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New-York tribune. [volume] (New York [N.Y.]) 1866-1924, October 04, 1910, Image 3

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MAYOR GAYNOR AT
CITY HALL AGAIN
Remains Half a Da>. After
Absence from Desk of Near
ly Two Months.
CONFERS WITH OFFICIALS
Telia Committee of 100 Citizens
H*- Is Glad He Had Fortitude
to Remain in City's
Service.
Mayor Gaj-nor sat st his desk in the
City Hall yesterday for the first time
Fince l>e was shot in the neck on the
•t^amship Kaiser TVilhelm der Grosse
,i he was about to sail for Europe rm
hij" vacation. That was on August 9.
Just six da- less than two months ago.
To these who saw the Mayor yesterday
he 9ee.^*d to be in excellent health, but
his voice rare him much trouble, and
he said the doctors had warned him not
to tax it too much.
In speaking to # committee or one
hundred citizens who called ■■ the
Mayor at noon to welcome him back, the
Ma: or «aid: "I am extremely glad that
in some way or other. I do not exactly
know how, I have had the fortitude. If I
may call it that, to remain in the service
the city rather than go Into any other
rei-vice." This statement was followed
by enthusiastic applause.
Later the Mayor received the heads
of his departments In his private office,
at which, time they presented to him a
mrt cf resolutions expressing their thank
fulness over his recovery. Soon after 1
©'clock the Mayor started for home In
h!s automobile with Mrs. Gaynor.
A crowd of several thousand persons
who had gathered to see the Mayor
ch*»ered as he left the City HalL As he
entered his car the crowd closed in and
a policeman told them rather roughly
to stand back. The Mayor Immediately
stopped the car and rebuked the police
man. "T>o not speak to the people in
that way." he said. "Address them
politely. You have no right to epeai to
people In that way. They are not In
my way."
Little Girls Bring Flowers.
Many flowers were received by the
Mayor, but those he enjoyed most were
brought In person, by three little girls
representing Public School 177, which
la st No. 77 Market street. The com
mittee was headed by Mollla Prate, six
years old. who carried a bouquet of old
faaci^ned flowers, almost as large as
h*TselL She made a nice little speech
to the Mayor, to which he replied kindly.
Frcni the children of th» school they
hrr» a written message, saylnjr: "It is
our hope that every day will show how
clad the people of our city aro that
ymj hay« be*-n spared to them."
The committee of c tixrns which wel
(omfd litm bark in th<? May«vr*s paabßc
-rception room, had been formed by
PrpFident Finlcy ef the College of th«
<"ity of New Tork, assisted by Jacob
SdliSC A. Bartcn Hepburn, Corneiius N.
B!i?>s. "tt'illiani A. Marble, John Claflin,
Alderman Marx end William A. John-
Btnn. In presenting the committee, cf
v, hich Jacob Schlff was chairman. Fresi
<l«-nt Mitchel of the Board of Aldermen
paid that the citizens of New Tcrk
ntshed to express their gratification rt
tnr recovery of the Mayor.
In introducing John Clailin as the
principal speaker Mr. Schiff said:
Mr. Mayor. vi;*"rj you ■»«*re Mneken
rjn« nhy ib*- hani or the would- assa>sin
tJ-;* people of »w York, waoin you have so
faithfully served, felt horror and their
n^arrs went out to you and your family.
tfnn tir-y prayed to the Almighty that you
--- £>+ spared. They are grateful that
ireir prayer? hay* >>*^n h^ard and that you
■n hack to-day to taJt«> up azain the dutir-s
■"•r.i«~h have been so b«»r*fl''ial to jour b*»
]ni<rvri rt.ry. T have r^>«n asked to call upon
Mr OaS:n to express f»r this «-ontmittee I
vhar T_h» whole city wou'd rar to you xo
4ay wmM th<*y all be accommodated in this
Cttar Hall.
All Appreciate His Splendid Work.
Amor? other things. Mr. Claflin said:
\'.> have i-nme here to tell yog thai -we
«•«■ pi.i to s»^i you sack and to consrrat
ai*Xm jroo on poor rerorsry. A "or «*'
m«nv "of uf <-.pr»oK<*d you politically. Now
"• si' aj>r < " p ciat*» th» .<rpl«»ndid work you
>:j4i* *?nn«- fn r th" city, and «■» thajik Ood
that you srn abl»» to continue. We ear
rfTt:y <r:sh >ou li^aUh and happiness*.
Tho Mar. or. who was dr^ply touched
h:- t].r im TTng. rrspond^d !n a ]o~*' but
riißtiri' t voice. 11^ as id
G+nU+ra-n: I would have -«■■■■ \«»ry claxl
m a-.oid this if po^ih l ". but when 1 came
io thr offi--«» thip rooming my • rotary in
f'.TTTiFd m* that it •*■** a fix»"i fa«-t that you
•<••-«. mminr hwf to welcome me. and I
hs<l to aoqijir.w.^o. You win have to oxc'Jße
:n* from saving miirh. T -^ould like to «x
t»nri my thurk? »o you in Kiiiiable words.
hot unfortunate!; nr «woe is still .<u<-b
tiiaf I r.TKI zrrai rtifli.-ulty in paying any
th:rr at jjII in addition to the nifrn word«
■ 1 t. anU \o7j."*
1 nia 11 add thaJ 1 »m extrrm^ly z *<\ that
m r-onf i»a-. or unotner— l do not exactly
hove- J rutv^ had th* fortitude, if T
tr,^\ v« .-ail it. to rTiain m the Bervtoe of
the* City rat!i<-r than :" inio any oth<^r vr
*'—~. At:<l 1 ran hv with fonfidmrp, bo
y/^^^/ /^% # silks
C4>^+\-*i+s±<^& RUGS
/_ J, SCREENS
m The Oriental Store. bronzes
The Oriental Store LAMPS
■"7 I'-xr Vantuuf* i*
t'> Utvr ibr <)ricnt." >
PEW specimens in the Curio Room possess
* greater significance than an old Corean Pottery
Vase, the shoulder of which shows the eight diagrams
symbolizing Human Nature— Heaven, Earth, Fire and
Heat, Thunder. Wind, Water, Mountains, while a
decorative band surrounding the vase symbolizes lon
gevity, the Orientals' highest type of distinction.
For the coonomeur, as well as every admirer of the quaint ami
the rare, the Vantine Curio collection is full of peculiar interest
—exquisite carved ivories, jade and rock crystal cabinet pieces;
Satiuma vases, jars and bowls by master artisans of Far Nippon;
fine old lacquers, and other remarkable curios not to be found
elsewhere, appear in the exhibit.
A visit to the Curio Room will amply repay you.
B^ j,,. a ,. 18th to 19th Streets. New York
Droauway Ah , o . Bo . ton and Philadelphia.
MAYOR AND MKS. GAYNOR LEAVING CITY HALL YESTERDAY
, AFTERNOON".
cause I have not very ntnch confidence in
myself, that if the body of the intelligent
citizens, without regard to clamor and to
senseless noise and vituperation, will con
tinue to work with me In the three years
that I have vet to serve In the same way
In which, they have worked with me up to
to-day. I think that in the four years you
can accomplish something through me, as
poor an Instrument as I may be.
I do not pretend— l never have pretended
—that I can accomplish anything standing
alone, but as the mere voice of the intelli
gent and righteous people of the city I can
do something at least. I am certain that
with their voice- back of even the bad voice
that I have now I shall be able in the four
years to do some little good for the city.
Then the Mayor showed how strong
he was by shaking the hand d each one
present. To each he had some good
humored remark to make. "Here's the
man who is indirectly responsible for all
this,*" he said as Dock Commissioner
Tomkins came up. He asked John D.
Rockefeller how his father was.
Talks to His Official Family.
At the gathering of the official family
heads in the Mayor's private office later.
Corporation Counsel Watson said he
feared most of the departments had been
simply marking, time since the Mayor
went away, but were now ready for a
vigorous advance.
What the Mayor said in reply was
rather significant in view of the way in
which the Police Department has figured
in the papers In the last few weeks. He
.-a ■■'. in part:
■While I was clad to receive the citisens'
«T»mrDl'?«»«, I am mon> crlad to receive my
associate!", in the government of the city,
f»'-a - .;s> I am able to say that no matter
what has been said publicly I f"lt entirely
certain that every head of department and
everybody in any chief employment under
the city was entirely loyal to the oity: I
shall riot say to myself, because that
might perm eajotisUcai. but loyal to the
riTy during my absence, -working away.
not ■with noise and fury and newspaper
clamor, but slowly and carefully, as all
good work In the world from the beginning
of the world has been done and has to be
don* now and in the future.
fliers is no short cut to results. Every
body who wants to achieve tins to sit down
and }••» a man of detail. We Rornetimeg
talk about genius: but there is not any
genius in the world except the genius of
rettina- ready. if I may cite an instance,
that is all the genius that even Napoleon
had; he had genius enough to get ready
and organize, conditions before he at
tempted to do a thing, and that is all we
ran <30, and T am entirely satisfied that
you are all doing that to the best of your
ability.
It was soon after 0 no o'clock when
the Mayor arrived at the City Hall. He
had not been expected so bboi . and there
na« no one to i.rect him except Lieu
lenant William Kenn< his police aid.
Pome of th*- newsboys rnn tin and
ciwered when they pect-giiteed him
The Mayor spent the first hour re
ceiving several of his fikatda. Including
Commissioner ICdwards of the Street
Cleaning Department, who had not seen
him since the day ho was nli'-t At
JO;30 o'clock the Mayor went upstairs
to preside at the first budget hearing.
VICTORY FOR V. Y. U FRESHMEN
Win from Sophomores in Final Rush cf
"Bloody Monday" Contests.
"Bloody Monday"* had a lively ending
laj=t ev»nlnsr at New York University, when
sixty sophomores in a rtrash and tumble
majiliTl la-- - ten m!nute3 tried to Us
lodge ah- t ninety freshmen from the steps
<=adlng to Bntter TTall. Tnarnwh a. there
■Kfr* more freshmen on the step* than
there. w**r*» sophomores at the final count,
th*. •-tor- ami to the under clansmen.
The rush between th" two llshs^ii on the
camr'J* resulted in a draw. In the other
contests Kothstein. a freshman, won in the
middleweight -spuing bout from Fried
man, a *ophomor». itclfßjiisa, sophomore,
defeated Smith. freshman, in the heavy
we'jrht <-la.'«. In the llirhtweicht ■wtp«tM7i
M<-T.oughiin, jeophomore, won over Ha to
man.
NEW-YORK DVTU TBim M*. TUESDAY, OCTOBER I. 1010
1 From Yesterday's "Evening Post."]
MURPHY'S SKILFUL GRAB
■ IN MAKING UP STATE TICKET HE
LOOKED OUT FOR TAMMANY.
Selected His Own Candidates for
i State Engineer and Controller Be
cause These Two Offices Are Most
Desirable from Point of View of
Patronage — Tammany Laughs Now.
How- Charles F. Murphy, boss of Tar
n: many Hall, managed to reserve for Tar
n' many, as its share of the Democratic state
; ticket, the two offices— State Controller
I and State Engineer— which control about
90 per cent of the patronage is the talK
| of politicians, bis and little, to-day. That
i there are widely different opinions an to
i the wisdom or political sagacity of that
procedure Is a fact apparent to any one
who talks about it first to a Tammany
• man and then to some Democrat who is
i not affiliated with Tammany Hall.
Tammany is jubilant over the- "treat
j ment" its candidates received at the hands
of the men, or man. who made up the
I ticket. Long before the matter of the head
of the ticket was disposed of they were
telling how they expected to see Tammany
land "seme of the best plums. One Tarn
; rrany district leader declared that he did
Dot care who was named for Governor ho
long as men who would "give the boys
something to fight for" were lined up on
the remainder of the ticket. It was com
monly thought about the hotels that Tam
many "had •. something up its sleeve," and
as tli«-> day of nominations progressed it
was felt that there was an "understand
ing" whereby the offices which carried
I with them th» great bulk of the patronage
were to go to Tammany Hall. . . .
"Well informed political observers be-
Ijpvod. however, thai they saw more than
on« reason why Bon?*?! consented to take
the nomination offered him. One was Mr.
Bensel's known ambition to go higher in a
political way than he would over get by
means of the Board of "Water Supply. The
other was that the nomination of Bensel,
with a record of handling a big job well,
would provoke less objection and arouse
tens suspicion than would that of a man
not so well known, one who would be. »x
pected to take his orders so far as patron
age was concerned directly from Murphy."
But Murphy, who has known Bens-el ever
since ho used to be his boss in the Dock
Department, was convinced, so his friends
say. that he could count on Bensel Just aa
surely as he could on a man who would at
once "be recognized as his m»r" tool.
Sohmer Perennial Officeholder.
Af for the candidacy that went to Tam
many, that of State Controller, there ;
was ess attempt to make it appear to b«=t !
anything than what it is, a plum thrown '
into the •'"idle of the Wigwam. For j
William Sohmer. who received the- place, {
is treasurer of Tammany Hall, and has {
been as far buck af= any one can remember
a p<»r«nnial place hunter and officeholder. j
Ostensibly a r«<n! estate. d*>;<ler. he romrs
very near being nothing more nor le?s than
a professional politician.
He has been County Register. County
Clerk and a state Senator, and in all of j
these places he has had the usual Tam- I
many record of servile loyalty to the ma- ,
chine and nothing more. Tiir- controller- !
ship has always been looked upon by the !
bosses in both parties as the most useful j
for the, purpose of patronage. Two years
as" th«» Republican convention allowed the
plac on the ticket to Barnes. At Roches
ter it had been sail all along that the
office was to go to a Tammany man.
While these two office -; can bo credited
to Murphy, with all tho discredit that that
fact carries, nothing more favorable is '
being Paid about the other men on the
ticket below Dlx. Thomas F. Conway. ,
niMTiine*" for Lieutenant Governor, has been •
*n inveterate place hunter in Democratic
polities until a recent real estate specula
tion and a new lino of lecal patronage
placed him beyond th«* immediate necessity
of beinsr continually on the lookout for *.
Jnh. He was long a protege of Smith
Weed, Democratic boss of northern Now
York, and it was to Weed's influence that
Vi» owed his nomination for Attorney Gen
eral on the Democratic ticket in 1838 and
again in 130".
Later he and Weed broke with the Dem
ocratic machine over the naming of the
state ticket In 1982, and. as it was reported
at the time, threw Clinton County to the
support of Odell. Subsequently the two
partners sold to the, state a. parcel of
Adirondack land for $200,000 which they
had purchased a few years before for
$65,000. It was openly charged In the
Legislature that this deal was consum
mated by Governor Od«il in payment for
their support of him in 1302. Sine* that
time Conway has figured In other deals in
?tate lands, it. la said, and has been con
nected with some of the water storage
schemes which have had for their purpose
the grabbing of large areas. He has gen
erally been credited with being the per
sonai representative of Thomas F. Ryan
and men Interested with hUn in the north
ern counties. This, a; any rate. Is the
talk about political gathering places, and It
jc expected that he will be called upon to
explain many things before election
day. . .
Kennedy a Ward Boss.
Years ago John J. Kennedy, who is
named for State Treasurer, was a political
ward boss in the machine of William F.
Bheehan In Buffalo. Of late he has been
allied with "Flngey" ' onners's organiza
tion, but recently stood up with Fitzpat
rick 'the man who unhorsed Connera from
the place he long occupied. He Is a typi
cal ward boss, but he in wealthy, and that
fact determined the Erie County leaders
to put him forward for the nomination. It
In his only qualification for the place.
Thomas F. Carmody, It was recognized
as soon as his name was mentioned for
the place, is merely being paid for the part
he played as the tool of Murphy and Con
nors when together they carried the state
convention of April. I'JOS, roughshod over
all opposition. The feeling against Car
mody at that time was so intense that it
•ran determined not to pay him at once.
He was told to wait. His turn came this
year, but his action of two years ago was
not forgotten, and the opposition to him
that developed on the convention floor Is
not likely to die out. • •
NOMINATED FOR ASSEMBLY.
Albany, Oct. 3 -Assemblyman Harold J
Hirim.n. of Albany, was r.-nomlnated to
day by the Ist Assembly District Republi
emsj convention.
Mlddletown. X. V., Oct. 3.— At the Demo
cratic convention here this afternoon
Charles Wills, of Port J.'rvl 8 . was nc>ml
rated for member of the Assembly. Cd Dis
trict. Orange County-
Buffalo. Oct. .1-OMver 0 UReau has
>een nominated as the Democratic candi
dats for the Assembly from the 2d Krje
iUMrlct.
NOMINATED FOR CONGRESS.
Sixth Massachusetts District-Augustus
P." Gardner. Republic** r( '^ n V^: rict
-seventh Ne« l*f* X Dl3trlct ~
Charles A. Talcott, DamocraC
NOTIFY STIMSON TOW
Hot Pace To Be Set for Repub
lican State Campaign.
CANDIDATE IN CONFERENCES
Former Ambassador Francis
Most Talked Of to Succeed
Chairman Woodruff
With the formal notification of Henry 1., :
Stimson. nominee for Governor, and the
election of a new state chairman to-day,
the Republican state campaign will be
fairly begun. It will be a campaign in
which the new element which won control
of the party at Saratoga— the so-called
Progressives— will be held responsible for
the result, and this element, in control,
will set a hot pace from the very begin
ning.
The reorganization of the state commit
tee will take place at 10 a. m. to-day—re
organization in that a new state chairman
will fc* elected to replace Timothy Lester
Woodruff and that the new Taft-Roose
velt group of leaders will control the body
in the election of this chairman. These
leaders are as much puzzled whom to
select, though, as they were about the
Identity of the Progressives' choice for the
governorship the night before the nomi
nations were made. It is largely a matter
for the candidate to decide, but there are
so many other considerations that Mr.
Stlmson and his advisers had their nands
full with it yesterday.
In the afternoon Lloyd C. Griscom, presi
dent of the New York County Republican
Committee; Representative Heroert I'ar
sons. Otto T. Bannard and Mr. St mson nad
a conference at the candidate's offlce. Tney
met at dinner last night at the Republican
Club to talk It over further. Finally they
decided to leave the matter open until
conferences could be held with upstate men
to-day to (c-t th^ir views about some of
the men discussed.
The man most talked about last nig^it
was Charles S. Francis, of Troy, formerly
Ambassador to Austria. He ta editor and
proprietor of 'The Troy Times." a Progres
sive, who lias been close enough to the
organization in Rensselaer County to be
on friendly t^rme with Cornelius V. Col
lins. It is understood that ail the Progres
sive leaders around here, from Colonel
Roosevelt down, think Mr. Francis would
be a good man
Another name considered during the day
was that of Ezra P. Prentice, formerly
leader of the 25th Assembly District and
for several years representative of that
district in the Assembly, where he became
a member of the Committee on Rules. \l*
13 now a Deputy Attorney General, with
headquarters In this city. Senator John B.
Rose, of Orange County, has been talked
about for this place. So have Representa
tives J. Sloat Fassott and John W. Dwight.
Mr. Stlmson spent most of his day com
pleting his speech of acceptance. He had
a conference with Mr. Griscom tat* in the
afternoon, about which neither of them
would talk. They -went over the draft of
the speech prepared by Mr. Stimson. di-»
cussed the state chairmanship and gener
ally talked over the campaign situation.
The formal notification of Mr. Stimson
will occur at the Republican Club at 5 p. m.
to-day. Mr. Griscom heads the committee
assigned to this duty by Senator Root, »«
chairman of the Saratoga convention. His
speech will be short. These tsermmenim will
mark the formal opening of the Republican
campaign.
"It will be a rrdhot campaign," predicted
Mr. Griscom yesterday. "From the moment
Mr. Stimson is notified of his nomination
the campaign will be open. Mr. Hearst. I
see. realizes the issue- whether Tammany
Hall shall be allowed to have control of the
finances of N>w York State and direct the
completion of the $101,000,000 bar** canal."
Following the meeting of the state com
mittee this morning the committee chosen
at the Saratoga convention to fill the va
cancy on the ticket for associate judge of
the Court of Appeals will meet. It will
name Frederick CoIHn. of Elmira, nomi
nated for that place ny the Democrats at
Rochester. This is In fulfilment of the un
derstanding that these nominations were to
be non-partisan, the Democrats renomi
natlng Judge Vann. in return for which the
Republicans were to nominate the Demo
crat chosen by the Rochester convention to
succeed the- late Judge Rartlett.
STIMSON SEES ROOSEVELT
Talk of State Campaign — Fran
cis for Woodruff's Place.
[Br Te!<?<rrßDh to The Tribune]
Oyster Bay. Oct. 3.— Henry L.. Btimson,
Republican candidate for Governor, was a
guest at Sagamore Hill to-day. He came
from CoM Spring Harbor. Long Island,
where be has a summer homo, in his auto
mobile, and spent an hoar with Mr. Room
velt. Both declined afterward to comment
on their meeting, except to say that the
state campaign had been discussed. Mr
Stimson said that li" had not yet made any
definite plans for the campaign, and would
not do no until he had been officially noti
fied of his nomination.
Charles 8. Francis, of Troy, former am
bassador to Austria-Hungary, Ivns nien
tioned for the first tim« here to-.: as suc
ecesor to Timothy 1. Woodruff as chair
man of the state committee. Mr. Rr...*.-
velt and Mr. Stimson both favor Mr. Fran
cis, It wan said. Ezra Prentice ha« also
been considered for th« chairmanship.
Congressman Nicholas T^onjrwortli. of
Ohio, accompanied Mr. Stimson from Saga
ore Hill to New York to-day. Mr. bong
worth sa i,i he, was coins: to Cincinnati to
take th« stump 1n bis district and help out
in the Ohio campaign.
Mr. Roosevelt has promised to start on a
campaign throughout the state for the Re
publican candidate as soon as he returns
from his Southern trip, on October 14. He
■will speak to the delegates of the Southern
New York Volunteer Firemen's Association
at Freeport. Long Island, to-morrow after
noon.
Several political vls.tors are expected at
Sagamore Hill for luncheon to-morrow.
Judge C W. Raymond, of Guthrie. Okla..
Is expected, and will invite Mr. Roosevelt
to make several speeches In Oklahoma
when he passes through the state en route
from Hot Springs. Ark., to St. Louis, on
the forthcoming speaking tour
MOTT NAMED FOR CONGRESS
Defeats Ex-Senator Eion R. Brown in
28th New York District.
[By Telegraph to Th« Tribune. 1
natertown. NT. Y. Oct. 3.-Luther W.
Jlott. for a few days State Superintendent
of Banks, was to-day nominated for Repre
sentative in Congress by the Republicans
of the 28th District, comprising Jefferson.
L#wis and Oswego counties.
Jefferson favored ex-Senator Elon R.
Brown, and its fourteen delegates were for
him. Oswego. with thirteen delegates, fa
vored Mott. Lewis had six delegates, but
no candidate. Theirs were the only dele
gates uninstructed. but on the first and only
ballot every one of them voted for Mott.
Jefferson Republicans are making a
strenuous effort to get Brown to run as an
Independent candidate. At present he looks
favorably OB the proposition, it Is said.
BRYAN ANTI-CANNON SPEAKER.
Danville. 111.. Oct. 3.— lt was announced
I, ci- to-day that William J. Bryan would
spend two days stumping this Congress
district against Speaker Cannon. He will
speak at Kankakee. Momence. Watseka
and Danville on October 20. Th« second
day will !*•• duvoted to the lower part of
th<i district.
Columbm Day Outing
OCTOBER 12.
.Spend thi^ most "American" o« American hoiida** on the qr .indent of »Tie- • n
rivers. Enjoy the bracing autumn air in a glorious sail through the rao^ pict
uresque and intere*t»nq scenery of the Hudson River. The big *v*i?t %tearoer
HENDRICK HUDSON
will niak- a special 200-mile trip to Kingston The Palisades, the broad Tappan 7.c». the
' , . , • r%« v^r.««»« — -in majestic Highland*. West Point crownm; th^
Point and return, leaving Desbrosses St.. ».4»». hHsht. grand old Storm Kins in his autumn
W. 42d St.. 10; W. 120 th St.. 10:-0. (Fare, Rarb of red and cold . )pf , th( , c^tskilt Miun-
S^fMl) Shorter trips may be taken to Fough- tains an? a few features of th«* panorama un
k^rDJ'iP "(-'I 30). Xcubur^h or West Point j rolled before your cy<*.
■SI iio> The spacious promenafle «!rcks ft tno llrn
' Reniiar throush boat leaves as usual at | Hr». Hurfwn mat* cnmdtes tepwrtMK and
|>sbro»»eß St.. s *<V W. -I'M St., •» W. l- M ->tn !an excellent rrstaT.rant. with first rteffl »er-
St '.i _■• -••-.• ; v}r^ ,g, g opf>n tnroUR h*njt the trip. -
HUDSON RIVER DAY LINE
Telephone 4 14 1 Sprin;.
The Telephone Directory is the most
useful and the most frequently used
publication in New York City
IT is on the desk of every business man. It is in even,- home of
the better class. It is in every* room of every hotel in the aty.
It is to be found in every- place where information is sought.
such as information bureaus, ticket offices, drug stores, cyf
stores, etc. It is consulted by over one million people each day.
Advertising space in the Telephone Directory is mr sale.
The field of its advertising influence is broad. It covers the
whole metropolitan area. It does not conflict or compete with
magazines or newspapers. Its great advertising value is due to
its peculiar influence as an information medium. It is of special
value to advertisers who desire to receive orders by telephone.
NEW MEXICO REGULAR
Progressives Outweighed in Con
stitutional Convention.
Santa Fe, X Sf., Oet ". New Mexico's
constitutional convention met to-day in t!i«
Hall of Representative.-*. Thomas B. Cat- •
ron former delegate to ' "ungressf. called i
the convention to order, and after the Rev. j
Julius De Ra<;her. chaplain of San Miguel i
Church, the oldest church in the United j
State?, had asked for the "seven gifts of j
the Holy Ghost" to descend on the one
hundred delegates, the oath of office was
administered by .John R. BfcFle, of the |
New Mexico Supreme Cob I (
Charles A. Spless. of l.a Vegas, was.
elected president His selection sasatflaa j
that the conservatives ar» in control of j
the convention, and that the initiative and j
referendum and prohibition will not be |
written into the constitution, but: that th-»,
organic law- will be a purely fundamental
document a.* desired by President Taft.
„.,.--- W. Armijo, of Santa F>. ■* roach
rider, was elected chief clerk: Ca?saro ■
Pedregbn, of Las Cruces, interpreter. *"d j
Major H. X. Whiting, of Albuttucrque.J
serseant-Ht-arm?.
The convention consists of seventy^-onei
Republi.aiis Httfi twenty-nine Dn-^crat?. j
National Cornmlttecman Solomon Ixnu.
Of Los Luna?, was made chairman of * ■
committee to propose.'the membership of j
the working committees. The convention'
will ..:..,, sixty days.
UPHOLDS JUSTICE BRADY
P. S. C Appeal in Whitridge
Case Denied by Justice Bischoff.
in a derision handed down yesterday. Jus
tice Bischoff. 'of the Supreme Court, upheld
the part taken by Justice Brady In the suit
brought last spring by the Public Service
Commission against F. W. "VVhitrid^e. re
ceiver of the Union Railway Company, for
th« recovery of $730,000 tn penalties imposed
on the road for its failure to equip the
cars of the company with wheel guards.
Th* 1 Public Service Commission, through
its counsel, made a motion to set aside the
dismissal of the complaint granted by
Justice Brady, on the ground that the jus
tice should not have heard the case, beine
a stockholder In the Third Avenue Railroad
Company, and, therefore, an interested
party.
When the ease was brought before him
Justice Brady suggested that the suit be
tried before some other Supreme Court
justice, but counsel for both sides agreed
that the trial should proceed before him.
Justice Bischoff denied the motion, nut
only because the application was Improper
and appeal should be made to a higher
court, but J also because Justice Brady at
the outset announced that he was a stock
holder in the Third Avenue Railroad Com
pany and because counsel did not then in
terpose objections.
"This allegation of interest is so utterly
remote and m fanciful." said Justice
Bischoff in his decision, "as to amount to
nothing." He then reviewed the possibili
ties of a reorganization and a taking over
by the Third Avenue Railroad Company of
the Union Railway Company, in which
case, he said, a reduction of the assets of
the Union Railway Company through the
payment of the penalties could not be re
flected in any loss on the participants In
the new stock.
NOMINATED FOR THE SENATE.
Scheneetady, N V. Oct. 5.— Assemblyman
Loren H. White, of Scheneetady County,
was to-day nominated for Senator by the
Democrats of the Slat District, comprising
3ch«n«rtady. Montgomery and Scboharie
counties.
Fall and Winter Edition of the Telephone D^-<-to—
goes to pres» Thursday. October 13tk.
NEW YORK TELEPHONE COMPANY
It 15 just as easy to have the best, by asking for the
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See that the label on each Roller bear* the script
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Cooking L'tensils of every kind: — Tin. Copper, Aluminum. Nickel
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Cleaning Material-. Vacuum Cleaner-, etc.
Refrigerators
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Telephone
Directory
Goes to Press
October 13th
Fireplace Furnishings

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