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New-York tribune. (New York [N.Y.]) 1866-1924, April 25, 1914, Image 1

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j.\ B?r-r? fi^alor------! I,
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?tiimne
WEATHER
To-day, elendy and iranser.
TEMl*Ell.\TrRE TE8TEBDAT?
Mich. 59: tow. *?.
Full report on PMf-s ??
.Jj i.NXlV ...No. 24,682,
|( ???ivri?ht. 1914,
B? The Tribes* \-Mirlntlon.l
NEW YORK, SATURDAY, APRIL 2.5, 1914
? t
O-DTrrO t\\V n-BXrrTOmCOOfotXm York. News-*. *4QW*a0l0** Ho?*?????
PRICE OM*. ( K.N I nvriUIERE TWO CENTS.
MOBS RIOTING IN MEXICO CITY;
FEDERALS BURN NUEVO LAREDO
?hexico city
TERRORIZED
BY WILD MOBS
Americans in Growing Peril
^O'Shaughnessy Safe
at Vera Cruz.
WASHINGTON STATUE
PULLED TO GROUND
Refugees Say Masses Fast
Were Getting Uncon?
trollable.
FLEEING AMERICANS
DETAINED ON ROAD
British Rear -amiral Offers to
Send Trains Under His Flag
for Their Relief.
[By <""SV> H TV? Tr!v-?:- ?
Vera Cruz. Mexico. April 24.?
Nelson O'Shaughnessy, United
States Charge d'Affaires, and
Consul General Shanklin and
their staffs arrived here from
Mexico City at 6 o'clock this af?
ternoon.
Thev report great turmoil in
the capital, saying that the masses
were rapidly becoming uncontrol?
lable and pleading with the gov?
ernment for a free hand.
The Washington Monument,
which was the gift of the Ameri?
can nation on the occasion of the
centennial celebration, was pulled
down with motor cars.
The mob was led by Jorge
Huerta, son of President Huerta,
who attached the ropes to the
statue.
Two Americans are reported to
have been rescued by military
aids of President Huerta from the
wrath of the mob.
The destruction of American
properties continues. Vile epi?
thets are being placed on build?
ings.
Several carload? of American
women and children and some
men ire detained a short distance
from here, where the road is cut
?nd to where trains from here are
*nt to receive refugee?.
They have been returned to the
Soledad station, outside the city
about thirty miles, and Rear Ad
?**ir<il Craddock, of the British
fcet here, has volunteered his
??-?vices to send trains out under
-be British flag to see if he can
??cure the passengers.
Huerta's last note to O'Shaugh
n<wy expressed good feelings
toward him, both on his own ac
Catittnii???] nn pace 8, ?< lnrnn S
This Morning's News.
?*HE WAS WITH MXXICO.
? Halla from OalYMton . 1
o Laredo. 1
'*"1 Cms < ?? . a
Army );.,\\y ?... , , Tamplco*s BsJta 3
- Call t.. Arm?. 4
? 'ion. 4
n th-i Sew York. . . 5
? .\<-w Vfirk. 6
' . '? ? '? S_ 8
? ?? r.nry. ... 8
X.OCAZ..
?ltm?r, Wafumi ?,,-:ay fm f?\ege\... 6
*-**lj-it oiri Kin? Bolter. 8
"A*'*' ?? . Breltanc. 7
"?-?-?M <?;?-;.- pUyl?rl Ar.,r*. |
^/?l!>... .,,,,,, fubak?**].15
?tllOOr, J. , . !rlw|fl(l?.30
*???? Cleared I . 20
, OevkkAL
***.\>e**-*.. ., r ?,l0 Qggggggtg. 7
1 ?*? Ha? ;.: ....?y S>i?!?.n.9
',"''?? ? KsfM '?'. Altar_16
*"??*? r;,?.?, ,? , n,? f fT9tfg. ao
?5'-*??!.8
??lei r ?
isr, . J
??__*r* ....'.'..'.'.'.V.*.'.'.'.10 ??... U
.18 mjtO J3
...
I?l
IS, 17
IS
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"?^l-'S 'L_ la 1
THE NEW YORK. UNDER ADMIRAL WINSLOW. PREPARING TO SAIL.
-1-1-?-?- ?- ?.
NUEVO LAREDO LAUT
WASTE BY MEXICANS
Thriving Border City Re?
duced to Ruins with
Torch and Dynamite.
4
U. S. MACHINE GUNS
END SOLDIERS' ORGY
Two Federais Killed While Try?
ing to Blow Up Interna?
tional Bridges.
I_nr??d<\ Tex., April 24.?Nuevo La?
redo, the thriving Mexican border to^vn
opposite here. 1? In ruin? to-night,
?-?ate- by dynamite and Are by
Mexican Federal ?oldlers, who late to?
day bep-;in an orgy of destruotloh arl I %h
did not end until they were forced to
flee southward ?before the gun? of th?
?' ;m tarder patrol.
Two Mexloane are known to have
been killed by the Un'ted Ptates troops,
and several were aeen to fall when a
machine trun platoon from Port Mein
tosh got Into action.
Pevern.1 brisk eklrmlphea between the
Americans and Mexlr-ans were fought
In quick time a? the Mexicans, their
troop trains ready to pull out of the
burning city, began an Indiscriminate
flre a'-ro?=9 the International boundary,
but to-night there ?M no evidence that
their ?hooting had been efi?-ctive.
I'ror^-rty (Inmace in Nuevo I__redo
will rasch *:**K<?A). Among the build?
ings destroyed were the United states
consulate, municipal building, postof
flee, theatre, thf< flour mill, one of the
largest In thl? section of tha Southwest;
the ?hops of tha Ml ?lean National Kail
roed ami smaller structur?e
Two Dynemitere Killed.
Th?. f.re waa still burning late to
alght, with no chance that It would he
i iied until everything inflammable
hud be<-n ?,?. ;>? <1 out. Kerosene and
other . ombuatlblee, liberally u.ued, ndd
ed t" the wreckage, which otherwise
would 'i"?" I ??'" been great, owin?< to
the adobe eonetruetloii largely used.
in, i roperty .'.ss In La?
redo, h.,: h Internet lone] bridges are
nute, though efforts to dynamite them
ted In th'' death of two men en
gaged ?f' the undertaking. <>n*? Mexi
can ?rai ?hol '? ??' ?herpehooter from
? top Of a Wat? tower. The Mexican
w.iK trying to reach th'- end of the In?
teraatlenal fool end trag?n '.ridge. An
other ?jrae killed when ho tried to blow
?it th" American railroad bridge.
Americana ?rere constantly at the
Anierhan ?Ida to prevent sii'h an at?
tempt,
W'h? n th?i Mexlran soldiers finally
departed order was quickly mette od in
LauredO, h II strong guards remain
throughout the rlty. A eerloua prob?
lem was tarnished tmmlgratloa and
Hty authorities by the pn-m-ri?-?' Lire
of hundreds of refugees from the burn?
ing city, who bad to be tarnished t.?od
and six Iter,
City Set on Fire.
The r. demi garrison evacuated
., Laredo yeeterday, suppeeedly
.. or Monterey. With it?
? i..],: ? ? . i Nttk '-itv. ordl? '
rrf about 7,000 population, wmt
t'ont lnri*?| en pa*? ">. r??Ju-B? ?
I I'PER PICTURE - ADMIRAI. <'A_-I
BROM M'R. W7N8T.OV,*, IN crvIUAN
DRE88.
A^rvniNTTTION OX DECK OF TTTK SrPERl)KEAT)XOrGHT.
EXECUTION FEAREE
OF 20 REFUGEE
Bryan Expresses Apprehensic
for 19 Americans and an
Englishman.
? I ? ago, April 24.?Twenty ?"??fug?.?
n In of ??ti American" ar.d OBS Britta
BBbJect? bave Iif^n taken jir,*?onorn h
Huertas forces ami um believed t
DATs been executed by s tiring soua?,
according to a telegram received fror
s?- rotary Bryan to-right, by Dr. Her
hert A. l-arkyn, president of a Mexlcai
plantation i-oaapany.
Mr. Hryan's telegram wa,i as follown
"The CollowlnSi ?Jated April 24, s
10 a. m., ami i? ?solved from the Amerl
enn Consul ?it Vsn Cms, Is sent fo;
your Information:
" 'Am Just reliably Informed at f
o'clock Tuesday nigiit poidiers stoppe?
train in vicinity of TlSfTS I'.'anca, or
Vira Crut Isthmus Railroad, taking
follow lug prisoners
" "W. Muigum. railroad pupenntend
sat; Elliott, engineer; RUey und Hart,
mini . Itors. All rirr? Amer.cana. Theae
parsons ars taken t?i Cordoba or nri
saba and believed ordered siiot.
" 'Sum?' eighteen or more Amerteana
left for Tierra Wanca. ?'. B. Herron.
s'ori'i.'in' ?if the Isthmua Railroad, arlfs
and four children; .1. O. Cook, chief
engineer, J??hn W Ll**hter, eondu?ctor;
.1. V. iJirifTSfon and wife; Kerwln, enKl
0 ? r, an'! Mr and Mrs. George? Ifa?
? '?irrlier.'
"Sum- SOMIan ttoppsd at Hacienda
Hotsoi-ongo on K?me railroad,, taking
prisoners I>l\vard Wunseb nnd Ron,
Sidney; A. If, Turner, set retary of tho
Hacienda .Motzoron?-??, all Americans;
also n man BBWSd i'.ovd, Bflttsb sub?
ject All taken to COrdoba or Orizaba.
it is reliably ^ t:. t. ri thai thes?? prison
< i may t?1 txecuted Admirals Plstehsr
.m?! Badger bars tins Information t..
i' r?? them."
Dr. I'urkyn ?aid .Wunsch, mentioned |
CANAL ZONE PUT
ON WAR FOOTING
Colonel Goethals's Orders Include the Detailing of
the Infantry to Patrol the Locks
on Isthmian Waterway.
Panama. April ?4 Oolonei Qsocgi
W. Goetbals. Governor of the Panamt
Canal Zone, to-day Issued orders plac?
ing th? Cnnal Zone on a strict wai
footing.
He Instructed Major Gerhardt, -nm
mandtaf the let h Infantry, to BSttd two
companies of infantry to patrol the
Gatun locks and one each for duty at
the Miradores and Pedro Miguel locks.
The soldiers got one hundred rounds
of ammunition each, and ???ill camp
near the i... ks
The operating machinery of all the
locks will he securely locked and the
keys placed In the possession of ?"oio
ii'i Qoethela
It Is understood that coast artillery
companies will be distributed among
the fortifications on ?STamoncol and
Cub-bra Islands, al th? Pacific Snd of
UUtl, ar i all?? SI Toro Point and
other forts Si the Atlantic end
The action of Colonel Goethals I?
bellet 'd 1.1 have been the result of
anti-Anirrlcan sentiment contained In
fly sheets which appeared in the streets
of Rename and also expressed edi?
torially in "ICI Diario." which is strong?
ly pro-Mexican.
There are 260 Mexican employes on
the Canal, and th.lr p?eosnos probably
bad something to do with the action of
net God .-ds.
Garde R.'drie-uer s Mexican resident
Of this city, was arrested to-day by the
Panama euthorlttea at the request of
the Canal Zone police. !!?? |g charged
With making Inflammatory anti-Amer
Icen speeches, and probably aril] be de- |
ported._._ :
In the telegram, Is the manager of the
plantation, which Is owned by 1.500
American and British stockholders. The
Boyd mentioned, he said, is Alexander
Boyd, of London, cashier of the plan?
tation Mrs Boyd also was on the
plantation, and two Californiens, named
I'ei kham and Andrews, according to
Dr. Parkyn. No mention aras mads ..f
them.
REBELS TAKE MONTEREY
Brownsville, Tex.. April 24?"Mon?
terey is In the hands of the ConstttU?
tlonallsts. aft- r a Bvs days' battie,"
was ?m offldal aimouncemenl late to?
day from Conetltutlonallsl hsedquar
ti rs In Matamoros, accompanied by
th? linglni of bells and an outburst of
rebel ?nthUSlaSffl thiuuiihout the city.
REBELS ATTACK TAMPICO
Renew Assault on Port and
Federal Gunboats Reply.
' :"-? m I ? T- ' une Purea? i
Washington, April 28 ?At 2-10o'clock
this morning the Navy I ?epartment
was Informed thai th? rebels were at?
tacking Tampico and that the Federal
gunboats were tiring
MEXICAN LOSS, 321 IN ALL
Washington. April 24.?The first of
llclal estimate of Me\uan casualties at
Vera ?UTOS was Cabled to the Na?. v I)e
pertmenl t.. night bj Rear admiral
Flet. h? r.
ii ?placed th?* dead si 120 and the
wu'jiiJ..d ut l.'.\ i
GALVESTON CHEERS
AS 5TH ARMY BRIGADE
j SAILS FOR VERA CRU;
Enlisted Men Not Weary, Although Non
of Them Had ?Slept, Says Richard
Harding Davis.
BREAKING OF HOME TIES HARD FEATURJ
Iransports Convoyed by Torpedo Boat He.?-,trovers G<
Under Way. with Bands Playing and "Movie"
Cameras Clicking.
By RICHARD HARDING DAVIS.
On Board Army Transport Kilpatricl;. Galveston. Tex.. Apr
24. 5:06 P. M.?Transport Sumner. with thr 4th Infantry. Colon?
Van Vliet, is just pulling out. She carries the first of the army t
leave for Mexico.
Ten minutes ago our convoy, the black, business-like destroyer
showed her the way. Nothing is lacking to make the departur
brilliant. The sun is blazing: the people of Galveston in stimme
bravery cover every wharf and roof. Thev are cheering and th
men on board are waving campaign hats and shouting. The ban?! i
playing "The Girl I Left Behind Me" and everv moving pictu:
company in America is perpetuating the scene.
The McClellan is now moving from the wharf. Her band play
"Dixie" and the people give the rebel yell. Our going ashore wh
is sounding and in five minutes we start.
ACTION QUICKENS AT DAYBREAK
After wiring you last night I drove to Fort Crockett to witnc
the scenes of excitemen4. that should be evident when five thousaru
men simultaneously break home ties, but although it was 2 in tin
morning and they were due on the transports at sunrise there wa;
as little excitement as when I circus folds its tents and silently steal"
away to the next village. Except for the big bonfires consuming th<
camn debris, there was no outward sign that a brigade was awak?
and on its way to war. But when daylight showed through the fo?
the action quickened and everybody was an actor.
If any citizen slept in Galveston last night, this morning he did
not look it. Everybody was on the front porch at 5:30. unshaven, in
wrappers and bath gowns, but awake to cheer the marching soldiers,
to wave to the officers, to delight in the comic relief furnished by the
teamsters and the army mule. Drawn up at two wharves, the trans?
ports rose out of the dripping fog all white and red. white and blue
and gold.
Below them on the wharf thousands of men in khaki at the
double quick unloaded wagons, passed ammunition boxes in cargo
nets, hoisted officers' prrsonal luggage, the quartermasters' type?
writers, the band's big French horn, cook pots and pans, their own
brown canvas cots and dog tents, the ccnipanv tents, the headquai
ters tents. Donkey engines snorted: winches creaked; the whistles
of the boatswains and the rattle of the running chairus were part of a
chorus of haw-hawing mules and panting motor cars fighting for a
place in the front row.
SHOW NO SIGNS OF WEARINESS.
No one had slept, and yet on the part of enlisted men there wa>
no sign of weariness.
Hundreds of them stood in ranks still bearing on erect shoulders
the heavy packs with which they had just hiked through the night
and fog.
Their eyes as they gazed up at the great transports of white and
gold were impatient, eagerly alert.
Before I arrived here I hated the idea that by the hands of our
not too scrupulous enemy even one of our boys should lose his life,
; even in defence of the honor of the flag, but as I looked at them
fror: the transport, at their broad shoulders carrying the packs as
lightly as a lady carries her opera cloak, at their clean cut. tanned
faces and steady, confident eyes. T found that my sympathy had been
misplaced.
My sorrow is entirely for the Mexicans. At a moment of de?
parture like this the women should keep away?they make a cruel
assault upon their feelings. For one year this brigade has been quar?
tered at Fort Crockett, and the families of officers and men have
joined them.
WIVES AND MOTHERS SAY GOODBY.
In a year they have made this pretty city seem like home, so
this morning those who are left behind are supplying a human note
that keeps you comoletely miserable. It may be the white haired
mother of an officer, she who arrived yesterday and who last night
while dining happily with her son heard him ordered to the front
or it may be the young wife and the children of the captain, shr
trying to play the part of the soldier's brave bride, and making ?
rotten failure at it, and the children swarming up over his shoulders,
utterly selfish, utterly unmoved, concerned only with the big white
ships. Or. if you look the other way. you find the sergeant gazing
unhappily at the sky, while his wife sobs on one shoulder, her mother
sobs on the other shoulder and numerous female friends and relatives
wail and weep.
They make him feel he is as good as dead already. In an
hour he will be at sea, with his duties to perform, with his orders to
give and to receive, but the woman, whether she lives on the line or
near the barracks, goes from the wharf to echoing room-; Idled only
with {hosts and <:'ts down to wait. HetS is the hardest part, and ?
that fact cast the only shadow that tell this morning over a mobiliza

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