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New-York tribune. [volume] (New York [N.Y.]) 1866-1924, September 29, 1910, Image 2

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|[ ieiO 1910
BLACK
STARR
j Si FROST
I Successors to Ball, Black & Co.
Wedding '
Gifts
» Jewels
, * Sterling Silver
Galdware
Stationery
I n every design or selec
tion of gems there is a
distinction which breathes
the individuality charac
teristic of every creation
which we offer. Particular
care is used at all times to
avoid the commonplace.
Kfth.Avenue &
Thirty- ninth Street
\ vr "York
Ca mmeyer
Stamped on a
Shoe means
Starmam^Merii
6 TH Ave.&2Q TK St.
U-CAN-B-E-Z
SHOE
for MEN
Who Want Comfort
Black and Russet
$5.00 $5.50 S^.OO
hey arc built along
the natural lines of
Ihe foot, thereby in
suring perfect ease.
1 r
Ne« I all "tammejer" Style
i o:>k Mailed free on Request.
BARNES TO SUPPORT TICKET
Expects Harmony to Prevail in
Party— Griscom Says the Same.
Famtoga Sprinu.-. N. V.. Sept. 2R—Will
lam Hariies, jr.. of Albany, wlio led iho
Sght ot the "old guard" against Colonel
K'loscvclt, said To-night:
.The ticket in Dominated and I am for the
ticket. That is axiomatic it is party eov
• rnmcitt. 1 ."-liail support the nominee* of
IN<' convention nTid tu>p«- lor liie best. I
expert tliat harmony uiji prevail In the
jiar.y. - '_ - :
The s:«te cntrrcntlon is ihe supreme .-ns
tnority ot tho party, i beheve in party
tsuyvt Ltraent. 1 believe in acquiescing in
Ihe will of the majority. 1i;. adopting the
nrtndple of <str«-«-t nominations th<- party
has ><■( its fare in iho direction of radical
ism which, if the tendency is not checked.
V.HI mean t!i<' advocacy iater of the
Initiative *?id refenenomn. direct l« j>risi;i
tinn. In oiiicr v.or<i=. a i»:jre democracy as
advocated !>y Mr. Uooscvtlt in Jjl«= sj»eceh
<iji tlte duett nomination* plank.
T>ire<-t-iioniina!icins in themselves are not
tiJiimportaTit. But the -party has made a
etujv-ndoiis blunder in bov.irie t<i a haMily
•. hi-.ijrhi out agitation. It may !>e political
expediency, as Mr. Roosevelt Kail. but any
political party that bows i«* political ex*
}.«-<iK-?,cv i«- making the one fundamental
*rjor tho <f>nsequenees ef which it cannot
;i\«'id
At St. I/f.uiis «n !>*•"> thVre n-rre eompro
misep. but through the Candgbted and in
domitable courat,->* <if Tnomjis <;. Platt the
Tlepubiican party was forced to adopt the
i:old stan^ani. That presentment, appar
rntly dangerous at th«> time, has ■ een the
cavse of «-ver>- Republican victory That has
ink-!-. T'lai-e from that tinie to this. Op
portunism is iHix>uif\r at the hour. lt.« day
of exist. ne«- is short. It is ib«- hope of the
rxm^emttve Republican thought of the
*tau that Mr. i>tim?on in his campaign
and if clen.-d <Jover!:nr will not betray the
EasM. eycophancy Ti.ai (he majority of the,
convention Bttowed. but ■will return 'to those
fnndamrntal principles of Republicanism
that have piven tJk- party a right to exist
- ÜBnM that he w iil recopnlze that the
r.e«ire of Rome for political !«ower must not
influence his mind. crhJch uji to this fime
has shown intelligent treatment of public
matters, and thai be will not be deceived
!.y the political .vagaries of the man who
placed him in nomination. T'pon this hor>«
r^Pts ib" future of the ItKjniLHcan party 'in
the Si;ii«- of New York.
Mr. Gri*oom s;i!d to-right that he ha>3 re
<^j-.<-d assurances from leaders of the "old
py;ird" i:i all parts of the suite that they
vould pupport the ticket heartily.
"There will be complete harmony in the
CKinpaiKn." he said. "\V« shall fiave tiie
i:r.iTf^i support of every elerat-nt in the
J-arty."
Mr. Griscom iidde<l that as a result of the
j<ction of The state convention he confi
dently expected that the party would win
at the i<olls in November, and said further:
W<- bare in Mr. Stirason a man of the
hipheM oru«-r. He is a man whom we can
<-«>!njiare without eharoe with Governor
Hughe* ai.d other successful • -ruor.-
Tit*- action of the convention will lx? of the
greatest help to Ihe party.
llr. .Siimson is a. tn-.iu whom we can take
be; o r«> tiit voters of* the. state with the
ksoviefixe that hn will fulni hi? duties- to
the people jn every respect, and I am coti
vinowl that be will i>e «4«^j«-d.
TO r *
Natura) Laxative
Wafer
Quickly Relieves:—
Biliousness.
Sick Headache,
Stomach Disorders.
Hrst remedy for
CONSTIPATION
LEAVING. THE CONVENTION HALL AFTER THE FIGHT OX THE PLATFORM A DIFFERENCE
Congressman Cocks and Theodore Roosevelt— Lou Pay" and William. Barnes, Jr. •
(Photo&raphs.copyrlght, 1910, by the American Press Association.) J\7~; : :i
STIMSON AND SCHOENECK 1 W\
tins ronvention." he said. '"It is now sailing clear and clean, with a
platform which will appeal to the people. It has nominated strong,
clean candidate?."
NOMINATIONS ALL
MADE UNANIMOUS
[H\T»-l»CTai)h to The Tribune. 1
Saratoga Springs. N. V.. Sept. 28.—
was ♦> p. m. when the convention recon
vened, although the recess had been
taken only until ." p. m. With the begin
ning of the rollcall for nominations Alle-
Kany . yielded 'to the 19th District of
New York, and Kinpsbury Fester took
the platform to place in nomina
tion Representative William B. Ben
net. After tracing Mr. Bennet's biog
raphy from the cradle to manhood Mr.
Foster informed the. convention that
it was his candidate who saved from de
feat the railway rate bill, the postal sav
ings - bank bill, the par* food bill and
other important legislation passed in the
last several years. He insisted that Mr.
Bennett was "to find Sir Galahad who
had sought to found the Holy Grail of
civic righteousness" and whose record
was "'as pure as the waters which flows
from the eternal hills whence cornea my
candidate's impregnable strength."
Mr. Foster was followed by H. B. Ful
1. rton, of Oransre. who announced amid
great applause that he purposed "to cut
it short and bite it off."' and who then
proceeded to announce that it was time
for the convention to accept the slogan
of the distinguished permanent chair
man and "harmonize and temporize."
Saying tliat he came from the-county of
Orange, where was born the young man
just nominated, he said be could indorse
every word just uttered by Mr. Foster.
! Mr. Fullerton referred with great ef
fect to the time when "our splendid and
l>eerless Koosevelt" was attacked in the
I halls of Congress In connection with
Secret Service. '"it was this fearless
I young man who came to the rescue of
I the President," he said.
"We were divided yesterday on the
trivial question of a temporary chair
man." declared Mr. Fullerton. to the
obvious amusement of Colonel Roose
velt, "but to-day we have heeded the
admonishment of our distinguished
{chairman, and stand as a unit behind
; Mr. Bonnet."
Fearful at one time that Mr. Puller
ton had forgotten his promise to "cut it
short and bite it off," the convention
I protested somewhat noisily, but yielded
to his plea for ■ moment more, during
'which he pronounced his peroration, fol
j lowed by great enthusiasm In the Men
i York delegation.
The rollcsJl then proceeded until Nas
sau was reached, when Mr. Roosevelt
was re-ognlzed and ascended to the
platform amid a tremendous outburst
of enthusiasm.
As had been the case earlier in the
day. the colonel's every period and his
frequent, characteristic gestures and
facial contortious were greeted with vig
orous applause. In fact it seemed only
necessary for him to screw up his eyes
and show his teeth to elicit the heartiest
laughter and applause.
Roosevelt Names Stimson.
Mr. Roosevelt then placed the name of
Henry I* Sttms-on in nomination. He
said:
Before pro* ec-ding to make the nomina
tion tliat 1 have to make I wish to state
that I i a 1 ,-' * very real, a very genuine
,'l ]r ,i ],],.] M-speot for Congressman Ken
iifct ' Bui I, think that the situation which
-re now ';.,., calls for the nomination of
anoU.tr man. l riw to nominate Hear? 1.
Si'itu-. ii and it i* perfectly appropriate mat
V .l man of another county, mall nomi
nate him. I • ■■>-...'■ I feel that at this ♦■!«..
•urn where BO much Is at Muk<-. it makes
not th* slightest difference from what
DOUllty be cuir.es if ho l- the right type of
a Wn Now. ■»c have taken high and
auvancp«l' ground in our platform to-day,
arid OUT words will •1...1 credit, or <li-. redit
upon OS aerordlnßly aa th«-y are backed
up hv our <ie»-<lt--. and I ' wish to m-«> not
mt-refv a thoroughly good man l;;.lii. «l. but
J mMt to so«- the very heal man that «>•
<an set in the Mat** "nominated., and for
tliat reason I ask your • support for the
<MUididat>- whom l h.t.<- named
Whf-n. as PrfstJdpnt. it •..(•amp my duty
to »p|M>int a District Attorney of. New York.
i ( ( -d that I had to choose an ofll'iT ho
ne«-<lr-d to display qualities .as grent a«
tnoN «f any infmhcr of the Cabinet. I
fell that there was a demand wad* upon,
not merely the integrity, but the truculent
integrity of tli*» man, a mand n»ad« upon
his ability. upon l - courace. puch as
could be made Is hardly any of ';■ r position.
\t tha« time wo knew that the man to
he' aplwin'ed would : ( \ ■•■ to be employed
by the government againM nome. of th*
ni'»?t powerful bujdneaa roinfjlnatior? in
<':o laTid. who v.ould employ the ablest
roun^l 'hat could he employed, and that
v.r- mnht have in the representative of the
l>»sop!e a man who could meet fairly on
jiieir level tee ablest man that these great
NFTtt-YOittT DAIIA TRIHIXK. THIUSDAV. SKITKMHKH 11>. 101 ft
< ..niinur.l from first |..it'
corporations could employ. T then went
over tho matter most carefully, among
others, with your chairman. Mr. Root, and
we cam© to the conclusion that the very
best man we could name for a task as
difficult and as important as any that was
to be performed in my administration or
that of the present President was the man
whom I now nominate. We put him in and
he made good.
It was his business to bring to justice
the Sugar Trust, one of the greatest cor
porations in this country, which by a most
elaborate system of collusion with govern
ment officials had defrauded the govern
ment out of literally enormous sums —
sums representing a vast fortune. So re
markable was the combination that until
we put in Mr. Stimson it hard proved im
possible to get at the actual facts. Mr.
Stimson got justice. Mr. Stimson convict
ed man after man in the employ of the
Sugar Trust. Mr. Stimson proved bis case
so clearly that the trust threw up Its
hands and returned to the government an
enormous sum.
He secured restitution, he secured pun
ishment. We have said on this platform
that we stood for justice, that we would
punish the corrupt man in public life and
in busmen life alike' and that the highest
social- or political' or nusiness affiliations
should not save the offender.
Those have been our words and those
have been Mr. Stimson'p deeds. What we
have said be lias done You can judge his
future by his past. He has performed a
great and a diflicult task of incredible im
portance and value, and he has performed
it as literally as no other man that I know
In New York could have performed it. Mr.
Stimson has not been a man much in pub
lic office. He has done his duty In th*
Tank* all bis life as a working Republican.
He has shown himself a tried and faithful
public servant In a position of incredible
difficulty.
Ii we nominate him, his nomination is a
guarantee that every promise made in the
platform will be kept, in letter and in spirit,
tor he i* of that temper that nothing in
the world could prevent him from endeav
oring to keep the promise, and he ha.s the
trenchant ability that will enable him to
keep it.
1 feel that we should put on the platform
that we have made a man whose past
career is In itself an absolute guarantee,
that be can and will do the. particular work
which he is to be elected to do, and there
fore I nominate for the high position of
Governor of the great Empire State to head
the Republican ticket Henry L.. Stimson.
The conclusion of Mr. Roosevelt's
speech was the occasion of another ova
tion.
John Lord oßrirui. of Buffalo, followed
Colonel Roosevelt, and. declaring that
th* cHiidMatn nominated by this conven
tion was certain to be elected, seconded.
on behalf <>f Erie County, the nomination
nf Mr. stimson. The roHcali was punc
tuated by frequent applause- from the
friends of both candidates.
When Livingston County was reached
ex-District Attorney Cook, the spokes
man, said:
"We have never seen this man Stim
son, hut we aling him three votes," the
total vote of the county being' seven
votes. The announcement was received
with an almost unanimous hiss.
Speaker Wadswortfa was greatly dis
tressed that a member of his delegation
should have appeared to cast a slur on
Mr. Stimson. While he did not feel that
Mr. Cook so Intended his remarks, he
expressed his disgust in emphatic terms,
and as soon as an opportunity presented
itself made the motion to make the
nomination of Mr. Stimson unanimous,
thereby seeking to make, it clear that
Mr. Cook's slighting remark was not
representative of the sentiment of the
delegation. Mr. Wadsworth later took
occasion to express his deep regret over
the incident In terms as sincere as if
less emphatic than he employed when
be voiced his sentiments directly to Mr.
Cook.
It soon became evident that Mr. Stim
son would be nominated, and on the close
01 the rollcall the chairman announcer!
that the vote stood: James B. McEwen,
35: T. B. Dunn, 88; William <;. Bennet,
IM2, and Henry L Stimson, <»4K. The
announcement was received with great
enthusiasm. When the cheering had
died away Kingsuury Foster moved that
the choice of the convention be mado
unanimous, a motion which was prompt
ly seconded not only by Speaker Wads
worth but by Messrs. Aid ridge, of Mon
roe, and Barnes, of Albany, and by
unanimous consent the secretary was in
structed to cast the entire vote of th*
convention for Mr. Stimson. an an
nouncement which decked still further
applause. i
When the enthusiasm which had at
tended the announcement of Mr. stim
son's nomination had spent itself, Hoy
B. Smith, of Onondaga, was recognized
and placed in nomination; HCdward
Sc.tioe.ueck, jduyoj; of. Syracuse, /or
VOTE ON THE PRIMARY PLANK.
Saratoga Springs, N. V., Sept. 2S. —
The vote by counties on the amend
ment to the primary plank in the
platform submitted by Speaker Wads
worth, which was defeated, was as
follows, those voting in the affirma
tive supporting the "old guard":
County. ' Ayes. Noes.
Albany 28 —
Allpgany B ~~T
Brootnc — •*•
CHtaraugus ..- - S
Cayuea '~ .»
C*hau;auqua - '5
Chemung - ]>
chenango — '
Clinton — (>( >
Columbia " ~~
Corttand — «
Unaware *> —
!»utches» •> '
Brie — «
Ksspx — « 3
Franklin 7 —
Kulu.n an.l Hamilton — 8
Genesoe ' " '6
< Irecne • 5 —
H«»rkim?r !' —
Jefforson -- 13
Kings 57 85
Lewis -. 1 •*
J>ivin?ston -. «> —
Madison ► 3 •>
Monror SS —
Montgomery fi 3
Nassau — 1 1
>.V\v York .- 10 179
X para •*> <"*
nnriria ".".'. -10 13
Onondaga -'•* —
Ontario - 1 s
Orange •*> '■*
Orleans - *
OSWPJJO — 11
OU*EI — >
I'utnam - '
Queens ..^ 11 IS
nmwrimr — 1!>
Richmond 1 1
Kockland •> —
t^t. I^awrence 1+ . I
Saratoga • 10 . —
Bcheneotady —- 1 1
Schohaiie * --
Bchnyl«r , — • 3
i i n'*ca •> —
Htpuben '♦
Suffolk — 12
Sullivan *'•
Ticsra - a
Tompklns - •
TMstrr •' «
WHrrf-n •"> '
Washington ~~ I
Wayne •"> «
Westchester 33 —
W>-omtag — «
Yates - 2
Totals 309 61*
Lieutenant Governor, a- nomination
which was promptly seconded by Rep
resentative Cocks, of Nassau, and ex-
Ass< mhlyman Murphy, of Kings. < m
the passage of a motion that the name
be mad" by acclamation Chairman Root
instructed (he secretary to cast the vote
of the convention for Mr. Bchoeneck.
Ex-Attorney General Julius M. slayer
of New York offered the name of Samuel
S. Koenig for renomination as Secretary
of State. The name was seconded by
Mr. Lewis, of Kings, and Assemblyman
Callan, of Columbia, and the nomination
was made by acclamation.
On motion of Judge Tierney. of Rens
selaer. James Thompson, of Valley Falls,
was placed in nomination for Controller.
Mr. Thompson is a prominent business
man In his section— an extensive paper
manufacturer. His nomination was sec
onded by Senator Brackett. Harry C.
c.lore, of Kings, placed in nomination
Senator John B. Kissell, who received a
second from Assemblyman Merritt, of
St. Lawrence. Representative Herbert
Parsons also seconded Mr. Thompson,
and a rollcall was ordered. Tho result
showed »»<t9 votes for Mr. Thompson and
293 for Mr. Klhscll, and on the motion of
Mr. Woodruff the nomination of Mr.
Thompson was made unanimou?.
Representative J. Sloat Fassett placed
in nomination Thomas F. Fennell. of Kl
mira. Deputy Secretary of State, for
State Treasurer, and the Secretary of
State, Mr. Koenig. seconded the nom
ination, the selection being made unani
mous.
Attorney General Edward EL O'Malley
was placed In renomination by Wesley
C. Dudley, District Attorney of Erie
County, his nomination being seconded
by Representative Vreeland. who paid
the Attorney General a high tribute.
His nomination also was made unani
mous.
For State Engineer and Surveyor
Frank M. Williams was named by Sen
ator Thomas, of Madison, and his nomi
nation was made by acclamation.
Judge Irving G. Vann, of Syracuse,
was renbmlnated by acclamation for
Judge of the Court of Appeals, and on
motion of General Stewart L. \V Iford
a resolution was adopted authorising the
chair to appoint ii committee to nomi
nate a candidate for judge to succeed
the late Edward B. Huril-tt. this being
of course, with the purpose of permitting
mi agreement with the Democrats where
by a non-partisan judicial ticket may
be named. Judge Vann. if fleeted, will
be retired, on account of the •<£<■ limit.
three years hence.
Lloyd Griscom offered the customary
resolution authorizing the chair to ap
point *t conuaittss to notify the candi
dates and another thanking the citizens
of Saratoga for their hospitality, etc.,
which was adopted. Mr. Root named ■
notification committee; headed by Mr.
GrlßCom. At 8:15 o'clock the gavel fell
and the convention adjourned without
day* - ' t
PROGRESSIVES CONTROL
"Did Guard's" Rule in State
Committee Ends.
SUCCESSOR TO WOODRUFF
Parsons and Bannard Mentioned
for Chairman, but No Decision
Reached-The New Members.
[By Telegraph to The Tribune.]
Saratoga SprinKS, N. T., Sept. 28.— Control
of the Republican State Committee has
been wrested from the "old guard" by the
Propressivo.« who bave fought Under the
Rooeevett banner. Sixteen cTianßes have
been made in the membership of thirty
eight. The Progressives figure that they
have control by twenty-one vot<-s at least
under the new alignment which was
reached in the convention.
No meeting of the new committee for
organization was held at the, end of the
convention, as Is customary. Instead, it
announced that a moetinp would be called
soon, of which due notice would be jjiven
by letter. At lhat meeting the n*»w chair
man will be chosen. Who he will he has
not been decided yet. There is considerable
talk of Herbert Tarpons and of Otto T.
Bannard.
Borough President Cromwell, of Rich
mond, who it was expected would be re
tired, won a re-election in the Stb District.
The fact that one of his Richmond dele-
Kates broke away from him on the Roose
velt vote was taken to indicate bis defeat.
"When the caucus waa held this morning
be kept Ma eight from Richmond intact
and annexed one of the eight delegates
from Manhattan. This was one of the
men from the district of .lames K. March.
A compromise was reached between the
"old guard" and the Progressives in the
Odell district. Senator Rose found thnt
he had not the votes to elect him against
the opposition stirred up by the "old
guard' In Sullivan and Rockland. He re
tinvl, therefore, and James Kilby, of Rock
land. w;is chosen unanimously. Mr. Kilby
is considered to be h conservative progres
sive or a progressive "old guardsman." He
Is >\u\tc likely to line up with Ihe Roosevelt
mon in the reorganisation of the lommit
tee, although they are not counting on
him, as he is said to be more or less
friendly with William Barnes, jr.
c?tute Chairman Woodruff was elected to
the committee from the Ud District, replac
ing Join 11. Campbell. In his district, the
6th, Alfred E. Vas» took his place. Vass is
a hot Progressive.
"Dan" Strobel. of Herkinier. in the 27th
District, the man who caused Assemblyman
Kveleth to dodge the direct nominations
vole, wh'-n ho was pledged to support that
reform, has been retired. 1 1 is successor is
X. Jesse Hrayton, who Is said to be well
and favorably known to the Hhermanite*
In the distri-t, with whom Mr. Strobel was
affiliated.
Lloyd C. Grtoeom, president of tho New
York County Republican Committee, was
elected a member of the committee from
the 13th District, succeeding Ezra I*. Pren
tice.
Smith < ox. <«r Nassau, sue coded John J.
Bartlett. of Suffolk, who took the unti-
HOOBCTtIt side. Mr. Cox will not make a
similar mistake.
Michael Blake replaced Ceorge W. Wan
maker in the 11th District in Manhattan.
Charles K. L«XOW took William Hcntsl*!
place .in the lUth. H. S. Johnston will fill
the ulace of the defeated De Bragga in the
14th District.
Colonel "Atio" Ciriiber replaces Harry W.
Mack In the luth District, this bang the
one ealn made by th« "old guard" in all
the chanaes. Samuel Krulewltch retires as
retires. ntative of the 16th District, his suc
cessor IwihlK Morris l^evy.
I'hiliD Klling replaces J. Duncan I*iw
rence. of Delaware County, in the I'lth Dis
trict. Assemblyman Edwin A. Merrltt. jr.,
takes the place Of John P. O'Brien, of
Plattaburg; Speaker Wadsworth is put on
the committee to succeed John A. Merritt.
Jr.. of Niagara Falls, and McGregor A.
Phillies replaces Colonel John T. Mott.
Colonel Michael J. Dady, of Brooklyn,!
offered a resolution in the convention to
night providing for the appointment of two
members-at-largs on the committee The
present member-at-large was appointed to
rcDresent the negro rare. There are thous
ands of negroes in Kings County, Colonel
Dadv Bald, and he believed the Republi
cans among them were entitled to a repre
sentative on the committee like Charles W.
Andersen, of Manhattan. The convention
did not ncreo with him and defeated bis
resolution by a heavy vote.
The. new state committee is male up as
follows:
t— Smith Cox, succeeding John J. Rartlett
2— Timothy I. Woodruff, succeeding John
H. Campbell.
3- Lewis M. Swascy.
■J-.1. A. LiVillgßtOll
:, iv J. 11. Kracke.
6— Alfred 1: Vass. succeeding Timothy I*.
Woodruff.
7— Michael J. Dady.
s 1 reorxe Cromwell.
!• chin le- 11. Murray.
1" Samuel S. Koenig.
11— Michael Blake, surceeditifi •;. W. Wan
maker.
Chart— K. l/cxow, succeeuiag William
f llcuk'-L
& Altaian & <Sn.
CALL ATTENTION TO AN ENTIRELY
NEW ORIENTAL RUG
IN VERY CHOICE DESIGNS AND COLORS AND
A LARGE VARIETY OF SMALL AND MEDIUM
SIZES. THE WEARING QUALITIES BEING GUARAN
TEED.
B. ALTMAN & CO. ARE SOLE AGENTS FOR THIS
RUG IN THE UNITED STATES.
r
& Altaian & (Ho.
HAVE READY FOR INSPECTION THEIR NEW
IMPORTATIONS OF LACE CURTAINS. PORTIERES,
UPHOLSTERY FABRICS AND CRETONNES.
— .- f '
THERE WILL BE PLACED ON SALE AT VERY LOW PRICE 3
THIS DAY (THURSDAY).
5,000 UPHOLSTERY SQUARES
OF DAMASKS. BROCADES. FIGURED VELOURS, ETC,
SUITABLE FOR CUSHIONS AND CHAIR SEATS.
35c to $2.50 each
THESE BEING EXTRAORDINARY REDUCTIONS
U. Attman & (En.
ARE NOW SHOWING COMPLETE ASSORTMENTS OF
BLACK DRESS SILKS
FOR AUTUMN WEAR. COMPRISING SILK AND WOOL SATINS.
MARQUISETTE. CRbPE METEOR. IMPORTED -BROCADES. SOFT
FINISHED DUCHESSE. ETC.
A SPECIAL SALE FOR THIS DAY (THURSDAY) WILL CONSIST OF
BLACK CREPE CHARMEUSE, 40 inches wide.
HERETOFORE $3.75 PER YARD . AT $2.40
BLACK CASHMERE DE SOIE, 36 INCHES, wide.
HERETOFORE $3.00 PER YARD . AT $1.58
fifth Jlccnue. a4th and 35th Streets, new York.
13— Lloyd C. Griscom. succeeding Ezra P.
14-H Pr s nt Jonnaton. succeeding J. H. De
IS-Abra a m Gruber, succeeding Harry W.
l^.-MoVri'^Levy. succeeding Samuel Krute
" witch.
17 -Moses M. Mekee
lV William H. Ten Kyrtc
William I* Ward.
"0- Tames Kilby. succeeding Benjamin B.
Odell.
"1-t.ou F. Payn.
corneliua V. * ollin?.
23 William Barnes, Jr.
24_philip Kiting.
25— John K. Stewart.
% -Kdwin A. Merritt. jr.. succeeding John
JKJ X O'PHen.
°7— M. Jess« Brayton. succeeding Daniel F.
McGregor A. Phillips, succeeding John
" ■T. Mntt.
"V- Francis He.ndrieks.
§>-George W. Dunn.
Charles H. Hett?
32— George W. Aldridge.
The Culmination of
Two Centuries of Effort
The Weber is one of a small group of
pianos — less than a half dozen all-told — which
musicians and musical authorities regard as
really great instruments.
This limited — the royalty of the piano world
and each one a true work of genius — is the culmination
of two centuries of earnest striving.
These few pianos are the "fittest" — survival of
as hardly fought a struggle for supremacy as industrial
history records.
And yet, even among- these few, there arc emphatic
points of distinction. .
The WEBER PIANO
With the Weber Piano, for instance.'the most marked
among these points is what is referred to by musical
people as "The Weber's sympathetic, singing tone. It
is this marvelous beauty and mellowness of* its tone.
together with the unsurpassed responsiveness of its
action, which, more than any other of its rare qualities,
have earned and held for the Weber its exalted rank.
Until one has seen and heard the Weber Piano, a
full realization of the wonders of piano value is out' of
the question.
A Betutifcl Model of the Weber Pi.no M.v be Purchased for *SCO.
Moderate Monthly Payments If Desired
THE AEOLIAN COMPANY
NEW YORK-CHICAOO-LONDON-PARIS-BERLIN
AEOLIAN HALL, 362 Fifth Avenue, near 34th Street. New York
»-.1. Sloat Fassett.
34— James W. Wads-north, jr.. succeeding
John A. Merritt.
John Grimm, jr.
3«— William 11. Daniel?.
• 37— Frank R. Ttter.
Member at large— Charles W. Andrrson.
PAY FOR NEW YORK SOLDIERS
State Volunteers in Spanish-American
War Will Receive $40,000.
Washington, Sept. 2S.— New York Stat%
volunteers in the Spanish-American War
•will receive about $JO,C»» additional pay
which they contend the government owe*
them. The claims of the Spanish war vet
erans have been pushed by Attorney Gen
eral CMall*»y of New York State.
The 47th Regiment, of Brooklyn, -will eet
JT.W3; the 2023 Regiment, of Buffalo, wilt
receive $9,273. and the. 2fllst and 203 d regi
ments, of New York City. $^525 and ff.OGSL
respectively.

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