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New-York tribune. [volume] (New York [N.Y.]) 1866-1924, September 01, 1910, Image 12

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FALLS OFF A SKYSCRAPER
Man Crashes Through Adjoining
Roof in 300-Foot Drop.
CRUSHED PAST RECOGNITION
Cards Lead to Identification of
Park Row Building Suicide
or Accident Victim.
~FAci>r H. Holbrook, a life Insurance
UllHr. »ho fell from the fourth floor of
the New York Life Insurance Building, on
January S. IS9S. either fell or jumped yes
terday from the twenty-sixth floor or the
roof of he Park Row Building. His body
Janded on the elevator shed on the roof of
& six story building next door, and was so
twdly crushed as to be unrecognizable.
The mar. terrible death caused many ste-
Sicgraphers and other women employes in
the. tall building to become hysterical.
Holbrook went to the Park Row Building
en business connected with the Preferred
Accident Insurance Company, of No M
Broadway, but it is not. known how he.
came to be either on the roof or the twen
ty-sixth floor, from one or the other of
„ h¥ is supposed to have fallen. Pome
painters working on the wall of the build-
Ing at the nineteenth floor said they saw
the body, but not until it came tumbling
through the air past them. None of them
eouJd tell whether the long fall began from
the top of the building or a window.
In the drcp of more than o<K> feet Holbrook's
body acquired a terrific momentum, and
•when it struck the top of the elevator shed
It crashed through a heavy iron screen, a
■heat of heavy glass and some half-inch
pjanking.
These obstacles were net sufficient to pre
vent Holbrook's body from dropping on
tor. of the elevator drum, which was in
rrotion at the time The body was so man
gled that It became wedged tightly in the
elevator machinery and stopped it.
Robert Maxwell, who was running the
car. was coverd with a shower of glass,
end,' glancing up. saw the body half pro
truding throueh the caee work. He then
jrot out and climbed up a ladder leading
to the roof. He called down the elevator
shaft for help, and the janitor of the build
ing called Patrolman Kelleher, of the Oak
street station.
E. L- Trainor. of No. 1945 52d street.
Brooklyn, who was In the building at No.
S3 Park Row. crawled into the shanty with
Michael Weir, head porter of the Park
How Building, and managed to extricate
nnihmai With the kid of the patrolman
they succeeded in getting the body to the
roof. This was done only after a wait of
more than an hour, because nobody present
•was -willing to act until the Coroner ha-d
•viewed the body. When a telephonic per
tr.:t was received from a clerk in the
Coroner's office, however, the crushed form
was carried to the street and from there
tent to the station house.
An examination at the dead man's '"""-
Ing failed to disclose any identification
mark, but the police found a number of
business cards in a wallet and from one
of these they found the name of the com
pany by which Bolbrook was employed.
William Morris, an .-•:.' of the com
. pany, who was acquainted with Holbrook.
toon arrived at the station house and
Identified the body by means of scnif per
ronal belongings. Holbrook's gold watch
tvas found in one of his pockets. It was
stopped at 9:17 o'clock, and the police
recorded this as the time of his death.
Holbrook was fifty-seven years old He
lived in the boarding house at No. 129 West
76th street, kept by Mrs. Parks. When
the was told of his death, she said he had
appeared to ne in good spirits at the. break
last table yesterday morning, and that she
knew no reason why he should kill hira
eelf. After thinking a few moments, how
ever, she said that he was greatly worried
over the health of bis wife, who recently be
came blind. A minature photograph ot
Mrs Holbrook was found in her husband's
■watch lob locket. Mrs. Parks said that Mrs.
:■ wok was staying at the Waverley
Hotel. In Ocean Grove, and that her hus
l>and. visited her I ere every' week.
SUET IN AUTO-SUFEEY CKASH
Two from Each Party Receive Serious
Injuries in Long Island Accident.
An automohile containing four men
cra£hc-d into ■ surrey in 'which were) two
Isen and two young women at Blue Point,
2_.or.g Island, far! yesterday morninc. Two
from each party were badly hurt. Of those
In the surrey Mi=s Leahy received internal
injuries, the nature of which is yet to be
determined, and her Bister, Grace, both of
Patchogrue. received an injury to her spine.
Dr. W. H. [joessett. of No. 112 West 119 th
*treet. who was driving the automobile, was
so severely cut about the head that twenty
Ftitches were required Dr. Joseph Zweig,
m. .'-■..' of ?»o. 147 East l2T>th street. r»»
celv»:-d a fracture of his collarbone. The
etarey vas wrecked.
AND
STEVENSON
9 c SB9I "JBS"-' it I 991
Neither the imaginative
fortune of Treasure Island
nor that of Monte Cristo
comes anywhere near the
buried "wealth of Cocos Isl
and, which may be acquired
by the United States as a
Pacific coaling- station. The
Buccaneers are said to have
left ■ hundred million in its
caves. Expeditions may be
organized to hunt for this,
says
HYDE SCOTT ROGERS
in an article in the
SUNDAY MAGAZINE
of the
NEW-YORK TRIBUNE
Sunday, Sept. 4th
liny Next
Sunday's
Tribune!
RECEIVERS FOR BREWERS
Clausen & Price Co. and Presi
dent C. C. Clausen Involved.
An Involuntary petition In bankruptcy
was filed yesterday with Judge Hough, in
the United States District Court, against
the Clausen & Price Brewing Company
and against Charles C. Clausen, president
of the company, personally. James N.
Rosenberg, of James. Schell & Elkus, at
torneys for the petitioners, said yesterday
that the debts in the two cases were
slightly in excess of $300,000. Judge
Hough appointed Henry Melville, of No.
120 Broad way. receiver for the company
and Richard P. Lvdon receiver of Mr.
Clausen's individual assets.
The proceedings are understood to be
largely of a friendly nature. They were
taken. Mr. Rosenberg said, without con
sultation with Mr. Clausen or his attorney
and because the condition of Mr. Clausen's
health was such that the business was in
danger from lack of his attention. The
debts. Mr. Rosenberg continued, in the
case both of the company and Mr. Clausen
individually, were principally loans from
close personal friends. The loans to Mr.
Clausen amounted to about $100,000, while
those to the company were a little more
than $200,000.
An allegation of preferential payments
was made in the bankruptcy petition, but
this, it is understood, was merely a for
mal charge to bring the case under the
jurisdiction of the court.
The petition against the company wae
sisrr.ed by Otto L. Dommerich, Henry Hen
oel and William V. McManus. It was for
$4.n?0 money loaned and service rendered.
The petition against Mr. Clausen person
ally was signed by Frederick Siemon. and
was for $1,000 money loaned. T' * assets
of the company are stated to be the brew
ery and real estate at 69th street and
Eleventh avenue, with the machinery and
equipment for making ale and porter. The
brew cry does not make beer. Mr. Clau
sr-n s personal assets are stated to be the
malt house, between 71st and T2d streets,
on the East Side, leased to the American
Malt Manufacturing Company. Siemon al
leges in his petition that Mr. Clausen has
rrride preferential payments amounting to
150,0
LOSE THEIR SOFT BERTHS
Court Squad Men Will Have to
Go Back en Patrol.
Ore result of the reform of the inferior
ts, which will go into operation this
rooming at ? o'clock, has been the issuance
of a general order by Police Commissioner
Baker containing new assignments for nine
lieutenants, twelve sergeants and 237 pa
trolmen who have been attached to court
. . Is. With a few exceptions of men
spc .'•■■ appointed to court work, all will
:■ . rt for routine police duty.
I •. -nam Patrick B. Lane is trans
••■■ to the public office squad and as
signed to the Criminal Courts Building,
record of subpoenas. and Lieutenant
Thomas J. Gleason is put on the special
co-^rt .-o:ad. while Sergeant Albert J->.
Duffy will command the special court
squad in Brooklyn. All the lieutenants
transferred will be on duty in Manhattan
ar.il The Bronx; four of the sergeants will
be occupied in Manhattan and the rest in
Brooklyn.
• t Magistrate Kempner. of Brooklyn.
a>k^d Commissioner Baker, in a letter
which reached the latter yesterday morn-
Ing, for fifty-one men to serve warrants.
The Commissioner stated that he could not
send so many, but that he wouid ailow for
this work nineteen patrolmen in Manhat
tan and The Bronx and would send six
teen to Brooklyn, Queens and Richmond.
TO WED MISS BRUENN SEPT. 4
Hungarian Officer and Parents of
Bride-To-Be Secure License.
Lieutenant Bela Sohwarz, of the Hun
garian army, called at the City Hall yes
terday in company with Margaret Amelia
Brueiin. the Wadleigta H:gh School girl
whom he is engaged to marry, and her
jarc-r.ts and secured a license to wed on
September 4. As Ifiss Bruenn is only six
teen years old. the consent of her parents
to the marriace was necessary.
Miss Bruenn wore a Nile green dress,
with a hobble skirt, not of the extreme
variety, a picture hat and a wide black
sash.
Lieutenant Sehwarz said the wedding
will take place in the temple of the
Brotherhood of Man, at 114 th street and
■Seventh avenue A reception will follow at
the Waldorf, and the couple will sail for
Eudape.-t on the George Washington on
September 14.
MINISTER'S BUNGALOW BURNS
House Euilt by the Rev. H. F. Knaben
schuh, of Brooklyn, Destroyed.
Riverhead, Long Ibland. Aue. 31.— The
bungalow owned by the Rev. H. F.
Knabenschuh. on the east end of Indian
Island. Peconic Bay, about two miles east
j of this place, was destroyed by lire early
| this morning. Four persons in the place
escaped t nhurt.
Mr. Knabenschub lives at No. 793 Quincy
! street. Brooklyn, and has been spending
! the summer in the bungalow, which ho
; built on Indian Island. With him last
j night were his nephew. William Knaben
schuh, also of Brooklyn; Albert Jacobs, a
: friend of the nephew, and Mrs. Sarhardt,
the housekeeper.
There were a number of rare antiques
I and some valuable furniture in the build
; ing, and all were destroyed. Mr. Knaben
i schuh estimates his loss at about $5,000.
' MODEL CITY " TO BE FIREPROOF
Mrs. Sage Establishes Testing Station
for Forest Hills Materials
An experiment station lor the testing of
fireproof building materials has been estab
lished by Mrs. }.;.-.-< 11 Sage at \var< n.
N. J.. in connection with her "model city"
project- The purpose of this undertaking
at Forest Hills. I>ong Island, is to enable
men of moderate means to live in comfort,
owning their own homes, with gardens and
plenty of fresh air.
The construction of the "model city" has
Just been started with two houses of terra
octta They ere to have walls, doors -■:■!
partitions of the sam« kind of hollow blocks
as are used for flreproonne New York
skyscrapers. It Is tin Intention <>f those
to charge of the Forest Hills building; op
erations to have all the houses nude abso
lutely fireproof in their structural parts.
EKIDGE FRUIT STAND TO GO
Stover Says Holder of Permit Takes
Up Too Much Room.
Park Commissioner Stover baa notified
John D Antonopulo, owner ••• the fruit
and soda water stand under the stairway
to the railroad platforms of the Brooklyn
Bridge, that he must vacate forthwith. His
notice to Antonopulo is dated August ■■".
.ir.'i ordera him to vacate on <•! before
September l, stating that his p imil has
been revoked.
Th* cause '••! the relocation, Mr. Stover
! says, is ■ violation of the tei in.- ot the
1 j.einiit, which provide that only a certain
I amount of ground snare .-!, ill be utilized
jbv the holder thereof. Commissioner
] Stover declares that the space utilized !:.is
i been increased greatly since 1908. when the
i j.-er:nit was issued. Mr. AntonopuU pays
I the city a rental of V") .i montli for the
j cpao- Ofcumed. and ■■'■<!.- the highest bidder
I lor the stand privilege. t .
W J^^^^mL^^^ /^*LJ^ *^3^
SUFFOLK FIREMEN LIVELY
Volunteers Strain Muscle and
Nerve for Prizes at Sayville.
ATTACK ON BOTTOMLESS PIT
East Islip's Slip Causes Cries for
Fair Deal-Sag Harbor's "Hay
rack" Wins Easily.
Suffolk County Volunteer Firemen p^>t to
gether yesterday In Sayville, Long Island,
to show about five thousand of the natives
and a sprinkliner thousand visitors what
they could do to a fire, and more praticu
larly how quickly they could do it. East
Islip was generally conceded the. "classiest"
proup of fire fiphters, though it was only
after they had proved their speed twice in
th© same contest that they really estab
lished their reputation.
In their first trial at "Honk and Ladder
Contest Xo. 2." which consisted of a three
hundred-foot run to a bucket line up a
ladder, followed by a bucket brigade at
tack on a defenceless barrel, some one very
Inconsiderately removed the bottom of the
barrel, and the East Islip volunteers
worked away for three, minutes trying to
fill the bottomless barrel. Then their buek
etman, Shepard Saxton. decided to investi
gate and found they were attacking the
bottomless pit instead of a supposedly re
tpectable barrel, and they were allowed an
other trial.
It was the twenty-fifth annual tourna
ment of the Suffolk County Volunteer Fire
men's Association, and a.s it was the first
time, since 1595 that the tournament has
come to Sayville the villagers constituted
themselves ints a huge welcoming commit
tee and laid aside and prepared one entire
street near the centre of the town for the
contests.
Frank "White, the village chief of police,
detailed Frank White to the traffic squad
for the day. to keep overeaper automobil
lsts from encroaching on Bwazey avenue,
the scene of the contests, and he put the
job of holding' the police line along the
route of the parade which preceded the
contests up to Frank White, patrolman.
Ex-Sheriff John S. Wells, of Suffolk
County, assisted In the latter job with
twenty-five deputies, gorgeously and offi
cially clothed in regular watchmen's uni
forms lent for the occasion by Allan Pink
erton, who is sometimes spoken of as being
of New York, but who. the Long Island
ers will tell you. is properly of Bayshore.
Whole Grandstand for Fair Deal.
The parade was the feature of the morn
ing celebration, and though there was no
prize for the best turnout, each visiting
company put on its marching togs and
trundled its apparatus through Greely ave
nue, Main street, and to the grandstand
in Bwazey avenue. Two year? ago at the
Suffolk County celebration some bad blood
developed over the award of a prize for the
best parade turnout, which explains the
lack of such incentive yesterday. The speed
contests of the afternoon, however, were
all rewarded with valuable prizes, and com
petition was keen.
For the most part the derisions of the
judges were accepted without dispute,
though occasionally an oldtimer with a
stop watch in his hand would grunt dis
contentedly, and on the incident of the bot
tcmless barrel the whole grandstand rose
up to demand another triaJ for the East
Itlip department.
Harry Haff, son of the yacht builder and
racer. Captain Hank Haff, carried a watch
that he declared was infallible, but his
differences of opinion with the judges were
comparatively few and of small conse
quence.
Robert Holmes, ox-marshal of the Say
ville department, led the parade, and was
accorded the seat of honor at the afternoon
races, with but one dissenting voice The
objection came from an aeed citizen of
Greenport. who. when he was not a!low?d
a seat beside the ex-marshal of Sayville,
loudly denounced the latter's preferment.
The Greenport one refused thereafter to
even so much as look at the races, until
about the middle of the Individual ladder
scaling contests, when he meekly inquired
of his neighbor in an ordinary seat:
"How's our Greenport boys doin'?"
After which he was as enthusiastic a? the
smallest boy there.
The Sag Harbor Hayrack, victor in half
a doezn Long Island contests, carried
off the honor in the hook and ladder con
test No. 1. which consisted of a 450-foot
run with the truck, followed by the erec
tion and scaling of a ladder. In this con
test Southampton's crew made a beautiful
run through the stretch, only to tind that
they had carelr-psly dropped the scaling
ladder in the excitement of the start.
Loud wails from the- Southampton con
tingent greeted this discovery, but they
were ruled out for their carelessness
• Prizes and Reminiscences.
Regis H. Tost, of Bayport, who recently
returned from an eight-year sojourn in
Pcrto Rico as Governor of that island, but
who has kept up his membership in the
Eayport department all the time, gave out
the silver cups and pieces of fire fighting
apparatus which made up the prize list.
This ceremony, conducted in Main Street
Park, unofficially knov.n as Sparrow Park,
because of its exceedingly small size, fol
lowed the racing of the day
Mr Post, from his long career as a vol
unteer fireman In Suffolk County, was able
to conjure up reminiscences of the old days
that highly amused the racing crews
He told of the first Introduction of the
canvas bucket in the bucket brigade con
tests, which on account of their lislu
v eight gave their users a Kr<-at advantage
over the other crews, equipped with ordi
nary wooden buckets Mr Post, with his
brother. W. X Post, who is now presidenl
of the Suffolk County Volunteer Firemen's
Association, equipped their Bayport com
pany with the neu style buckets, and gal
loped away Kith all the prizes given in thai
connection at that tournament.
The next day • sent one of the new
bucket to his rival. Abraham I, Field,
t>,»-n the racing captain of the Hunting/ton
company :nv\ now the treasurer of the
Suffolk County association, and <>n a tag
atta< hed t" the bucket w,is the Inscrip
tion
It's big enough for a bathtub; ltd bold a Mood
of are.
And I thirk It's vi to Abraham to nil it up
with beers.
Mr. Post and State Senator Orlando
Hubbs, of the Ist Senatorial District, were
talking over the political situation.
""We'll send up twelve of the solid< si
Roosevelt men you ever saw to Saratoga,"
said .Senator Hubbs, "and they'll be right
behind I ooa irelt in everything he says
li< s for. We're for Roosevelt down here,
all risht. and particularly now that wo
know everything's all right between Roose
velt and Taft. Why, it wouldn't be safe for
any politician in this district to go against
ltoos«-velt."
LAD REMANDED FOR SHOOTING.
William Croune. fifteen years old, ->f No
i 122 d streel who was arrested on
in-! i for shooting at William
Mullaley, of No 2149 Fifth avenue, his rival
f,,i the i.i- or of lift* en year-old K\ , t
Weber, <.f No 319 Eas< 125 th Btreet, was ar
r.n>-Mi«-'i In the Children's ''"'in yesterday
ar.d remanded until Septembei tot en
tence He pleaded guilty, saying be used
th< revolver because li<- had been beaten
I Mull ilej In • veral n.-t UghU md didn't
intend t" take an 3 more punishment. His
case will i« Investigated by the Ch&lren's
Bo •' ;>«; >«
MAY UK THE TABLES
Railroads Likely to Subject
Shippers to Inquisition.
FORECAST AT RATE HEARING
F. 0. Melcher, of the Rock Isl
and, Tells of Road's In
creased Expenses.
rhtcaso. Aug. with th«
closing of the testimony for the Santa Fe
system before the epeclal examiners for the
Interstate Commerce Commission and the
statement from the roads statistician that
the increases in freight rates asked would
net the Santa Fe only 594.0K) increase yearly
in earnings, there came to-day a euggos
tion that the railroads now on the de
fensive might change their tactics and
seek to compel the shippers, who oppose,
the advance in freight rates, to declare
how much they profit on the different com
modities under consideration and the re
turn they enjoy on their invested capital.
A request from F. J. Norton, counsel for
the Santa Fe, for the names of the differ
ent associations of shippers represented h
the hearing, that he might question certain
of the shippers, gave color to these reports.
One prominent railroad man declared that
the railroads might well ask the shippers
what their profits are on the commodities
affected by the proposed Increase in freight
rates so that the commission may know
whether they are or axe not seriously dis
turbed by the increase which they are
fighting.
F. O. Melcher, second vice-president or
the Rock Island Railroad Company, told
to-day of increased expenses of the road
in late years due. according to him. to ad
vances in the wage scale and Increased
cost of operation- He was questioned by
W. S. Dickinson, counsel for the road.
Mr. Melcher offered in evidence a table
showing- that Increased wa.ges paid in the
operating department of the road amounted
in 1906 and liW to SS2S.W, in 1907 and 19ft? to
$1,314,000, in 190S and 1W to $1,314,000. in 1909
and 1910 to $1,451,000, and in 1910 and 1911
the estimated increase would total $2,612,000.
Mr. Melcher said that in his opinion the
road does not get more efficient labor by
reason of the increased wages. Some of
the increases, he said, were the result of
threatened strikes which were settled and
some were granted after arbitration.
"The argument advanced by the em
ployes in 1906 for an increase." he said,
"was that the roads were prosperous and
the men wanted a 'chunk' of the prosper
ity."
In the later pleas for advanced wages
the men argued that the cost of living had
increased, and for that reason demanded
more money.
Mr. Melcher declared that in his opinion
no change is likely to restore any part of
the wage increase unless the road can get
more for hauling freight.
"In tne fiscal year just closed," said Mr.
Melcher, "the gross earnings increased
$5,300,000 and the operating expenses in
creased $5,500,000."
He also commented on the legislative
measures, which had increased the cost of
operating the railroad.
"I do not object to the safety appliance
lar.\" said Mr. Melcher; "it was a good
thing, but it does not save money. We
have to have as many men on a train now
as before the automatic brake was in
stalled. The hours of labor bill was a
proper bill, but has required more men
and en Increased expenditure. Other re
quired regulations have been good, but
they all cost money and go *o swell the
increased cost of operation. Altogether, I
.should say that the increased volume of
traffic has not kept pace with the increased
cost of operation."
James Peabody, statistician of th" Santa
Fe system, belittled the effect of the pro
posed freight rate advance when he took
the witness stand to-day.
"If the proposed advance wrre to be put
into effect and to remain in effect for one
year." said Mr. Peabody, "the Santa Fe
would earn only $94,000 more than it is
earning right now."
F. T. F. LOVEJOY SUES
Oarnegie "Young Partner" Wants Re
ceiver for Realty Company.
[By Telegraph to The Tribune. ]
Pittsburg. Aug. 31.— F. T. F. Lovejoy, one
of Andrew Carnegie's "junior partners,"
tiled a bill in equity to-day against Robert
C Hall, a wealthy broker; his wifp. Frances
Clapp Hall, and the Carleton Realty Com
pany and its officers, in which lip demands
a receiver for the company which now
holds the Bellefleld Dwellings property, a
5750.000 apartment house in the East End.
Lovejoy states that Hall proposed a part
nership to him in 1902 to build the apart
ment on ground owned by Hall, that Hall
put less than $10,000 into the venture, while
Lovejoy carried him with cash ;md his
note.s. Lovejoy demands that the court
order Hall's indebtedness to him paid. He
claims Ji^.iw from Hall personally and
(413,000 from the Carleton Realty Company,
which he say.-. Hall formed solely to take
over the property after he had heavily
mortgaged it without Lovejoy's consent
while Lovejoy was ill in <~"olora<lo
Lovejoy charges that Hall's wife aided
Hall to defraud him; tli.it Hall has been
systematically turning over his properties
to her to block creditors, and that Hall de
fjjvf-'l him from the beginning of the part
nership and has refused to make any ac
counting.
I. & G. N. CLAIMS VALID
Texas Legislature Passes Bill Affecting
Unsecured $2,000,000.
Austin. Tex., Aug. 31.— The Legislature
to-day finally enacted the bill validating
the claims of creditors against the Inter
national & Great Northern Railroad. The
bill was passed In the House as it came
from the Senate, and will become effective
upon receiving the Governor's approval.
It validates approximately $2,000,000 of un
secured claims against the International
& Great Northern Railroad which will have
to be assumed by the purchasers of the
road next month. As passed, no claims
will I. allowed which were incurred prior
to two years before the road went into the
hands ■>■ a .receiver.
MACVEAGH WRITES BANKERS
Letter Probably Clears Way for Emer
gency Currency Associations.
Washington, Aug. 31.— .Secretary Mac-
Veagh lias made his decisions on several
questions which the Chicago banks raised
sis <<• the interpretation of the law permit
ting the organization of emergency cur
rency associations In a letter which the
Secretary of the Treasury has written from
his summer home at Dublin, >.' 11.; to
James B. ITorgun, head of the Chjcago
Clearing House committee, the questions
have been disposed of in such a manner, it
i- believed, as will clear the way for the
banks 'if Chicago ami all the other large
Western cities to form the emergency cur
rency associations which were provided for
in tlif- Vreeland act of 1908, and
which are being strongly recommended to
the banks by the Treasury Department
now.
While the bankers of th« Middle West
lriv«. maintained all along that they could
gee nothing on the financial horizon to
suggest an emergency i sue of currency,
>i!.cl have taken some exceptions to various
parts of the plan, their principal i)U (> ry has
1m en for an Interpretation of what will be
regarded as "commercial paper." The
bankers thought they discovered some con
flict with the definitions of the national
bank law. The Secretary's decision i- said
to settle thai question to their satisfaction
It is now expected that the organization
of emergency currency associations all
through the West will be carried forward
at oiji-6.
HAPPY CROWDJN_ TUNNELS
Queens and Brooklyn Excursions
in Pennsylvania Tubes.
Enthusiasm was marked among the
crowds which had an opportunity of in
serting the tunnel system of tho -
sylvanla Railroad yesterday. Bereral b^
dred persons from Jamaica and Richmond
Hill made the Journey through the tunnel,
in the series of excursions arranged M both
the Long island and Pennsylvania raHroads
for residents of Manhattan. Queens. Brook
lyn and other sections of Long Island.
There was a fair sprinkling of women In
the crowds.
On the trip from Jamaica to Manhattan
every man had out his watch timing the
run. and the majority agreed that the time
between the two points was 18 minutes, but
Motorman Ackerley said the. official run
i ning time was 17% minutes. Then the
crowd cheered. President Ralph Peters of
the Long Island Railroad remarked that
he had no doubt that when th* road got
down to business the running time between
Manhattan and Jamaica would be fifteen
minutes.
More than three hundred members of the
Brooklyn League made the trip through
the tunnels by special train in the morning.
This morning residents of the north shore
of Long Island will be taken over the
rout©, and the afternoon trip will be de
voted to residents of the Rockaways.
SAN FRANCISCO MINING STOCKS.
San Francicco. Aug. 31.-The official clos
ing quotations for mining stocks to-day
were as follows:
aw a lllJulia }X
Alpha. Con OS Kentucky on 1"
Belcher W Kentucky con W
Best & Belcher 47 L. Wash Con ■<»
Bullion 18 Mexican *-2
Caledonia 42 Occidental Con -46
Challenge Con 16 Ophir " l *!,
Chollar -. 19!Poto?i |j ■
Confidence -"0 Savage'- • • ■ • • % .
Con Cal & Va 1.37 Sierra Nevada. »
Con Imperial <M Union Con **>
Crown Point 94 Utah C0n...-- «>
Gould & Curry 23 TeUow Jacket «»
Hale & yorcross... .33 _
MARINE INTELLIGENCE.
MINIATURE ALMANAC.
Sunrise. 5:26; sunset, 6:35; moon Hits, 2:48;
moon's age, 27.
HIGH WATER.^ pM
Sandy Hook "••>* f£\
Governor's Island «•« «•"
Hell Gate »* sls
WIRELESS REPORTS.
The Lusitania. r^portod as 802 mile? east of
Sandy Hook at noon yesterday, is expected to
dock "this evening or Friday forenoon.
The Patricia, repor-M as 21S miles east or
Pandy Hook at 2 15 p m yesterday. 1? expected
to dock this forenoon.
INCOMING STEAMERS.
TO-DAY.
Vessel From. Lir.e.
•Lusitania Ijverpool, Autr 27 <_*unard
• A neon Cristobal, Auk 25 Panama
• Trent Bermuda, Au e 30 R M P P
•~ar> Paulo Para. Aug 21 Brazilian
Kansas City Cardiff. Auk 15
Patrirla Hamburg. Aug 2<r.. Hamb-Am
Proteus New Orleans. Aug- 27. . . .So Pac
rviiar Grove Huelva, Augr 18 -^
Pity of Mont (fry. Savannah. Ausr 29 Savannah
San Giovanni Naples, Au X 18 Italian
Bencliff Hueiva. Aug: IB
FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 2.
•La Provence Havre. Aug 27 French
•Merida Havana, Aug 3f» Ward
Metapan Santa Marta. Aug 24.Tnit Fruit
Con of Grenada.. Port -au-Spain. Aue i". Trinidad
SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 3.
•New York Southampton, Aug 27 \ir.er
•Justin Barhado?. Aug 2t? Booth
Cleveland Cherbourg. Auk 27. .Hani I>- Am
Montevideo Havana, A-is: 30 Spanish
Massiiia Naples. Aug 1" Italian
Cof Atlanta Savannah. Auf 81 .... Savannah
Ban Marcos Galveston. Aug 27 Malory
•Brings mall.
OUTGOING STEAMERS.
TO-DAY.
Mall Veeael
Vessel. For. Line. closes. falls.
La Lorraine. Havre. French 7:00 a m 1O:(H) a m
Or Kurfuerst, Bremen. N G L 7:08 a m i<»:no a m
Ikarla. Montevideo, Norton... f>:00 a m li;:O<>!ii
Monterey. Havana. Ward.... 9:00 am 12:<M> m
Santa Marta. .Tarn. TJ F Co.. 9:."?0 a m 12:O(t m
Allemania, Haytl. 11:00 am 1 :OO p m
Oscar 11. Copenhagen. S A... '_':OO p m
Campania. Naples, Uranium.. il:««>am
City of St Louis. Sayan. Say 3:o»pna
FRIDAY. SEPTEMBER 2.
llatanzas, Tampico. Wan.... - 12:00 m
Arapahoe. Jacksonville. Clyde 1: A I' m
SATURDAY. SEPTEMBER 3.
St Louis, Southampton. Am. 6:3o am Irt:«x>am
Caronia. Liverpool. Cunard. . 6:30 am 10:00 am
X A Victoria, Hamburg, HA «:•'•.'> a m 1" .'«> a in
Baltic. Liverpool, "W 5...... 7:30 am 11:00 a in
Trent. Bermuda, R M S P. . . 8 <<O a m 1i>:""a in
Zulia. Curacao. Red D 8:30 a. m 12:<>Oin
Byron. Santos, L & H 8:30 a -m 3:OOpnn
Carolina, San Juan. NY&PR !>:<«"> a m 12:*lO m
Havana, Havana, "Ward 10-.nn a m 1:00 pin
Samla. Inagiia. H-A 11:00 am 1 :00 pm
Tapajos Bahia. Brazilian . . .11:00 a m l:*iOpm
Panama, Cristobal. Panama. ll:3o a m 3: 00 p m
Magdalena. Colon. RMS P.l2:3<> p m S:0O p m
Chicago. Havre, French — 3:OO pr
Minnewapka, London. Atl T. - l»:30am
Vaderland. Antwerp. R Star. 11 no a m
California. Glasgow. Anchor. f>:i>o a m
Eirma. Libau. Russian
Madonna, Naples. Fabre 12:00 m
D d'Aosta. Naples, Italian.. 11:0nam
Iroauois, Jacksonville. Clyde. — 1:00 n m
Coin ho. Galvestcn. Mallory.. !:iifipm
C of Montgomery. Sayan. Pay 3:»">pm
TRANSPACIFIC MAILS.
Destination and steamer. Close in N. V V. M.
Hawaii. Japan. Corea and China (via
San Francisco) — Nippon Maru To-day, *' n .o
Japan. Cor»a. China and Philippine
Islands (via Vancouver) — Emr-res?
of Japan .. Sept 2.6:30
Fiii Islands and Australia (via
Vancouver)— Zelandia Pert 4.6:30
Japan. Corea and Philippine Islands
(via Seattle! — Kamakura Mam Sept 5. B:30
Hawaii (via San Francisco) — Sierra. Sept .". t>:3o
SHIPPING NEWS
Port of New York, Wednesday, August
31. 1910.
ARRIVED.
Steamer Ossabaw. Texas City August 20 and
Brunswick 2S. to the Texas City Ps Co. with
melee. Left Quarantine at ":SS am.
Steamer Crown of Gallcla (Br). Guantanamo
August 26, to the Trinidad Shipping and Trad-
Ing Co, in ballast. Arrived at the Bar at 3
a m.
Strainer Oceanic (Br>. Southampton and
Cherbourg August 24 and Queenstown 'J">. to
the White Star Line, with 60.-, cabin and :«7
steerage passengers, malls and mdse. Arrived
at the Bar at 12:57 a m.
Steamer Fortuna (Nor). Cardenas August ir>.
Matanzas 22 and Havana 2.".. to the Blunson
Ss Line, with sugar. Arrived at the Bar .it 8
a m.
Steamer El Cid, Galveston August 2."i, to the
Southern Pacific Co. with mdse. Left Quaran
tine at 6:33 a m.
Steamer Bluecher (Ger), Hamburg August
21, Boulogne and Southampton l'_'. to the
Hamburg-American Line, with 107 enhin and
541 steerage passengers, malls and indse. Ar
rived at the Bar at 2 a m.
Steamer Koenig Albert (Ger). Genoa Ausrust
11. Naples in and Gibraltar 22. to O+lricha &
Co. with 316 cabin and 321 steerage passen
gers and nidsf-. Arrived at the Bar at 6 18
a m.
Steamer Kilsyth (Br). Nine Bay August 2.">.
SEPTEMBER 15th
First showing of
Shirts for Autumn Weir. Alanv
are dainty color effects never
woven in cloth until now.
EARL ft WILSON.
Antique Bellows
Fenders. Fire-Sets, Andirons
Coal and Wood Holder*
J^VIS&C^NGEft
iaoaud lU2U'v»i t-.'dSt.. New Voru
to the Hill--- Ss Line, with BwJM Arrived
tbe ifuiiawn ss Unr. with Banar mwwi
Trtabtad it. s.vannm 2£carts««a n^ w(th
24 and Ktr.Ri.ton 27. f " '- qn V ' » r- - i at tW
■7S pasp*nK*rs. malls and Bsaßt, Arri.ea
,n.ls'-. Left Quarantine at Z.vO _p m. — .;.» ft.
Steamer Pannonla <Br>. JJ'tt'^rtKraltnf
' name 13. rnl-rmo 18. "•»*•, "JSZ m ca bin
21, to th* Cunard F« Co. I-td. ~ u " V,*. .\r
an.l 1 133 steeraße pas^nK-rs an<l niad.
1 !-,-<-,-! at the Bar at 4:41 P 1 "- „._u , t t«« and
Steamer Verona mal). J.«i«i A «r « f*
Naples 20. to H»rtn»M. aT *_' °- anrl „,fl«- •
Anired at th« Bar «t 4:OH pm. Thlrtv-H.rh«
Arrived at tho Bar at 4.CW , p i rn. tran -lt
cabin and 7.M etcerage pa«sfn«era arc in
for Philadelphia. ...„., port An
Steam-r Vlncenzo rtl ffo^JfiSffi Co. •"»"
hi Sas'ss^SSi ■« ••
Anchored In Quarantine at i^ W^ m^ T , ro
Steamer P^o Paulr, (Brar>. R1« A R
August and Para South of Heotiasw
Oraca. with mdse. South of sconai
ship at 11 pm. v , Au _ n ataa p m "Had
Handy Hook. N i. Au* ?1.-Tmodefate sea.
south, moderate brew: cloudy, moment
STEAMERS AT FOREIGN PORTS.
ARRIVED. .
AdelSdl-A^ of ***><.*?»& JK
New York via St Vincent. C V .
mantle. . „ ■. -»v- York
Liverpool. Auk 31-CampanU (Br). >™
via Flshßuard. tHoro for
Shanghai. Aug 28-St Patrick (Br), Mi R
I Rotte;dlm °A«R 30-Lltuan.a CB-a* SCew Tart
i York and Newport N>»> via P«r l«n
I pn r York and Newport News X*^?"™ via
Port Paid. Aiig 31-Bl«Iey (Br) Ne* orK
Oran for Aden. Singapore, etc.
SAn-ED.
Steamers Mauritania mr). 001 : eTll *Br)!
GaJveston; Prudential J«gS«2t^jfVSi:
Port Antonio; Hermod (Nor), > r .*v or i _ rßr ).
P-nn-vlranla (Ger) Harnr«r»: Gr«a^
Grenada: Potomac (Br). Fernanaina. <- {
(BrV Port Paid: Oomar^h-.
sonville: Umpasae, Key T* est. «ic.
Norfolk and Newport News.
SAILED.
Barbados. Au* 29-^Tustln (Br), from Para for
Eoutha m P tln rk -Au S W-Atr-to (Br» » To£
via Berbad!>B. Colon. Xlnrston. etc . noon.
goe^o^ifdSTa^SSwSM^
NVw York for Hot,* Koaj: £**££*%-
GrosA" (6rt».fr«n Bremen and Southamp
ton for Now York.
Genoa Au«r 31-Cretlc (Br). New York.
PASSED.
Kinrale. A'lir 31— Terenc*. (B«. New. York for
Manehe?t»r. .^-
The BROWNING-KING
SPECIAL is on sale to
day in all of our stores.
It is a better Derby bat
than anything heretofore
shown at
83.00.
This hat is made by one of
the best manufacturers in
this country, from a special
mixture of fur. closely
felted, insuring a body that
will give satisfactory ser
vice even in a light-weight
hat.
It is trimmed with specially
made bands and bindings,
and has a genuine French
Calf leather, the best
known to the hat trade.
The details of the hat are
in keeping with the high
grade materials of which
it is made. The blocks
embrace every proportion
from the smallest to the
largest, and are made in
three weights — self-con
forming, flexible and full
stiff.
Browning-King
'mm & Company
y sSffi r Broadway at 32nd Street
V' Cooper Square at sth Street
Fulton Street, Brooklyn
AMU NTS.
I Entire Block. T.th Avf.. 4:<<i-44th Sis. FV - S. !
Dally Matineeg a 2 Best Seats $1 00 j
opens next SAT. evg. s ;v: n
Gigantic Entire JJew Triple Production.
The International up. j i-> >;. „ j
MM of < The i Cirrus
Ni;ii{ur;i S Kiirtlii|iinke>. I Acts.
M;i\lne KUl«tt'» Til 39 St . bett. FT vA(i Ay '
TO.MCIII TU,- |jnPT«DT A New
at s:--V.s :--V. In L UrOianl Ka re, rvmed y.
Nazimova'a 39TM ST. Theatre 30th * B""v"
ZSBS&ffiM Wan Bgg
DflLY' L BaBY SINE K-K
B-way * 3»th. I>«D I WSMC l.ah. l> av .
ll'irgy Til.. 4l*B'y. Ev.Sri.".. Mts.Sat..l.nh r>
I.IU I THE SUMMER I IK* m
riKi.ns I u'ininvKßs H^fkaxkliv :
I YRIC 4<:dSt " w - of B ' »>- Km... la I
„.lguis mm ,',',■>»»•;.■■
H. c l.'ihor Day — >I.\l>\MF X *"
Ha.U^t.rj.W.ofß'y. <» IS Mat Trl- 11 -„ I
Last vrvek Here t'I.\KA in nie.M«rrl...
Next v.-k Cm I] l.li-M -v of a Star *"
Wed; Evg . Sept. 7. MOTHkk. Seat, To-flay
< ;isino. TVy A 3Dtti Mat a Sat l.ah Day U' d i
IIP/and »0W » B«O JDW»TigfeIA \
I pw FleWs" Herald S«j.. ;v, & ;,, .., . Ev - .jY
Mats. i > manic v ( »LosLtnM 5h,,,,,,rrS h,,,,,,rr
DREAMLAND
Urlfclniil JefTrle*-.lolin<«on M..,,., w rlrturo.
Take Iron StftimhoAta.
MANHATTAN BE \'H
PAIN WORKS
ro vK.nr.
I BIU III DADI/ "iniian summer Car-
I LUnA rMniV mm closes sept, is
See the ends of the scarf?
2.5 cents.
See the smile?
13,368 scarfs end at that
price to-day.
Four-in-hands of fancy silks
in many weaves — knitted silks
too.
The semi-annual cleanup of
our neckwear stock, with that of
one of our makers.
All made to sell at .50 cents.
2.5 c.
Xo end yet to the hargains in
men's suits at $15 and $20.
Thousands suitable for wear
the next two months — not to
speak of next Spring.
Rogers Peet & Compant.
Three Broadway Stores
at at at
Warren st. 13th st. 34th sfc
AMUSEMENTS.
>'KW YORK'S LEADING THKATRF>
>FXT SUNDAY'S TTME.*:
"WHERE THERE IS NO
THEATRICAL SYNDICATE."
Special ArtlcJ* by
CHARLES FROHMAV.
CiIDIDC B>ay &40 St. ■««■ ' U
CHI ■ I II C Matinee Saturdays. 2:15.
SEAT SALE OPENS I REOPEN*
TO-DAY. 9 A. M ' NEXT MONDAY
JOHN DREW smith
ALAN DALE SAYS:
"OCR MISS GIBBS i
IS STILL RUNNING IN
LONDON. BUT THANKS To I
CHARLES FROHMAN. TOT" 1
CAN SEE A GOODLY SHOW
RIGHT HERE 1
at th* !
KNICKERBOCKER." j
EVE. 8:10. MAT. SAT. AT 2:13. I I
THE MUSICAL COMEDY f
MAGNIFICENT. 1
ftARRIPif 35th St.. nr. B'xray. Ev, « ?«i
UHnniV/fV M at. Saturday Or.lr. ■ 2:1."» ■■ t
THE FOryiEST THING IN NEW TORS
is »v»ry minute of A E. Matt2»T? ir.
LOVE AMONG HIONS
I VPPIIM * stil St - nr - B'wiy. Eves 1:15.
1- I V/CUIYI Mat. Saturdays Only. 2:15.
THE GREATEST WONDER IN N. Y.
Is the Wondsrg.of the Arabian Nights 1.-.
THE BRASS BOTTLE
CRITERION*^ 'iirvLjilU
Ull! I EnIUII Mat. Sat. & Sept. 5. 2:15.
LAUGHS! LAUGHS'! UUGHS!!!
THE COMMUTERS^
HUDSON 44tb m.. mr. B- Way . ve«.S:l3.
nUUOUII Last M atine« Saturday. 2:15.
LAST 4 PERFORMANCES
THE SPENDTHBIfTiiMto
CHARLES DILLINGHAM'S Mats
GLOBE £?& %^v ,^3l
BESSIE McCOY^th^^hoV
IMPERIAL RUSSIAN DANCERS.
MEW AMSTERDAM JSKSV«- a T^
Mats. TTed. and Sat. Xtra Mat. Labor bar
She's the' Toast of th« Town!
MADAME SHERRY
LIN A ABARBANELL, with RALPH HER;
NEW YORK B'way & 45th St. ~Eve.««Tls
I^iCVV lUnrV Matlne* Sat. Onlr « i.\.
THE ARCADIANS
THE MOST ENDURING IS THE BEST
I (RFRTV w '»* 4 - d >' Ev< "» fits
* jiDl: ***'* M Mats. Wed. & Sat.. ~11
"WON RIGHT FROM Tlifc
START. '—Herald.
"No !iv«:i»r farce ha? nrlnei
through w»st 42d St. in a long*
time." — World. I
"One of the roost !™t«»r»9'---e plays*
S*-*; York has had in ci- i •*'- ,
— Sun.
HENRY B. HARRIS Fill I all J
■■P ■■ V "Real plar, real character.
§ U k r»al plot." — T'— :-«
* 2 ■ "Genuine humor and c-—
■ ■■ m utne pathos." — Post.
COUNTRY il
B#% \§ "Should be ftr>od flat* a !c-«
II W fun on Broadway." — Jour-
U I - ral of Commerce.
BY EDGAR ''J".. c"lc "l. ta , tnlr •. Broadway
S T . TV IN. hit." — Telegraph.
"Inxtant success." — Commercial.
"Audience lay back and laughed."
— Eve. ■Worlfl
"Po alive, »o rolltckfnr. that It has
come to stay." — Globe.
"The characterization Is well done"
— Eve. Mai!. I
J&ROiN - PARIS^^I T — ■
Refreshments. Table Chairs. $1.
LAST 3 NIGHTS
F. 7.IEGFTLD. tlr.'f. New Revue. '
FOLLIES g 19 10 IS:
DC! i(AA 44th *■'*■• n-r B-war. | SEATS
tSCLAaVIU SAT. NIGHT. 8:15.1 TO-r.vY
DAVID BELASCO THE LILY
\ Sfc Int LILT
EXTRA MATINEE ÜBOR r».\T.
DCDIIRI ll* V". 4 - - n'r ITway Eve •:13
ntrUDLIu Wrd and Pat. Mat.. 2:t-\
A laiiKh with Erery Tick of the Watch.
rah" V>;,y ner BOBBY BURNIT
g^o^ROM^ MEXT SAT. & H0».
OLDFIELD-ROBERTSON
\NP OTHER GRBAT RACERS in THE BU>
GEST R^XCE .MEET In rHE HIST OF
WTO RACING. (M'c'm't DAN SMITH.*
NO SPEED LIMIT. •-* •» (> P. M. Crt/«
GESERAL-ADMISSIOX.-r _•_■ •.P - -
TeTftrt n*v. 4,% th st." r.v«. si.v" Mai«ktr«*
Ad IUX • Si« 2:t.v Wed. Mat . r.«V -*»£
SEVEN DATS
Wullh. W-..?^ < •■> Ev .S:l." .Mts.S-it.Lab t> W - >l}
H.B.Warner \ u £tAIus Jiirmy at entini
City Theatre E. 14th St. Eve* Sar.M.it CV^r
PIPI ier C t»ith '••- « iv» -born/
*■*■■»>■ I *- and Maude K:iynw»mtf
n»K»nnll»c !-•**»! ''"■ «••«»»• — Rrlxht KM
AUTCDIOAiiI , JI'I.IAN El-TIXIK./
HIfICnIUAII [ K.I HI..rH,H .1u11..' K-4
4Jd St.. nr. IVwuy. ; lohnnr Vnnl. ( mini •!
i:\II MAT. -.'■%<•. > CoiintfM ChU<». l»«hrr« I
CIICII I World In Wax. K.^-^veH V><- "4
CUCIi «'lNKM.\TO<;iJ.\ril K*ih »•<•*»'..
Ml]>»i' : * : ■ Mu»i>r (.»?ni.r X lVople »IKe«» Abo'- 1 *
~1% 111 A IVIRI/ A i Ch*rmlon." Rotfe's R* ! :
lii \ iDrvri f0 ,,,.,., w f; „,,^,
* ■ Mnl niill.T. ■•« ! * I.c© Tlarrison. others. '
HVMMKK"«rFIN'* «.«•. rilwartlH. Truly
DftnC» nilll||l > i M»i»tt«i-k. R. I~ »••«■•
nUUr Matinee.. ! h«rj:. S«.urt 1 ■♦ >'«*"« *"
IiIAHIUV " : M >'•■"' n> .*<>-iOi- Mm r» il3r<
AuflULinl Ibe GUI I Left Behind M*

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