' •• 4, » a*
v.,-*-";'^ « !»» s; «i t.-rai «•
V '" 1! * >W 12 «: 7< Hoffman.. 20
i vL'*' 1 : ••• S« 13 9 >•' B<?nsrhot'n D
•j^Vahr,.. . 9 , r .< 7 fl n*t*.r... "*■
• t'h'r*****-. l'K J* It 1O Archibaid. 12
' f-,>^?""" lnr> "' :': ' 11 Herbert... «5O
• rv^T^ • ... " '2 Nieolal.... 15
JV^L?*- »02 I 1 '1 « Kinr - . ■4*
... '-- - ',- i M rt^ri- •■
'■- 1 , ..
-**~-'r. ■■■ IK. 5* 15 10 Davi!.... IS 5
Lawn Tennis
Gale ¥re*Oenl* Uria.l Ha.cc*
White Caps on Huntington Bay Too Much for
Fast Motor Boats.
I Half a gale from the eastward destroyed
all chances of a race yesterday for the
motor boats that are to compete for the
honor of defending the British interna
tional cup. The waters of Huntinston
i Bay were whipped into whitecaps by the
, breeze, and the committee, after waiting
|in vain all afternoon for the boats to
show up. postponed the race until to-day,
! when It is expected that F. K. Burnham's
; Dixie TI will be among the starters. Her
owner reported to Charles P. Tower.chair
man of the race committee, on board the
tup C. P. Raymond yesterday, and said
that he would have his boat there to-day.
The- Question. the Skimmer and the
Hurry are also expected to start
The committee has decided that the spe
cial cup offered by Dr. Smart, ■ British
yachtsman, will be given to the American
boat that makes the fastest time in next
Saturday's race off L.archmon*. Amonjr
the visitors who were entertained yester
day by the Motor Boat Club of America
at its headquarters, the Chateau dee
Beaux Arts, was Lieutenant .T. Brester. a
naval architect of Rotterdam. Holland,
■who has come to witness the trials and
the cup race on Saturday.
The boats that will represent Great
Britain arrived at Larchmont yesterday.
They are the Pioneer, the hydroplane
owned by the Duke of Westminster: the
Zisarella, Daniel Hanbury's boat, and the
Maple Leaf, owned by H. Mackay Edgar.
Lieutenant X. M. Robins, who will steer
th*> Zigarella. and T. \V. Astell. the cap
tain of the Maple Leaf, were guests at
the Larchmont Yacht dub last night.
They will both visit Huntinßion to-day, it
ts paid.
Th«»re is considerable discussion and not
a little adverse criticism regarding: certain
conditions under the deed of gift which
provide that under the rules of the Marine
Association of the United Kingdom "every
vessel is to b» fitted with an efficient ex
LARNED TO LEAD TEAM
May Head American Challengers
for Davis Cup.
[F.;. Telpjrrarh •- The Tniian». ]
Newport. R. 1.. Aver. -wuHain A.
Lamed. the national champion, Is likely to
lead the American challenpinsr team for
the Dwight V. Davis international cup
against the British Isles and the Aus
tralian holders of the trophy. The news
that T^ani«»d would probably (jo as one of
the players to Australia cam* 1 a? a surprise
to-day '" the lawn tennis players as
sembled here for the national championship
tournament. The five times holder of the
highest honors on the courts of this coun
try, acoonltnir to Dr. James DwigUt, presi
dent of the United States National Lawn
Tennis Association and chairman of the
International committee, Is ready to make
the sacrifice of his time if a suitable team
can be mad° up.
rj>r. Dwisht is pleased with th»» pro<p«»ct.
especially as the youns Callfornlan,
Maurire K. McLouehlin. who was one of
the team ■ year a«o with Melville H. Lang
and B"hL<? C. Wrajht. are said to be willing
to again make the long Journey to the
antipodes. Those who have recently
watch~l Larned's coaching of the youns
nnd brilliant McLouzhlin. are not surprised
at the decision of the champion to make
the trip. He is easily the best man in this
country. to-day, and there is great hope at
this time that -with him on the team the
trophy may be returned to this country.
Th«" only hitch in th~ proceedings seems
to be that Lamed and Wright are hardly
on friendly terms. It is said' that Wright
is of the opinion that Lamed coached Mc-
I^ouzblins how to defeat him at Lonsrwood.
But it is certain that Lamed has taken
McLnusrhlin under his wing as a protege.
Be was remarkably successful with him
in th<« doubles? at Southampton. Long Isl
and la«t week, where the two defeated the
Pacific Coast pair. Thomas C. Bundy and
Trowbridce Hendrick. hi a sensational five
et match. lamed is in the best form he
ha« ... n in some years, and no stronzer
baasa than the three players named could
be !=<=nt by this country-
| JERSEY CITY. 7; MONTREAL. 3.
With Kissinger twirling in his oldthne
' form, Jersey City managed to take a. srame
! from' the Montreal players yesterday by a
i score of 7 to S. Th« Skeet^rs found Wiggs.
the visitors' pitcher, easy In the fourth and
pi!*d up five ... The score follows-.
c _ v riTT ! MONTREAL.
.. is;
ihet»iiVih 4rt rt 7 ♦♦••INattross. 2b i O 1 0.1"
: :
Towls •_--.- 10 8! Totals C» 7 2471
~ •Rat— 1 for WJ«t in ninth inning
,«. Rt f , 2 .'. .i o ■■ <i x— 7
'v r Tr«U '.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.o « '. 0 0 n <• I 2—3
*~ C ! n ' r ., «,,-.. rvinin^r r-nckill. Stolen bases
" ■ ' vr f
has- on_ v., \v en - pirst base on alls— OH
rager. . : by ,-- .. r | ijetx oa imam Jer
-4/ sfoaSST' ,i; Spire- • tan
arid Kelly. _
ROCHESTER. 6; BALTIMORE. 4. ,
n. i; E.
At Baltimore— |•l •• 2 *^ .j O •
r.och^ter i o i rt 1 0 1 0 0-4 12 1
%££££££££* Blair: AdWn.. vicker.
.^";» rr nn < !^s»p'irc— Boyle and Byron.
TORONTO, 5: PROVIDENCE, 2.
K. H. E.
At Providence „ „,.:: ii. ■. 7 "
Toronto - '' '.'. o - „ 0 i_-j a i
________
CUBS BUY A STAR TWIRLER .
, x as* .:. Ky., A.ag 16.-Fred Toney. . a
pitcher of the Bluegraas League, was sold
££> by the Winchester club to the u>
caß National League club for what is of
fi.iallv declared the highest price ever paid
lor v Class D player. The amount how
ever was not announced. Ton* achieve
ment include a wventeeri-inning no-Mt
gam", in which he struck out nineteen bats
rr.tn. His home is in Nashville. Term.
Cl-veland. Aug. l«.-Th« Cleveland base
ball club to-day purchased Pat Donahue, a
catcher from the Philadelphia American
League club, and Pitcher "HI" West from
Toledo. Donahue was with the Boston
Americans for several seasons. He was sold
to Philadelphia early this year. He will
join Cleveland to-morrow. He suffered
from rhe_Bß-»«*am in the spring, and his
purchase is on condition that he - in shape
to play. West ana tried by Cleveland in
the fall of mi and bb mi in ON. then sent
to Toledo. He will report at the close of
j the American Association • ion.
Detroit. Aup. 16.— Th*> Detroit A,merican
L«acuc baseball club ha.s purchased W>s
terzil, a third baseman, from Wichita, Kan.
T, New York National I^a^ue club has
aorexißasi Johnson, an outfielder, of '"*
Waco club of the Texas Leai ■■ and Mun-
S HI, a pitcher, of th- Dallas club of th*
same l^ag-U".
Both player? will join the Qiasts at the
. •„,.«. of the Texas League auasuu The
| o>a! « • p riut through by joe p«jch«rnbach,
<-'. ihC Da!!^ clu!>
NEW-YORK DAILY TPTFTXT:. WEDKESDAT. AUGUST- TT. lWft
Racing
haust silencer " This ruie. H appears, is a
hardship on such hUrh speed boats as the
Dixi«= 11. whirh has l>een doing: h«T best
racing without a silencer. The moffier
now being fitted to her. it is said, will not
only impair hor speed, but it may also
cause a repetition of the accident which
took piaco two years aero, when both her
captain and engineer were overcome by the
fum^s of the gaauleac forced in'o their
faces ma ttoe last leg of the race. Many
declare that this rale should h<» amended
so thai a muffle- should not he compul
sory.
Pursuant to the- deed of gift, the start on
Saturday will be a (tying one. all com
petitors starting toother by sisrnal five
minutes after the preparatory signal. The
measurement?. th» starting and Judging of
the race are to be carried out under the
direction of the International commission.
There is no restriction on the number, size
or horsepower of the engines or motors, ex
cept that each boat taking part in any
race shall be fitted with such mechanical
power as will drive her astern at not less
than four knots in smooth water.
In the event of any temporary accident
to or derangement of any on* of the com
peting vessels during the race, no assist
ance shall be rendered to the boat other
than by the hands carried by that boat. If
outside assistance is necessary, the dis
tinguishing flap must be hauled down and
the vessel must take no further part in
the races. Outside assistance may not be
given or rendered or procured until the
distinguishing; flap has been hauled down.
In case of an accident to one of the com
petitors, the others shall continue and
finish the course. Bach boat competing for
the cup must carry two life buoys in a po
sition ready for use. and it is recommended
that each member taking part in a race for
the cup shall wear a life jacket or make
use of any other device or apparatus for
lifesaving in case of immersion.-
BIG OPENING AI GOSHEN
Crowds Gather for Trotting Meet
on Historic Track.
The annual four days' racing meeting at
"th» old hiPTnrio track" at Goshen. N. V..
opened yesterday . and n record-breaslng
crowd was in attendance Half an hour
- r the sale at tickets began there was not
a seat vacant in the big grandstand, and
the boxes and parking spaces proved inad
equate tn the occasion. People came in
BtrtomobUee In runabouts and in farm
wagons, some of which held a score or
more of merrymakers, as the opening
day of the meeting was "ladies day. '
and it was evident that they apv>re
ciated the compliment vrtiich Secretary
Weston had paid them by appearing 'in
tho scene in full for.-
Raring that has seldom boon equalled
was witnessed by the spectators, who greet
ed the victors with cheers as they drove
back to th< judge's stand after each hard
fought battle in the homestretch. Louis
W. Winan'a beautiful chestnut mare Dora
was th«» centre of attraction in the p:2otrot.
where she met Myrtle Granette. from the
Glenm^re Stables-, with Billy Andrews m
the sulky, and C. S. Hendrickson's bay
mare Helen Redmond, both formidable ad
versaries.
Myrtle Granette won the first two heats.
and it looked as though Mr. Andrews would
receive the driver's prize of K0 by running
in f^raisrht h^atp, but in the third heat
Che mare made a hrenk in a neck-and-nerk
tussle with Dora, and she was thrown back
in third place, tn the fourth heat Mr. \n
drewe camr- out determined to do or die.
and the niare «\ idently thought she had
conceded quite enough to t)i<* "visiting:
lady" when she gave her the third heat
Myrtle gained slow!-- frotn the word
"Go," and gradually passed all but Dora
In the first lap. When they rounded the
turn into the homestretch Myrtle took the
pole and Ted by a length at the finish. When
Mr k.ndre* s drove back to the Judges'
stand John A. Townsend appeared, carry
big a hup<» horse.sh"" of roses, with a
pennant on which was printed "Welcome
home," which he presented to the famous
r<=insman.
A deplorable accident, which resulted
in the death of the beautiful mare Sliver
Bell, owned by Howard S. Kerne:-, occurred
in this race and finished the day for Mr.
Kerner, as he was overcome with grief at
the tragic end of his favorite. In the first
heat of the race Mr. Kerner inadvertently
drove Silver B-?ll into the sulky which
T>ora was drawing as the two made the
first turn. Before the mare could extricate
herself she was thrown, breaking her hip.
A veterinary made a hasty examination
and was forced to shoot the young mare,
which had been bred and raised on the
farm of Mr. Kerner.
I'.smu the Brst beat of the 2:M
pacing event tn Mary Ann. The Cannon, a
hay preidinc owned bj A X Asmus, car
ried everything before him. James Kee
gan'a Alwanda made a jrood showing in
the fourth heat and came down the home
stretch neck and neck with the winner.
Joseph Qtbbon's Claro is still under the.
weather. Buffering from a bruise to his
hind foot, which male Mm give a bad
performance last week at Monroe. He did
not do much better yesterday, but man
aged bo keep inside the flag.
Tii" Preacher was quite upset by al! the
excitement and finished in seventh place.
but be won the next three heats and de
feated Little Sweetheart, which claimed
the first beat.
All Of the races were tor SLOW purses, or
which 50 per cent went to the winner.
The summaries foilow .
TROTTING— CLASS— THREE IN FIVE) —
PURSE, "7. 000.
The Preacher, b. p.. by Liberty
Chimes; Brookdale Farm (Goode) .7 111
Little Sweetheart, b. m. by Moko;
A B. Coxe (BerrUll 1 2 3 3
VaJette. eh h.. by Mobel; U. H.
Waahburne. (Corwia) * 3 2 2
Barer Dell. b. jr.. by Delmarch
(William Deverson) 2 4 5 4
lliirmaciuke. br. 2. by Allerton •<.'.
f?. Hendrickson) • 5 4 ro
Air'ron, br m.. b' r Mobi I EEmplre
Farm (Burcht 3 6 C
Crei^hton. b. k.. by Tin* Uondsman
(C W. Laselle) 3 dis.
Biatan. or. p.. by Dlngara (Howard S.
K'-rr.eri dis.
Disturbance, b. g., by Silent Brook
i.j. V Qanlyj ' lis -
Time, 2:15? i. 2:15. 2:14 .i. 2:10.
PACING— CLASS— IN FIVE—
purse, $1,000.
The. Cannon, b. fr.. by Red Merribella;
A. E. Asouia (Rhodes) 2 111
Man' Ann. b m by Sidney Prince;
W. iii -i lonn<1 onn< 11 1 Foil 1 - 5 3
jJMI Us. >■ g-.. by Alvan.irr; .1.
k •!*!! 4ft32
JV: Vara Boy. blk. ff-. by M'rrivale;
E. D Hoi!enb»:ck 8 4 2 4
Dan Wood. eh p.. by Nuthurjt ; W.
Rhoties (Lawrence) . . 7 6 4
Kannelta, b. m.. by Austral; E. F.
Hall (Corbin; - • ....57*
Clara, eh. X.. by Mendocina; Joseph
Glbbona ' .887
Kinp Cole, b. h.. by Bingen; J. L.
Dod«* S3 dis
Time— 2:11 '«. 2:10%, 2:11 I*,1 *, 2:1314.
TROTTING— 2 :2'» CLASS THREE IN FIVS—
PURSE, $l.<«.«t.
Myrtle Grar.ette.' br. m.. by (raw ••
Glenmere .-•••- (Andrews) 113 1
Dora. eh. ro.'. by E. L. Robinson;
I/wis S. Winans (Pcnnock) ft 2 1 2
Helen Redmond, b. m.. by Tommy
' Button C. S. Hendrickaon 2 3 2 1
Mi«» WUkie blk. m.. by Wilkl«
Burns; W. L. Fthr.ies 4 7 4 «
Koyo. 'b. h.. by Kyrilllc; l: 1! Mac- _
k'enxi*' . 1 ft In
f=i«ter-*in-l-aw. blk. in., by Helr-at-
Law: y K. PreP'.ott <(;onlin) •» 4 ft m
Fbli*fht. m g., by E3blii«. jr.; Uhite
Marsh Stock Farm <l >H.i^htM ■ . 3 d <Ua
Oakland Belle, blk. ni., by Oakland
B«ron T. Trmn«r< * ifnastii ...... "• ftU
kin . Bell. h B. by Oon Ball «Hur
fliCkJ ■'■ <• Ar
Tune, tMT'4, :.1G ! 4. U.I7U.
Automobiling
MAKE RAPID PROGRESS
Sixty-four Players Survive in
Big Lawn Tennis Tourney.
PELL DEFEATS JOHNSON
Beals Wright Forced to Extend
Himself to Beat George
M Church.
[By Tple^raph to The Tribune.]
Newport. R. 1.. Aug. 15- — All records for
rapidity of play were surpassed to-day in
the thirtieth all comers" national lawn
tennis championship tournament. A total
of sixty-five results were chalked on the
board, and the original field of IS! com
petitors, a record number, was reduced to
practically the sixty-four survivors to
night All of the third round brackets
were Oiled or split matches in five in
stances made the outcome certain early in
the morning:.
The championship match in tb» doubles.
with the Pacific Coast pair as challengers,
was postponed because of the continued
stormy weather. This loft :\ clear field
for the singles, and the card was filled
with fine contests despite the fact that
the courts were sodden and slow. The
chief match, thtet in which Theodore
Roosevelt Pell, the Xew England cham
pion, defeated Wallace F. Johnson, the
Pennsylvania champion, in straight sets.
7—5.7 — 5. §—6, •> — 4. savored of an uaeel as
.Johnson ranked third on the national list
last year. Then Beals C. Wright, the ex
champion, caught a tartar in young
George M. Church, the Princeton inter-
SCDOl— Stic winner, who rook a set from
"Wright before the latter won, at 7—5.7 — 5.
i—c(i — e ( g_i. % — i. t
Nathaniel W. Wiles, the Harvard player,
was In rare form, and defeated Morris S.
Clark, who was the victim of a yacht
ins accident while on his way here, by a
score of 6—2, 6—3. *? — S. Frederick P.
Fox, who was with Clark on the unfortu
nate yacht, scored by the default of
Thomas Ridgeway. All of the Califor
nians maintained their places with ease.
It was a day of splendid victories for
the collegians also. In the opening round
Alfred S. Dabney. jr.. of Harvard, scored
over S. J. Wagstaff, — 2, 66 — — 1. W.
St. Washburn. the Columbia interscholas
tic winner, won two matches, in his first
defeating Goodwin Hobbs. 6—2.6 — 2. 6—3.6 — 3. 6—l,6 — I,
and then C L. Cooke. 6—3,6 — 3, 6—3.6 — 3. fi —
Dean Mathey. of Princeton: Reuben .V.
Holden. jr., of Yale, and K. Tudor Cross,
the. former New England intercollegiate
winner, and others held to form.
There was a drizzle most of the day. The
gallery, however, was larger than at the
opening, the grandstand being filled and
there being a fringe of spectators about all
of the courts. Beals C. Wright, because of
the fact that, with McLaukhlin. he is be
liever! to be the key to the championship
situation this year, held a large and Inter
ested crowd during his match with Church.
The tall. boy was a surprise to Wright. The
former hit the ball hard and gave it terrific
pace in the first set. The ex-champion tried
to outmanoeuvre him from the base line, but
to no purpose. When Church was within a
stroke of winning at — I and 4"- -30 in the
first set. however, Wright woke up and
carried off a spirited attack at the net that
gave him a victors at 7—5.
Again In the second sei Church held to
his lirhing and passing game. Occasionally
he tnad'' Journeys to the pet fur n quick
slash across court, and by steadiness he
led at 4—l on games. Wright Hi.-,iin tried to
overcome bis opponent, but Church found
the openings so often that tiie h«- . who is
but seventeen years of age, scored the set.
at 6— C. Thai was sufficient to warn Wright
of his danger and that he could take ik>
chances. He was up to close rang<
return for the balan<-e of the match.
Even so, Church kept his famous opponent
on the run chasing the ball. Hut Wright
footed fast and never shirked a return. In
the two sets, the third and fourth. Wright
afforded a glimpse of his oldthne ski!!. He
fairly flogged the ball for 'cross-court shots
and continually forced Church out of posi
tion. By this sort of play Wright was en
abled to win the sets at 6—l, 6—l, but lie
»*it> continual]] compelled to extend him
self.
Two of the veteran players also distin
■ guished themselves during the day Henry
W. Slocum scored handily, defeating H.
G. Simmons. S— 2, 7—5, 6—l The ex-cham
pion was in fine form, and. as he is well
placed in the draw, it would not be sur
prising- if he came into the semi-finals.
Malcolm G. Chace also scored in two
matches with all of his former vigorous
overhead action.
The rain continues to-night, and it is
doubtful If the championship doubles will
hold the court, to-morrow as scheduled.
The summary follows:
All comers' national championship ("singles;
first round — Alfred S. Dabney defeated S. J.
a«v,ifr. — 2. 9—3,9 — 3, 6—l;6 — I; C. i.. Coolie de
feated Edwin F. Torrey. jr.. — 1, — 1. 8 — :{;
W. M. Wash burn defeated Goodwin F-lobbs,
B—2, 6—o,6 — 0, 6—2:6 — 2: Trowbridge W. Hendrick de
feated C. I- Sherman. 6—l. B—o,8 — 0, — I; Harry
A. M'-Klnney defeat. •! W. E. Hey] jr.. — 1.
B—2. — 1; A. N. Itesisrie defeated William D.
Bourn*. 6—4.6 — 4. <> — 2, 5 — T. 6 i: James S. Cnsb
man defeated Frederick F. De Rham. by de
fault; S. L. Beals defeated William McCre&th.
by default: Walter Roberta defeated Douglass
Campbell, by default: J. D. E. Jooea defeated
H. P. Cross. c,—^C. — «. 6—2,6 — 2, »J — 1.
Second round — C. E. Cutting defeated D. F
Appleton, jr.. B—-.8 — -. B—2,8 — 2, « — 2; Frederick P.
Fox defeated Thomas Ridjjeway. by default;
\.. H. Hobbs defeated F. B. Reeves, — I, — 3,
— i; J. H. Kyle defeated John Thomas, by
default; A. 1., Sands defeated C H. King.
S — 6. 7—7 — 4 — C. r, — — 1; .T. S. BUllnss. jr.,
defeated W. S. Brown, by default: Kinij Smith
defeated Fulton Cutting, by default; Alfred
Stiliman. 3d. defeated Rowland Hazard, by
default; A. G. Thatcher defeated E. P. Gro*
v»nor, by default; F. H. Harris defeated Basil
Warner, by default: E. L. Winston defeated
J. S. Brown, jr., 6—2.6 — 2. o—2,0 — 2, X—K — 6 F. W. Paul.
jr.. defeated Ezra Gould, 4—6. 6—4.6 — 4. 6—B.6 — 8. —
— 5: Malcolm C. Chace defeated R. Richard
son. 6—or6 — o rt—l.t — 1. rt — 2; Frederick C hunan de
feated Alfred S. Dabney. jr.. •", — I. 0 — 4. o—7.0 — 7.
Alfred L. Hamrr.ett defeated F. M. Edgell. I
by default: E. H. Whitney defeated R. Brooks,
by default: Shaw McKean defeated John C. I
Tomlinson, by default: F. P. Williams defeated
M. D. Champlin. by default: Theodore Roose
velt Pell defeated Wallace F. Johnpon. 7—."..7 — .".. I
B—o,8 — 0, 6—l:6 — I: Richard H. Palmer defeated J. I.
Co!*, jr.. — 1, « — 4. — 3: C. L. Cole defeated
J. H. 'L, Todd. jr.. 2—B. 6—3.6 — 3. B—B.8 — 8. «— 1. o—3;0 — 3;
A. B. I.npalej- defeated W. Schroeder, t; — j
8 — GG — 4; Nathaniel W. Niles defeated Morrte
S. Clark, B—2,8 — 2, B—3, B—3:8 — 3: B<»a!« C. Wright
defeated George M. Church. 7—5,7 — 5, 3—3 — rt — 1.
— i; E. S. H. Pendertraat defeated E. L.
Frailer. • — -■ B—2,8 — 2, 88 — 1 . K. Tudor Gross de
feated 11. H. Knisrht. t'i — 0. *". — 0. «—1;« — 1; Dean
Mathi • defeated Russeii Perkins, rt o. 6 — X.
«t — 0; S. L. Beals defeated W. T Coke. jr..
8 — 8 — 6—2;6 — 2; Edcar F. !..••■ defeated Walter
Roberts, by default: Frederick C. Colston
defeated F. T. McAulan, 66 — — 2. 6—l: R.
TV. Wilson defeated R. Oiiawold, — 3, 6—2,6 — 2,
,-, — 3; g. T. Thomas, jr.. defeated 11. I- Will
iamson, by default; F. B. Hoffman, Jr.. de
feated T. J. Mullln. by default: C. Amory de
feated Roberts Taylor, by default: H. Nlcker
■on defeated R. W. Grant, by default; Stanley
Heiiphaw defeated George A. Lyons, jr.. by
default: William B. Crania, Jr.. defeated Harry
W. McVlrkar. 8 — tl — 0. 0—0;0 — 0; Dr. Eiwlnc E.
Taylor defeated Louis N. XoH. by default;
CraiK -Riddle defeated Dorr Xewton. by de
fault • Henry W. Sloeum defeated H. G. Sim
mons, — -. I — •". <?—I:? — I: A. D. Chaplin defeated
G. A. Thompson, by default: C. D Jones de
feated F. L. Conrad by default; Frank .T.
Sulloway defeated R. M. Hoerr. ft — 7. — 2.
c, 4- J. D. E. Jfines defeated William Tilling
hastßuU o—l.0 — 1. rt— 2. t" — 1: Reuben A. Holden.
jr.. defeated Bwtnc fitille. — 3 B—o.8 — 0. 7—.",;7 — .",;
Pauline Foßdjrk defeated F. T. Frellnehuysen.
,■ i «— p. — 3. — <5. — 2: W. M Washburn
defeated C. 1.. Cor-ke rt— -. rt— ?. rt— 4 : F. H.
Burr defpnted T. s. Blumer. •'■ — 2, 2 — rt. — 2.
« I: i-harif-s M Bull. jr.. defeated Harry A.
McKinne.v. B—rt.8 — rt. in — B, — 2: A. y. Resrsrlo
defeated George T. Ad»«. rt— 3. 4— rt. K—o.
„ •;. Percy D, Slvard defeated Cnrdner Boais.
-*_ i,' (i 7 r, — 4, rt — 4; Miles 8 Charlock de- '
feated Acton Grlß.-om. rt—l. *— '*• rt— .T; J. M
Holesmbe jr.. defeated T. H. Taylor, ft— l.
ri ( ,\ i Thomas C Bundy defeated P. S.
p Randolph. «— 0. •?—'>. «— " - J. O. Am
defeated coi net Carer, rt —■: 15—11; «--".
Third round — E. H. Whitney vs. Bha« Mc
ran 8 4 ■■- " "— '■ unnnlnheil.
CONNECTICUT LEAGUE RESULTS.
Northampton. 2: Hartford, 0.
Snrinirfiel.). S: Ilolyoke. 2
Waterbiiry. 2; Xew Haven. 1.
N*»n Britain. 4: Rridpeport, 0.
Bftoenall. P«lo ■ mdi I ■ '
Motor Boating
GIANTS ON TOP AGAIN
Defeat Pittsburg in Hard Fought,
Close Game.
AMES IN SPLENDID FORM
New York Twirler Invincible in
Pinches and Allows Only
Seven Hits.
The Giants defeated the Pirates again in
a hard fought came at the Polo Grounds
yesterday afternoon by a score of 2 to 1. a
result which has ruled in the three games
played between the two teams. Masterly
pitching by Ames and Adams held the
scoring down. Both twirlers were in su
perb form. Adams allowing only six hits,
while Ames parcelled out seven very spar
ingly.
The score was tied in the first inning, and
thereafter the two teams raced neck and
neck, for the lead which meant victory.
As the game progressed Ames go» better
and better. In the last five innings only
two of the Pirates reached first base, and
one of these got a life on an error.
Brilliant fielding helped Adams out im
measurably, and it. was not until the
Giants started a bunting game in the
eighth that the winning run was scored.
A single, a bunt, a sacrifice and a pass
filled the bases. Then Bridwell fulfilled the
expectations of all those who still, con
sider him a pinch hitter of some class
when he rapped a hot grounder through the
pitcher's box which scored the winning run.
Ames was called on to pull himself, out
of several tight places and he did it In
a. manner which delighted the few "fans"
who were present. As a matter of fact, it
was the smallest attendance which Pitts
burg has played to in the last two seasons,
and many were of the opinion that the
work of the umpires on Monday had dis
gusted the "fans." In the seventh inning
Wilson walloped a terrific triple to left
field as a starter, but Ames never faltered.
Gibson could do no better than down a
feeble grasser to Bridwell and was out at
first. Adams struck out, while Devlin '"ol
laxed Byrne's grounder and threw to Merkle
in time to retire the aide. That was the
last opportunity to score that the Pirates
had.
Snodcrass went throuph th«» same without
getting p. hit. but he was legally at bar. only
twice. Furthermore, it took some spry
fieldincr to keep him off thf bases wben
he did get a crack at the ball. Campbell
marif a wonderful catcli of his Ion« fly
in the sixth inning. The Pittsburg fielder
plucked the ball off the ground and turned
haH a ?oTn»r?a':!t it) th<» effort to make the
catch. .Murray and Snodgrass, too, wore
called on to capture sump wicked looking
smashes and they responded in their usual
effective manner.
The Pirates fell upon Ames's eurwes in
tlie first inning and tallied their only run.
"Red" checked the speed of Byrne'a hot
grounder, so that Doyle could handle it
easily and retire the riinn»r with the throw
to Merkle. Merk!» heat out Campbell in a
race to first when xh& latter grounded to
the first baseman. Clarke, however,
bounded a lucky sinele over Ames's head
and mad** a clean steal of necondL Warner
doubled to the right field fence; scoring
'"lark", while Miller was easy. Bridwell to
Merkle.
But the Giant? found Adam? considerably
to their llkinir in their half of the same
innine:. T'evore led off with a stashing
triple td the rijjrht field fence, and by very
fast running heat out Flynn'p throw to
Gibson of Doyle-'s gTonnder. Although Mur
ray sacrificed and Rridweii walked, T'evlln
forced out Doyle al third Byrne making
the play unassisted.
The Giants got a few scattering hits
Which were without effect in the next few
Innings, bur the head of the batting order
started off the eighth inning. Devore
smashed a hot one at Adams, the ball
bouncing off the, pitcher's glove for a hit.
Then Doyle beat out a perfectly placed
bunt, and Snodgrasa advanced both players
with a sacrifice. Murray looked too danger
ous and was purposely passed, filling the
bases. Bridwell singled to centre field,
scoring Devore with th*» winning run. but
Wilson's good throw to Gibson caught
Doyle at the plate. Clarke ran in for
Devlin's short fly and barely caught the.
ball for the third out.
The score follows:
NEW YORK. | PITTSBURG.
abrlbpoa»i a b rlbpo a c
Y ore. If.. 4 22 0 0-(H Byrne. 3b..: 4 no 3 50
Doyle, 2b.. 40 1 2 ft 1 (Campbell, rf :? o o 1 on
P"<iKTass. of 2 00*2 001 Clarke, 1f... 31 l « an
Murray, rf . 2O 0 1 0 OjWajcner. H 40 l ° 30
B'dwell, m3Ol 2 SOlMiller, 2b... 402 3 2 I
Devlin, Sb. 40 1' 2 4iF!ynn. lb. . 400 0 00
Merkle. lb. 3 0117 10! Wilson, cf . . 403 I Ii
Schlei, p... 200 1 2 0[ Gibson, c... ,'5 o O 3 30
A nice p... 30 0 0 30| Adams, p.. 3O 0 0 11
Totals . .27 262718 2| Totals ...321734152
New York I ft ft 0 O 0 o 1 T—2
Pirtsburs: 1 0 0 ft o 0 <> g 0 . 1
Two-base bits— Wagner, Merkle. Three-basw
hits Devore. Wilson. Sacrifice hit, — Murray.
Schlel. Snoderass. Stolen base — Clark*. Left
on bases- Ptttsburg- ": New York. 7. First I im
on err"rs — Flttsbure. 1 : New York, 2. Doable
plays — Wasrn^r. Miller and Flynn; Rridwell.
Doyle and Merkle. Struck out — By Adams -'
by Ames. 2. Base* on halls — Off Adams 2:' off
Amc". •.' Hit by pitcher — By Adams, 1 (Snod
frras:=>. Time — 1 :."fi. Umpires — Rigler ami Ems
lie.
CINCINNATI WINS TWO.
Philadelphia, A.ug 16.— Cincinnati won
both games of a double-header with the
Phillies here to-day by scores of 6 to 3 and
4 to 1. The visitors, although outbatted in
the first gam* 1 , hunched their safe drives
to better effect than their opponents, whil(»
in the second frame Suggs pitched very ef
fectively.
The scores foilow:
FIRST GAME.
CINCINNATI. ) PHILADELPHIA.
ab r lb po a • abrlh pi) a <•
Richer. If. 3 1 V 2 OOlTUus, rf... 5 1 3 2 00
[:gan. 2b... 50 1 0 2 o(Knah?. 2b. 40 1 • 41
Hob'zell.lb. 4 I 1 8 10- Bates, cf.. 50 2 .1 01
Mltchell.rt. 4 11 4 lOlMasee, If . . 4 1 1 2 00
Paskert.cf.. 102 0 0 o] Grant, rib . 3 0 <> .> 2ft
McLean, c. 31.2 « T.u.l(?rus. lb 4 1 211 0(»
Clarke, c... 100 1 0 o|Doolan, ss. 4 0 3 3 SO
Dovrney. us 4 I 0 3 4 IjMoran, c... 40 o 4 l t>
Lobert. 3b.. 211 8 Moren. p... 2 0 0 0 3 0
Rowan, p.. 300 '• 2 o|Shettler, p. <>.■ it 1, 11
I Slaughter.? 00 0 0 OO
j'Bransneld. 1 0 0 0 D*
!t Walsh ... 10 1 0 •••>
Totals 3S«»2TIII| Totals .37 31327 16 3
'Batted for Moren in sixth inning. f ßatted
for Shettl«r In -nfhth inning.
Cincinnati ••'1*2210 •— 4
Philadelphia .20000 0 0 1 o—3
Hits— Off Moren. 8 in « Innings: off Shettl*»r. 1
in 2 Innings : off Slaughter. 0 In 1 Inninn. Two
base hits — Mitchell. Luderua. Hoblitzell, Titus.
Throe-base hit Titus. Sacrifice hits — Rowan.
Knabe. Double plays — Knabe. Doolan and Lu
>ru.«. Grant. Knab«» and Luderu.v Downey and
Hoblitzell. Stolen bases Bcaa, Maa«e (2). Dool
an. Struck out— By Rowan. r>: by Moren. 2: by
Slaughter. 1. Left on bases— Cincinnati. 5; Phil
adelphia. 10. Fin* base on balls — Off Rowan, 2:
off Karen, 2; off Shettler. 1: off Sla.iirhter. :.
•First base on errors — Cincinnati. 2: Philadelphia
1. Passed ball— MeL«-an. Time. 1 M
SECOND GAME.
CINCINNATI. I PHILADELPHIA
ab r lb po a ej ah r lb po a »
Beseher. if. 501 0 001 Titos, rf.... 4i»«) 3 0 0
Miller, cf.. 000 11 0 I|Knabe. 2h. . 400 2 5 0
Ejran, 2b.. 800 3 3 1 [Rates. cf...r»00 I OO
Hob' mel. lb „ 1 1 IS OOlMa— , 1f... 400 1 0 0
Mitchell, rf 411 S 101 Grant. 3b. .412010
Pask't.cf.lf 402 1 0-OfLuderua, lb. 302 10 It
Clarke, c. . 300 4 10! Dooiaa, «s. . 400 2 10
Downey, ■* 41 2 1 40| Jacklltscli c.TOO I 10
liob^rt. 3b. 212 0 SOlßwtes. p... 100 ■ 10
Suggs, p... 400 0 20 Bhettlei p.. 000 (i 0 0
I 'Rranstield.. 100 ft 00
Totals . ■..-. 4027 iI - 1 Totals ...3114 27 10 1
•Batted for BCwlag in *ichth innini.
Cincinnati - ♦ • • • • 1 0 I—4
Philadelphia " 0 0 1 000 „ ». 1
HI!, <"'ff I'-'-'inc. 7 ip 8 itir:(ii*». off Shettl«r.
2in I Inning- Two-base hit— Grant Home run
— m h-ttll SafHllce hit — Lobarl Stolon bases —
Hoblttael l¥a»l.-nl ¥ a»l.-n (2). Begther |21. .Struck out —
Bs iugt* 5; by rTwtnp. 8 hy Shettl»r. 1. I*ft
on ba««»~Clncinna»l. 8; Philadelphia, i T\r*
has* en balU Off rf'ie**. '.'; eff Bwlaji 2. First
ha*« on error* Philadelphia. 2. Hit by pitched
Wi-Hv Suss*. 1 (RwlnKi Wild pitches— Purks.
Shettler. Time. 1 '.40. Lmr!res--Drennan and
'Baseball Fight
in Three Leagues
NATIONAL. I.FAIiIT. (.AMES TO-DAY.
Plttftbunc at N*w York.
Chicago .it Brooklyn (two «*m*»>.
M. r «<••:- at Boston.
Cincinnati at Philadelphia.
RKSTTTS OF GAMES YESTERDAY.
New York. 2: Pittubnix. l-
ClilrsKO v«. Brooklyn (rain).
Cincinnati, 4; Philadelphia. 3.
Cincinnati. 1; Philatlerphia. 1.
St. I.nul*. 7: B«Ht«n. S.
Bottton. "; St. l.nui*. 3.
NATIONAL LEAGUE STANDING.
W. I- P.C.i W. I-. P.C
Chicaso... B7 M Philu -V» ■ .*»♦»
Pltt»bur*. «l 40 .804 Brooklyn.. 42 «O .412
XcwVork. 60 41 ..104 St. Loui*. . VI 63 .400
Cincinnati 52 52 ..VK» Boston 39 70 .:15X
AMERICAN LEAGUE GAME* TO-DAY.
Philadelphia at Cleveland.
Detroit at Washington.
RESULTS OF GAME!? YESTERDAY.
New York. 7: Chicago. I.
Boston. I: St. l.nai*. 0.
Phlladelpuia. 18; Cleveland. 3.
Detroit, 8; Washington. .1.
AMERICAN LEAGUE .STANDING.
. W. L. P.C. IT. 1- F.C.
Phila 71 33 .6«f» Cleveland . »H ■>* .483
805t0n.... K.i 46 ..>77,Wswhing'n 47 <fl .431
Detroit... «0 4* Chicago.. . 44 *- .415
New York. 60 19 ..>.".0 t. Louis. - 34 "' •••-*
EASTERN LEAGUE GAMES TO-DAY.
Buffalo at Newark.
Toronto at Provide-nce.
Rochester at Baltimore.
Montreal at Jersey City.
RESULTS OF GAMES YESTERDAY.
Buffalo. 2; Newark, 1.
Newark. 7; Buffalo. .'.
Toronto. 5; Providence. 5.
Rochester. 6; Baltimore. 4.
Jersey City. 7: Montreal. 3.
EASTERN LEAGUE STANDING.
W. L. P.C.J W\ L. P.C.
Rochester. 67 43 .609 Buffalo .. . 4* 5* .453
Newark. . . 67 46 .593 ! Montreal .. 47 59 .44:5
Toronto... 58 51 ..VTJ.Provld'nce 47 ■ .431
Baltimore .>» 54 .518'JerseyCity 47 «5 .420
INDIANS WIN AND LOSE
Waddell in Fine Form Until Re
lieved in First Game.
Newark won and lost a game to Buffalo
yesterday afternoon, the visitors taking
the. first contest by a score of 2 to 1.
while the Indians won the second by 7 to 2-
The first same was marked by brilliant
pitching by Waddell. who retired in the
; eighth innins to allow Lee to bat for
him. Up to that time Waddell had allowed
but three hits, had struck out six men.
given two bases on balls and permitted one
run. Perkins, who followed Wadded in
the box. brought the game to ten innings,
when he was replaced by Spade, who gave
the game to Buffalo by allowing the vis
itors one run and two hits.
The Indians won the second Karri" prac
tically in the first inning, when they fell
on "Dummy" Taylor's curves for five hits.
which, aided by an error by Pattee. al
lowed the locals to tally four runs. iay
lor was replaced by Jessup in the second
inning, but the home players added three
more tallies to their score before the game
was railed, in the eight inniner. on account
of darkness. Holmes, the Newark twirlT.
was hit. rather freely by the visitors, but
good support prevented much damage.
Rochester defeated Baltimore yesterday
in a ninth inning batting rally and
strengthened Its hold on nr?^ place.
The scores of the Buffalo-Newark games
fellow:
FIRST GAMS
BUFFALO. I NEWARK.
abrtbpoae) tbr n»poae
Henline. cf 4no ?. »O Browne, cf.. »•! 3 ■• .
Pattee. bs. 321 1 4" ZimT-ar.. 3b 300 2 •••'
White, If.. .".0 0 2 1 *»! louder, -" . 4 T 3 5 '-'I
Core'an. 3b 501 2 40! Kelly. If-.-. ■"■•"• \ OO
McCabe. If. 40 2 '- OOlGanley. rf.. .'."l <> 10
Smith "I>. •Ol ■-• ©•ISchlafly. a 401 5 ° '»
Babrie. lb.. »O«>13 lOjAcler. 1b... 2<>o •"> •«
William*, r Sol 0 4 0 (lister c -(> •> " ■• • »
Vowi'kfc v 400 0 40! Waddell. p.. _•..., ft 10
I Meyer. 2b... 20 1 0 OO
Parkin, p... ••• • OO
|<T»de. p. 000 O OO
• Lee 100 ft OO
ItHoltz - 100 0 OO
Totals . . .33 •_• e3313 01 Totals ... »i 73310 1
•Batted for Waddell in eighth innins;. tßatted
for Parkin in tenth innins.
Buffalo . " 8 <> 0 «> • 1 • • • —
Newark 0 0000 " " 0 10 IV 1
Two-ba-»e hits— Louden <2>. Sacrifice hits-
White (2). Sabrie Zimmerman. Struck out —
By WaodeH •: by V«»wlnkle, I. First base on !
— Off Waddell. 2; off Vowtnklß, 2; off.
Parkin 1: off Spade. I- Double play — Smith.
Pattee and Pabrie. Hit.«— OfT Waddell. 3in 8 inn
iiixs: off aPrkin. 1 in 2 innlnjrs. =- '•' o n bases
—Newark. 7. Buffalo. 4. Time — 2:10.
SECOND GAME.
NEWARK. I BLFFAI.O.
ab r In p. a " abrlbpcan
p-o«n» rf tO 0 201 Henline. cf. 4 0 0 »••
Zim'man.3b 4 * 2 1 1 li Pattee, ss..4t 1 401
Louden SS. 32 : 22 01 White. If . . . 4 0 8 20 0
Kelly. If. 32 3 1O 0 ! Corxoran. 2b 40 1 100
Gonley. cf. 4 1 2 200 McCabe rf. 40 2 I'OO
Scbtafly. » 40 1 210 Smith. 2b... 4" l •»•
\g\er ib.. 412 SrtOl«abrie. 1b... 41 2 31 O
BTAIUMer.c 4 0 1 '► OO! Williams, c. 40 1 72 1
Holmes, p.. 3 0 0 1 4 o! Taylor, p...» 0 « •••
Jeoßop p... - ; •' 1 01"
ItCrcnin 10 a 000
j -
Totals.. "33 71328 521 Totals . -.30 211 196 2
• ,<—■ called; darkness. tßatted for Taylor in
second inn."- ,
,-„.,,.,, 4 O t 1 O 0 t x — 7
Fuffalo ..■.■..:.■.■.■..■.■ "011 00 o 0-2
Two-base iiits— Schlafly. Sabrie. Zimmerman.
Three-baa hit— Airier. Stolen base—Zimmer
man First base on — Newark, I: Buffalo.
1 - -nek out— By Helm*?. 5: by Jessup 2.
Ftrrt bas» on --■-..- Wil.i pitch-
Holmes. Hits-OS Taylor.4 in 1 ta«ta« . V*tt
on twees— Newark. 7: Buffalo. 10 Empires —
Stafford and Hurst. Attendance — «.<*».
CARDINALS WIN AND LOSE.
Boston. Aug. 16.— St. Louis and Boston
divided a double-header to-day, the visit
ors taking the first game by a score of 7
to 5 and Boston winning the second by a
score of 7 to 3. Three local pitchers were
batted hard in the first contest and Bos
ton's errors helped 9t. Louis. Frock was .
effective in the second gaaßM and Boston
hit the ball hard.
The scores follow:
FIHST GAME.
ST. i..-,r - | BOSTON
aa r lbpoa* abrl&poae
HiiK'n* 2i>4 1 2 0 CO! Collins. 1f... 522 I •!«•
Ell* If 4O 1 1 lOjHerzOg. 3b.. 4132 2 0
Mow 1 v 52 3 2 10 Sweeney. lb. 4 1 1 M 30
KonfV. lb -1213 01 j Miller, rf -- .1J)0 [0 0
LEvansrf.'O 1 2 •Sbarpe 100 a 10
Phelpa. c.. »i i « 0 O|C. Evans, p. 100 • •>"
H'luw't.ssßO 2 1 50|AbbatfCo,«B401 1 IS
Lu"h p. .41 1 „ 4.1 Beck. ef... ••« 1 •■ i
Oa'-e's cf 4112 001 Graham, c. *Ol -: 11
v ' |Shean. 2b... 200 3 31
I Frock, p. ... <""> «> »a
| Brown, p. . .2 0 a 1 3O
I rsmitb. . . 101 0 "••
ISellers. -' . . . 1: •• 0,00
Totals.. Si 7M2713 l| Totals 38 ■"• ■2719 3
~ 'Hatted for Miller in seventh inning. * Batted
for Brown -..: seventh Inning.
<t .-iia '« 1 • O • 0 O t o—7
Boston 0 # 1 • 1 • * • •— 3
Two-base hits— Heraot Graham, Konrtchy.
Home run — Sweeney. Hits— Off Frock. 4 In 1
inning- off Brown. 7 in '• innings; off Kvans. 3
In 2 innlnßS. Sacrifice — Oakea. Elite, Huk
.. „. ?nolen base... — Huirxlns. Mowrev. Double
[,; H v9 — M v and Konetchy: Evans. Graham
and Sweeney. Lrfft on bases — ?t. Louis. 10.
Boston. 8. First i>a.*e on balls — On" Brown, l':
off Evans. 1: off Loan, 3. First has* on error. —
St. Louis. 2: Boston. 1. Hit by piu-her— Pv
X.ush iKiTirit' Struck out —By llrown. 3; by
Evans. 1: by Lush. 3. Tim*_l:4S.
SECOND GAME.
BOSTON. ! ST. tOCIS.
al< r lb poa ej abrlbpoae
Collins If 412 1 ©01 Hucgina. 2. 411 O4 •»
Hrnoc. 3b 4•' I 2 OOlEllia. if 400 ;!».)
«sw"ney lb 4 0 I !> 00 Mowrey, 3b. . 301 111
Miller, rf 41 '. 1 0 0! Konetchy. Ib, 4 1 i lotm
Abba ss 81 00 4 l'Kvans. rf. . . . 411 I•> ii
Beck «"f S3 2 3 OOPbelpi c 3<> 1 •« I
Rariiien c 3 1 0 4 2 0(Oake«. of 4•> 1 2*o
Sh<>an 2b 4" - '■ •"'' Hulawttt. «a. ••! i ■'• -
Frock' p.." 4.i l «> 20|Willts. p 200 000
I'Zacher 101 000
I Packman, p . . O0 o 0O O
Jtßilss . l 00 O0(>
Tctals. .33 7 i<> -"7 13 1- Totals 3*38 24 S3
•Ratte.j for Willis in eiKhth Inning. -Ba'.t««!
for Backman in ninth Inning
Boston ...• • t " • 2 • 1 «— t
St. Ijxiia : 0 " " 0 • 1 • I—o
Twi-hMs* hits — Sw^neey. Hulswrttt. Horn* runs
Miller. Konrtchy. Hits — Willis. «• In 7
bmtnga; iff Bafktnuo. - In • inning. s^crlfli*
t\\r*- CMlina, FlarUltn Stolen bases — Collins •■.">
rouble plays— AbOßtlcchlo. Bmbi and Uwmwaay
liusKlnn. ilulswlti and Konetchy; ifhean anvl
g«**n»]r, l^ft on base* — St I»uls. »!; Boston,
« First baaa on balls — Off Frock, 2: off Willis.
; First base on errors— St. Louis, 1: Boston, t.
Struck out —By Frock. 8: by won*. 3: t>v R« -k
.yin t. W :-1 pitch — W ttlis. T!?n*j — I :4s. -^X»"iny
aim — Kiwi l , and Kin*
Other Sports
WIND OP WITH VICTORY
Yankees BeafWhite Sox in Last
Game of Series.
POUND OLMSTEAD HARD
Visitors Drive Chicago Twirler
from Box in Sixth and Score
Five Runs.
Chicago. Ausr. tS— The Yankees '""
up their Western trip here this afternoon
with a declsne victory over the Chicago
White Fox. The score was- to I. Th*
Sot were ad to escape without ••*•*■
out. as the visitor- playefl an errorless
gam- in the Reid and eav? O" ■■ such
fine support that th«* seven hits the ' *"•
ke«» twirler allowed v.'ere without much
■Jfjßt.l
In the eighth innins Quinn had a period
of weakness which resulted in an injured
player and a rnn. Tw« singles and two
outs tallied a run for I M Sox. When
Meloan came up to hat Quinn c-it T0039
with a high one. which struck the bats
man on the head, and he dropped uncon
scious at the plate. H» was carried ••■* ! '
the field, and Parent ■ ■ - sent M run for
him, but Doherty filed out and retired th*
side. The injury to Meloan is not expect
ed to prove serious.
The Yankees had a busy day with th»
stick and pounded three home pitchers—
Olmstead. Young and White — for a total
of ten hits. Cree and Knl?ht were th 9
heroes. "Birdie" connecting for a trip!*
and two 3insles, while Knight made a
double and two singles. Olmstead started
the game and was fairly steady for fiv-»
innings, but in the sixth the ' •--* sot
to him and pounded out five runs, ■whicrt
clinched the game. Young, who succeeded,
him. was more effective. but retired in
favor of a pinch bitter, and White finished
out the came.
tfinzles by Qaixm and Cree scored a run
for the visitor* in the third innins. and
they followed this up with another run in
the fifth on Daniel's safe bunt, a wild
pitch, which put the runner on third, ani
Cres - sacrifice fly. Knight's double, fol
lowed by a- couple of errors, -"■ - the Yan
kees an opening which they were quick t<»
take advantage of in the sixth :mstf>
Singles by Daniels and Wolter and a tnp!^
by rac followed and flvo runs were tar
lied. Then Olmstead retired. Your.? held
the Yankees runless for the next two in
nings, and White was just as effective ta
th* ninth.
The score follows:
NEW YORK. CHICAGO.
abrlbpoae! ab " \o po * *
Daniels. If 112 I 1I 1 OOiMcCoal. » *•= 4 3 1
Wolter. rf2 11 - OO'Zelder. M -2 , =I !
Croo cf . 4«> .1 2 lOMaioan. rf.. .10 1 1 2«
T.anort° 4•>o° 3*> Par-r.:. rf . . O 0 '» 0•«
kSSSu si si.l 00-ivwßh-tr. .if 4*>,> t ««
Roarh. SS. .-. ■ A I 20 Tan-hil!. Zh. 4"! S *•
Austin. 3b r.rt O O Zwtllins. cf. 3*l S3 ••
-weeney.c. 3I O s Oo!CoUins. 1b..4001i o^
Quinr. p.. 3 2 1 O 6Oi Sullivan, c 411 4 J«
!Tru=^. p... 1 rtl » O no
> r> no
•Fa
Total, .XlM^TzOi Total, ...^772^
•Batted for TeSJBI ia •■=" ' mcm?.
N»w Tort ..001 • 2 * • A « — T
Chicago ..'.'..* •• •••••• 1 O— l
Two-base ■ -TbbjUl ~-- - -- - hit— Cr—.
Hit, — o- Olmsted. » In 5 C-1 nnia«a off Toi:n«.
nor^ tn 2 1-3 innings; ofT ".V;.-.-» 1 m I baata»
Pacriac« hits— ZA-..->r Cr»«». Dani-Is. Doub.w
Dlay— Zeider to M tonne to ColUns. T>ft m
lM^a_N-w' York. 7: Caicajro. 7. Bases or. balls
—Off Olmsted. 3: -" Q'llnn. 1: off Youn?. 3.
First ka« on errors— N«r«- Tort. 3. Hit rv
pltcher-Br Quinn. 1. Struck "■;'— 3v Otl! *?*— '
1- by Quinn. 5: by Your.::. L -Wild pitch— Ol
stefl. Tims — Hi Umpires — Evans an 4 Coin-
Rower.
MAKE TWENTY-THREE HITS
Athletics Wallop Cleveland in a
One-Sided Game.
Cleveland. Aug IS.— Cleveland was badly
beaten by Philadelphia to-day. The, scor*
was 13 to ". Falkenber* weakened in th
eiphth innia?, and ■ close contest •■■
made decidedly one-sided. The BB»M— si
Stovall. CoOlns and Baker and Ban"'
fielding were the features. Th« Athletics
rr.ade a season's record in pounding out
twenty-three hits.*
The score follows:
PHIL.VPEL.PHIA. XTWULSV
a*> r lb po a <• abrlhpna*
lAird •' - I O 4 rtf>!Nit«.«. Gb....M 2 - ■» 0
oSrta^rfS 2 3 .*, nrvstova!. B*V SO 512 20
»'oHins"t>4 3 4 1 30 ; Blr » cf 5 O •» 1 •«
irK 1 t i 0 ilFjsw'v. c. 50 « ■ so
Faker.3b. " 1 a I l O' Easterly c. - « r ; J«
r>ax-i« lb 5 12" lOKmzfr. If. 3 * 1 3 1
MThv. rf 5 2 3 O OOtTb'MB. rf . 4 O 1 0 t«
Ban? ■ - 1 ■■ -" Rath, ,-...4 1 10 It
Thomas.c 1001 ©©JFaDL-bencp 51 ntn t .1
Plank.p.. r 0 * 9 1O
LSv*ton.c 3 1 2 3 1 •>!
»Hou.«er.. 1 0 1 " '"■
tHartsel. » 1 • • " l 1
♦Lapp.... 0 1 • • • -■>
- ---- fin.-vrvnn
Coombs.pJ 22-1%
Totals. ... 23 27 14 0; Total* ..313 1127 13 8
'Batted for Thomas In fifth trr.ms-. *?taa ■■
Hovser. ißatted for ■■■* In fifth ■*■■
Philadelphia 1 * •> " = « ft ft «-!'
Cleveland l » • •• • • ••-*
TH»o-bas»* hits — Rath. Stcrra Easterly. Ba'-c-r.
■ r-avis. Oldrtns. Murphy, ilclr-n^s. -y^^-
BacrtOea hits— Collins. Barry. Lord_Ftol«a ca^»
— Kruee«>.r Thomason. Co'.llnw ry>ubl» Ci*']—
Barry and Davis Hl:s— Off PTank. *** + *%*"
8 ,. off ->„-,- 2in 1 1-3 tinlnss: ■■<? *2?" a 25
4 in M „--i . — .- base -ca tall— O ; -
FalkenbArir. 2: off Plan*. 2; ; off Drvsrr. r
Stroc* oat— Bj Fanwnbwg; 4: V Flank. i_: h^
- .... ?»=■«-< --. - -a
irly 1- Thomas. 1. .-..-, safes**
Sft on base*- n-v*Ur.d. 9: ?^«f drt 2^, ! ?- 4'4 '
TmTe— 2:OS. rrr.pir**— "jar *-->. Q-Lou^.!ta.
BOSTON. 2; ST. LOUIS. 0.
St Louis. Aag 16.— Boston won aW la**
same of the series with St. Louis - "
by a score of 2 to 0. Smith, weaken-d lr.
the eighth innin? and •■■ replaced by
Hall, who stopped a rally on th» part of
St Tx-.ui3. EngW took Gardner's - 1— •'
second In the s-venth tanta* The latter
was badly spiked.
The score follows:
BOSTON". ST. :-~-': -~-' ■
at) r t b :>■>*» ,--,^
Gardner 2b2l>t ~5 0 Star.,. *.-.-••• o0"
FnUi» «b i«n oto HartiHl. Sb. 300 .1 1<»
PvrtelTsb' 40 1 1 lO ' N>wnam. Ih. 40 I 6 1 «
_ rf 4«A 4 •«
T^t?U Vf 4«>"> *» -■,-•-•-•«
WaV^^r « 3<>t 5 4<V TValiac. s* . 201 ] .S •>
T?4d>y tb *1 *M I•» Tnwffli. a 302 a t•>
H^ner r' 40 11 OO KlVifer. c. . 20 « 4 »•
K^-t w V ' -t t ! I•> link, p . . 20 1 • ■«
,-, . 1 n
<=n-"it'f o' 101 o 4 •■> •Crlss I•• • O.>
Hat Up.... 1»» 0 10- Ray. p 000 0 O.>
Tota'- _-..:- Totals. -. .30 0 1 27 14 0
•Battc.i for t-nk in ♦■iiihth inning-
Boston „ „ 1 o o 1 o rt p-2
St. Loins " « V • 4> • • rt n * v ~ rt
Two-basf hi:« — HoPnan. P.radley. Sacrt.l.—
hits— Wallaop" Sr.iith i">. tSradlev. tlan!n?r. rw«u
b\f o'.av— Wapier. Gardner anrj nra<l!<»y. Stolon
base— Truesila>. na^fs on bal!*— *>ff Unit. «:
off .-Smith. I. Strac* out -I!v Unk. 2. Hst*-Orr
■^rr.lth « in 7 tunings: off Ha!l. 0 In 2 l.tnin^*:
off Unk. 9 In }< tnnins:»: off Ray. o in \ toatag.
Left ori Wumm — St r.ou! I.1 '. 4: Coatuo. h. T!mf..
1:4». ( riirir* — P»rr!nr.
DETROIT. I; WASHINGTON. 3.
Wa.-hinfrtcn. Au?. In.- Washington ■■•
Detroit stru?s!»tl through nine inr.inss of
rain and mud to-.liv. t'^e latter finally win
ning by a ■core of * t.» X The came wa*
lr.terrt:"pte<l tnfn by showers, Cobb at'»i»»
l.ome from thin! in the 'ourth innins wnt:<r
Groom was pltchtosj the oalL
The score follows:
DETROIT. WASHINGTON.
ah r 1h rw> * •! aJ> r lb po % •
Mrlntvre If T1 *> t '"> Milan, cf . . 4 1 i I •> '"»
pjjr,ntv.:b. 511 .". 2»» Killif^r. &SO O a 3 ■
Cobb ef.~.*; i•" i 2 l»> F.IV frtd. 3b .•. • • a oi»
Crawfontrf 52 1 - «• <> (onroy. If . 4 1 3 3 o•>
Mi-rfrtv.Sb. .%'»: > "« MoßrWf. an I O t 2 St
Rush *3... 41 I V. 4 o.Gwil»r. rf. SO j 2 0«v
T Jon?« lb »•• t * •! I' Cnstaub. tt> ."5 •> 1 S» 2 '»
Schmidt, c 40 1 « 20 Ainainlth. c ■■'111
Donovan p 4l» i> 0 lO'Oroom. p. . 3 O o 13!
IOWT. P «»O 0 f» »»i»
' 'fchaef »r . t O •» rt O»>
Totals ..33SS2TM1! Total* . :: 3132T 12 4
• Ra- for Groom In aMI inninj.
p»trolt 0 • • 2 O 3 2 «' l-«
■\Yanhtnrton ft I •■ 1 •» .> ■ rt \— i
TAvo-bas.^ hits — ?3b»rfeW. Milan. «e^.-.l»-.
Hits- Off Orttom. 8 In s Inninas. sacrifloe htt —
. ■oii'-u; Stolen ba»p« — M!!au <2>. ETb«»rf<?l<{. Mr?
lirM*. C8«*»I«r. «V>n>» i2>. Mona^y. Bi>"h -il,i 1 ,
r>el#har t.eft on ba.»M — Washington, 12: P»
troll, * •-"- on N»lls-«OfT Groom. •'.; o(T Dwsi -
van. 3. Kirst baa* en «rrer»— lVtroit. I. Waa
tnctor. x. Htr by pitcher— vl i" -•->)« eai
nyn v rvnovan. 4 Fas*»d ball — Srhmidt. X. TtBJS
—1:55. Vwpire»-*ierin and Conaollr.
6

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