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New-York tribune. [volume] (New York [N.Y.]) 1866-1924, December 27, 1910, Image 10

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TO
KENRY CLEWS & GO.,
BANKERS. . ■
11. 13. ■>:.. IT AND 19 BROAD ST.
MKHBER9 X. T. STOCK KXCHAStJB.
•TOCKS and BONDS bourfct and "bo 1« for IB
veetora or Carried oB liberal term*.
-- Bankina- ArrooaU received enbj^et to check
art »l«ht. Interest paid on daily balancea,
IXVESTMENT KITIBB.
LETTERS Or CREDIT
lM»ued Available the \Torld O\-*r
WANTED'
«m AMERIfA> Pf A>'O COM.
- -20« BABCOCK < wn.rnx
2.% EQUITABLE IJFE IN*
TOO HUDSON COMPANIES !*l »'
?«• MOHAWK VAI.I.EV CO.
. 190 V. S. ITNISHINO I'm.
TREDERIC H. HATCH & CO.
. New York Boston
SO Broad M SO Ctmtrf* *«.
yri^atf teiephoneg between New Tork fc Bo«ton
WINDSOR TRUST CO.
FARMERS LOU 1 TRUST GO.
TITLE GUIRMTEE I TRUST CO.
NEW YORK MORTGAGE SECURITY CO.
BOCGHT AND BOLD.
CLINTON GILBERT.
' m 2 WALL ST.
PEOPLES GAS LIGHT* COKE CO. (CHICAGO)
Ist Consol. Mtjje. ft „ Gold Bonds,
; TtVTZ APRIL. IC*J3. -
Yield 4.80%
?»nil for descriptive offering.
EFFINGHAM LAWRENCE * CO..
■ 111 Broadway.
1852 1910
;Jas. B. Colgate & Co,
36 MS' all M.. New York
MEMBERS INVESTMENT
(Jr. i STOCK EX. BONDS
DIVIDEND NOTICES.
i *TllE FOURTH NATIONAL BANK OF THE
. -crrr.OF new York.
New York. Dec. 20. 1910.
!' The Board o( Directors has. thle day declared
'* '.<;art-ry l»lHlllil of TWO PEK CENT., free
J«rom tax, payable on and after Jan. Ist. prox
•iroo. i_i
♦ l"h«- transfer books will close at 3P. M. thit
•at". reopening: .lan. 3rd. 1911.
t DANIEL. J. ROGERg. Cashier.
NIPI>MN<; MINES COMPAXV
! 3»r. Broadway. New York. Deecacber 30. IPIO.
T!>< Board of Directors has to-day declared a
■Mntar quarterly dividend of FIVE PER CENT.
t>: an *xira dividend of TWO AND ONE
iHALF PER CENT, payable January 20. 1911.
!to siiarrtiolders of record as of December 31,
Hf>l«. Transfer books will close December • SI.
•3LP ? " and ••■ i Ti January I*>. 3t*ll.
: P. C. PFEIFFER. Treasurer.
* THE BANK OF AMERICA.
New York. I '<=• ember 20th. 1910.
The Board of Director? have to-day declared
• semi-annual dividend of thirteen (13) per
cent., free of tax. payable January Srd. 1911, to
fbjtertihol'iera of record of this date.
The transfer books will remain closed until
January Mb. 1911.
j. W. M. BENNET. Caxhtef
jfcfcIERCHANTS EXCHANGE NATIONAL BANK
of the Chy-cf'New York.
Dec 20, IPIO.
2 The Hoard ..f Directors have this day declared
m e-rci-annual dividend of THREE PER CENT..
\t~' cf lax. I'ayabif on and after January 3.
|lf>ll. to stockholders of record at the dose of
fe-uslness Deccral.<:r --. 3910.
B. V. GAMBIEH, Cashier.
MEETINGS.
L THE I'I.AZA BANK.
• New York. December Hill. ISM.
The Annual llrttac of the Stockholders of
J^THE PLAZA BANK will be held at its Bank
pine House. 05th Street and Fifth Avenue. Bor
ough of Manhattan. City at New York, on the
tlOth day eg January. 1911; at 13 o'clock M..
IJor the purpose of .letting fourteen Directors
tlor the ensjiinp year and three inspectors of
{Election to ecr»«. at the next Annual Meeting.
f «.nd for the transaction of purh other business
\mx may properly come 1..»-for^ Paid meeting.
■. Polls will remain open from 12 M. until 1
yp. M. Transfer books will be closed from De
,«e«'niber CStfc, 1010. to January 4th. 1911.
E. M. CLARKE, Cayhier.
i»XHE ANNUAL MEETING OF THE STOCK
; holders of The Fidelity and Casualty Com
3>aiiy of New York for the election of dlrec
ftorE, election of inspectors of election, and
LJof the T rancactioii of such other business as
[»hail come before the meeting, trill be held
La.' t-*> office of the Company. Nos. 02-94 Lib-
Ir-Tiy Street, in the City of New York, on Tues-
LAe;-. the 3rd day of January. 1911. at 12
■o'clock noon, the polls to remain open until
f32:SO <i"cl«ck P. M.
fTIIE FIDELITY ANT» CASUALTY COMPANY
OK NEW TOKK.
rcbt. J. HILLAP. Pr«>sidPtit.
THE CONEY ISLAND JOCKEY CLUB.
Tri^ Annual Mating of Hie Stockholders of The
j*7oney If land Jockey Club, for the Election of
fDlrectcr6 add for th- transaction of such other
■ibb luff r ~tttb v fee brc.irgtit J>^for<? It, will be
\h<\<3 »t the office 'of th<? Club. 571 Fifth Avenue.
J^Cew York. -on Monti sy. January J»th. 011, at ?.
iw'clocl-. and the polk fill remain apea for one
>>ljmir
The >tiK-:- T!-an--f. • Book" nill he closed from
Bi*r*rr\kvr .':!«' to .lan,i<ir'. SHI 1
' BCmmJER I- "PAJiSONS. Presi^rnt.
feTHTJ ANNUAL MEETING OF THE STOCK
* hcOder? of N«-n- N^thTlanJ Bank of New York
•Bpt lip? ejection ••" Directors for the *nsuinfr
J^ear and for tiiv transaction of i?uch oth^r
tfcurtimi a» may properly come befow the meet
\finr. ■"'H be ii.-M at ilie banklnc hous* of salrl
f»t4SPociatioTi, 41 W«at StM street, in the City of
{>*<■•■ "\ •-'. on T i~~iny. the 1<<»1) Jay of January.
llSl!. at four o'clock P. M. Poll- will be open
Jfr^m ruv P. M to five r. m
t I'ated. >frw York. : ■ ..ml*' "7th. 1010.
J. ADAMS BROWN. Pr«fidTt.
5 CntTl? .1. IJB\RI>. <'a*hlfr.
SAVINGS BANKS,
*Cfhr Htm cry Savings Batik
'> UCD 130 BOWERY.
NEW YORK. Dec 15. 191".
/ A — [i -annual dividend at the, rate of
' THREE and OM-MXII IKK t FVT
7!<!r xmmm has been declared and will be.
• *■•. ; ■■ -d to depositors on all sums of $S.wß
•^ «nd gywl and not exceeding $j.'""^
'" • Id Bkafl have been deposited «t least
; ♦ > -*... jnonths o:> the first day at January
I n«r-^t, and Tiill be payable on and art«-r
{Monday. Zaixxry 16. 1811.
Honey <3ejx>stied on or atfaw laa«aiT
■ 10 ?■'.!. drew interest from January L 1911.
'• '■';- HEVKY A BCEEKCK. President.
">V:! i TAJ! E. KXOX. Comptroller.
J««gKPH a. 2-!l > i - - • '"
ftlnionDimeSavingsßank
PRESENT LOCATION
40th Street and 6th Avenue
'. Interest at 3^ per cent per annum. Credited
Sir MtT 1. I»ayabJe January 1&. or later. Money
Bv>ea|l«tf ea or before January 10 draws ln
fltercEt ;r..i;. Jar ; uarj 1. IS*l 3 .
• T-'Ahl-fcTS E. SPRAGCE. Pr»sld*-nt.
i »'l: AN' 11. I.EAKE. Treasurer.
' ■...■ O. . •-- Secretary. _
iTEWVOBK SAVINGS BANK
fy, 1 >'. IV.' tor. 14th *"t. and «<h Avenue.
"i" J«n. 1. It'll, dividend at the rate A
iFOUR PER CENT.
baa nnmim vn all sums from $5 to 53.0V0 en
" ... thereto und^r the by-laws.
kW.P"MI» MADE ON OR BEFORE JAN. 10
{S.VTLL DRAW INTEREST KROM JAN. 1.
: : - WILLIAM FELPINGER. PrteidenU
I JAMEF L. WANDLIXO. Treasurer.
; A.P.CKIBALP M. PEKTZ gt^.-^tar?'.
[SEAMEN'S BANK FOR SAVINGS
i - 7* and "6 Ws!l Street.
WrfTtiU TRUSTEES HAVE ORDERED THAT j
I J INTEREST be ;a'd to dtpw.tor? «»ntSTl*<s j
1 thereto under the by-laws, and in accordance j
{ • '■ the Savings Bank Law. for the six months |
f«=!Jlngr Dt-c. Sl*r. 191". ■ -
' On accounts not exceeding three 'hiußanil <j«-l- j
>re a .th* .rate of FOUR PER CENT, per
* vnum.
' '.-•■fci;. en and after Monday. Jan. 16th. 181 L
• DANIEL BARNES. President.
GEORGE M. HALSEY. Cashier.
w;LLIHTON H. BENEDICT. Secretary.
New York. I>eo. 15th. 1810.
iJwpoaita noad« on or before Jan. lOth v.lll draw ,
interest from Jan. l«t. t
THE BANK FOR SAVINGS
IK THE CITY OF NEW TOIJK.
260 Fourth Avenue. Dtc. 16th. IWlt.
1831J SEMI- ANN LAI. DIVIDEND.
Tiie Board of Trustees has declared au in
terest dividend for the Six Months eliding Dec.
Bl*t. l«: 0. at the rat« of THREE AMI (INK-
H.4U" PEK (KM. per annum on all #ume of
$;■>•' and upward entitled thereto, and payable
«n i ..'■•. January 20th. 1911. The dividend
*.J3l 1.. crtdited to depositor* .-.•■•:•; . Jan
%iarr Ist, litll. Dapaatta aea4e a* or before ■:
Januarj- lotii. 1811. will draw lnt«.-rett from;
U*nuarj- lei. lull
T.. . WALTER TRIMBLE, President.
CHARLES A. SHERMAN, Secretary.
JAMES .v ' ■'■ -' ■■-■ Comptroller
K\^T KIVER SAVINGS INSTITCTION.
2<U BROADWAY, NEW YORK.
! - BCRPtXTfI OVER IZ%.
i Ttc l"stfa M?uil-annual dividend has Im • ■
j .dcclare-1 nt the- -•"'• of
• Four Per Cent.
T per annum on all accounts entitled thereto,
• payable on ■:."'.: Jan. -'" Deposits
{• made on or before Jan. 10th will draw In
ter«M from Jan. Jet, 1»1 L
D. &: RAMSAY. !•:•-•! C. A WHITNEY. Sec
REPORT ON BARGE CANAL
White Gets Views of Stevens,
Williams and Engineers.
REGRET DIVISION OF POWER
! Public Works Superintendent
Favors Separate Commission I
— State Engineer Sees
End in 1915.
Albany. Dec. 26.— Expressing th« fear
that the total cost of the barge canal may
exceed the original estimate of $101,000,000
as a result of litigation and damages, and
the belief that the present system of divided
responsibility and authority can be im-
I.rcved, Governor White recently requested
Frederick C. Stevens, State Superintendent
of Public Works: State Engineer Frank
K. Williams and the advisory board of
consulting engineers to report as to the
condition and progress of barge canal work
■with such recommendations as they might
see fit to offer.
These reports, made public by the Gov
ernor to-day, while agreeing that the pres
ent system of authority and responsibility,
divided between the Canal Board, the Ad
visory Board of Consulting Engineers, the
Superintendent of Public Works and the
State Engineer, is far from ideal, differ
as to the remedy to be applied in order to
overcome delays and to effect economy In
construction.
Superintendent Stevens believes that in
the case of so great an undertaking as the
V..:rge canal work some method should have
been devised which would have guaranteed
a continuity of the work under a separate
commission, instead of the frequent change
of officials under the present system.
"Where there is full authority." he says,
"full responsibility is easily placed, but
where there is a division of authority, it
is difficult to place responsibility."
State Engineer Williams, while admit
ting that the ponderous machinery having
to do with the administration of barge
canal affairs is responsible for delays, re
frains from recommending any changes in
the law. He believes that the canal will
be completed within the original appropri
ation of $101,000,000 "if it Is pushed for
ward honestly and economically." About
pne-third of the entire construction work,
he says, has been completed. The whole
line of the Champlain and Oswego canals
is now under contract, and all the Erie
canal is either under contract or advertised
for letting, except a two-mile section at
Medina and some minor structures, ma
chinery, etc.
Expects Completion by 1915.
I Providing the same rate of progress at
tained during the last year is maintained,
Mr. Williams says the Champlain Canal,
from Whitehall, on Lake Champlain, to the
j Hudson River, at "Waterford, should be in
I operation in the spring of 1913. The com
| bined Oswego and Erie canals, from the city
of Oswego, on Lake Ontario, to Troy,
1 should be in operation in the spring of 1914,
and the entire Erie Canal system, from
Buffalo to Troy. should be completed in the
[ spring of 1915.
I The advisory board of consulting engi
neer? takes the view that it is not desirable
at this stage of the canal work to make a
change in the administrative system under
which the canal work is being carried on.
The really serious defect of the present ad
: ministrative, system, says the board, arises
from the frequent changes of officials in
control of it. The division of authority and
i responsibility, it asserts, "was purposely
! made. aft«-r thorough study and considera
tion, with a view of securing honest admin
istration."
On December 1 contracts aggregating $67.
60 C'/"» had been let. and during the last
week others totalling about 35 ? 50aOOO were
awarded, so" that the present contracts
amount to about £75.10.000. There are yet
to hr let rlevrn contracts, representing- an
aggregate of $3,000,000. There is also re
quired for railroad and highway changes,
railroad and other bridges, the construction
of the basin at Albany, operating machin
ery, etc.. work to the estimated value 01
about 57,300,000. thus bringing the total con
struction costs up to about $53,400,000. The
advisory board's report says:
It will be seen, therefore, that SO 1 ; per
cent of the construction work inferred 03
the barge canal act is now under contract,
and that an additional 6*2 per cent has been
advertised, leaving only 13 per cent yet to
be contracted, which, if let at as reason
able figures as the above *7 per cent shows,
the total expense of constructing the orig
inal bare canal will be about £>N,SOO,<W>, or
about $2,200,009 less than called for in the
original barge canal act. notwithstanding
tho fact that locks have been widened from
2* to *5 feet. at an added cost of 53.50 C.000:
that the ls-mile level from T>x-kport to
Tonawanda has been lowered 6.5 feet, at
an added cost of $462,009; that by special
act of the legislature the harbor at Syra
cuse Is to be Improved at quite considera.ble
added cost, and that in the Mohawk Val
ley eight dams, originally estimated as tim
ber-fixed dams, have been supplanted by a
bridge type of movable dam. constructed of
steel, which will better regulate the floods
in said valley A harbor at Ixtckport. has
been provided. and ijumerous turning
basins on the Rochester and Lockport level.
All of the above changes have cost upward
of $4,000,090, but this added amount is in
cluded in the >»> per cent of work already
lei. hence it is conservative to believe that
all of the work can be constructed within
the estimate, of 3903.
Superintendent Stevens's Views.
Superintendent Stevens devotes a consid
erable portion of his report to the matter
of divided responsibility and to the
change of officials having in charge the
barge canal work. The- salary of the
State Engineer, which up to the present
time has been $5,000 a year, he says is "so
small as to be almost ridiculous." The
State Engineer, Mr. Stevens says, has
little voice in the selection of his force, his
subordinates being in actuality selected for
him as a result of Civil Service examina
tions. -The Civil Service," the superin
tendent observes, "as applied to an im
provement of this kind results in making
the state a gigantic training school for
engineers."
Superintendent Stevens refers to what he
believes to have been an inadequate Study
of the barge ''anal plans as a whole at the
outset, and ascribes considerable of the
delay in construction to the frequent
changes which it has been necessary to
make in the plans and specifications of in
numerable contracts. Another cause of de
lay was Inadequate machinery and ln
sufnejent capital on the part of pome of the
contractors. The operation of existing
canals for six months of the year during
the construction has also contributed to
the delay.
Discussing the suggestion that a separate
commission would have accomplished bet
ter results, Superintendent Stevens points
out that the weakness of the present plans
lies in the fact that while the advisers,
the consulting engineers, are made continu
ous, the responsible, conceiving and direct-
Ing force is left changeable, with the re
sults "f already having given the work
four such separate heads. Continuing, he
says:
1 If a commission composed of 'three mem
bera, the chief of whom should be required
to be an engineer, one of whom should &<*
■ gauged, experienced man of af
fairs, and the third an experienced and
well qualified attorney, could have been
provided and salaries made adequate to
command tjie services of the very best men
obtainable, provision being also made for
such commission to remain in continuous
charge until the completion of the work
unless "removed for cause, I believe far bet
ter results would be attianed. *-V;'
If it be urged that BUcb system would
tend to increase tii.- cost to the state tor
doing the work on account of engineering,
1 would cite the fact that up to November
1 there has been paid tor advisory engi
neers' salaries and expenses since the '•
ginning of the work the sum of 5:57,482 50.
There was paid, up to November 1. for other
engineering, including the 'making of sur
NEW-YORK DAILY TRIBUNE, TUESDAY. DECEMBER 27. 1910.
veys*,' Urn preparation of- plans and the
supervision of work, the sum of $4,150,406 5\i.
Valuable Water Powers Assured.
State Engineer Williams calls particular
attention to the fact that incidental to the
construction of the canal there has been
; and will be created valuable water powers,
some at entirely new locations, others at
locations already partly developed. He
urges that no portion -of the powers thus
created be disposed of until the Legislature
shall have sufficient information to enable
it to enact comprehensive uniform lecKa
tion on the subject. The total values or
these water powers amount to several mill
ions of dollars and the, state engineer says
it is highly important that the state shall
derive the benefit therefrom, inasmuch as It
is the state's 'capital which is involved.
The advisory board in its report admits
that the division of executive authority and
responsibility "Is at. times somewhat awk
ward and a cause of delay," but declares It
of especial value "on account of the fre
quent changes of executive officials in
charge brought about by political upheav
als," i
The board says it would be of great value
to the state if it had a. permanent engi
neering organization, carefully selected and
free from politics and political changes,
v.ith which to intrust all its work of public
improvement ami maintenance. Continuing,
the board says:
But the state has no such non-political
organization, and it seems to be necess.-u-y
under the terms of the state constitution
to put the canal work in the hands of
both tho Superintendent ol" Public Works
and the State Engineer. These two offi
cers have brief tenure of office, and it is
beliovei it would be a very serious mis
take to give the unrestricted charge of the
construction work of the barge canal im
provement to any one man selected for so
brief a period as two years. This was
shown very clearly in the administration
of the $9,000,090 canal work in ISPS and
1838. which was practically in sole charge
of a single official, and was so strongly
criticised by examining boards and the
public as to bo the prime cause of the
administration of the barge canal work be
ing placed wh^re it is at present by Ihf
terms of the barge canal act of 1903. The
beard expresses its belief that, whatever
differences in authority and administra
tion hay« arisen in the conduct of the
work, tho final result has been, on the
whole, to the advantage of the state.
INVITED HUSBAND TO RENO
Wanted Him to Bring Children to
Divorce Centre for Christmas.
fey Tclegrrfph to The Tribune.]
Pittsburgh Dec. I'G. — Pittsburg- was
much interested to-day in the story that
Mrs. J. "Walton Cook, wife of one of the
prominent and rich young clubmen of
Pittsburg:,. has taken up her residence in
Reno. Nov., preparatory to obtaining a
residence, for the avowed purpose of
seeking a divorce from her husband.
Mr. Cook epent Christmas in Pit.tsbury,
though it is known that he declined an
unusual invitation to eat Christmas din
ner with his wife in Reno. Mrs. Cook,
according to her close friends, wanted to
see the children once more, and invited
her husband to come to her with them
and be her g-uest in Reno at Christmas
dinner, but he declined.
Mrs. Cook was formerly Miss Edith.
Boole, of New York. They have been
married but a few years, and no reason
has been made public why they shouid
be divorced.
DEAL WITH TRAINMEN NOW
Western Railroads Hope to Start
New Year Clean.
Chicago, Dec 2fi. -With the wage con
troversy between the Western railroads and
the locomotive engineers adjusted amicably,
the managers ar« ready to resume nego
tiations with the trainmen and conductors,
in the hope that the slate may be wiped
clean by the new year.
Seventy-five thousand trainmen and con
ductors of all the railroads west of Ohi
ca.go arc involved in the controversy. They
demand a wage, increase of about. lf> pev
cent. On account of the critical stage
which th* negotiations with the engineers
rwwfihnd at tho end of last week confer
ences with the trainmen and conductors
were adjourned temporarily. They will bo
resumed to-morrow, and it is expected that
before the end of the week an agreement
will be reached
The manager^, it is understood, have
offered the men a fiat increase of 10 per'
cent over existing schedules, but have
agr«r*i to no change in working rales.
■ . _
THE WEALTH OF CALIFORNIA
Has Greatly Increased in the Last Year
— Christinas Trade.
fKy Telegraph to The Tribute. i • •-
I San Francisco, Dec. -X.— wealth of
California has greatly increased in the last
year, and the local resources and liabilities
of all banks in California exceed, for the
first time. $1,000,000,000. The most remark
able feature of the year's development is
th« growth in relative importance of na
tional banks. Of 195,489,000 increase in the
total resources and liabilities of these
banks. $73,000,000 is traceable to San Fran
cisco alone, mainly owing to the conver
sion of two large state banks to the na
tional system.
One item of great significance in the com
bined bank statements is that of savings
deposits, which in state and national banks
totals 5343.U<5,230. - Based on the figures of
the recent census, the per capita of savings
bank deposits is $143.
Christmas business in San Francisco was
excentionally good this year. It began
earl) and continued through tho whole
month of December. Owners and managers
of leading re.tail houses say this year's
business was the largest in their experi
ence, and their daily bank deposits verify
their statements.
TO STOP THEFTS OF STAMPS
Pittsburg and Business Firms Have
Been Robbed of $50,000 Yearly.
[By TeU crrar»h to The Tribune.]
Fittsburg, Dec. 2fi.— The larger firms of
Pittsburg, as well as tho city of Pittsburg
proper, have decided to check the whole
sale theft of stamps by clerks. With this
object in view, the city has ordered a large
perforating stamping machine, with which
the letter "P" will be punched in every
postage stamp bought by the city. The
Crucible Steel Company and many other
larg<* firms are following suit.
It is asserted by the police, who have
been working on the case, that JiO.GOO worth
of stamps have been stolen from these con
cerns and from the city onVes yearly. The
bold statement is made that in many cases
clerks have been taking the stamps and
selling them at cut rates to smaller shop*
kei pen.
170 SMOKING, SAYS VOLIVA
Greta After So-Called Independents at
Zion City.
Chicago, D««. 'A.— Wilbur Glenn Vollva,
overseer and successor to John Alexander
Dowie, has opened up it new crusadw
against smoking In Zion City. Taking cog
iiu;uire of the existence of a new faction,
known as the Inch-pendents., who have BOt
been iiraid to smoke in public recently, h P
has followed a general circular on the sub
ject with personal loiters to alleged leaders.
In each Voliva announced he would he
gin prosecutions if tne "pernicious habit"
was not instantly abandoned
FRICK COMPANY GIVES $100,000.
I ni'.nt'.-.vn. Perm.. Dec. 26. — The rhrisi
rnafc gift of R3T acres of land, at Mount
BtpMocfc, near here, to Kay<-tte QOBjnt*
for use a.« a site for charitable anl < "i
rertb.nal institutions wns announced to
day by the H. C Frir-k Coal Company
Tht- tract is valued at $100,000
YEAR OF PEACE AND ORDER
General Edwards Reviews Af
fairs of Insular Possessions.
PROGRESS IN PHILIPPINES
| Trade Greatly Helped by New
Tariff Law — rPorto Rico Ex
ceptionally Prosperous.
Washington. Dec. 9K>-42eneral Clarence
R. K-hvards. chief of the Bureau at Insu
lar Affairs of the War Department, in his
report for the. year ended November M
says that with minor exceptions, readily
controlled by the civil police power, and
of themselves of less Importance i han
numerous disorders occurring in the United
States, peace and order hav> marked the
conduct of affairs throughout the Philip
pine islands. While no reduction has been
made in the number of United States
troops In the islands, no call on them has
been necessary, or seems likely in the im
mediate future, and their continued pres
ence may be considered valuable from an
internal point of view, so long as present
conditions continue, merely for moral effect.
The constabulary has continued on a high
plane of efficiency, and has demonstrated
its fitness to cope promptly and certainly
with such disorder or lawlessness as has
recently appeared.
General Edwards says the practical estab
lishment of free commercial relations with
the United States, accomplished by the
tariff legislation of August 5, 1909 (the
Payne-Aldrich law), marks a new era in
the material development of tho islands.
In both imports and exports tho values
recorded far exceeded those of any pre
vious year. Imports amounted to $JT,067,
630, and were $9,275,233 in excess of those
of 1909. while there was an increase of
$8,570,60$ in the export total of $39,864,169 for
1910. In both brandies of the trade the
United States was credited with the larger
part of these increases, imports of Ameri
can goods more than doubling In value and
exports increasing more than SO per cent.
For the first time the United States took
the lead in imports, with a value of $10,
775,301, or about 30 -per cent of the total,
and in the increase of X, 083,531 for the year
the most noteworthy Instajnce of the oper
ation of free trade is found in cotton
cloths. These imports of American origin
Increased in value from $452,401 to BL9U»-
S3B in a textile trade heretofore distinctively
British. American iron and steel, which
had already taken a prominent place in the
supply of the islands, was imported to a
larger value than in 1903 by more than
$1,000,000. The import trade from countries
other than the United States reflected the
improved conditions of the year and
showed an aggregate increase of $3,000,000.
He reports the continued success of pos
tal savings banks, reviews progress in rail
road building and recommends amendments
to mining laws which will develop the re
sources of the islands while preventing
their exploitation for purposes of specula
tion.
Speaking of his trip to the Philippines
with Secretary Dickinson, General Ed
wards says it has served to emphasize in
his mind the desirability of such visits by
th«-*se who have to deal directly with the
administration of Philippine affairs or the
fixing of a Philippine policy, and leads him
to suggest tne importance of visits by at
least sub-committees of the Senate and
House of Representatives whenever such
visits are practicable. The information
gained and the insight secured from direct
contact would, he thinks, far more than
repay in the time saved in the deliberations
of the committees and in debate on the
floor the cost of such visits, a.s well as tend
to assure, the best legislative results for
the Philippines.
Porto Rico's Prosperity.
Porto Rico. General Edwards says, has
enjefyed an exceptionally prosperous 3'ear,
I free on the one hand from serious political
! agitation and marked on the other by en
| couraging commercial and industrial de
j velopment. The administration has been
j a distinct success, for which the Governor
is entitled to much praise.
That confidence has been o>tablished in
the stability of the government and the
opportunities presented seems proved by
increased investments and operations, aa
■9 ell as by the introduction of new- capital.
During the year there have been registered
fourteen domestic and foreign corporations
for sugar making, eighteen for raising,
canning and packing fruit, and twenty-two
to engage In coffee and cattle raising, ship
ping and transportation and other enter
priser. That, notwithstanding this, only
about GO per cent of ths lands of Porto
Rico are under cultivation should afford a
clearer impression of its industrial possi
bilities with sufficient capital interested and
the extension of modern agricultural meth
ods.
Education has kept pace with the finan
cial and industrial improvement. Nearly
$!),000,000 has been expended in educational
activities in the last ten years, and the
number of pupils enrolled has more than
quadrupled. In the last year nearly 90 per
cent of the graded schools were taught
wholly in English, as compared with 66 per
cent the preceding year.
One of the lasting benefits of American
control in Porto Rico has been the rapid
extension of good macadamized roads
throughout the island. In order to continue
this work the Legislature on March 10, UHo,
authorized the issue of bonds to the amount
of $425,000 for the construction of roads and
bridges.
General Edwards urges action on the bill
to amend the Foraker a^-t passed by the
House last summer and now awaiting ac
tion by. the Senate giving citizenship and
a larger share in government*! affairs to j
the Porto Ricans.
POLICE DOG FOR PROVIDENCE
"Sergeant" Brug Has Already-
Proved His Worth.
[By Telegraph to The Tribune.]
Providence. R. 1., Dec. 26.— "Sergeant"
Brug of the local police force is the first
canine patrolman in the United States
outside of New York City, according- to
his admirers.
Brug is a genuine German police dog,
accredited with once having- pursued a
criminal by the sense of scent alone for
over one hundred miles, the chase result
ing: in the capture and conviction of the
malefactor. He has been lent to the
Providence Police Department by his
owner, and is now the subject of a num
ber of sleuth experiments which have al
ready proved him to be an almost indis
pensable asset as a pursuer of criminals.
AGAINST PAJAMAS .FOR WOMEN
Boston Dress Expert Favors Nor
, wegian Peasant's Costume.
[By Telegraph to The Tribune ]
Boston. Dec. 26. - Mrs. Ellen Richards,
one of Boston's foremost dress experts, dif
fers with her English cousins when they
advocate that women should work in the
household attired in pajamas, with a ki
mono handy In case callers arrive. She
points out that man's garments do not give
him In reality the boasted freedom of
movement of which he fondly believes him
self to enjoy. and declares that "women
would not have the ideal working attire if
garbed in pajamas.
Mr?. Richards has travelled all over the
world, but her conception of an Meal cos
tume for women is drawn from the attire
of the women peasantry of Norway.
II FINANCIAL MARKET
:
The stock market was closed yesterday.
• For the convenience of readers Friday's
| closing quotations are reprinted.
ACTIVE STOCKS.
Bid. Asked. I Eld. *•*•*
. i Ainal Copper 824 ti2?i!K City So pf. 64 %. M
II Am !<■ ■ i Huk 43? i 43 ~i lede Ga«.. 105*4 10«
Am B S & V Wri !«> ? f^-tngh Va1..1~»% 179%
Am Can * 7*7 * !»'•» Minn & St L. 28 27
do pref. .. 7**'- 77 MStP&SSML£..M»*i W»H
, Am Cur &r 50 51 j Nat Biscuit.. 1 17 }» 118**
Am Exprefis.2y> 240 , Nat Lead. ... 34 • .-.4*4
Am Ico Sec. 174 18 | do ■ pref.". ..106 U)V%.
Am LOCO .. . aeVi «7 I N'ev Con Cop 18% I s * *
Am Smelt... 73 73? i N 1 Central. 11»'» 111
do pref...102 If.'. ; t X T Dock pf. *"> -«•
Am T & T..M2 1 , V 42 : XV Nil & H..89 151 ;
Am Tob pref.»3U in Serf & West W)Ti 100 .
' Am Woolen. 32 32 1 * Nor f'urlfir . .li.Va lloTi
do prrf... 91 92\ S Oh T &LA Ml 4O*
Anaconda . . 35% 39 Pacific Mall.. 2SVi 2«*i
Atrhison ...lOoi* 100 Venn X R.-..128H 128-4
i do ..102Vi !<>3-VPet> Ga« & C.lOSh 10G*i
At Coast L..114H 114% Ry Steel Sp.. SI 32
Bait X- 0h10.104H 104% do pref 91 7 » 03
Brook R Tr. 75;* 751* I Read in* 140 Vi 14994
Brook In G. 134 135 do 2tl pref. »2 »3
Can Pacific. l93}ils>3'i Rock Island.. 2!>"ii »'*
Cent Loath.. 311* 32 ISo raeliie 1144 11**4
Chen & Ohio SOU 80% Southern Ry.. 28 27
Chic ft Alt.. 27 M ' do pref.... 61 «I '% j
COt W pref 44 Vx 45 ■ Tf-nn Copper. 34 83
C M & St i\l2l** 122' i! Tex *• Pacific 25-.. 28
• do.pref... 14,1 V 147 TStL. &W. 22',» 23
Chic UTrac 2% 4 :do prof 51' S3
do pref... .V 3 fi^i ÜBagr&Ppfs4 S9
Consul Gas. .l.io^ 1.-..V.2 ! Union Pacific. 169 s * 170
Corn Pr Tiff 14' 2 16 do pref.... 91% 82
•D &R G pf. R7tt t;7-VUn Rv Invest 26 SO
r.'lfitili Secur. S3 '-■ " 33' ido - pref . . . . 56 60
Erie ..;.... 27't 27's USCiP&Fpf 00 MU
do 2 1 pr.. 34 35!» USR&Rpf. 14 17
Gen 8ee... 154 lor, IT'S Rub Ist p. 100 Vi 109%
Goldfleld Con 8% h' 2 V S Steel "-'* 72« i
Gt Nor pref.l22?i 123 ' do., pref ... .116^ 118Ti
do ore ctfs SB 56* i Utah Copper. 44% 45
Inter-Metro. n»'i 1»% Wabash 16 t«^
do pref. -.-.'■ .11 .14 - do pref 33^ 84
Int Harv pf.121 122 "Wells F Kxp.l'4s 152
IntPapprpf. r.-V,A r»6 '-it ; Western Mi.. 49 49?4
Int St*>am P4O 40 ] 4 I do pref 74** 78
lowa Cent pf 31 '•& 32* ■West Un Tel. 72* i 73
Kan City So 31% 3C)4 Wesfh'se Mfgr 664 67 l t
•Ex div. 2<£ percent. \
m
INACTIVE STOCKS.
Last r-Closinß.— *
sale. Bid. Asked.
Adams Express 243 220 345
AlUs-Chalmers Co S% B*4 B',i
Allis-Chalmers Co pref CO 29 SO ;
Amer Agricultural Chemical.. 40.» 4C!i 46
Anier Agr Chemical pref 102 90 — ft
Amor Beet Sugar pref 93 91 86
Amer Brake Shoe & Fdy pref.l29T» 127 ?i —
Amer Car & Foundry pref. ..US I,*1 ,* 113>i 115
Amer Coal 120^ 60 150
Amer Cotton Oil 59? i 5S 58* i
Amer Hide & Leather 4 4!i 4%
Amer Hide & Leather pref... 23 22 22-»
Amer Linseed ll',i Ii 125*
Amer Linseed pref 32 32 33*4 [
Amer Locomotive pref 105*4 10.1 Vi 107
Amer Malt pref ~ 35 1 * 33?* 3«&
Amer Smeltingr pref B 85»* MM 1 * 87
Amer Snuff 275 260 • —
Amer Snuff pre.f 101 = i I<*» 101
Amer Steel Foundry 41" 1 42 43
Amer Sugar 11&»« 114 116
Amer Sugar pier 113 118 113
Amer Telegraph & Cable 84 "** 84
Ann Arbor 33 25 SO
Ann Arbor pref 70 65 70
Associated Oil M 46& —
Baltimore & Ohio pref 91 80 »IU
Batopllas Mining- MC 2 2',a
Bethlehem Steel 29 & 27%, 29**
Bethlehem Steel pref 59 36*s .18.-» !
Brunswick- 9*3 » 10
Buff. Roch & Pitta 107 102 104
Buff, Roch & Pitts pref 127 125 140
Butterick Company 28 1 * 27 30
Canada Southern 6O ] ,a 04 ! 73*4
Central of New Jersey 278 .J6O 281
I Central Leather pref 104 103 104
Central & So Am Telegraph.. 117 * i 120 1 -!
Chicago Me Alton pref 64 Ti — 66* A
Chicago Great Western 21T» 23 22* A
Chic, Ind & Louis pref...... — CO 80
Chicago & Northwestern 142H 141 '•■» 142
Chicago & Northwestern pref.2oC 180 210
Chic, St Paul. Minn & 0 140 138 145
Chic, St Paul. M & O pref. ..165 160 175
Chic. Clev. Cm & .St L. 60 1 * 66 69!*
Chic. Clev, Cm &St L pref.. 09& &8?i 100
. Cleveland & PHUburg — 163 —
Colorado Fuel & Iron 31 30 r 4 31
Colorado Fuel& Iron pref 110^= llo'i 117
Colorado & Southern 57 56? i 57' i
Ccl & Southern Ist pref 73 72 75
Col & Southern 2d pref 74 70 75
Col & Hocking Coal & 1r0n... 414 1 4 6
Corn Products Refining pref.. 79 78 79* i
Delaware & Hudson 1625 i l«2^a 165
Del, Lacka. & Western 520 490 575
: Denver & Rio Grande 29Vt 28 29
Dcs Moiues & Fort Dodge 4'j 414 1 - 2 13
Detroit & Macklr.ae 80 82 Ss PO
Detroit United R R 68 t>* 70
Duluth, South Shore & Atl... 11 10 12
I Duluth. South Shore & At! pf. 21 21 22
Erie Ist pref 47 4, i 46? i |
Evansville & Terr* Haut« 601! 58 62
Evansville & Terre Haute pf. S2 1 * 70 SO
Federal Mining & Smelting.. II 12'-i l. »
Federal Mining & Smelt pref. 4C : * 45 4 .55
Federal Sugar „ 30 25 35
Federal Sugar pref 96 85 —
General Chemical 95 95 100
General Chemical pref.. 103*4 100 10414
Grant-y Mining 40 30 ,60
Havana Electric Railway 93 89 —
Havana Electric Railway pf. &3'-i — 85 7*7 *
! Hocking Valley 139 123 135
j Homestake 85Vi S4 : * 88
Illinois Central ,130' i ISO's 133
j Ingersoll Rand Co 105 93 —
) Ingersoll Rand Co pref 84 '» i<~ —
International Harvester tBHi loft 1(H»H
! International ' Paper ■. 12% 12 i 13
• Int Steam Pump pr"?f SAM 84 S3
. lowa Central IST*' 1« 1«»4
Kansas City, Ft ? & M pr«f. 73 73 7GV4 j
Keokuk & Dcs Molnes pref. . . 4&% .>"> 50
Lackawanna Steel 39 85 39
. Laclede Gas pref 95 SO 102
Lake Erie & Western 17** 1?. 30
Lake Erie & Western pref... 37 f * 39 4.">
Lake Shore ; 320 325 450
Long Island 64 62 67
Louisville & Nashville 143*4 142*^ 144
Mackay Companies 92 1 * 90W fV"
Mackay Companies pref 7*» 74H 75% j
Manhattan Beach -. — ' 2Vj 3
Manhattan Elevated 139 137» 1?"
Marine 5 4»,i 5
Marine pref 16 1 15% 16H
I Michigan Central — — ISO
I Minneapolis *St Louis pref.. 53*4 — M
Minn. St Paul «- S S M 131 130 132
Minn., St P & S is M pref... 14« 100
Missouri, Kansas & Texas 32 81 32
Missouri. Kansas & Texas pf. 62 62* i 63
Missouri Pacific 46 7 -» 4r,\ 46 : i
Morris & Essex 183 175 l«0
Nashville & Chattanooga 140 136 143
National Biscuit pref 123 123 124
Nat Enameling & Stamping.. 1« M 17 ' i
Nat Enameling & Strg pref.. «4 80 m
National of Mexico pref «>P ♦» 72
National of Mexico 2d pref... »**/ i .14 !l i mm
New Central Coal 52 's 30 M
New York Air Brake 71 68 72
N V Chicago & St Louis 6fi 64 H8
N* T, Chic &St L Ist prpf. ..10S*4 105 lio
X T. Chic & St L 2d pref.... 90 88 93
New York Dock 29 — 35
N V, Lackawanna & Western — US 125
N V, Ontario & Western . 4OH 40 40IS
Norfolk A- Western pref R!) SO 89 %
North American : 64 64 65
Ontario Silver 2 l*i 2"-i
Pacific Coast 105 PS 10."
Pacific Coast Ist pref 105 ;K> Hi)
Pacific Coast 2<l prrf 105 OS 105
Pacific Tel & Tel pref ftf> 93 99
PeoriH. & Eastern 20 17 22
Philadelphia C 97% 04 J»7H
Pitta. -Clev. ci & St L 97 95 98 ',i
Pitts. Clev. «'in &- St L pref. 113 Ifis 112
Plttsburg Coal ... . 18* il7 is*i
Pittsburg Coal pr»f 66S «7 60
Pitts. Fort Wayne & Chic ...173 'ts 1«3 —
Pressed Steel Car 30 3<» 31
Pressed Steel Car rref ft.T« M W-
Pullman Palace Car 158 1 * 13R 100
Quicksilver 3 2 Rt4
Quicksilver pref R'/i 4 r»
Readinir Ist pref 9O R7 i 91
Rensselaer & Saratoga 200 — 200
Republic Iron & Steel 3O'/3 SOU 30' i
Republic Iron & Steel pref.,.. 03'/i 92 M
Rock Inland pref BO 60%. 62
Rome, Wat & Osd^nsr 121^i 110 —
I St L A St F Ist pref 62 »> 65
St I- &SF 2d pref SS'i 3S*i 4O
StIi&SFC4E 111 ctf5.. .125 10l> 150
St L&S F C E 111 ctfa pf.-llfi'i — 11.-5 i
St L&SFC &E HI new... fft*i 50 58H
St Louts Southwestern 25'» 2."> 26
St Louis Southwestern pref... 62 60-3 61 ' i
■^ears-Roebuck ISI ISO ~V, 1
Sears-Roebuck pref 120 USH 119
Sloss-Slieffield Steel & 1r0n... 40 ! -i 49 4914
gloss-Sheffield Steel *• T pref..ll4's --- 1 1 1: I ,fi
South Porto Rico Sugar 90 ST» o-
South Porto Rico Sugar pref. lll 100 11.", „
Southern Ry M& O ctfs..... S6'i 70 v,-, ' y '
Tennessee Copper J 136 1.?6 I 36 1 * ,
Texas & Pacific Land Trust.. 90 ,«S «2 i
Third Avenue R R.... _WU 9 ! 4 in
Toledo Railways & Light .... R 7S 8
Twin City Rapid Transit . 10S*i ins 10S*^ :
ITnlon Bap: & Paper S*i X » ,
tJnited Cigar Mfsr pref.. loo 1 , io-"> 103
I"ntt»d "Dry Goods... .101 too 102- ■'
United Dry Goods pref 102 1"O 102 ,
U S Cast Iron Pipe &• Fdry.. 16' 4 Ift*^ 17 !■■
United States Express.. 94 (8 M
U S Realty & Improvement . . 6ft 6S 70 1
TT S Reduction & Refining .. .. 4*4 4"-? 7 \ (■'
trnlted States Rubber 34*-i; 34 .-;.-> Ih
United States Rubber 2.1 pref 71 ! » 71 74 |n
Virginia-Carolina Chemical.. . «li Kl»i 0!i B
Va-Car Chemical prof 123 122 12."»
Virginia Iron, Coal & Coke... r.fi'i 4J\ r , t . 12
WesUnchous* Ut& Ist j,r.»f...122 110 122 i*•
Wheeling A: Tjiko Erie .I-, IH 5*4 n
Whef-ling & Ijjke R Ist pref. 12'- 12 1.1 it
Wheeling & I^ake E 2J prof. fi"i» 61,6 1 , ■* ,
Wisconsin Central f>7'j 58 r»7 Ij(
LIVESTOCK MARKETS.
New- York.' Dbewake* 2rt. 1910. \
WEEKLY recfi
1 :■ 1 ■, 'ows.cnivpn.Sh'- 1 [)oi;p.
Jersey City .... 1,528 — i»4i> B.BM 1.1 t;(..-j
K4« York ... . 3.823 — 2.3A4 2.83S 15,974
li^higii valley.. 5.305 — 440 5.412 « —
Central Union .. 3.183 — 4KO 1i.r.44 •' __
Scattering — 70 110 40 4,850
Totals U. 05.1 70 4.343 2>.if_' :ur.i7
T'ls last week:. 13.550 72 8.300 48.197 33.410
WEBKM* EXPORTS." . £
: I 1.1 v« Live Qrs.of
Shipper. Stianier. t-Httle. sheep. ir^f
Morris Beef <*<■>.. Teutonic — . — 740
Morris Beef •'„ . Mlimetu— ■■ -•'« —
Swift Beet Co.; Teutonic — — 888
.Swift Beef I*o. Mlnnetonka. . .. 223 — 47.1
B'berg«r &■ Sons* Co.. M'tonka. •'"■' — 1 «mo
T.ShanilifrK Sc Son, Mlnnetuika 2.17 — .—. —
Miscellan«ouß, Hcnnudlan .... 46 — —
Total « \i" >rt« 1,020 — 3.123
Total exporta ia>i week 888 80 3.147
Boston export* thin week... 1.301 - — ■
Philadelphia exports this weefi 881 — —
Portland exporti this weak.. ..1.T71 — - —
To I»iulon 2.802 — 3.125
To Liverpool .....1,717 — —
To Glasgow : 250 — ■ ;i'_;
Ti> Antwerp »*3 — ■;- —
T< > THE HOLDERS OF ~~~~~"~
$5,000,000 vf
MINNEAPOUS & ST. LOUIS RAILROAD COMPANY
5% GOLD NOTES, DUE FEBRUARY I. 1*1!
Holders of the above-mentioned Xotcs ■»« hereby notified that thi^ Cotnpanr : j.;i_"
decided to pay off at maturity si."'". "'". (l "" i,:.r value rh-r»?<-,f and to offer to ., Tt<^
the remaining J4.000.000' Nous to February i. 1913. at T,% interest P^r annum, p^;
able seml-annually. February' Ist and Ann.-.: Ist. -r^<
The $4,000,000 Notes will be spcurfd by the •■am- (•••!' ••' as Is no-nr -' a ,- ft .
for the $5,000,000 Notes, viz: .
$6,250,000 Minnesota, Dakota el Pacific Railway Company First >r ort .
gage Bonds, bHnK all the bonds Issued, in r...^»-<r of 22^.60 mile 3of rai]Tr, 7*7 *
on which said bonds are a first mortgage, and al! the stock.
The indenture securing the $4,000,000 Notes issued in exchange for those m-? ; .. J
ing will provide that the Minnesota. Dakota & Pacific Railway Company Fl»t"
Mortgage Bonds, deposited as collateral, shall km* interest at the rat* of "% p^
annum Instead of 4%. as heretofore, that the Company shall deposit thereunder'^
additional Minnesota, Dakota *■ Pacific Railway Company Bonds and Siock'w^
may be issued during the life of said Notes, that the collateral may bo changed yfcj--'
the "written consent of Speyer & Co. tinder the terms and restrictions therei^;,* .
forth, and that the new Notes may bo redeemed at any time at par and lateHsffj
at the company's option, upon sixty days' previous notice
A cash payment of $25 in respect of each $1,000 Note extended will s , Fn^ #
to holders accepting the extension. f,;^
Holders of the- above-mentioned Notes who desire to avail themselves of .^ ~
privilege of extension on the above-mentioned terms, must. ON OR BEFORE A^
5, 1911. deposit same (ex February 1. 1911. coupons) with MESSRS. SPEYEr 4
CO., New York, against Temporary Receipts, exchangeable for the Definitive 5£
Notes on or about February 1. 1911. when the payment of $25 per $1,000 Note win b,
made. The right Is reserved to withdraw the above offer at any time -withc-t
previous notice.
Notes not deposited for extension M above will b? paid at maturity at _;g»
office of the Central Trust Company of New York. _■_„;>
Copies of the Trust Indenture securing the New NSaiM to which r»f»^n<»!|
made may be obtained upon application. usaj
The Minneapolis & St Louis Railroad Co.
• j. By F. H. DAVIS. Treanrr.^^
1 X«w Tork. December 16th, 1010. .*-..
Referring to the foregoing notice, we are now prepared to accept deposit
of the Notes, and will, on behalf of The Minneapolis A St. Louis Railroad Com.
p*ny, simultaneously with the delivery of the new Notes, make the above men*
tioned cash payment of $25 in respect of each $1,000 Note extended.
SPEYER & CO.'
New Tork. December 16th, 1010.
INTEREST ON DEPOSITS
This Company receives deposits which
may be made either subject to check or in
the" form of demand or time certificates.
It solicits individual, household or busi
ness accounts and allows interest thereon.
Depositors in the Fifth Avenue Branch
may cash checks and make deposits at the
Main Office, if they so desire, and a simi
lar arrangement may be made by deposi
tors of the Main Office at the Branch.
Foreign Drafts and Letters of Credit
are issued. Safe Deposit Vaults.
Fifth Avenue Branch
Guaranty Trust Co. of New York
Fifth Avenue & 43d Street, New York
Main Office. 28 Nassau St. London Office, 33 Lombard St.
ANDREW J. MTORMAt'K. Auctioneer.
REGULAR AUCTION SALE OF
STOCKS AND BONDS
By ADRIAN H. MULLER & SON
OFFICE NO. 55 WILLIAM ST..
Wednesday, Dec. 28th, 1910
at 12:30 o'clock, at the
EXCHANGE SALESROOM.
NOS. 14 AND 16 VESBT STREET.
BY ORDER OF EXECUTORS ESTATE OP
MARY L. MORRISON,
f 1,000 Canada Southern Rway Cd Mtj:«. 5
p. c. Bd., 1913.
11,000 Evansville & Terre Haute R. R. Ist
Consld. Mtge. t> p. c. Bd.. 1911.
$1,000 Ulster & Delaware R. R. Ist Consld.
Mtge. 5 P. c. Bd.. 102«.
o ?hs. American Exchange Nat I. Bank.
8 she. National Bank of Commerce.
S sh«. Mechanics & Metals Natl. Bank.
4 shi. Chatham National Bank.
8 shs. Corn Exchange Bank.
22 shs. Delaware & Hudson Co.
BY ORDER OK TRUSTEE ESTATE Of M. A.
HUTCHINSON.
100 *hs. Cleveland & Pittsburj? R. R. Co.
me! Wabash R. R. 2d Mtg«. I p. c Bd..
11939.
27 ehs. Utlca Steam * Mohawk Valley Cotton
Mills.
BY ORDER OF ADMINISTRATORS.
St 000 North Carolina Special Tax Bond. OK
of Deposit.
$3,000 Montana Coal ,c- Coke Co. Ist Mts». *>
p. c. Fds.. 1920.
FOR ACCOUNT OF WHOM IT MAT CONCERN.
20 she. Lackawanna Steel Co.
<10,000 Standard Milling Co. 5 p. c Bds.. due
1030.
20 shs. Ostrander Fire Brick Co.
75 shs. Tripler Liquid Air Co.
510,000 Wisconsin. Minnesota & Pacific R. R-
Ist 4b. 1950.
10,000 shs. Nevada United Mines Co.
$2,000 Criterion Club, City of New York. M j
Mtge. 4 p. c. Regstd. Bd.. on BS3 oth |
Avenue, due 1954.
$ 4,000 Chic & Eastern Illinois R. R. Consld. j
6s, MM "• ..^
13,000 Chic. & Eastern Illinois R. R- Ist
Extn. 6s. 1031.
$.".000 Buffalo. Rochester & Plttsburs K. R-. j
Lincoln Park & Charlotte Ist .'.«. 1039.
?16,000 Baltimore & Ilarrisburg Ry. Ist ss, j
1036. _
S.OOO rhs. Colville Mining & fimcltlnff C«.
4.00«» shs. Colvllle Mining: & SmeUlrg Co.
66 shs. Tabard Inn Corporation Pr«»M.
KJ> ehs. Tabard Inn Corporation common.
135 she. First National Bank of Paint Rock, ,
Texas. - ' .' ■"
40!> «ihß. Miller Mining Co. j
37 shs. Bleeckfr St. & Fulton Ferry R. R. I
Ouar. m p. c.
900 shs. United Copper Co. "Prefd. _ |
10 shs Aeolian-Weber Piano & Pianola Co. I
Pfd. - >/"-l:--
20 ahs. Queens County Trust Co.
25 shs. Broadway Trust Co. of N. T. _ _ |
Sto.OOu Siurtyvant Realty Co. 3d Mt^. Bonds.
1 4 shs. Orr ( V. Prer*.
P3B sh?. Orr Co. common.
$25 000 Baltimore & Ohio R. R. Ist Mts:e. 8
p. c. Bds.. 1936.
JtOO shs. Northwestern Commercial Co.
f 10.000 Columbus & Hocklnj? Coal * Iron Co.
?.' S T, „.. Col!. Trust «P. c. Bds.. Ctfs. of Be
25 shK. Delaware, Lackawanna .<: W*«t*rn R. |
R.
To Avonraouth •- 40^
To Bermuda and West Indies.. « — —*
Total exports 4.0";' ~
Total exports last week 3.w>3 50 3.31>7
QUOTATIONS FOR BEBVKS.
Good to choice native steers $6 SIDE'S 75
Poor to fair native steers }^ 5 W
Oxen and stags »W «w>
Bulls and An cows -40® 35
Good to choke native steers one year
Pgo 6 25®>7 jO
BJSEVB9 Receipts for two days. 159 cars.
or 2.743 head. Including 12 cars for. the market.
Steers and cows firm and 10© 15c higher; bulls
I full steady. Th« yards were leans . Ordinary
to prime ?t»ers sold at $5 50ffj$6 75 per IW> lb:
i India, $4igs4 75; cows. $2 4<>3s4 80. Df«aj« r-»«'
! dull, but steady. No later cables.
£a.le-_McPh«"isoii & Co.: 20 Virginia steers.
I*l4 It> average. $6 V. p*t I'"' Ib: '->. 190 Tb-
MM 1«, "ISO tb,-*6 19; 88) lOS-J tt>. $0 .V»: 1
Mill 8-^o Ib. $4 40. 2 cows. MOB lt>. $4 SO; V. W>
n>, $4 4" 1. fV«i It.. *•" !>O: I. 870 tb, *:'.'" 3, <*?•
Tr. $3 20: 1. 630 Tr.. H 40. . ...,
B Sanders: 2i» Virginia st«er». 1252 Ib. ?•>.>•»:
23 1135 IK M 1 bull. 1230 tt>. ?t75- l. 550 Tb.
$4- 3 rows. 112 i: tb. $t 75: 7. 014 tb. J3B; 2. 9^
Ib. S3 35: 1- >88 tb. $:: 10: I 088 tb. ?3; S. JW
n> DM: ■ 725 Bt, $2 »"
Newton * Co.: 2O Virginia steers*. litv> Ib.
$8 CO; 20. 12T.9 It.. $0 60: '.i' 1.47 Kb. $6 40.
Kerns Commission Company: '. Owe FtW*.
1291 •!. «•■:.-• i bull. i""" 1 B) ?« 75: 1. H;»t» »•■
S4 (»: 11 "cows, lOtR m. $4 60; .'.. 97» rh. S.T 00; 2,
- :. Bkajaaeva * son: 2O Virginia steers. 1270
tb. *6 4.".
ft Jii.l,l * Co.: s cows, 7RS XT- $." 20.
CALVES — Receipts for two flays. 745. in
cluding 264 head" for the niarltrt. Vents fuily
steady; Western ratvea steady, but no prime !<»t» !
offered: barnyard oalv»« entirely nominal. !
Common to oliok-e veals sol. at $74t51l r>er "*' |
Ttj: culls. 8B#J98; Weateta «ah - $5 v** PiuwJ
catlves slow, nt 11 i;l'". for city dressed veals ami j
i:;,- for rnuniry die»set| calve*.
Sa.les»-Tobln A- Btenaon: 17 veals. 141 Tt> aye- 1
rage, at 11050 pa* i"" tb; -"•>. 198 Ib. 510. Ie!»s»
$5. .
S. Judd a co ■ 2S veals. M tb. $10; 2 culls. i
125 ft.. *♦'•. 5, HS tb. »."i 50; 1»H» Western calves. :
•j«v: rt.. $.1 «>
Newton & Co : 17 Pennsylvania caN IIS Ib.
$10.
Kern* Commiasion Company: l» veaU. \\\ n.
$10 50; 3, 103 TT. $7 I" Ohio. ICO tb. $10; 3. 133
n. *7.
S. Sanders: 12 veal*. ISO n». $11; B. 1M 1T»,
$1 7.".. '_• 170 tti. $S. 12 culls. St. v. «,'. W>.
NHKKr AMI i.\mrs Ueceii»ts for two
days. SO .I-.- or 6.227 head, including 7 .-art ft—
the market. -!;..•;'. m „:. and in moderate de
mand; litmb.l Iron* Be ■■<!.. r '■• aaa4!i
"••iklus; heavy lambs, 2r.Sf4O«- Ji!i?Jier. Co:nra^n
to prime sheep -.-.M a. $2.^) ( fH per 100 tb: oullf
?2: common to him -atnlis. *,""• 7*. «*»'. •..">. culls. .
$5. Dressed mutton quiet, at s'if»S p«r n.. I
..r.'»ce,l lamb* at ««"..,# lie ,
Sale? — Kern» Commission Company: 21* Ohio
I I COLUMBIA f§,
I I TRUST I
■BM| rnMPAMY | jc
135 Broadway, New York City
OFFICERS •"-j^l
WILL ARD V. hING . . . President 9
AUGUSTUS G. PAINE . \ic?-Prevd«H |
HOWARD BAYNE . VTce-Pres- and Tress. I
LANGLEY W. WIGGIS . . Secretary |
FRED. C. MARSTO* . Ass't Secretary \
'PARK TERRELL . Mqr. Municipal Dept. ]
GEORGE E. WARREN . . Trust Officer il
INDEPENDENT OF THE CONTROL
OF AW SINGLE INTEREST
NEW YORK REALTY OWNERS
FIFTEENTH YEAR. •.-;:."
ASSETS *3.0f10.000. __J^, .
MOO CONVERTIBLE
GOLD BONDS BOND* -i^i
6% 6.8696
WRITE FOR CIRCULAR T.
METROPOLITAN 4r.F>r\. 489 STH AT*
Central Trust Company of Hew Ytffc
54 WALL STREET
CAPITAL and SURPLUS $J3,O«O.000
{ot which $17.000.000 has been ganwj)
Union Trust Co. of HewYrt
80 BROADWAY Fifth Aye. s >?t -. 3t
Capital & Surplus, $8,737,000
Allows Interest on Deposits
BOND SALESMAN. WITH 12 TEAKS* *C
perieccc in otSce management and salesa»j"
ship in th« citl«s of New York. Chicago api »-
Louis, m.« eraplo-ved. desires to maka c^ B3 *!
A koo.l clientele In Chicago and a ißW<a*Rt
that market should make him an '"?'•*'?.
representative for established New York w>j»
house desiring to open Western cosret.-***
P-rsona! Interview desired between M »2r;
2fith and 31-«t. Address J. W.. -^-* Bro*^ 1
New York Cltr- _^^^
ELECTIONS. _3i-.
OF»*ICB OF THE AiIEUUCAN 1 COAI» CC*
PANY OF ALLEOANY COUNTY.:—
• No. t Broadway. .111-
New Tcrk. Decemb*>- 3--S. '••*,•
The annual election for Directors at. g^:
AMERICAN COAT. COMPANY of * !*r
County (New Jersey>. will b« held at tb«£*
pany*e offlc«». No. S3 Montgoir> ■• St., **£.
City. N. J.. on Thursday. iho 2*>th c! rr I****^1 ****^
I!>l<>. between, the hours of 12 and '. °~rV
P. M. GEO. M. EOWLBY. aecWßß^
NOTICE OF" DISSOLUTION^
NOTICE 19 HEREBY GIVEN XH . A W
atlaj of the stockholders of tb* L JV-».
rerwald Packing Company. a doir.-s eurpo
tlon. Kill be hald at So. SI East I*»S „
Borough of Manhattan. City of New ;.^ ">»
th<- 0»»h of JanusrT. 1»11. at I P. « •„„-
purpose of dlMalvlny th^ sa- - cor?« ■--
pursuant to Section 22t of th» *»'*
poration Law of rh«» State of New BH
ut approving of the action of its pr'j-j.
directors favoring »a.ld dlaeoluttoa i atrt^^
rylnsr th* consent of said atoefcho'' 1*"1 *"
writing thereto _ „...•
N«\r Tort City. I>«c«nber 14th. KH'A- -~-
lambs. -.- tb . *-„- at St> "5 per '■••■ ». •flia
th. at < M ..■>■ It BJ at $«»>: 81 »t»t« I*^
*♦ tr». a- $«;. 4 cult sheer. TO ** i' *- ' «• %
Xewton i Co.: 60 PenasylvanU a.::NJ. g^,
$0 7.".; 5 culls S4 tb. $5: 15 sheep, UO t^ **
a ea n>. $2.
Tobin * Shannon: SO »tat*» lamtw. 13 "* w i
12 sh^-p. M tb. S3. M fcv i#
S. Sanders: 3U state lamb*. I<O ©• ■"Jg.tß
Pennsylvania, 6* nx $«.'-•: Ms •» ">• **;i-'
*heep. ... •» pi I •■' IN. Jl. _ ■j'V
HOC;* — Receipts for two days, -2W 'Jt&+
•■->•! head. Int'tudlnsr half a ear '•-" th« »*
St. a.!- feellna:. _
Sales— I Sanders: 33 PennsylTanta'* l^,.,.;
It» avtfrace. at i* 40 per !*».» *»• . , i ;. «£*
OTHER LIVESTOCK MARKET*^
. Kansas City. Dec. »-- C"* T TIl 3: ,T. R t3S^
6.4 W. inctudlnK 250 Southerns; 10 »J 3< LrJ*i«
c»w« jitrcnir to UV higher. '""' < r*»n*
export ate«ir?. $5306584.>: fair to tt oo *>'J m t*+-
Si 75: Western. ?3 <*>e^. 7-%: stock*" *^,5*2
ere. - $4fssT>4(>: Southi>rn. f* fl"** 4 •?vfS?;«#
c 00... $atrst?b; natlv*-. ru r.o'is"-: ii tt * it rii^»
■>s:j: cu:t». ■■•■.■ »4 -■'. « •■•■** . 7t5«S
WOO9— Receipts. 4,CQ»I;-3c? love.-; *.■;■ **
<7 T.'.-iiT «•: heavj". ?T ".*:<• bO; EV^IS
■■» j: :;■■:*:>. .• < v - \'^ n «*«J2
W>!EUP— Receipts. 2.(C0: nw>C3C s . ; - Jlf '|4*l
hlKh^r. Lamba. $3 "'■> ■i > ; 25: :■ sar J*^m^
» J&. w«tfeer». »3 7A«$-4 30, •«•• P"*^
«t'Hiii--rii Mid f«-»der«. i 3043 "5.

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