OCR Interpretation


New-York tribune. [volume] (New York [N.Y.]) 1866-1924, October 02, 1910, Image 20

Image and text provided by Library of Congress, Washington, DC

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83030214/1910-10-02/ed-1/seq-20/

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M LE BLANC IN AN AEROPLANE, FLEW FASTER THAN A FLOCK OF CARRIER j
SWALLOW
£ r-ULES ZB^4 FEET:.
w 2rUL-ES 633.6 ttt.l
la close behind the automobile.
The speed that is credited to the leaders in
the race will be surprising to most persons. The
figures that are given, however, are taken from
the results of recent scientific investigation.
It has long been known that the homing
♦igeon, though the surest of all birds in return
ing to its nest, was not the swiftest. An attempt
was made not long since in the French army to
substitute swallows as messenger birds. After
a prolonged series of tests the attempt was
abandoned, as it was found that the swallows
NEW-YORK DAILY TRIBUNE. SUNDAY. OCTOBER 2, 1910>'
: CROW
2 M*LES 260 FEET
were likely to go astray. Some remarkable
records for speed were obtained, however. The
< stimate, placing the swallow's flight at 2 mil»-s
2.544 feet a minute represents an average of the
best records made in these tests.
Notwithstanding that the aeroplane still has
competitors ahead in the race for the supremacy
of the air, it is intert sting to note that many of
its most famous rivals have already been left
behind. The pigeon, which was perhaps the
most celebrat< d of these, is left well in the
rear. The wild duck and wild goo.^e, long con
t liarasssi
LOCOMOTIVE a MILES
i-TMI-E 4*7 FEET...
sldered marvels of speed, are fairly outdis
tanced. And even the eagle, the "king of birds, "
whose strength of wing has been celebrated
since the first men turned thefr eyes toward the
sky, has been outstripped and beattn in his
own kingdom.
Incidentally, It la Interesting to note the rela
tive speeds attained by noteworthy inhabitants
of the earth and tL* waters, and by man upon
both. "Without assistance man has been able
to swim 524 fee* v walk 1.017 feet, run 1.CC1.2
feet and skate 1.909.S feet in one minute. These
FRJGfVTE B»R-t>
IrHLE s*t£>3 FEET
MOTOR CYCLE 3 2 0 FEET...
are world's speeds made by sr:ch men as C. 3t UI
Daniels, the swimmer; William Young: and H. I ni
Curtis, the walkers; M. W. Long and '■"'■■ P<
I unghi, the runners, and H. P. Y. -\- r and C. n
Rudd, the skaters. )e
In an eight-oared racing shell man has "• hi
died 1,124.4 feet in the same length of tine '^
This was the speed made by the Oxford crt« ' 3A
In 1803 and by Cambridge in "'•" on the PK- qi
ney-Mortlake course.
That a human beins: has sailed in z *352 •*
boat at Urn rate of -."-T :•• I in on* rr.inuie «2
DUCK
HffWtf
i HtiC h
1550 FEET..?
f*LCOH\
1 ri . E
1057 FEET..
~_m.

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