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New-York tribune. [volume] (New York [N.Y.]) 1866-1924, November 26, 1910, Image 11

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Of interest to tOomen
YOUTH kE MAIUMTY
Some of the Points in Which
Their Apparel Differs.
Tie tiny girl of three or four may wear.
■when she appears in public, as costly antl
elaborate apparel as her parents care to
kay for her. provided that !t is of a fineness
sad delicacy suited to her tender years.
but when she rt-aches an ace of consrious
ripss she is expected to cultivate simplicity.
Even whea she makes her formal entry
society her frocks, although their style
will b« much inSuenced by these her mother
•«rears. will etill bear certain marks to d!s-
- FOR DEBUTANTES
tlng--*^^ them as twin? -=r;=iistakatly
the tLppirttosn-ces of a bud-
It zrAzbt be supposed tir^t tiiere -would be
less diSerence Jiist now tiuni usual between
the g-osris for dftbuiar.tes ar.a those for
more =iar=re -creerers. but this is hardly tHe
case. The sliaplicliy cf the latter is mostly
a nmtter oT line. the materials used belr.g
ge2era::y sapch too costly to be suitable for
you:.*:- Srocks. The very straight and
carro-w -'Jhouette, trhlch is favored among'
other reasens because of its youthful ap
pes.-^ace, is not often conspicuous in frocks
for r-rls In tbeir teens. On the contrary,
there t» a tendency to the slightly bouffant
eT»cts so easily prod-orefl in full skirts of
chir-:n cr otter similar fabrics try catching
tiers -sp a. little all arcrnc at about knee
ieJShi.
Life Ccrsrers. little Sobers, mrtow beaded
basds and ttar eds»s of fur. all of which,
except the little bows, mar be seen or. the
tCo ccrrumes Illustrated to-day, are among
•C« fisy-oratiens that announce the debu
tants Mm. The fir- frock shown is °*
rose satin, veiled xrtth sky blue cbUTon.
t>e d.-aperl« being caught vrith buckles cf
-^Be» •■ pastel tones. Although rather more
etepi« in psncral e^ect. The second froc* is
reaSy more elaborately decorated. It is of
■seal and has a tunic of chiffon in
tbe same shaae. ed^e<i with fur. The skirt
teioxr -he tunic la adorned with, satin roses,
cbhrattertes -,-..- and beads, and a
bea,- fringe. There ar«? more roses on the
ck^j^ and the decoHetage is finished with
beads.
EN SPORT IS NOT SPORT
rjomplain of
ilsoxy A" fa
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Miss Amy H. Honuuis,
filrector ot physical Vacation. Is sure that
th^ r.o-x rule requiring all Btndenfcß to take
«th>:Jrs xcork no hara to the VTeUes
fey rr-orts. and eep«ciany the rowing, la
wWcb Vv-e!]fcsiey girls have always partic
tdarlv eic^llPd-
Sheffield Reproductions
The growing popularity of silver in
Meat Dish re fi ne a Sheffield style makes pres
aild Cover ads ol this ware especially appropriate.
A beautiful example is this hand-chased
«i^ \^ a » Dish and Cover. Other pieces to
/^^^^^^^s match, as well as a large assortment of staple
!M^ss ■A tabi^- ware to meet the demands of all. will
'^^^^^-^o^f^\ he found here— Planked Steak Dishes. Two
&7^r;"*^^' : s|[!3^ =^V >-^ and Three Compartment Veg
f>*^^m^ag£&&*^Z^r" ela^ c Dishes. Chop and Cold
J*^JS^Z-^-~ Mr=i Dishes. Breakfast Sets.
'^'v/J-^* —^ E====s= WiS2C Lunch Sets. Hot V/aler and
Milk Pitcher, teercl^ Bean to Fern Dish., etc. elc .
Th Meridea Company, silversmiths
49-51 West Thirty-fourth Street
Carriage Entrance. 35th St~««_
FAVORS SO-CALLED "FADS"
Newest Woman Member' of
School Board Says So.
The newest woman member of the school
i>«ard, ln ss Martha I* Draper, of No. 18
TOert Sth street, v.ho was appointed yes
terday b r irayor Gaynor to nil one of th©
vacancies resulting from the. expiration of
S5 ter »s of several ccmmlesioners. has no
sympathy with the persons who think there
are too many "fads". In the public schools.
I have never been able to find any of
these 'fads.' " she said yesterday, "and I
have been interested In schools for a good
while, too. , Education isn't a matter of
booia^ alone. I believe in cooking lesson? j
.or gprls. in manual training. in all the i
various practical branches, and I was
heartily glad •when the Manhattan Trade
Scaocl for Girls was taken ever by th©
Board of Education, II my of our boys and
{Tirls must begin to •K'ork for a living very
early, and that must be considered in their
training in the public schools."
Miss Draper also believes strongly In ath
letics, and is a member of the board of
the girls' branch of m Public Schools
Athletic League. "But I'm quite in fa
vor," she said yesterday, "of the restric
tions the Board of Education Imposes on
girls. There are some things In the line
of games and exercises -which boys can do
■w-fth perfect safety, and plrls can't—foot
ball. for instance," she added with a laugh.
"I tvish there -were larg-er facilities for girls
In the athletics they can do; but the Board
of Estimate and Apportionment never gives
the schools all the schools think they ought
to have."
The women teachers wGI have to -wait
until Miss Draper has been commissioner
for a while before finding 1 out -whether she
stands for etjual pay. "It is a subject
about which there is a good deal to say
JVet&s of the Ma.rK.e-tj
Turkey Drops a Litt'-«.
Tbere vras such a demand for turkeys at
Washington Marlcet <. a Thanksgiving Eve
that tie price rose to 30 and 32 cents a
pound, iast year's figures, bat a slight drop
hes come with the end of the week. Chick
ens and geese came next to turkeys in
popular favor, but there was very little
call for ducklings. Fine broiling chickens
■were only 22 cents, as against X centa a
pound this time last year. "Wild ducks,
grouse, ra:ll)ird3 and , tail remain un
changed in price.
Holiday Baskets.
Ho'iday baskets, containing fruit and
candy, very prettily arranged, are $L 20 each. >
A consignment of the finest grapefruit se«Ji
in the market for a long time is seUing at
in© rate of 23 cents apiece. .-•:..... - grape-
Iruit are 23 cents for four. The winter
supply cf oranges is coming in very slowly ;
the oranges on the fruit stalls range from
4j to 7S cents a dozen. Egyptian melons
are £2 each and sugar pines are 40 cents.
French figs are 51 a dozen, mangoes CO
' cents a. dozen and pomegranates $1 50 a
dozen. Winter banana apples are 75 cents
lo $1 a dozen. Jonathans are 40 cents to $1
and KeWtown pippins and Spltzenbergs are
!1Z cents ro SI a dozen. Morocco grapes have
; gene out, and are replaced by the Em
! percrs. at 2i cents a pound; Concords are
! 25 cents a basket. Niagaras LO cents a bas
ket. Juid Malagas and Tokays 25 cents a
i pound. Anjou and Cornice pears and Easter
| Beauties are $1 a. dozen, and winter »M 3
i are f» cents to $1 CO a dozen. The holiday
j dainties include stuffed prunes at 50 cents
! a packet. Fard dates at 13 cents a small
j packet, soft sheli almonds at 23 centa a
j quart hickory nuts at 15 cents and new
j Brazil nuts at 20 cents a Quart.
Mushroom Prices Prohibitive.
m Mushrooms s^ea prohibitive at 90 cents
a pound, but they arc [gaper than they
were at the same time last year. Beautiful
DAILY TRIEI^, SATITRDAY, XOTOrBER 26, 1010.
f on both sides." she observed cautiously.
Miss Draper Is the flfth woman to be
1 appointed as commissioner, and the first
jto be named by Mayor Gavnor. She has
' been for some ye-ars chairman of the local
; school board in the 9th District.
SALADS FQRj/viMTER
Green Herbs Should Accompany
Substantial Roasts.
j The rrarkets are showing an attractive
i array of green salads— romaine. watercress,
i field palad, esoarole. celery and lettuce.
j These are the Ideal kinds of salad to serve
with hot roast beef and Yorkshire pud
ding, a* they help to "cut" the fatty ele
ments in the meat. In fact, one might al
most say that they are the only proper
'salad? to serve at such dinners.
j Of course, there are some acid fruit
salads that may be used with heavy meats,
such as grapefruit or orange salad; but,
while these may be relished as a change,
they do not wear so well as the green
salad, besides being- more expensive, for a
nickel or a dime will buy enough water
cress, lettuce or. escarole for a meal, or
even for two.
Alligator pears, of course, make a de-
Ughtfol winter salad, especially aa no oli
but only lemon Juice or vinegar, with sea
soning-. Is used to dress them, but they arc
too expensive to be u.«ed commonly.
Fruit, nut, cheese and vegetable salads.
rich with mayonnaise, should usually be
reserved for luncheons and suppers. They
should be served at dinner only when the
piece de resistance Is a light meat, lacking
in fat. or when some acid Jelly Is serred
with the meat.
Although any bit of green is delicious
■with rich meats, some varieties seem to be
especially suited to some meats. Water
cress, of course. Is excellent with steak.
Poultry calls fcr celery. Mint gives the
finishing touch to roast lamb or mutton,
and escarole Is the thing for roast beef,
while lettuce Is delicious with almost any
kind of roast meat or flsh. Pork Is so ex
tremely jrreasy that the ordinary green
salad scarcely provides acid enough for It,
and so it Is served with tart apple sauce or
cranberries.
tt a housewife finds some green mint for
6ale, as she occasionally will at this season
In the market stalls, she will do -well to
buy several bunches and bottle some mint
sauce for winter use, adding- a sma'l piece
of horseradish to each bottle.
Chop two large tablespoonfuls of mint,
edd four tablespoonfuls of sugar, and stir
ir.to one cupful and a half of vinegar. Seal
the bottles with paraffin.
CALMS FEARS'OF THE ANT!S
Head of Woman Suffrage Party
Is Opposed to Violence.
Anti-suffrage statesmen who may have
feared for their own heads and windows
sin re the suffragette riots began In England
may now take courage. The "Boss" of
woman suffrage party, Mrs. Carrie Chap
man Catt, has spoken, and she "can't see
that the English methods would help."
Mrs? Oatt Is not without sympathy, how
ever, for her riotous sisters. "When asked
yesterday what she thought of the Englißh
demonstration, she said:
"I don't think that any one outside a
movement can satisfactorily advise those
in it, or that one country can Judge for
another. We In this country can't fully
appreciate the provocation of the English
women, but we do know that Mr. Asqiiith
has given them cause for great Indigna
tion. He makes promises which, while they
may sound definite to tha uninitiated, are
only cheap bids for votes. They are quite
right in distrusting htm, hot I cannot see
how such methods as the ones that have
been adopted will help."
Mrs. Catt added that Implicit reliance
could not be placed on the reports that
have been coming from England.
"In previous cases," she said, "reports
of the violence of suffragette demonstra
tions have been greatly exaggerated. A.
pebble, for Instance, which was thrown
against the window of the Premier's hoee
was magnified Into a brick, and In that
form the story was cabled to this country."
Some experimenters with f.rei-sa cookery
advise one to heat the box before putting
In the food, by placing a kettle of hot
water In It and lettlnc It stand half an
hour.
hothouse cucumbers are 25 cents «ach, trot
ordinary ones can be bong-ht for 10 cents
each. New Jersey cranberries are 10 cents
and fine Cape Cods are 15 cents a quart.
Green peas are 50 cents a Quart, string
beans are 35 cents a Quart, lima beans 45
cents, and there Is a new variety of bean—
Crown of Japan— selling at 85 cents a Quart.
Red cabbages and Savoys are 15 cents a
head, lettuces are also 15 cents, and cauli
flowers are- 15 to 35 cents each. Horse
radish Is 15 cents a stick, endive Is 25 cents
a pound, chicory is 10 cents a head, esca
role Is also 10 cents, and spinach Is 20 cents
the half peck. Two bunches of knob celery
are 15 cents and two bunches of beets 25
cents; pumpkin is 5 cents a pound, water
cress 5 cents a bunch and celery 25 cents
a bunch. Potatoes and sweet potatoes are
10 cents a Quart, tomatoes are 50 cents a
basket, French artichokes are 15 cents
each, new carrots are 5 cents a bunch, and
brussels sprouts are 25 cents for two boxes.
Little Changes in Fish.
Spanish mackerel are down again to 18
cents a pound, smelts are 15 to 20 cents a
pound, sea bass and halibut are also 18
cents; striped bass are up to SO cents a
pound, yellow pike are 25 cents, tan bass
and whitefish 20 cents, yellow perch 15
cents, haddock 12 cents and blackflah. carp,
cod and flounders 10 cents a pound. King
fish and white perch are 15 cents a pound.
Fillet of sole sells at 20 cents a pound.
Fresh mackerel are 50 cents each, lobsters
are 30 cents a pound, scallops are 50 cents
a quart and hard shell crabs are 40 cents
a dozen.
Veal Higher than. Lamb.
Fancy grade lamb Is 10 to ll^i cents a
pound wholesale; rack* of lamb are only
20 cents a pound, and shoulders are 10
cents a pound. Veal has not come down
as much as lamb; city dressed veal calves
are 14% to lU'ra cents a pound wholesale,
and Western city dressed calves are .11 to
'i2\i rents a pound wholesale. Pork tender
loin Is 35 cents a pound, and loin of pork
is 13 cents. Prime rib roast is 22 cents a
; pound, round steak is 20 cents; smoked
ham Is 22 cents, fresh ham IS cents, and
bacon 28 cents a pound.
Eggs at 43 cents a dozen, are one cent
higher than last week; butter 13 37 cents,
and sweet butter is 41 cents a pound.
Uptown Prices.
Uptown meat prices are about the gam«
|as last week. Sirloin Is 20 and 22 cents a
pound, porterhouse 25 cents, and smokea
| tongue 22 cents a pound. Veal cutlets are
32 cents, veal chops 25 cents, pork chops
'*) cents, shoulders of pork 14 cents, fore
quarters of lamb 14 cents, and hindquar
ters IS cents a pound.
| Baldwin apples are 15 cents a small
basket, large Hood River oranges are 40
cents a dozen, and Hood River apples are
ID cents a basket. Malagas are 25 cents
and sweet grapes IS cents a pound.
Red and white cabbages, small cauliflow
ers and lettuces are 10 cents a head, brus-
B els- sprouts are 10 cents a box. and New
Jersey cranberries are 10 cents a quart.
Tomatoes are 15 cents a email basket^ ana
6weet potatoes are 10 cents a quart. Cel
ery Is 10 oentM a .bunch.
Yellow pike are down again to 25 cents
a pound, whltensh also are 25 cents. Smelts
are from 12 to 20 cents, weakflah and but-
UHIHII are 15 cents, seabase and halibut
ateaks are 18 cents, striped bass 20 cents,
haddock and flounders 8 cenu. and cod IS
centa * pound. Fresh mackerel are, GO c«it«
: tact,. *ad acaTlw •*• m Mm m, wmt.
CHURCH AND RELIGIOUS NEWS NOTES
Dr. Grosvenor Celebrates the Fifteenth Anniversary of His
Rectorate at Incarnation.
The Rev Dr. WB»» M. Grosvenor will
celebrate to-morrow the fifteenth anniver
sary of his rectorship of the Episcopal
Church of the incarnation. In connection
v-ith the celebration figures of the parish
fifteen years ago an uptown one. to-day
a downtown one-will be given, and they
serve as comparison for the owth of the
Episcopal Church In this city and diocese
within the last few years. As Indicative of
this growth it can be pointed out that the
year the Rev. Dr. Grosvenor came to th •
incarnation parish It gave to all general
causes outside of itself and outside of the
diocese of New York. 57.000. To-morrow
the rector will ask for *15.C00.f0r world
missions alone, and expects, It Is eald. to
receive that sum without doubt, and pos
sibly more-
It is interesting to record, from the voice
of an expert who for years hag been fa
miliar with religious conditions in New
York, the exact status of the Episcopal
Church fifteen years ago. He says: "The
Incarnation record for the last fifteen years
seems to me to be a good barometer of
New York religious conditions. It is. I am
sure, for the Episcopal Church, but I am
also sure that most other bodies have made
corresponding advances.
"In New York fifteen years ago. when
Dr. Grosvenor came, there were fourteen
Episcopal parishes that had 1,000 com
municants, and only one of them that had
as n.arsy as 2.000. This counts Trinity and
its chapels separately, as they practically
are separate in their work. There were
eighteen parishes having total Incomes of
J20.000 or more. Of these, three had In
comes exceeding $50,000 and five exceeding
$100,000. The Incarnation. Dr. Grosvenor's
parish, had that year 875 communicants,
or. if the chapel be included, 1,306. It had,
church and chapel together, a financial In
come that year of $86,900. The whole num
ber of communicants In the diocese of
New York fifteen years ago was 66,000. Let
me add that the diocese of New York is
little more than the boroughs of Manhat
tan, The Bronx and Richmond. Hudson
River counties as far north as Ulster are
included, but the strength is in the city.
The boroughs of Brooklyn and Queens are
not Included.
"During Dr. Grosvenor's time in New
York— that is, during the last fifteen years
—the number of Episcopal parishes having
1.000 members or more has increased from
fourteen to twenty-two, or more than 50
per cent: and where fifteen years ago there
was only one having above 2,000, counting
Trinity Church and chapels separately as
before, to-day there are four above 2,000,
two above 3,000 and one above ",000. Fif
teen years ago there wer*» eighteen par
ishes having Incomes exceeding 520,000 each.
Of these, five had incomes exceeding $100,
000. To-day there are thirty-five parishes
with Incomes exceeding $20,000. Of these,
eight exceed $50,000, four exceed SIOO.OOO and
tfcree exceed $300,000 each. These are not
special and occasional years, but regular
lr.coiz.es. Incarnation parish had 575 mem
bers fifteen years ago. To-day it has 1,500.
The 1,305 of church and chapel of fifteen
years ago have Increased to 2,400 In both,
or more than 1.000 growth. Fifteen years
ago Episcopalian 3 In the diocese of New
York numbered 68,000. To-day they fall
Just a little under 100,000. Their gifts now
amount to 13,500,000 a year, or considerably
more than $1,000,000 growth in the fifteen
years. Of this sum a healthy growth is
given to missions of all -kinds.
"In this connection there are three points
to be made, not from the records, but open
to everybody who has eyes to see. The
first of these is the one that other bodies,
Roman Catholic and Protestant, have gone
forward in Sew York. The second is that
ail Christian bodies are entering Into so
cial service, civic matters and the real
work of this world as they did not fifteen
years ago. And the third is that lawyers,
bankers and the general run of unordained
men are taking a far more active and
vital Interest than they did a decafle and a
half ago. They are giving more and work
ing more. I might add a fourth point,
which is that Christian good feeling on
the part of all bodies. Roman Catholic and
Protestant, is stronger than it used to be.
"Lastly, the opening of the Cathedral of
St. John the Divine, 'to be conducted on
broad Christian lines, for al! people, and
not merely for Episcopalians, is going to
make for Christian progress in this city
during the next fifteen years as few things
could do."
The Rev. Dr. GrOßvenor was educated at
New York University and "Williams Col
lege, and came Into prominence as rector
of Trinity Church, Lenox. Coming to New
York, as rector of one of the large par
iishes.' he steadily grew in Influence, until
Ihe is now president of the standing com
imlttee, deputy to the General Convention,
'chairman of the committee on fabric of
! the cathedral, besides holding many other
' places of responsibility. The endowment
S fund of the Church of the Incarnation has
'been Increased in fifteen years from $22,500
j to $306,000, and the total gifts in that period
iof Incarnation people have been $2,100,000.
! The rector will deliver an historical sermon
! to-morrow.
BIBLE TERCENTENARY
Further plar.s are announced for the cel
ebration of the tercentenary of the King
James version of the English Bible, In
asmuch as the time of the publication of
the King James version In the year 1611
is unknown, the American Bible Society
cannot fix any date when It is most fitting
that these celebrations should take place,
but in order that the celebrations may at
tain general and national Blgnificance. the
society would recommend that they be
fceid as far as practicable on Sunday. April
23, 1311 the first Sunday after Easter, and
throughout the week following. A larg*
committee of distinguished persona will be
convened to act at as early a data aa
practicable in connection with a meeting
ir. New York City to be held in recogni
tion of th'.s event.
GENERAL ITEMS OF THE WEEK.
A' St. Bartholomew's Church there will
bft special music at 4 o'clock even' Sunday
afternoon during Advent.
t t he Eighteenth Street Methodist
Episcopal Church beginning to-morrow the
Rev. G E. Barber will conduct a series of
revival meetings.
"Son* Modem Errahets and Their In
terpretation of Lizard Religion" will be
the subject of a series of Sunday evening
sermons to be delivered by the Rev. L
Herman Randall at the Mount Morris Bap
tist Church, beginning to-morrow.
m- Aked will consider "The Religious
Significance o.' the Trial and Death of
Socrates" at the Fifth Avenue Baptist
Church to-morrow.
Mr Hill will preach in the morning at
the Church of the Holy Communion and
Dr. Mottet in the afternoon and evening.
The Rev I M Haldeman will preach to
morrow morning and evening at the First
Baptist Church. His evening subject will
be^n the Body «nd Out of the Body; or,
th« story of Paul. Who Went to Heaven
and Came Back; an Inspired Testimony to
the Fact of Personality, the Location of
Heaven and the Consciousness of the In
termediate State."
To morrow morning at 11 o'clock at th«
Lenox' Avenue Unitarian Church the Rev.
Merle St Crolx Wright will have for hiß
sermon topic -The Witness of the Spirit."
Mr*. Jean Morton will apeak at the N«w
to-morrow at 11 o'clock on "Inspiration of
Life." :, ~
The Rev. Dr. Samuel HcGerald. of Buf
falo, will speak at the servires In Christ's
Mission to-morrow and tell the story of
his conversion from Roman Catholicism to
Evangelical Christianity. Dr. McGerald
has told this story In nearly all the states
In this country and in all parts of Great
Britain and Island and drew largo audi
ences wherever it was given.
"Revolutions in Mexico and Portugal and
the Case of Spain as Symptoms of the
World's Unrest: Some Lessons for Our
Own Country and Community and the
Heart Quiet Humanity Craves" will be Dr.
3. Edward Young's subject at the Bedford
Presbyterian Church to-morrow evening.
Eight negro children, trained concert
Fingers, will sing two selections at the Sun
day evening service at Grace Methodist
Church to-morrow. Dr. Reisner. the pas
tor, will speak briefly on "New York High
Toned Society."
At Calvary Methodist Episcopal Church
the Rev. Dr. C. L. Good ell will preach at
11 a. m. In the evening at 8 o'clock there
will be a special musical service, with an
address by the pastor.
At the Temple Judge Willis
Brown, who has made a life study of work
among boys, will speak on "The Boy and
the Law" to-morrow evening.
"The Attitude of Christ and. His Church
Toward the Laboring Classes" will be the
theme of the Rev. Dr. Buchanan's aer
mon to-morrow morning in the Fourth
Avenue Presbyterian Church, now worshp-
Ing in the assembly rooms of the Charities
Building.
The s'lbjpct of the lesson sermon In the
Christian Science churches to-morrow will
be "Ancient and Modern Necromancy,
Alias Mesmerism and Hypnotism, De
nounced."
At St. Andrew's Methodist Episcopal
Church the Rev. Dr. George Clarke Peck
will preach at 11 a. m. and 8 p. m. to
morrow.
At the Harlem Preatiyterian Church to
morrow Dr. Caughey will preach In the
evening the last of his series of sermons
on "Questions About Eternity, as Answered
in the Word of God." His subject tp-mor
row morning will be "Is There a Hell?"
At the Temple Beth-E3 to-morrow morn-
Ing at 11 o'clock Dr. Samuel Schulman will
speak on "Social Justice— the Jewish Ideal."
"Fortitude In Sickness and Suffering"
will be the subject discussed at the Em
manuel Healing Service at St. Mark's to
morrow night.
At the Esoteric Society Dr. Desa'. dellven)
a series of lectures on "Philosophy of the
Human Mind and Soul," at 8 p. m. to
morrow.
"A Tragedy: Quit Your Sin," is the sub
ject on which Dr. David James Burrell will
preach to-morrow morning in tha Marble
Collegiate Church.
At the Scotch Presbyterian Church Dr
Wyll© will conduct both the morning and
evening services.
At the Union Methodist Episcopal Church
J. Lewis Hartsock, the minister, will epeals
In the morning on "The Moral Law "
At the "West Etid Collegiate Church the
Rev. Dr. Henry Bvertson Cobb will preach
in the morning, and at 4:30 p. m. a rauslcai
sen-ice will fee held, at which a double
quartet choir will render the Thankßffiving
cantata "Seed Time and Harvest." by John
E. West.
At the Broadway Tabernacle Dr. Jeffer
son will .preach at 11 o'clock, and In. the
evening there will be a special musical ser
vice, at which the choir will sing the
Thanksgiving ode by R. H. Woodman and
a harvest song: by C. Lee Williams.
At the Col'egiate Church of St. Nicholas
the Rev. Malcolm James MacLeod will
preach at both morning and evening ser
vices.
At the 23d street Young Men's Christian
Association "Living Upstairs" will be the
subject of an address by the Rev. Dr.
George Clark Peck, of St. Andrew's Meth
odist Episcopal Church.
\ Felix Adler will continue his series
of addresses to-morrow morning in the
meeting house of the Society for Ethical
Culture, His subject will be "The Ethical
Principle in Social Reform,"
At the Brick Church to-morrow Dr.
Henry van Dyke will preach at 11 o'clock
and Norman Thomas, the assistant minis
ter, at vesper service at 4.
At the Church of the Puritans the Rev.
Dr. C. J. Young will preach to-morrow
morning and evening. In tha morning his
subject will be "A Good Life Epitomized"
and in the evening he wiii preach on "A
Good Use for a Bad Life."
At the Church of the Ascension L>r. Percy
Stlckney Grant's morning subject will be
"Was Tolstoy a Christian?" At 8 p. m.
Booker T. Washington will speak on "The
Successful Training- of the Negro."
Dr. Robert Stuart Mac Arthur, at Calvary
Baptist Church, will preach at 11 o'clock
on "A Triple Crown." At 8 p. m.. illus
trative of the topic "Songs of Thanksgiv
ing," the great choir, under the direction
of Edward Morris Bowman, will give a
special musical service.
Dr. Charles A. Baton, pastor of the Mad
ison Avenue Baptist Church, will preacii
to-morrow, both morning and evening.
Dr. Carter, pastor of the Madisoa Avenue
Reformed Church, begins to-morrow night
a series of Sacred Travel Talks on the
Holy Land, under the general title, "la
the Footsteps of the Nazarene."
At the Lenox Avanue Christian Church
Dr. W. Bayard Craig, minister, will preach
in the morning on "The World When Christ
Was Bora" In the evening- Dr. Craig will
continue his illustrated lectures on "How
We Got Our Bible," discussing the first
great authorized version.
To-morrow at 11 o'clock, at Carnegie. Hail,
Dr. Wise will preach on "Woman's Work
in Man's World." This address was to
have been given last Sunday, but was post
poned for one week in order that tribute
might be paid to the memory of Tolstoy.
The Rev. Dr. A. Edwin Keigwln. will
preach at both services In the West End
Presbyterian Church to-morrow.
At the Fourth Presbyterian Church,
"Hlgglns. the Sky Pilot of the Lumber
Jacks," will be the speaker.
At the Church of the Divine Fatarnity
th« Rev. Dr. Fran Oliver Hall will preach
at 11 a. m. on "Tho Great Agreements In
Religion." At 8 p. m. will fc ft nell -j tne seo _
and of a oerlco cf union services of this
church, the Fre« Synagogue and the
Church of the Messtnh for the discussion
of social questions from th© relljjloua
standpoint.
At the Fifth Avenue Presbyterian
Church the Rev. Dr. Jamaa Q. 'k. Mc-
Clure, president of McConnick Theological
Seminary of Chicago, will preach both in
th« morning and afternoon.
the Intensely .Interesting discourse on
"Alma and Ideals" end bow they can be
materialized, realized and enjoyed, vriO. b«
given by Mrs. Adele Marie Rlque. founder
of the university for soul' education, men
tal and material elevation of Paris.
At the "West Presbyterian Church the
Rev. Dr. A. H. Evans, tha pastor, will
preach to-morrow at 11 a. in. on "Has God
Left Anything, Undone?" And at 3 p. m.
ther© will be a special musical B^riiCa.
"Sex, Home and Human Progress" will
bo the subject of an address by Dr. Ly
man B. Sperry, of --os Angeles, CaL. at
the Harlem branch of the Young Men's
Christian Association, to-morrow after
neon at 4:30 o'clock.
At the Church of the Messiah (Uni
tarian), the senior minister. Dr. Robert
Collyer, will preach to-morrow at 11
o'clock on "The Joy of Youth." .
James A. Edgerton, president, of the Na
tional New Thought Alliance, will speak
to-morrow evening on "What the "New
Thought Stands For." at Carnegie Hall.
- At Plymouth Congregational, the Rev.
Newell Dwight HIHi3 will preach at M
a. m. on "How Shall • a Practical Man
Modify Tolstoy's Literal Interpretation of
Christ's Words. "If a man take away thy
cloak, let him have thy coat also.* "
"Crystallized Christianity" will be the
subject of Dr. George P. Eckman's short
discourse to-morrow evening at St.Paula
Methodist Episcopal Church. At the
morning service he will preach on "The
Bondage of Brotherhood."
There will be a musical service at St.
James Methodist Episcopal Church to
morrow evening at 8 o'clock.
m ■_■ j
The Sailors' Home and Institute Is about
to celebrate its second anniversary. It
has come through Its first two years with
an advance In every department that far
exceeds expectations. The management
announces that an endowment of $100,000
la needed to develop the full possibilities
of the work. Of this It Is hoped to raise
WO.OOO this year.
HUNTS FOR FRAUD DIPLOMAS
Registrar of City College Making-
Investigation at Albany.
[By Telegraph to Tho Tribune. ]
Albany. Nov. 25.— Arvld D. Anderson,
registrar of the College of the City of New-
York, who was sent here by the trustees
of that Institution to examine the diplomas
granted by the State Board of Regents to
graduates of the college to determine If
any were fraudulent, spent all day In the
examinations department of the State Edu
cation Department going over the diplomas
of IS<77. Mr. Anderson will remain here for
several days continuing the work which
was begun to-day. He will cover the
diplomas Issued, during the last three years.
"I came to Albany to-day," said Mr. An
derson, "at the suggestion of the trusutees
of the College of the City of New York
and will report my findings to them. Aa yet
I have discovered no fraudulent dlpiomaa,
but I have examined only about a hundred
of the diplomas."
Registrar Anderson said that the educa
tional Institution he represented granted
from four to five hundred diplomas a year,
and that the task before him was not a
light one, as he must examine each of them
with exceeding care. He said, further, that
though the District Attorney of New York
County was deeply Interested in the ques
tion of alleged fraud in the granting of
diplomas, he had not met a represent
ative of that office In Albany and knew of
no such contemplated visit.
Dr. Augustus S. Downing. First Assistant
Commisiloner of Education, said that the
State of New York, through the Education
Department, wu In no way to blame for
tha fraudulent Issuance of diploma*. It
«uch fraud was to be found, as It was the
duty of the department to Issue diplomas
which were certified to by the educational
Institutions which were under the jurisdic
tion of the State Board c' Regents.
"But I shall meet with Registrar Ander
son and have a long talk with him before
he leaves Albany," said he.
A general alarm was sent out yesterday
for the arrest ot Joshua Goluboch, who
for three years wa9 assistant registrar of
City College. He Is charged with preparing
oo^us diplomas. Goiuboch's home is at No.
840 Eastern Parkway. Brooklyn.
RELIGIOUS NOTICES.
FIFTH AVENUE PfIESBYTERUN GHUHOH
Fifth Are. and 55Ch Street.
Een-ices at U A. M. and 4 P. 31.
REV. JAMES G. K. McCLURE, D.D.,
0? Chicago,
will preach in the morning and afternoon.
Bible School meets at 9:30 A. M.
Men's Bible Class at 10 A. M.
Wednesday Evening Lecture at SIX
Every one is invited to these services.
THE UNION THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY
in the City of New York.
Service; In the Chapel. Claremont Avenue, be
tween UGLh and 121' d streets, at eleven o'clock.
Preacher, The Rev. Professor HENRY SLOANS
COFFIN. D. D.
4 P. — The Communion of the Lord's Sup
per, conducted by the Rev. WILTON MERLE
SMITH. D. D.. and the Rev. ANSON P. AT
TERBURY, D. D. Thee* services are a part o*
the Dedication Exercises of the New Buildings.
The public are cordially Invited.
The Church of the Divine Paternity.
Central Park West and 7«tfa Strwt.
11 A. M., the Pastor, FRANK OLIVER HALL,
D. D.. will preach upon
"The Great Agreements in Religion."
At 8 P. M. : Union Service of this Church, The
Free Synagogue and The Church of the Messiah.
Addresses by Marcus M. Marks, Wm. M. Ash
ton and Miss Leonora CReiliy. upon "STRIKED,
ARBITRATION and CONCILIATION."
All are invited.
CHIRCH OF THE ASCENSION.
Fifth Avenue and Tenth Street.
Rev. Dr. PERCY STICKNEY GRANT. Rector.
11 a. m. Morning Service and Sermon (Rector).
4 p. m. Even-Song and Senncn. "Harvest
Cantata."
S p. m. Mr. BOOKER T. WASHINGTON.
"TH3 SUCCESSFUL TRAINING OP TH3
NEORO."
9 p. m. People's Fornm. Mr. W .VOTON*.
THE SOCIETY FOB KTHICAi CCI. rt" HE.
Founded 1876.
Meetln»-House. Central Park W. and 64th St.
11 a. m.
DR. FELIX ADLER
will continue els series of a4Jr*ssea.
His Subject will be. ■•
•THE! ETHICAL PRINCIPLE DC SOCIAZ.
REFORM."
The Public Is Welcome.
31ADISO.V AVE>XE REFORMED CHURCH.
57th et. and Madison aye.
DR. CARTER, the Pastor. PREACHES
11 a. M. — "Background and Perspective."
a P. M. — the Footstep* or tie Nazarcae."
First In series of sacred travel talks on tho
Holy Laufi. Subject to-morrow nigiit, "To t£«
Holy Land by the War of tho Pea."
St. George's Cburcb
Stuyvesant Square and 16th St
Rev. HUGH BIRCKHEAD. D.D., Rector
11 A. M. — Morning: Prayer and Sermon.
Preacher, the Rector.
ALL, SEATS FREE.
CENTRAL PIiEBBYTERI.VN' CHTTRCH.
West 57th at., bet. Broadway and 7th aye.
Rev. WILTON MERLE-SMITH. D. D.. Pastor.
Rev. G. H. SMTTH. Jr.. Aselstant.
Mr. SMYTH preaches at 11 a. m. and Hum.
Christian Endeavor Meeting Sunday morning
at 9:45- Young Men"s Blb;« Study Class, lv
a. m. Sunday School. 3 p.m. Devotional meat
lng Wednesday evening at 8. ALL vvfciurOME.
CHURCH OF ZIOX AND ST. TIMOTHY.
334 West 67th St.
Rector. Rev. HENRY LUBECK. D. C L.
Holy Communion S a. m.
Morning: Prayer. Holy Communion.
Special Sermon by the Rector for
Men's Missionary Movement 11 a. m.
Evensong with Sermon by Rev. Dr.
Rushton 8 p.m.
Fourth Presbyterian Church,
West End Ava. an.l Olst St.
EDGAR WHITAKEP. WORK. D. [> .. Pastor.
P. ELV.'OOD KRICKrOS. Assistant.
Dr. WORK preaches at 11 a. ra.
At the Evenlns Service, Rev F. E. inGGTVa
Sky-PHot of the Lumberja^fcs. will sp-ak.
Madison Square Presbyterian Ch.roh
Madison avenue and 24th •tptet.
Rev. C. H. PAJtXUUKBTj D. IX, Paetor.
Rev. O. R. MON'TOOMERT. Ph. D
Assistant Minister.
The. pastor wtjl preach II a. re., and
Mr. Montgomery 8 p. m.
St. Bartholomew's Church
Madison avenue, corner 44th »tre*L.
The Rev. LEIGHTON PARKS. D. D.. Rector.
30 a. m.— Holy Oommun-f 1.
11 a. m. — Morning Prayer and Sermon.
4 p. m. — Ev«nln« Prayer and Address.
Tha Rector will preach morning and afternoon.
" MADISON AVENUE M. B. CHURCH.
Corner *.".:! Btr»«t.
Rev. WALLACE MACAIUT.IJW. D. D.. Paster.
11 A. M.— Preaching by the Paator.
8 P. M.. — SPECIAL. MUSICAL. SERVICE, at
which tit* TiU&kafivtnr Cantata. "Satd Tttna
ul UiMtc." to W«*. will t» r«»l«I«A tar U.%
RELIGIOUS NOTICES.
TITE MIDDLE COLLEGIATE CHUHCH.
2i Av«>. and Ttli St-
Rev. JOHN G. FAGG. U D.. Mln!««
will preaclJ at 11 A. M. aad » P. M.
THE "MARBLE COLLEGIATE -CHURCH.
sth Avo. and 3*tn at- ... ,
Brsr. DAVID JAMES BURRELL. D. D.. *"***
ter, will preach at 11 A. it. and 8 P. M.
Morr.in^ — Trasr^dy: "Quit Your Sin. '
Evenlap— Movlac Oa.
THE COLLEGIATE CIICRCn OF 3T.
NICHOLAS.
sth Are. and 4»tn St.
Rev MALCOLM JAiIES MAC LEOI>. XUllakai
will preach at 11 A. M. and » P. H.
THE WEST EVD COLLEGL\TE (HJKrH.
T\'«»st End At». and TTtn St.
Rev. HENRT EVERTSON COBB. D. D.. iTl=l»
ter. trill preach at 11 A. M. and *:&> P. 3*. _ m
4:30 P. — Musical Service -with »ii«nlH
Choir. "West's Cantata. "Seed time and Har
vest." *•■ '-•■■-'
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
Broadway ami 70th street.
PASTOR, I. M. HfILDEMAN.
11 A. 31.— -TACL'S IIE.VCEFORTIT: '<>;. THE
SrECLVX CROWN r.IVB>" TO THOSE \* HO
LOVE THE APPE.VRINO OF 'HKI-r '
8 P. M.--IS THE BOI>Y .VN*r> OCX OF THE
BODTj <<;• THE «riiCl OF PAUL WHI>
WENT TO HEVITLV AND CA3EE BACK: .V>
IN KM. TKnTIMOXV TO THE FACT
OK PERSONALITY. TUT. LOCATION OF
If \VK>. VM> THF3 CONSCIOUSNESS OF
THE INTER.MEDLITE STATE."
trinity Gburcb
Sunday Services— 7:oo. 7:Wt 10:30 a. —■- &*
man); 3:30. 6:0O p. m.
"Week-day Services: 7:30. »:00 a. m. ; 3p. m.
Noonday Services In Adverst: Monday. Nov. ■»
I — Rt. Rev. CHARLES HENRY BRENT. IX IX.
Bishop Phiilpplne Islands.
Nov. 2»-D*c 2 (IncL>— Rt. Rev. ASI»-rt 9.
i LLOYD. D. D.. Pr-a. Board of Mlaalon*.
CHXTRCH OPEN ALL DAT
The public IS cordially Invited to tts ««r^'ra«a.
both on Sundays an.; on week day.
North Presbyterian Church
153 th »t.. b«t. Broadway ac<l Ara»t«rCaia «i^
Rev. JOHN R.MIGHY. Ph. 0., Pastor
11 A. M. — "A Wilderness or a River."*
8 P. — "Th» Call of th» W..-1. '
FIFTH AVENUE BAPTIST CHURCH
8 West Forty-gUtn Str«*t.
The REV. CHARLES F. AK£l>. D, IX.
will preach to-morrow morning and ev^niny.
Services at 11 and 9 o'clock.
Morning: 'The Place of Seventeenth C«ntarr
l«f-a.:a In tha LlTa of To-day— a Sermon far
Thankssrlvlng'.' "
Evening: "The Relijcioua Significance of Xh»
Trial and Death of Socrates."
BIBI.K ri.A«.-I>* FOR YOO'G »EX AXT>
YOCNG WOMEN" AT 9:30 A. M.
ADVANCED NEW THOUGHT
Public Invited. Sunday Horr.teg. 11 o'clock, a*
Duryea Hall. 200 "West 72d. Subject: "Aim* and.
Ideals" Materialized. Speaker. Mrs. Adela
Marie Ri(i'J«. Founder of University for Sod
Education of Paris. Miss Eilck. Sololat.
Broadway Tabernacle,
Broadway and 36th Stn^et.
Rev. CHARLES E. JEFFERSON, D". D.. Paator,
preacbea at 11 A. 11. Special musical service* 9
P. iL "Woodman's 'Tr-aaasjjlvini? Day Ode."
"Wednesday. 3 P. M.. Prayer Meeting. _
BRICK CHURCH
Fifth Avenao ana Thirty-seventh Street.
HHNRT VAN DTKE will Breach at It.
NORMAN M. THOMAS at Vesper Service at 4.
Bible School and Classes. 9:15 A. M.
aildw««k service •Wednesday. 3 P. M.
CALVIBY aETHOOIST EPISCOPAL GHUHGH,
129 th Street and Sevjeth Avenue.
Rev. CHARLES L. GOODELL, D. D . Pastor.
11 A. M. and 9 P. il. — Preachlse by the Paator.
SPECIAL 3n>ICAL SERVICE
with an address by the Pastor.
RUTGERS P?»E33T7E=?IA?I CHURCH
Broadway and "3d stre**.
REV. ABBOTT E. XITTREDGE, D. D.,
will preach 11 a. a. and 9 p. in. and conduct th»
Prayer Meeting Wednesday er<%. at 8:15.
WEST E«0 PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
Amsterdam Aye. and lCSth St.
Rev. A. Edwin Keigwin, CO., Pastor.
Services at 11 A. iL i.-. 8 P.M.
Dr. Kelgwln will preach, at both »ervlc<».
CHIRCH OF THE 3IE»SIAH,
(UNITARIAN). Park aw. and -Wr. at.
-— . . ~. v ;'.-v. ROBERT COZXTBR. Lit. IX
Ministers, j Rt>v JOHN' HAYXES HOT-iTES-
Mornfce Service. 11 a. m. Dr. COLi.TER will
preach. Subject: "THE JOY OF YOUTH." All
are cordially lnvtred.
: UNIVERSITY PLACE PRESBTTEP-lA-V
I CHUP-CH. cor. of 10th st. 'or.* block west from
Broadway). GEORGE ALEXANDER. -•• D..
Pastor — worship to-morrow at 11 a. in.
{ and 8 p. m. Tha Pastor -will preach. Swrrtcn
1 preparatory to the Communion -will b* haM ta
j the Chapel. "Wednesday evening a- $ o'clock.
MADISON ATENTB B APTT9T CHURCH.
MADISON 1 AVENUE, COR. 31ST STREET.
C. A. EATON, D. D., Pastor
wtll preach at 11 A. 31. acd SP. M.
8 P. M.— "Th« Making at I^U."
OLD FIRST CHURCH
sth .we.. 11th to 12tlx St
HOWARI> DUFFIELD. D. D.. Tsxzsr.
The Rev. CHaJILES R. ERXiMAN'. at I - Ba»
ton. will preach, 1.1 a- m.. * 3. m.
SAiNT ANDREW'S CHURCH,
78th 9tn^«t. -west of Colmabus »T»an«.
GEORGE CLAUKE PECK. D. D^ Minister.
11 a. a and 3 p. m. — preanhina; by th»
Minister.
ALL ■ 3 OtTL3 •T'nltariaai. Fourth avenue. 2Oth
st. Re*-. THOMAS R. SLICER. Pastor, will
conduct Service. Mr. BOOKER T. WASHING
TON, Prlnclcal Tuslcesee School. will »pea.-c of
liia worlt for the neyro education in the South.
Services 11 a. m. All cordially Invited.
CHURCH OF THE INCARNATION. Madison
aye. aad BHta st- — Rev. "W. M. QRO3VEXOP,
D. D.. Rector. — 9 a. m.. Holy Communion; 11
a. m., M rmeg- Prayer. Sermon '.Rector), and
Holy Cornrruslon. 4p. m. — Special Musical Ser
vice. William* 9 Cantata. "Bethany."
ALL ANGELS' CHURCH. Waat End are. aad
Slat St.. Rev. S. DE LANCET TOWNSEND.
D. D. . Recvor. — Holy Communion. 8 a. m. ;
morning prayer anil sermon by tha Rsctijr, 11
a. m. Choral ovenaon*. 4 n. cz. Strassers wel
come. *"
GRACE CHURCH, JSSSS.
Services, 3. 11, 4, 3. Preachers: Rector at 1L
Rev. W. B. EDT>T at 4. Rev. THEODORE
SEPGHWICg at S.
Y(.^' Trtj)le Crow:i ... 3, Musical
■*r i~J Service Songs of Thanksgivisy. tncij<ila»
m new "Harvest Cantata" (Harrison);
'■ Bowman, Cond.
MRS. iiAi'.T E. CHAPtaj.
XEW THOT7GHT.
BERKELEY THEATRE;
West 44th St., near sta Ay«.
Sunday afternoon* _at_8 1
LENX>X AVETCS T7NITARIAN- CHtTRCt""
Cbrnar 121 st Street. . Services a. ":!*NBV
"The Witness oi th» Spirit."
Rev Merle St. Croix TVrlpht. r>. D.. MlnlaUr.
Sunday School 9 45 A. M. Ail Welcogie.
St. PAIL'S METHODIST chYrch.
WMt Had Avgnu* and 3Cth Street.
Ray. GEOROE P. ECKMAX. D. D.. Pastor.
11 A. M. — Bondage of Brotherhood.
9 P. M. — Cry^talUzßfl Chrtstlanlty.
P.ELiaiOt^ aOCIETTY OF FP.:'FrN:>} (Ortho
dox). — Meeting for worship 144 East 2Ot!»
Btrset. New York; TVaßhmarMn an^i Laray#tr»
avenues. Brooklyn. 11 o'clock. IXVDLET M.
STEVEX? proposes attending N" Y. nieetin?.
ST MARK'S. M «ta asd^ioth st.. P«v. Dr.
L. W. BATTEN, Rector. — Holy Comrnonloa. •
a. m. ; momin» 7ray«r unit iMsnTion, 11 a. rs :
servlcs of to« EtamwMMl Haa'.ing Mission. §
p. m.
GRACE. 104 th. W. of Oolcmtraa — CHRIS
TTAN F. REISN-ER. It. "Wh T Ar« Chris
tiana a.a- - .r" 8. "Hlglir-Tona Society."
Cotorad Stngera.
CHRIST CHCRCH. Broadway. Tlst 3t-.
Rev. G. A. STRONG. Rector.
1 A. 11 11 A. M.. Rector.
9 P. M. All Walcora*.
CHURCH" OF THE HEAVENLY REST.
Fifth a-»«.. abov- -Ctis st.
Rev. HERBERT •'HIPMi.V. Rectcr.
Senrlcoa. 3 and 11 a. p.. ■* p. m.
Mu«ii«>u vi-i..i' Presbyterian Church.
Northeast corner Of 73d Street.
Dr ROBERT MACKENZIE, at 11 A. M.
Dr. HENRY SLOASE COFFTN. »'. * P. M.
WE»T FREHBTTEKIAN CTTCRCII.
On -t^d st., b«tw«*a Bth and «I» »▼«•.
Rev. ANTHONY H. EVANS. D D.. Pastor.
Preaches at 11 a. m. and 9 p>, a.
At TEMPLE BETH-EX^ sth mv*. am} 75ta «t-
Sunday, 11 a. Nx, Dr. SCHLTJ>IAN win preach.
I Subject. "Social Jnstlc*»— th« Jewish ideal." Ail
I ara woloocr.
RELIGIOUS SOCIETY OP" FRIENDS. —
Meetings for worship. 11 a. nx. at 2Zt Eaat
13th at.. Manhattan, and 110 Schenaerhorn St..
Brooklyn.
BEDFORD PRE^BYTERXAX' CHURCH.
Nostraml «*• and D««n ax., Brooklyn. — Pas
tor S EDWARD TOCNO win preach at 10 4.'.
and 7:45;
ST M*di»on Aronue and 12«tb Street.
, ..* c 11 A.M. Sermon by Rev. Allan Ma.-R»Mte
JAMfM P.M. Musical Sgrv.Qttartet.V'^teiKThn; ?
AXiL 9OUT-S" tAnthon Memorial* CH'"R'"h7
Bt. Ntchola* aTB.. 114 th St.. Rev C STARK
WEATtTER PIL,VTT. Ractor — rigr-rlcoa. lta *.
PARK PRESBYTERIAN OHtrRCH. B«th m~.
Airmterdain Am — PrfHchlng by Pastor. Rev. Dr.
AX3OX P. ATTERBCRY. It a. m.. 8 p. m.
LEW AVENUE COLLEGIATE CHURCH.
oomer l^il et., Ban .-:: ■>.•. TILTOX. Jr.. D.
p.. Pastor. — S^rvleaa. 11 i. m. and S p. m.
ST. MATTHEW - CHURCH. West M^ at..
aear Ctotral Park. — Bar. ARTHT.-R H. .^XiE.
Rjctor. Purrtcwa. *, 11 a. m. ana Hp. ■
MEMORIAL. BAPTIST. TTW»io«T Squar*.—
EDWABP Jt T t><»."»N'. Paatar. wtll 1 — «. :i. uaa
Mr. SIMMONS. S.
BROOKLYN.
PLYMOUTH CirCPXH.
Orango Stre«t, between Hicks an.l Henry
Street* Ta>» raptor. Rot. Newnt! Dwfjch*
Hllll*. wilt preacix at 10:45 A. XL. an 7:45
P. M. Momln>f subject. -"HOTV SHALL 4.
PRACTICAL. MAM MODIFT TOL3TOr^ ■■-".
ERAL INTERPRETATION OF CHRIST'S
WORD 3. It a man take away thy cloak, let
him have thy coat also.* ?•• Evening sublec*
JOHN BROWN. aad Ida BTCm'S-9 I*nSm
Tore* Ca&ttk' ** B(t«aU wi 1 13 m l^m-^mimm
jm ■« fi.>N *mm at C* aoKaTaV* ~j
11

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