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New-York tribune. [volume] (New York [N.Y.]) 1866-1924, October 11, 1910, Image 16

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WOMEN GO ON SHE
Few of 10.000 Necktie Workers
Who Go Out Are Men.
LOOK TO GIRL AS LEADER
Miss Mollie Hamer Has Spent
Eight of Her Twenty-one
Years in Factories.
For several hours yesterday trie ftrwts
or Th*> East Side were Fwarmlnj? ■with
women and rlrls f^om the neckwear far
torless who ■went out in response to the
rail for a ccneral f-trlk^. and started for
«~!lnton HaJl. No 151 Clinton street, the
principal headquarters of the strikers. The
men form ?ur!i a small pmportjon of the
BjajctESPSaS 1 workers thai they were hardly
noticeable. How many went on strike yes
terday waf> difficult to estimate. The leer
est estimate was ten thousand, and ail
apreed that the other ten thousand would
quit to-<3ay.
The Neckwear Cutters' Union has Its
▼egular headquarters at No. 25 Third ave
rse, but ■arJBSJ The Ftrtke the peneral
strike headquarters in Manhattan will be
«1 Clinton Hall. TVhile Abraham Miller,
*:*rera' organizer of the union, is recoc
nze-3 formally a;- the leader of the strike.
Miff UoDfe Hamer. * dark-eyed eiri with
* husinesslike manner, if looked upon by
th* women *s tbe. real leader.
Miff Hamer. though she 1s only twenty
ene year? ■• age. has been « neckwear
-worker for *>icht years. Ha saM yesterday
that it ... time for • rhar.ge in the con
ditions of work.
• The wases have been crowing lower and
Vv cr. un^il many of th? workers have only
« few dollars a veek." «-ri^ continued. "We,
Inirnd to m a minimum wage rate of not
•'<■!■? than ?"" a week.
Formerly ■ neckwear worker could
nake « n^rktje. ajid now. by the BBectaMsa
tion of work, fix different kinds of work
r>rp and f-emetimes more are employed on
«>n«> necktie, and large quantities eC thorn
•s>r*> turned out by the six. In the case of
jnn?i of ■ ... neckties a cutter, operator.
•turner, xriznmfr. point maker and box
naker are required to make a tie. Of
•<nurfe. the work turned out in this way Is
enormous, and this city has beeeaae the
.frrrat centre ....
Say Few Factories Are Sanitary.
'There are other complaints beFides»low
•vrapej. There are unsanitary factories.
kmly some of the large factories beln« • l-a'l
itary, the hours of work are too lons.
Jr addition to this the »rrls are treated
very tyrannically by many of the fore
«'«rnen. who act as if they owned the
f&^tories. If ■ girl laughs or talks she Is
3!ab> to diemissaL. and if the forewoman
"Ts»]kr- to her in an Insulting way aha dare
n<.t tElk bacV. -VU this will have to be
yrrri^died "
It was reported thai a number of th«
j^anv:fß<-turerp had made settlements, but
t:« etrfkera -, «-,. to return to work Iwfore
Monday Wllßam Bchwartj chairman of
tv,e stri^" commit tee. f-aid that fort y-«^ight
xr.anufacturers had settled, bat before
»y more •^ver< a expected to.yi^ld and
-.- r »-;-,■ of all who had settlM would
f n back in a body.
The cu«ters say thpy will not go hacK
tn work in any factory uher*> the neck
•p ff.r workers have not settled. The de
mands of the aacfeeaear cutters ar» for $21
a week and the Saturday half- holiday all
The year round. Their present wages are
$21 a wwk and they hav«> th«» Saturday
3:e3f-ho]idfiy only during June. July and
.A-ieust.
Employers Against Closed Shop.
Mom of th* 1 marjufiicturers who ere
*=een \«>Fterda^ eaid that they did not un
<^erstanu arbat the ln»«ar woiktra
v anted. The only sp^cifj.' demands they
>aye rereivrii. XY-ry said, were on behalf
of th* cotters. As to the recognition of
tin onion, most of the manufacturers said
That, while they had nothing against the
■vni'iTi an<i would he •rtlling to pay union
•m ajr»^ c . they would nev^r pee to the
■closed shop
Srim^ of !'i(> manufacturers said Iheir
rmrVvf?; admitted tiiat until the strike
«i«]fr fame they were satisfied with their
*-cn6Hionf= •a"d wages. A meoting of man*
• f r>. r \\\rrrf- v.iH tak*- plar«» in the Broad
-»py Central Hotel thte afternoon be form
*lti ;.«»nci:ition.
The Firikcr 1 : !jad a mass ineriing in
«*""linton Hall lat«» in tbe afternoon. «Jen
*=ral Organiser >"il!rr. Kr-n.iamin Wcto
r'^'n. gpiier:;! organizer of the United He
lir^w Trades; ?.. J". Vlpstein. who ]ir«-tided.
»- ♦"rolclstfin and others Fiaate
The lvad^Tr; of tlie ("ustom Tailors*
■Cnion. which ordered a strike four werks
*irrt of three hundred of its members for
3-igbcr waces and a si ••-•• i workday, »n
jioutickJ yesterday tliat It had joined the
" rntd Oaritvnt Workers of America and
•r.B'l declared .i general strike, to go into
effect tf!-dr; - . T!ie menil>ers of tbe union
■^-<irk <m made to order. Hyman
"JsTovik. secretary of the union, said last
aught that twenty thousand tailors would
3<' rfTectcd by the strike.
i'LERMONT AGAIN SHIPSHAPE
prdso:i Eiver Day Line Repairs and
Exhibits Model of First Steamboat.
Tin- duplicate <>f llotxrt Pulton's yttiam
i «■.-; . the densoat. whioh v a-- one of the?
- iikf t)bj«*-ls of interest during the Hiid
«-on-l"ulton celebration, and the Hud
•on lilvrr : 'a' L«ir>e recently bought an«l
»«ii«Jir<j. -• L- «»n exhibition yesterday.
Freddeat Olcott of tho Day La and
JA«K>Kt«ni Grn^ral Suj>erlnt«-ndent White
«-r.ovi*»o the iwrty of nou-Fpai>er men ;in*i
•jir.tr srue-stF about the. boat shortly after
fi:«, mrrivni ai l^Sth firw-t from tnt- shij>
f arrj at St. iU^Tpe.
The Oermont will remain at llinh Ktrret
r<-r about a m<*>nth. when it will move down
mo s seer quarters at l*i-ai»TOßses street.
3n the summer it will Fail up ihe Hudson
to Pouphkf»:ppie, where it will main dur
iag the autumn.
FORFEIT $20,000 CASH BAIL
Marthal Caji't Find Rosenberg
Brothers, Indicted for Customs Frauds.
Judpf Hand pronounced the forMtur*
y*-tt*-rday of th*- EHCrt cafh ball put up
for ..f- and Huk" Rosenlx-rB, milliners.
Wliesi trial had lx*en lix^-d fnr this t.i i),
rS rhft federal court.
■a trace of the brothers, -who uere ln
«llrt*^l for customs fraud? with a third
Jirothcr. Max. manager ef the firm's branch
in Paris, has fen found by Marshal Hen
i-;*:! ard hip aids.
H. DECKER GOES TO SiNG SING.
HaroM looker, the tw*»nty-year-old son
r * a -wcaJthy Chicago man, ■was tent to
doc Bin* lor "MSB two and s half to five
:«-Er« yesterday by <*ounfy Judp* DJk«». In
3'^icklyn, on c STgi- of abduction. Decker
v. as altered to hay« tak^n young Flor^ri'^
Hjrhardp Rirhter to Rochester from her
borne, No. 17H Greene avenue, Brooklyn.
AJMtber aliened vlr.tlm of Decker waf- Anna
UcKn'rhT, at No. S5 £t. Mark 1 Place,
lir^f-klyn Jude*; Dlkf- raid that Decker had
t- fc.'a<-.k past.
You can't vote atea you register; and
if you didn't register yesterday do it
Ic-dey.
SOME OF THE STRIKING NECKTIE WORKERS.
MISS MOLLIE HAMER.
Th«> loader of th«> strikers.
WILSON NOW IN CONTEMPT
President of United Wireless
Still Holds Account Books.
Colonel Christopher Columbus Wilson,
president of the United Wireless Telegraph
Company, was yesterday adjudged in con
tempt of court by Judge Hand, in the
United States Circuit Court.
The grand jury is making a further in
vestigation of the affairs of the United
Wireless, and while Colonel Wilson and the
other officers indicted have all along de
clared their eagerness to have a tJiorough
investigation of the whole business of the
company, Colonel Wilson refused to hand
over to the grand jury books of accounts
which had been intrusted to his custody
by the directors of the company.
Henry A. Wise. United States Attorney,
ap^ared before Judge Hand yesterday at
th« opening of court to present the finding
of the grand jury declaring that Colonel
Wilson, as president of the company, re
fused to obey the subperna of the govern
ment to produce letter press books needed
in the investigation.
Arthur M. King, counsel for the com
pany, who was accompanied by .T. B.
BtasjehtJeM, said that at a recent meeting
the directors had confided these books to
the personal custody of Colonel Wilson.
As the latter is under indictment, he re
fused to supply evidence against himself.
The case was pet over until 4 p. m.. when
Mr. BtanchSjeM appeared and announced
that It was the intention of the defendant?
to carry all the decisions of th*> lower
court to the United States Court of Ap
peal* fie suggested thru Judge Hand
should therefore adjudge hie client in con
tempt to facilitate matters This was done,
and rolonel Wilson was released on his
former ball.
800.000 USED PLAYGROUNDS
Record Attendance of Children in
Parks This Summer.
According to the figures compiled by
Howard Rradstreet. supervisor of re^r*>a
tion. the attendant at the twenty-three
city playgrounds for th» season of twelve
week? beginning on July 1. was BOCLOQO.
The record week was the first one in Au
gust, when SQ.S44 children used the grounds.
"While 'he figures for the opening week
showed that 43.122 children had entered
into the playground work, it was not until
the third week, * !-.• n additional attendants
were employed and the grounds well or
ganized, that a narked increase over last
■rear's record was forecasted. That week
found ~.4?-S participating In aH'th<» games
and contests.
'harts are now r'«-Inir prepared under the
supervision of Mr. Bradstreet which will
show just where and when the greatest
number of workers are required. In some
playgrounds the attendance is heavier at
certain hours than in others. To get the
1.-- results, the recreation supervisor
says, it is Imperative to know those hours
in • ah playground.
The following parks showed the largest
attendances: Hamilton Pish. Tompklns
Square, De Witt < "lint on. Thomas Jefferson.
Peward. Mulberry Bend and Corlean
Hook.
ELECTRICAL SHOW BEGINS
New Devices Shown for Heat,
Light, Power and Domestic Use.
needed with the rays of a hundred thou
sand electric lights, that produced a soft
yet brilliant effect through the delicately
gr«.<*n and white color scheme of the "dec
orations. Madison Square Garden presented
a dreamlike spectacle when its doors were
thrown open at noon yesterday for the
fourth annual electrical show.
In a brightness that approaches daylight
l-ut contains no unpleasant glare one may
view the newest devices that have been
Invented during the last year to add to
human comfort and the pleasantness of
life- with the ad of electricity.
it Includes practically every known ap«
plication of «lectric power, beating and
lighting. Electric vehicles, designed for
pleasure and commercial purposes, are
shown In many styles and equipped with
batteries of tlie latest kind, whose in
vt-ntors ascribe to them an efficiency that
nay revolutionize the whole motor car In
dustry
Special ran 1 has been devoted to the dis
play and demonstration of the adaptabil
ity of electricity for household purposes.
There arc more than one hundred »x
hibitors, and among them most of the
leading manufacturers and inventors of
electrical appliances of the United States.
The exhibition Will last ten days, and will
be open daily from M a. m. until 11 p. m.
While the first visitors made their round
through the exhibition, its promoter! and
niany of the exhibitors had a luncheon, at
which they drank to the success of the
venture and congratulated the manage
ment on the t irmly and beautiful com
pletion of tie exhibit. A number of well
known men were present. J. W. I,ieb. Jr.,
presided, and . ;. „!>:e n. < !ortelyou ex
pr< ssed on behalf of the guests their ap
preciation of the fine things shown at the
exhibit:
CONTROLLER EXPECTS CHANGE
General Austen Still Head of Tax Col
lection Bureau. However.
There were no upheavals In th«» Bureau
for the Collection of Taxes In the. Finance
I*epartment yesterday. in spite of the MHte
ment given out from the Controller's office
on Saturday, In which the management of
the bureau by Genera! David B Austen
was severely criticised.
Controller f 'rers-ierpa-t said he ha.i not
decided to af-k for the general's resigna
tion, but he expected ■ change .•■'■• on Gen
eral Aucten said he did not care to discuss
the statement ♦'rim the Finance Depart
ment. He smiled a;- he replied In the nega
tive to a question s« to whether he hail
re.ML- •
Tamrrany Hall members don't forget
te register. Will you forget it, or will you
put it off and then be prevented by sick
ness or absence on another registration
day ' Don* take the chance Register
to-day, so you'll be sure of your vote on
November 8.
MISS QUINN ON STAND
Tells Story of Alleged Relations
with Peck in Examination.
IDEALIZED HIM. SHE SAYS
Former Professor Proposed tc
Her Ten Days After Divorce,
Says Witness.
Miss Esther Quinn, the stenographer who
has sued Harry Thurston Peck, until re
cently professor of Latin at Columbia Uni
versity, for $V>.<W! for alleged breach of
promise, made lier first appearance in the
proceeding yesterday, when she submitted
to an examination before trial by the de
fendant's counsel, whose object was to re
veal certain alleged circumstances in her
past career which Professor Peck hopes to
be able to embody in his answer to the
suit. The examination was held in the
office of her counsel. Daniel O'Reilly, and
the examination was by Mr. Francis, rep
resenting Dr. Peck.
i The plaintiff is a short, rather stout and
determined looking woman, of a little more
than thirty. Mi« Quinn's demeanor on the
witness stand Indicated her Ions: experi
ence in the business world. She was at all
times cool and, although occasionally she
would answer a question with a little more
than the usual rmphasls, she never one«
really lost her temper.
Mies Quinn was a determined witness,
end once she said a thing adhered to it
The examination being a searching one,
her testimony was largely of a negative
character. She did not have to affirm or
contradict the testimony of any other wit
ness, but. was asked to furnish the answers
to questions that the defendant thinks will
aid him to frame his reply to her allega
tion, and to most of these the. plaintiff
made denial, the affirmative answers being
unimportant.
Defendant Not Present.
Now and then O'Reilly put in an objec
tion, declaring that the examination was
taking too wide a scope Dr. Peck was not
present at the examination.
It was about September 1:4. 1305. the plain
tiff said in her complaint, that Professor
Peck proposed to her, about ten days after
she learned that his wife had obtained a
divorce. Asked whether that was not
rather soon after the divorce, she said: "I
idealized Professor Perk, and I thought
that if he believed it to be right it must
b. so."
After describing her friendship with t>r.
Peck. Miss Q;jinn said, in answer to a
question: "1 don't think it was proper to
r^ rngaged i<- me and go and marry an
other woman."
And in this connection the witness said:
"I supposed he was a gentleman, but It
turns out he was not."
Miss Quinn said she did not hear of Dr.
Peck's second marriage for some time after
it took place, and when she talked to him
about it he said, according to her testi
mony, that he had filtered into the mar
riage on an Impulse, that he married be
cause he needed a housekeeper, and that
h<> still loved he* (Miss Quinn).
The examination began with a series of
questions* regarding the places where Mies
Quinn had been employed. Counsel for the
defendant also wanted to know some of
the places where the plaintiff had lived.
Miss Quinn did not remember the ad
dresses.
She remembered that she had lived in
Lenox avenue. "IMd you live alone?"
asked the lawyer. "<th. no," replied Miss
Quinn: "with my family my mother and
my brother."
It was possible, said Miss Quinn, that
the lived in West 134 th street. This ad
dress, ii is said, will figure in the trial.
Describes Work for Peck.
Telling of the work that she did for
Professor Peck, the witness said that the
defendant was writing a series of articles
under the name of Hafford Pike.
"He told me." said Miss Quinn. "that
they were such that he could not put his
own name to them. He dictated those
articles to me. He also reviewed books
and dictated the literary criticisms I
never did any stenographic work, despite
the fact that Dr. .Peck recommended me
very highly as a stenographer. I took
them directly on the typewriter."
Then Mr Francis wanted to know about
the places where Miss Quinn had dined.
He mentioned some of a rather unsavory
recitation, but she didn't remember them,
abe Bald She had luncheon at the Cadillac
with Dr. Peck one day, but didn't have
any wine. Then Mr Francis wanted to
know if she smoked cigarettes.
"I never came nearer to them than Dr.
peck's smoke," she Said
Then Mr O'Reilly suddenly Insisted that
he saw a detective in the interest of the
defendant In the room. Mr. Francis de
nied that he hnd any detective there, and
the incldtnt passed off. but O'Reilly ob
tertofl that the examination whs going too
far and said it was a fishing expedition.
Miss Quinn said that only. she and Dr.
Peck were In the room when he proposed.
She did not receive an engagement ring
from him. she said, but he did give her a
bracelet, which she mill had. She knew
before she became, engaged that th« de
fendant was married, but he had told her
that a)ie and his wife were not living to
gether. "He acted like a bachelor," said
the witness.
"When he told m#»." she said, "after 1
asked him, that be .-in married, he told
me that i? he had not been married he
would have proposed to me. In no one of
his letters did he abk me to marry him
directly, though h«- intimated it."
She had not regarded him as under any
obligation to marr) her until he proposed
on FeptTnhrr 15. she said. She' regarded
the correspondence with Dr. Peck before
his divorce us entirely innocent, tim said.
"Was it on the plane of your relations
with others?"
"i'«-rtainly not. No other man ever
made love to me for three or four years
and then told me he wa.s a married man,"
she declared
The examination will go on to-day.
"SOPHS" WIN RUSH CLASSIC
Columbia Freshmen Fail to
Capture Flag of Their Rivals.
With shouts of victory, the sophomore
class of Columbia University walked off
the field yesterday after successfully de
fending its colors in the annual flag rush.
The classic contest was brimful of in
cidents of a spectacular nature, and the
crowd, which completely surrounded the
field, yelled Itself hoarse, as freshman after
freshman walked up over the human mass
of opponents and gripped the crossbar of
the pole on which the sophomore flag wa?
flying, only to be yanked down by the
hair and garments.
At ono stage a first year man of the
coxswain type had all hut freed himself—
being entirely clear, except for one foot,
which half a dozen "sophs" were holding
in a vise-like- grip- when suddenly reinforcp>
ments from b<=-low were brought into play
and the near-hero was lowered by de
grees, until he disappeared entirely. At the
end of the first of the three fiv»-mimite
periods a "Foph" by the nnme of G \V.
Dunn was carried off the tiekl suffering
from n kick in the head.
During the remaining periods it became
apparent that the members of the upper
class were getting the better of the scrap.
Gradually they wore down the opposition
of their younger rivals, and even the in
terference of juniors and seniors proved to
he of no avail, and the final whistle de
clared the "S'>j.;ip" to be the winners.
Then began the real hazing. The two
classes knew that tht^y must pass the foun
tains on their way to the gymnasium, and
they bad counted much upon this mode of
relieving their feelings. The rivals pitched
upon each other on the steps leading up to
the library. Several were thrown into the
fountains bodily, while others, in their
fevered excitement, rushed in of their «» - .vn
accord.
BODY DRAWN TO AQUEDUCT
Little "Indian" Drowned After
Entering "Blow-Off" Pipe.
TTie search for .Too Plenty, the young
ster who ventured into the dnrk recesses
of a four-foot m;rin forming part of a
"blow-off" connected with the old Croton
aqueduct, in Highhridge Park, opposite
172 d street, on Saturday afternoon, came
to an end yesterday, when his body was
found on the bed of the aqueduct at a
point under 169 th street. His clothing
was caught on the tube bottom and the
water was rushing over him. Near at
hand was found a little toy gun with
which he was armed when. a.s an "Indian"
striving to hide from a squad of youth
ful "cowboys," he walked into the big pipe.
Before the hunt could be started in
earnest it was necessary to drain off about
ninety million gallons of water running
in the aqueduct between the < 'roton dam
and the distributing station at 135 th Street
and Couvent avenue.
When the water had been lowered sev
ere! feet from its usual six-foot depth, at 9
o'clock yesterday, a gang of workmen un
der Richard I. Blake, engineer in charge
of the Eiighbridge water station, entered
the main aqueduct near the Ilighbrldge
gatehouse. They grappled in the water
and finally found the body. It was taken
to the West 152 d street police station.
LONG TERM FOR BOY BURGLAR
Wright. Who Robbed Homes in The
Bronx, Gets 21 Years in Prison.
George Wright, who gained t lie sobriquet
of "The Literary Burglar" by hid habit of
leaving notes in homes he rohlied in The
Bronx, was sentenced yesterday by .lud^e
Mulqueen, in General Sessions, to twenty
one years in stair prison.
Wright, who is only twenty-two yean
old. has spent most of the last five years
in prison for burglary. Me pleaded guilty
yeserday to burglary as a second offender
and was given the limit.
He was released from Blmlra Reforma
tory two years ago. and during tho Inter
vening time, until his arrest, on August 26.
had robbed half a doaen homes in The
Bronx
INQUIRE INTO SARON'S SANITY.
A commission wan appointed yesterday by
Judge Mulqueen, in ijeneraJ Sessions, to in
quire into tho Banity of Louis Saron, of No.
536 Becond aventfe. who Is charged with
having made an attempt upon the life of
Magistrate O'Connor on Beptember f> near
the magistrate's home. On the commtsskw
are Dr. Joel Orosnor, Francis I', ijurvan
and Charles K. Wammack.
If you want to put in your vote for
Stimson and against a Tammanyized
6tate government, you must register. Do
it to-day.
MARINE INTELLIGENCE.
MINIATURE ALMANAC.
Bunrfs*. 8:08; sunset. f>:2S; iiv«n tvelx. 10:60;
moon's age, 8.
HIGH WATER.
A.M. P.M.
Fandy Hook .12 10 12 49
Governor's Island 12:31 l :(»
Hell Gate . . 2:21 :■ .v.
WIRELESS REPORTS.
The Kron primes* ln Cecllle. reported a.« 433
milf-8 fact of fcandy Hook at f»..V. a ni yester
day, i* expected to <!<•.. this for«noon.
The Adriatic, reported us 1.130 mile* «aM of
Bandy Hook at 1 in ■ m \ryt'r<lay. In expected
to dock Wednesday evening or Thursday fort
noon
The Martha Washington, reported as 243 mile*
♦•ant of Bandy Hook at S:IS a m yesterday, is
expected to dock this forenoon.
The c F Tletgen. reported as '<•'•" mil** *-<«( of
Sandy H'-<ik at noon on Sunday, la upeeted to
dork Wednesday forenoon.
The President Lincoln, reported ac 7.V» mltrs
oast of Sandy Hook at 2:10 p in yeMerriay. Is
•■p*< tf.i t.i dork Wedntadaj aftem- on.
INCOMING STEAMERS.
TO-DAY. -, V '•;'•
Vewel. From. U.
•Marticslbo. . . . .. La Uua>ru, Oct. ,< Red D
•Havana Havana. Ort .8. r .Ward
•Ta ?u8 Kingston. Oct c ,i_^v S .i!
•Slblria inagua, o<rt 6 .Ilamb-Am
•Kronpr. Cecllle.Brwnen. Oct*-"- N °c"-^
•I'armania Liverpool. Oct 4.- . .....Cu na.d
•C rTlctgen.....Christlanf«nd. ( Oct I. Scan-
Norton Savlll". Sept -*••
rerea. Gibraltar, **? •£ —
Lowther Castle. ..Algiers. Sept -' ■
El Monte Galvcston. Oct 3 £* *£>
Kroonlanrl Antwerp. Ort 1 ; •
Olulla Almerta. hept -«• • • "4"* n
Manzanillo Guantanamo C t 5. .. • • war 4w ar4
Martha Wash-n... Palermo, hept 28 A^'nrh
I^i Gascogne Havre. Oct I . - r£22
Kstoni» :• . IJbau. f-^ , '^" ■w«,l>r I
Pallanra Hamburg. S*Pt 2. . .Ha.nb-Am
St I^ur-nt Coninna Sept ■ .* Tench
Narraganset I^n'lon. »•%? a ° Co
Harcroft ()r n. Bat* **_._.
New York Rotterdam JW •••• "
Kentra I/indon, SPP I -' aZIZTTZ
Antonio U»per. ...< adlz. Sept 30. 2gl?^
C0ma1...._....Kcy West. Oct P. Ma or>
Denver Galvcsfon. Oct 5 Ma " o I 3r
ElSiglo Galveston. Oct 5 So pac
WEDNESDAY. oliobbii 12.
President Lincoln. Hamburg. Oct. * ...Hamb-Am
Konig Albert Gibraltar. <>ct «■ £• <» Uoyd
}'etroleine . Shi'ld?. Sept W.?* •
Rotterdam P.otterdani. t-'Pt •=" -•• ••— .^ '
Valle Galvpston. Oct 6.... 50 Paclflc
THURSDAY. OCTOHEU 13.
•I.udttania IJverpool. Oft » ' '^ffw
•Obldenae Jamaica. Oct »•• Jt 0 . 1 .
Kansas City.. Swansea, S»pt 2J> Bristol
Stavann«rrn Jamaica. Oct R .- ' -
Antilles New Orleans. Ort *....So Pac
City of Savannah.Savannah. Oct 10. ..—Savannah
•Brings mail.
OUTGOING STEAMERS.
T °- DAY - Mall V«*l
Mail Yeesel
Vessel. For. Line- closes. sails.
X Will, m 11. Bremen. NGL. 6:30 am 10:00 am
Colon. Cristobal. Panama... 11:30 am 3:00 pm
Seminole. Pan Doming. Clyde. 10:00 a m l-.00 p m
Noordajn. Rotterdam. Holl-A. 1 2 : J5*°
C of Atlanta. Savannah. Say. ?• ™> P m
Apache, Jacksonville. Clyde- — — 1:00 p m
WEDNESDAY. OCTOBER 12.
Mauretania, L.tverp'l. Cunaxd 5:30 a m 9:00 am
Majestic. Southampton. \V S. 11 so am 3:00 pm
Bluecher, Hamburg. Ham-Am ,™ m
Alice. Naples. Austrian — — l:<>opra
Concho. Galveston. Ma I lory. .. ■ l:(0pm
Comanche. Jacksonville, Clyde l:'X>prn
THURSDAY. OCTOBER IX
La Savoie, Havre. French... 7 <tft a m 10:00 am
P F Wilhelm. Hamburg 6:3<»am 10«Oara
Esn^ranza. Havana, Ward... J):0Oam 12:00 m
Zn.-npa. Jamaica. TTT T FCo . f>:3o a m 12:0Om
Alblngia, Havtl, Hamb-Am. .11:00 am l:O0pm
Oscar 11. Christlansand. FA.— 2:00 pm
«.'ampajiello, Rotterdam. .
C of Columbus, Say. Par.... — 3:oOpm
Sablne, Brunswick. Mallory.- 1:00 pm
TRANSPACIFIC MAILS.
Destination and steamer. Close in N. Y. P.M.
Hawaii (via Seattle)— Mexican ..;.. .To-day. 6:30
Tahiti. Marquesas, New Zealand,
Australia (via An Francisco)—
Marlpoea Oct 12. « 30
Japan. Korea. China (via Seattle)—
Red Hill Oct IS. 8:30
Japan. Korea, China. Philippines (via
Vancouver) — Empress of India Oct 14. 6:30
Hawaii (via San Francisco) — Sierra.. Oct 17, 6:00
Japan Korea, China. Philippines ivia
San Francisco)— Mongolia O^t 20, 6:30
SHIPPING NEWS
Port of New York, Monday, October
10, 1910.
ARRIVED.
Steamer Martha Washington (Aust), Trieste
and Patras September 24. Palermo 28 and Al
merla October 1. to Phelps Brothers A Co, with
passengers and mdse. Southeast of Fire Island
at 6:10 p m.
Steamer Alblngia fGer). Monte»n Bay Septem
ber 21. Petit Goave 23. Port au prince 24. Santa
Marta 27. Savanllla 29. Cartagena October 1,
Kingston 4 and Inatrtia ft. tr> the. Hamburg-
American Line, with 14 passengers, malls and
tndse. Arrived at the Bar « 11 p m. Pih.
Steamer Coamo. Mayeguez October I, Agua
dlllo 3 and San Juan ft, to the, New York and
Porto Rico t-'s Co, with M passengers, mails and
mdse. Arrived at the Bar at 2 a SB,
Steamer New York «r>utrh>. Rotterdam Sep
tember 2R, to Philip Ruprecht. in ballast. Ar
rived at the Bar at 5 p m.
Steamer Kroonland (Beljri. Antwerp and Dover
October 1, to the Red Star TJno. with passen
gers and mdfe. Eighteen miles east of Fire,
Island at 5:10 p m.
Steamer Mlnn'tonka <Br). I^<n<ion October 1.
to the Atlantic Transport Line, with 152 ra*s»n
gprs and mdse. Arrived at the Bar at 7:45 am.
Steamer Clothilde <"unco <Nr>r>. Port Antonio
October 6. to the Cuaco Importing Co, with
fruit. Arrived at the Bar at 7 a m.
Steamer Richmond. Georgetown O«".t«b»?r T. to
th A Atlantic Coast Lumber Co. with mdcc.
Passed in Quarantine at a m.
Steamer City of Columbus. Savannah October
7. to the Ocean So Co, with passengers and
mdpp. Passed In Quarantine at 7:2" a m.
Steamer Momus. New Orleans October ft, to
the Southern Pacific Co, with pa«seng»rs and
mdse. Passed in Quarantine at 710 a m.
Steamer Evelyn. Philadelphia. Passed in
Quarantine at 5:37 a m.
Steamer Chesapeake, Ualtimore. to the New
York and Baltimore Transportation Co. with
mdse. Passed in Quarantine at ft:3f> a m.
Steamer Bella tßr>. Port Moralte October 3
tnd Kingston 6, to the Atlantic Fruit Co. with
2 passengers and fruit. Arrived at the. Bar at
3:15 p m.
Steamer Princes? Ann*. Newport N»wi and
Norfolk, to the Old Pominlon Ps Co. with pas
sengers and mdse. Passed in Quarantine at 2. 1S
ii in
Steamer New York <r*utcn tank), Rotterdam.
Off Flr« island at 1:85 p m. '
Steamer Kror.n!and ißeljr), Antwerp and Dover
October I. to th» Red Star Line, with 3!V> cabin
and 7.T.T steerage pfes«'-n«;ers and mot* Arrived
at the Bar at 8:15 p m.
Steamer Martha ■\V=»shinirton lAust). Trieste
September 24, Patras 3". Palermo 2S. Alrlerp SO
»nd Almeria October 1. to Phf-lps Bros & Co.
•with 3CB cabin and 1,031 steerage passengers
and mil" Arrive^ at the Bar at 7:.%* pm.
Sandy Hook. N .T. Oct 10. 0:."0 p m Wind
northwest, fresh breeze; clear; moderate sea.
SAILED.
Steamers Surinam? (Dutch). r^merara. Ha^
wallan. Puerto Mexico: Monroe. Norfolk and N«i
fort News: Clfv of Everett. Boston: American
(Dutch). Antwerp; Rio Grande, Brunswick.
STEAMERS AT FOREIGN PORTS.
ARRIVED.
Plymouth, Got 10. 3 a m — sTslssi "vVilheim Ii
i«;eri. New York for Cherbourg and Bremen
(and proceeded
Cherbourg, ort 10. 10 a m— Kaiser Wilrelm II
ii ',fr), New York via Plymouth for Bremen
(and proceeded).
AMUSEMENTS.
RET DII D m m *e^ Weet 42nd Street, near Broadway.
ET |^ II Eg I 1 ffX DAVIP BEI.ABCO M««'-
Cl B^ %tf D L I *W Kvea. 8:15. M. * Sat. Mats.. 2:11.
EVERY ONE WHO SEES IT IS A WALKING ADVER
TISEMENT OF THIS MOST EXTRAORDINARY PLAY
HI. AW A KKI..\N«;KK> PRODUCTION' I ' ~~
„,, .. , . „ i v ri^HKSE few ltn»a ar* written
duration assajk Brook.) 1 "i,h the hope that they may
Ran pay jm f\ f* If\ an Induce you to **■" < " « < ' c »-" If
UL UL I'M II 1 1 L l' nu tl ° y° v wl " experience, a most
rSßl>~liliU 111 ri'll«htful entertainment faraway
liLllLUUll Ul °™ ">* beaten track. The play
1» such an overwhelmlna; and as-
Alllllllf All P I HI! •ur.-d ■•jc-eM that it will b« at
SUNNYBRQQK FARM t=s.r.^i^:
UUllll I 111 IUU 11 I fill 111 table happtnxy« that ronifi with
meeting this most charming of
Founded on the Famous Rebecca Books girls. 9e>e "Rebecca."' now!
B] Kate Douglas iKirin and Charlotte Thompson . .
si: ATS > i-. I. 1. IX <; <> WBK X S IX Al>vA XC r
INO SKAT 1 * FOR AN\ (.HIHKKT THF- I
A IRK I'OR SAI.K AT \V\ OK THE I
HOTELS. M I SKATS ON KAI.F AT I
THE BOX-01--KICE. I
Entire Block. «th Aye.. 4:n-44th Ms Eva. •
Dally ilatineea 2. Best BaavtS $100.
The Interna- Ballet o» Th» I 1 2 New
tionil Cup Niagara i Earthquake t Circus Acts
COMEDY. 41 St., E. of B">. To-nlnht. f«:lfi.
Mew American TUT Calill V Wlth JOHN
Play. mC rAmILI westt.ey.
1,YR1C,42d.W.0f By. Ev.B:l.V MtTn'»-.slW
Graco Wme. Troubadour. 1 " 1 R * n " la er
La Uue.lVlnie. I rOUDaDuUrwheeler.
11r...,,|» ; i, Th.. B"y. «"0r.41. Kv> i.v Mat.Sat.
uiniF AIUIII In "'•' New Mu-1.-.il C.-im-
MARIE CAHILL edy. ,H OV rOK(iOT.
Mnxine Klllott'n Th.,So.bet.By&flA v. Ev.«:3o.
Mat Tom' w.; 3:3o. FOHBKS-nOBERTMON
in The Pw>«lDK of I*B Third Floor Bark.
<"\KINO.B'y & 30th. Evb.S:lß. Mil Sal 15
CaU QCDUIRn in lll: rAM K FROM
SAM BcnllAnii .mii.uahkek. •
Lew Fields" Herat. l .TVv &33 Bt. Kv.s7TiT
SI..M) Mat., Marie Dressier '" Tillle'a
n ,l w'C * ' "' ' m"w.. 230 Kvu .8:00
DrLYS BABY MINE
II KETT. 424 Street. West of Tirnadway.
Evb«.«:2o Mats. MOTHER ">'"«'<>» E<*-
Thura. and Pat. l" ' nl - n crt Goodman.
Nazi- IQTU CT Th "^ •- S»th. nr. B"way.
» HKNRV BAVAO« OaTen THai 50
LITTLE
A IV? O Z E L
MUM hTIIN HOf!K> THKMriIWT
,^mS B WITH THE BEST." , Jt
Circle. Hy ft ««th. Ev.R:l».Mt T > u.2« c .r oc>s ,
The Oreat Drum* MADAMr" V
of Mother l,ov<-. »»l ** l»f M IYI fc X
.U »T KM), l2Mh M W. of » AY.A V. Kvsf(:ls
FRITH SCHEFF In THE MIX4OI
6l\Virin ! F.ve-vEv. s.l.\ A Kat. Mat, 2f,
ir.Vir.U I LEHAR'fI OPERETTA t:i :\ a C is
I'l.At U I "l>«• t Ituntrlblndcr"
1 tit \TME I "The Mouse Trau redOler."
Ftgisttrfd
Trade
Mark.
Fine Table Linens
At "The Linen Store"
Our present collection of Fine Table Damasks amply"
justifies our reputation for having the widest possible assort
ment of these goods.
These high grade Table Linens are not only very
durable but grow^softer and more beautiful with each suc
cessive laundering.
No feature of table appointment is more important
than the Linens, which if carefully chosen will invariably
enhance the beauty of the fine china and silverware.
We quote prices below for one of our most attractive
and exclusive designs, the *'Grape Vine."
irmrrl nrr- ask. w." osajp. pMa >•■-.• -<gg ggj »*ftJ«%- «*»
Napkins 31 inches.. - 14.00 Cloths. 2»x 2 « yard.. »..-. g?^|jgj™^?ga
CloUjs. 2x3 yard* .... " 102.1 Cloths. 2l*x.-'-,2 l *x.-'-, yards.- H .v»
In Decorative Table Linens, our assortment includes a very,
wide range of designs and styles in Doilies, Centre Pieces, Tea
Cloths, Scarfs and Tray Cloths. fcS -
James McCutcheon & Co.,
sth Aye. & 34th St., w.wo?T-Ast Or!.O r!.
BUY BY THE MARK.
Glasgow, Oct. 10— California <Br), N»w Toric via.
TrlMt*? Oct 9— Ultcnla tßr>. X«»- Tork via
THeste. Oct O~- ntcnla. «B'\ N#* Tork vta
Nap!»».
Chrlfttansand. Oft 0, noon — United State* (I?an).
New York for Copenhagen.
Shanghai. Oct 10— Chesapeake 'Br). New Tor*
via t^t Vincent. C V. etc; Hudson <Br>. New
York via Colombo and Honor Korj.
Sin«^por», Ort — Bi»!*"v ißr». >•>■*■ York via
Oran, ate
Bermuda. Oct 10. R a m — Trent <Br> N*w York;
12:25 p m. Trinidad <Br). N«w York.
Manchester. «Xt * '""anritna; iß"'. New YerX.
Malta. CVt — Llchtenfels (Ger). N»w York tor
Port Said. etc.
Sue*, Oct o—Albenara0 — Albenara »Or). Toioharna. see tor
Boston and New York; Lennox ißr>. Yoko
hama. »tc. for B">!«ton and New York.
Dover. O?t I<>. 1:35 p m- Vaderland (Bela),
New York fT Antwerp land pror«ede<l>.
Ijondon. Oct. 10 — Mlnnewacka <Br>. N-w York.
Naples. O«"t 7 — Venexla «Fr). New York.
Bremen Oct 9. 3 P m — Frledrtch <ler Gross**
(G*r>. New York.
Valparaiso. Oct 10 — Charlton Hall <Br). flew
York via Bahia Blanca, Valdlvi* and
Talcahuano
Baht« Blanci, Ort 10— St Gothard tßr^. New
T«rk via Norfolk.
Caldera Ort in — Trojan »Br>. N«w York and
Norfolk via Punta Ar-nas and Valparaiso
PAIRED.
Gibraltar. Oct £— Pannoria. (Br). (from Flume.
etc), New York.
Boulogne, Oct *. « p — Ryndara (Dutch) (rroin
Rotterdam). New York.
G«-nca, Oct 6— Taormtna clta!>. New York.
Hong Kong. Oct — Empress of Japan «Br>. Van
couver via Yokohama.
Pereerara, Oct 6 — K"rona >BrV N«w York.
Che.rbru;r«[. O^t 0, 1» p m— Barbaro-«a fGer>
(from Bremen l. New York.
Algiers. Oct 9— Ka?enga (Br» ffrom Calcutta, and
Colombo), Boston and New York.
Pu»hlr» Oct 10 — Bantu i Br>. New York.
Sinjrapore. Oct (4— Welsh . Frtnr« <Br> (from
Yokohama, etc). Boyton and New York.
' Christlan-and. Oct B. midnight— HelUa; Olav
»Dan) (from C»T»nha(»*n>. New York
PASSED.
UeaM. Oct ft- Orlflamm* tßr>. New Tork for
Havre.
j Praw!<" Point. Oct 9— Chariots (Dutch). New
York for Amsterdam.
Gibraltar. Ort «-._oreanla atnr». New York for
Naples and Genoa: lOrh. Duca deft!! Abrua2l
atal>. New York for Naples and Genoa.
lele of Wight. Oct 10— Vaderland lße!g>. N»w
York for Dover and Antwerp.
AMUSEMENT 3.
THE NEW & THEATRE
Central Park West. «2nd. 63d Su. Tele.. HMX) CoL
THE BLUE BIRD ££££
(•The Bin* Bird for Happin**« •
Hvpn. | M Mats. Wednesday * Saturday. "J:l\
EXTRA MATINEK THIRSDAY AT S P. M.
liIUUITTAIi f'KKA. West 34th (-tr—t.
ffIJIIIfIAI IAH Ev». « IV Mat. Hat.. 2.15. !
"Peon* 1714 Murray Hill. Prlc«» $2 to 25c.
Hill QThe Mute Player
1 111 [■ A (in Enzli'h). Only Comic j
* ■ ■* ■ ■ Opera In Town.
HCTfiB Bfy. ••«■ St. Ev. iv Mat*. Wed. !
HO I III! A- Sat.. J:ia, W*d. Mat.. 3nc-*l.{W>
2^ ce t ks SEVEN DAYS
«uiu<k STy, SO. Ev. 8:15. MaU.IWd. & Sat.
H.B.Warner i '.^aius Jimmy Valentine
I flit I n 111 HI ••"• Hawthorn. Mr. OS**- :
IfULvlllAL I.il Hawthorn. Mr* «;arrl
** Dally Ma t. tic. n»r Cran* A Co. . qth»r».
II UIUDDI i Karno'a Comedians. Brrt i
ALnAMDIfA coote>&co.. Laddie cue. ■
** Datly Mat. .'.%. I Howard * North, others.
STYLE SHOW °ttot c ooo t,t ,5 10
■ CTfID house TlHv.cW Hoof Onrtirn.
AO lUll nUUOClndrr th* AnspWs of
Admission Kfi* th * I-**""* Tailor*'
AQnilSSIOli gUCt.\»<x-Utl.vi •>? Amrri™
Cl I CftJ TCDDV Uud »° a Theatre.
ELLEN TERRY rirri^n
Sh»k«*p^»r» • Heroine* with Illustrative Art'?
Tkta.W. Fraktn».ll> U*.44th. Phon* nryant 4^f>tf'
PITY Theatre. E. Uth«' Eve A Sat. Mat
11l I I --'s<-. IWV. 75c. $1 Wad. Mat . 2,%«r-7.V.
ARSENE LUPINV,;,rr
Next Week. iMONTCOMERT A STONE.
AC AH 4Uh ; . nr. B«»y. Evt-. $:."U>.
DCLAdwU Mats. Thura and Fat.. 2 20
I SSiSv?" "THE CONCERT"
A M ERICAN (£"<* * anrt M iio«K\
"a"*'r.H«.y —THE Mnshn * r\\%
|i\l!\ MAT. 23r. JZlfuner Quintet, others.
H.VMMKKSTEIN'S I Pelt-Blanche. Bui Fisher.
Eva .--, .-.h-T:- Ji Mason. Keeier A Ob . Cats
Datly MMjiJiVJ^»_l_ni\a| of Ito»t>a. 7 e^h»-rs.
AGAUEMY '"V.. THE crisis
Estmbl.ibod
Half
Ctnturr.
Has thf dancing Mercurf
puzzled you— put oft* \ mi- r ill
outfitting '
That's good for us, for from
the other fellows' new clothes
you've seen the trend of Pall
fashions.
So when you drop in now to
look at our suits, without our
sayso you'll know the styles are
right, as usual.
Fall suits, $18 to $48.
The Cushion' Shoe
rhronic standees, is but one of
our shoe specialties.
At the 13th Street Store only.
440 boys' neglige shirts, all
'Stars." Collars attached and
idetached.
Dollar quality.
Mr
Rogers Peet & Company
Three Broadway Stores
at at at
Warren st. 13tb st. 34th st.
AMUSEMENTS.
>FW YORK'S IK\PIN(, rHM'
CIIDIDC B-w»t « 4*th «t. Eves. S:ls
Lin I ink Mats. Tom'w. * fat.. 2:15.
JOHN DREW Smith
I VPCIIIi 4 ' :h St ~ nr - B'war. Eves. J»:CO.
LIUCUnI Matin-" Saturday .■ 2:15
G - p - HUNTLEY K^ TTrK WILLIAMS
la DF.CORATI.XG nnßrmi
KNICKERBOCKER Mat! Sat! Onty **ZA7>.
l-.V7.-OUR MISS GIBBS
By the A .•'••■ of Th^ A I ■*— 1
HUDSON Weot 44th Street. Ev». «:20.
nUvOUEI Mats. Tom'w. A Sat.. 2:20.
HELEN WARE
THE DESERTERS A^a rhlp-n
PDITCDIAH B ' w 44 ■:n
unllCniUi • -- -
■ - ■-: .;HS . OMF. b-Rl'M
THE COMMUTERS .
CHARLKS PII.I.INr.HAM'S .Eves, at 82*
*> I /^ a-* C B'way. Matinees
LILUDCi 44th st. [Safy at 2:13.
THE GIRL IN THE TRAIN
NEW AMSTERDAM Ma F r-
I.lna Abarbanell. with Ralph He nr. li»
MADAME SHERRY
NLW Tllnß Marine. Torr'w.. Pc to *Csn
HARRY KELLYC^v
THE DEACON — THE UOY
NEXT MOMi\\ !♦*•!• Thursday
gars? 1 THE .DOLLAR PRINCESS
pair TV B*>v ir ■ 4«th St. Eves. » .15.
UAlb I I Mats Tom-TV. « Sat.. '.' l\
C.F.O M. COHAN'S KIOtiEST HIT.
GET RICH QUICK WILLINSFO3O
FRIDAY AFTERNOON at C.13. SPECIAL
PERFORMANCE. "THE I'E>ALT\V*
■ IDCDTV West 4Cd St. :v ** * '"'
LIOLH 1 a Mat* Tom *. * s*t . M.v
A PLAY OF CITY LIFE
IT'S THE BIG HIT ! !
THE COUNTRY BOY B^V
It- UICDCQ'V KITrY «;OKO»» m
Jut Wtbtn 5 A!llfA wllM;t;no *»
IV WAT * -.m» ST. riL.rr/1 1.1 VI- *
MiiWXJ. * Sat. with COASk A. BHiELOW.
PHILHARMONIC
■ SOCIETY OF NEW VOKK. %a^
GUSTAV MAHLER
_— — — ON TOR II
______„ New Plans BBCSSSSi
Id TIT.>DAY MGIIT COXCrKT"*.
i 1* FRII>AV AFT. ro>TEKTS.
i a. siMMV ATT. CONCERTS
A UUtlnculftheU arraiv of So!oi*t%.
Subscription renewals now !n proc-»««
Public Subscription Sal» opena CK-t. 17.
Subscription Mall Orders received by L«u
don Cbarlton. M«r . Carneirtct Hal).
WHITE FOR PnOSPECTfS.
METKoroiaTAN 6i ; rR.\ iibt : sE
>>\t t»aturdar Afternooo. *
PAVLOWA ® MOR.DKIN
Imp. Kusolan nuliet * Orchestra.
Seat Sale Sow — Price* >Ti» to 3**o.
H H TKir \l »Hi<»» - . vm
•TH» MM. IN Of THE <KNTIK\
I \.,.Mi- i..-,t Or, 1.r,1r, of r«r*
M»ilN«»n ■■»«— )r> Umw4m. Ort. !•-?• SSp.
r nCtl |H«rM »•» *»»i. Siiia— ■•*» AbrMsl.
Clltll CH.EMATOCRAPH R^-.h Hour.
\ilst» I Mayor '■" n ' A Veople Talked vv t

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