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New-York tribune. [volume] (New York [N.Y.]) 1866-1924, July 18, 1914, Image 2

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rised no one in the courtroom if ?he
ad toppled over.
Mrs. Cat man took her stand beside
ber counsel in front ai.d slightly to
the left ?.f Justice Van Sielen. Her
counsel, George Levy, stood near.
"You represent this defendant?" the
judge Bsk.
"I do, ami I waive the reading of the
indictment," Mr. Levy answered.
"Florence Conklin Carman, how plead
you to this indictment** Guilty or not
guilty?'' asked the justice, looking at
Carman.
It seemed ?? if she would reply. Her
? framed a word when
Mr Lev; interposed.
'i en'er a plea of not guilty." he
said, and then made the usual reserva?
tions, providing for two weeks' time In
which he might be allowed to enter a
new* plea, a demurrer <>r a mo'ion to
quash the
Taking Mrs Carman's ar*m, Le\y
then escorted her to the little room
?ii. He itm
mediately returned, and the TMstrict
Attorne?. moved that bail be set at
120,000.' To th's the justice a*
and counsel for Mr?, (arman e
Ho obiec'ion.
Le\y then returned to the back room
and he and Mrs. Carman reappeared
?he two bond?men. Ernest R i
dall and Smith Coxe. both of Krrep.-rt.
Prisoner Is Released.
The bondsmen, with Mr?. Carman
standing a' their right, held up their
right hand? and swore to the contents
of the ba
Th..' the cmrt proceedings.
With her I- . Mrs. Carman hur
lied from the room, and, eluding pho?
tographer , got i. car, with I'r
Carman and Randall, i ad off
for a long automobil?
I*r. Ca ? ? to Kreeport
later without I to all
?sort? conjectures, Dr. ?'ar?
man amusi
Mrs. Carman had taken a trr.iri to New
*1 ork at the village of Qie?
The physician had conaented to re?
cen? a committee from the press to?
night. Just before 9 o'clock he tele?
phoned that his wife would receive the
three representatives agreed upon.
When The Tribune correspondent
and two orheis reached the Carman
home they were Ushered into the doc?
tor's office, little changed In any a ly
from what It wa? the night of -Tune 30,
"p. hen Mrs. Bailey was shot to death
just as she was about to leave the
office. Mr', ?arman and her
Mrs. Ida Powell, were sitting In the
front parlor receiving the sympathy
of several of the former's closest
friends in Freeport After n wait of
?orne minute? Mr. Levy came In and
asked the newspaper tuen to go in'o ,
the waiting room, where Mrs. Carman
would meet them.
Mr?. Car- . ' ;n with Pr. Car?
inan, the latter smiling.- He was. in
bis shirt sleeves.
The ton*-? expression on Mrs. Car?
man's face had almost disappeared. The
forty-mile automobile iide apparently
bad relieved her greatly. The inter?
view began with the remark by some
one that she tm.st be tired.
"I am very tired." she answered,
smiling. "Put you don't look nearly
as tired as might be expected." "You
see, I have be in where I was very quiet ,
for the !.. it few .
?Were you treated well In jail?"
"I was treated very kindly. They
were all very good to me over in
Mine?la."
"We know that you were anxious to
appear before ?he grand jury. Were
you much disappointed, Mrs. Carman,
at not appear*.: ?
Mrs. Carman (irons *ingry.
"T was terribly disappointed at pot
he ? ^ able ?o go he*"ore ?he grand
jury." she answered. "I certainly ex
ptsc'ed to be allowed to tell my story.
ted t.. give them a plain,
frank eeeounl o' everything that hap?
pened that day, wha' I did in town and
what I did after 1 got back home. It
was ui rot to hear my
"It eertai'!y seems to me that the
word of n white woman should be as
goo?! as thai of a negro woman and a
tr8mp. It ? "?? * ' ' '?'rand
juries supposed to be iiist? I<n't there
any I here simply
to niak '
"It has been suggested as an ex
planat'.'n of why you w? re not allowe?!
te g?-, before th<- grand jury." said one
of her que?tioner?, 'that the jurors
decided from the evidence that they
would have to indict you and that,
therefore, they were unwi'ling to face
you."
"Well, that's ? pretty weak explana?
tion."
Then the talk 'urnrd to the subject
of the diet?,graph
"I did not ill ?hat .1 ctograph be?
cause I a*n
you n<
be." Mr? ? !arman aid, and th? ?
anger m her voice. "I did not pul
because I a ' the doctor.
That I? tie interpretation whicl
l.ewspaper men have read into it for me,
and you have made all the trouble
You have convicted me, when you tai.?
the time t" It was not be?
cause I was jealous. Jealousy was no?
th?- natural explanation even. 1 didn't
feel that way about it. Not at
"But. Mra <"ar- ? alire
that It V.-B!? ?he ?!'r*r,CrapV, Which Vl a ?
caused all -.our trouble. I' directed
suspicion toward you in the first place."
Rlames Ml on Dictograph.
"I n ?lize t| at 1 wa? ver ? I
? " ? ill I know ' . dictograph has
?en responsible foi a burden *
upon tr,e which has been at times al?
most impossibl' ?
"Will >"? to us frankly,
then, whj * on I "l it pul
"I will be g!a?l to give you the full
explanation. *i . - . wherever I
went, when the doc'or would n
men friends, thev would t-nv t?. him:
'My, \ou are lucky, I'oc. You can go
ai.ywher?* ? a' any t ?
- ave to account for ?t All you
have jrou are ,
bu'
try would Sayi 'You're a devil,
I>oc." They wen
sbou* '
**?" em, a- d all that
sort of tl
"I ?ranted to know if he was all
If he vas no! all i ight, why.
1 wanted to know th-,'. too " Here she
?mil? : . sed a* }, ?
"An?!
k about
1
7
though now I know t has bio- .
thi?
'1 .rranh would
a small amount and that the
mor.? well ?pent either way,
whether it turned out he was a!! right
or ?
""*". t at would have happened If It ha I
turne.;
"Well, there ? . been a Job
for I- rjeeted I'r. Carman.
"N.. hiwirre." She Sa*.?.
"Y* il ?." sa.d 'dit
t armar., loot .' ' at him. "I would
hm\e r'ar'id divotoM proc .
agair.ist you, HO .;.a"er w
and I h?-a: '
Ing but what was good."
? a diary of what
you heard?"
"No, ? never kept any diary, I ran
assure you of '
"Were y?, g over the
graph the t,.g'i,i '
i .,*
?8 M8r It I
head?eh<?, ar?d I wat all t;*?-?l i
had a rr.o?t fatiguing day shopping in
the f'y"
"Tell BS, f '.? , |
hove told the :?'???'''? | ? ? ' th?
let you tapeur before * ?
Mr?. ' ?irr,?-, m ?I ',<? would have
told then, Jaat what el
No'tor. ?'. '.'.'? iMtsest, "That Ha? the.
\
!
true storv," she said; "and I could t
diff?rant one."
"Do \ou think you have been treat
fa;i : .
"No. 1 do not. Mhink I have b?
'framed up.' The district Attorr
tted me fairly, and Bui
has been ?eat unjuet to me in ev<
\?n?. Mr. Smith has very poor i
vlsers. The newspapers have hi
unjust. The grand jury i
infair. The rrc-s has been
sponsihle for my indictment. It 1
?
"Do yen ??ht the result of yc
trial." asked the Tribune reporter.
? Not if I get B square deal. Not
thry treat me straight."
"Do you think you will be 'framed t
then *"'
"I do not fear that trial in the lei
if they give me a square dial if til
don't 'frame me up.' "
"Do you think you will be 'fram
up'?"
"As long as these detectives are co
netted with the cnse 'here is certatr
a chance that they will 'frame me up,
Ti'lla Inquest Story?
When questioned concerning the 1
eidente of the night of the mure]
Mrs. Carman related the same sto
the told on the stund at the Coronel
inquc '
"Have you a theory as to who coi
miffed this crime?"
"No, I have not. Why should I ha
any ?"
"After the trial do you expect
come back to Presport to live?'
"I certainly do expect to come bac
There is no reason why 1 should no
and I expect to be very happy, too."
Mrs. Carman, ?vhen questioned abo
her coming motor trip, said:
"We will go to Atlantic City ai
? iphia in an automobile. We mi
po to the Delaware Water (?ap. but
nan* you to promise riot to bother n
again "
".v'hen will you go?"
"We will go just as aoon as we cf
get a maid to leave in charge? My si
1er, Mrs. Powell, has to go to bus
ness each day and my mother has hea
trouble. 1 will do the household woi
row. If we can get a maid we rnf
start Sunday or Monday."
As the newspaper men were leavir
Mrs. Carman said to them:
"It is time no??- that you newspap?
men take your attention away from ir
and devote it to finding the real mu
derer. There i.-i plenty of work f<
you men to do "
There were reports to-day th?
Celia Coleman had still further "ampl
tied" her ptory and this time said thi
one of Mrs. Carman's hands wi
doubled up under her shawl as thoug
she was holding something that nigl
when she passed through the kitchei
according to the maid, right after th
sound of the shot, and that Cilia ha
said further she believed this som<
thing ?v,is a pistol.
Th:?. afternoon Phinoas Seamat
county detective, and a Burns detectiv
drove up to the Carman house an
took Celia's clothes away with them.
WANT U. S. TO TAKI
COLORADO MINES
Senator Martine and "Mother'
Jones Advocate Step at
Wehster Hall Meeting.
United States Senator Jamos E, Mar
tine and "Mother" Jon? were tl
i i.il speakers at a meeting in weh
?ter Hall la^t night, a? ??. hi '??? abo i
six hundred costless men and a scor
oi women demanded ?hat ?',? govern
ment take over the coal mine* in Cole
rado. The women came in son .
handy, for at the end of an impus
. :),(cch "Mother" Jones ?
men to dig down in their pockets, "t.
the W0B94 n to do ' '
Martine declared that hi
had been advocating governmei ' i
ership for forty yeai . He ???-.
although h" wai a Democrat, he wouli
? -.'low that fact to stand in th?
way of supporting a government bill
no matt I ? oduced it.
"Moth?r" Jon? wai go>n;
back to Colorado next week, and sh?
' the authorities there to put hei
: I, I 'tin r sneakers ?'. el t Jol i
i mini
workers, who a ?erted that if the minei
were not taken over by peaceful meam
ihey would be taken over by a n
? oi Hugh Frayne, organizer of th?
I of 1 aboi
I Loudon ?? ere th" i
or?. Mos? of fhe speakers den. .
Her.
\ - to have pre
sid? 1 at the me. . of hir
mother prevemed him from being
teech he had prepare.
I by Benjam h, th?
chairman.
PHONE FOILS SNAKE BITE
Medical Aid Summoned D'y
Wire for Boy Victim.
Quick use of a telephone and ar
au'omohile ambulance paved ?tie ?if?
of Lawrence I'.ertial, .?(venteen year.
old, ?if ."'1 Popular ?t., Yonkers, when
and p" oned b) ? copper hea-l
? , a? the bs ?? of the P
Alpine, yesterday, Companions
his right l?-ir ?well gave him liquoi
h? Aral antidote, then telephoned
aero-:? the river t.. Yon ken aivl sum?
moned ?' ' J iSenh'l Ho?pital amb'i
lance. When they reached Ludlow
dock Dr. O'Donnell was waiting for
them and he quickly cauterized the
wound. B? lition is critical
Henry Palmer, while mowing gras.?
In Cornwall y? terday, discovered a
four ? ? , roiled up and
s at him. He k
CANDIDATES TO TOE MARK
Schieffielin'sCommittceAdopts
Fundamental Principles.
The temporary committee, of which
William Jay Schieffelln is chairman,
whi'-h ha?? ? nation
? ?., ? ng
to the eoi ? ? .
-I I of
tal j eh musl be
n it will support.
te rule for
late fur par?
? 'o the
f civil service reform, and
the ?hort ballot.
The committee, which will be en
i to 100, will confer with
leaders to secure th?
II pul in tl.p
its wh? re m. uni ?
Motorcyclist Killed in Race.
. ?*- ' " '"'v 17. Thonaa B.
of Birmingham, Ala, wai
fatally injured to -lay in ?he rae?
the lederation of American Motor
convention here Duf
!n? ' Of the .lay he crashed
fell - ?er a twenty fool
? ? '?' and ,1 ,d a few hours
Joins Mother in Death.
Pel : . Komano
of Littll I
i body of I. ii ? i fe. v. ?
i
11
? ? ured, ?i;?-d this
Ho pits!
hit th? mother shs went im?
bu? tl,e child Wll
I (ett into u cauul. i
1 DEAD, 21 MORE
ILL WITH TYPHOID
Total of 68 Cases Now Re?
ported in Outbreak at
Orphan Asylum.
NEWARK HEALTH
OFFICIALS AROUSED
Handling of Milk Blamed for the
Disease?Herd of 22 Cows
Found Healthy.
The fir-st death resulting from typhoid
outbreak in St. Mary's Orphan Asy?
lum, in N'ewark, happened yesterday
when Miss Anna Wallace, of 7H?' Jeffer
son St., Brooklyn, died in St. Mary's
?I ispital, Orange, where a number of
the stricken were taken. Twen'y-otie
note cases were reported ysterday.
which makes a total of sixty-eight
The N'ewark health authorities sus?
pect that the outbreak was due to the
methods of handling the milk supply.
Miss Wallace was a cousin of the
Rev. C. Coyne, rector of the Sacred
Heart Church, which is opposite the
asylum. She was visiting at the rec
fory when s'ricken three weeks ago.
As the rectory is ?supplied with milk
from the asylum dairy, and as the
physicians have decided that the epi
?letnic in the institution is due to the
milk, it is believed by the physician?
Mrs Wallace contracted disease from
the same source
The Rev. George Ruttner and two
other priests, with two pisters of the
asylum, are in the advanced stages of
the disease, it is said. Father ?lohertv,
chaplain of the asylum, is also ill, as
is the housekeeper of the rectory. The
doctors assert that the contagion has
been checked, but a rigid quarantine is
kept on the asylum and ground-.
AM the cows in the asylum herd have
be? n examined and found healthy. This
adds to the problem of the physicians,
who an? attempting to discover the
reuse of the outbreak. The health au?
thorities pow plan an Investigation of
the methods of handling the milk.
Dr, Richard N. Connolly, city hac
teriologisl of Newark, it is ?nid, has
traced the germ of typhoid to the cows
of the institution f.r the handling of
their milk. There are twenty-two cow.?
in the herd.
St. Michael's Hospital has twenty-?ix
of the patienta and flea are at St.
Elizabeth's Hospital, Elizabeth.
The city health officials have taken
charge of the asylum.
BUFFALO INVADED
BY ARMY WORM
Pests in Myriads Devastate Up?
state Cities. Ruining Lawns
and Gardens.
Buffalo, July 17, Unless immediate
action ?s taken the plague of aim..'
worms, which hs weep Buf?
falo, pi es to b 'ne the mo-! de
? \, In the hiator) of the citir.
I ?. Forester Fil.teived hundreds
from all parts of the
city to-day, and an investigation
showed the worm in amazing nun I
Many lawns in the fashionable Dels
wan av. district have been devastated
and lo?,k as if a fores! Are had swept
them. The worms have found their
Into many homes and gardens.
Forester Filer has advised that.
all gardens and lawns be r.prayed with
of lead.
Albany, July 1". Cpon learning to?
da) thai army worms had appeared in
and El mira, ? ommissioner
' n J. Huson, of the Departmi
. communicated with local
irities in both cities requesting
full information regarding the inva
?
few of them wcently were re?
ported to be In the vicinity of Brook?
lyn, but thev are believed to have
killed off.
LIGHTNING KILLS ONE
Hits Railroad Waiting Station
?Two Am Injured.
Trenton, V J., July 17. One man
was killed and two others were severe
|y shocked when a waiting station
l der? Divi ?on of the
P< ' ?a Railroad was struck by
? ng th.* afternoon. Jacob Reitz
inger was kille?!
His brother I,out? and Ric'iard Ford
w? i' in jured.
The three men hid been walking
together in the park when the
came up. Thev sought shelter in the
station and th.' huililiri? wa? ?truck.
All were thrown to the floor I ?
and Ford were able to rise, but Jacob,
while perfectly i
to m"*.' II- w-t carried to the road
and take.-, t.. Mercer Hospital in a
? g automobile. 1* la thought that
he died while en route. A pulmotor
whs used without success in an effort
t.. revive him. He was engaged to
marry .Miss Edna i'.oston, of Trenton.
BROKEN GLASS CUTS ARM
Schenckman's Injuries Caused
by Shattering of Pane.
Amputation may save the life of
'
I'la'-e, whose righ' arm v ,. laCI
bj n ? a ?ndow w h.ch he w ,.
"Hi to re
1 he glai ?
broke when Schenckman and other em?
ployes of the glasa company wer?'
.aiiving it across the sidewalk from
the wagon. Th glass severed arteries
and veins and cut the hone. Pr. F.
Montgomery Smith,at Flower Hospital.
?aid that blood poisoning would prob?
ably cat:--e the man' death unie
arm were amputa*, i
HOLD WIDOW ON
COCAINE CHARGE
Wife of Alderman Arrested Af?
ter Raid on East Side
Flathouse.
Mi Mary w- ling, widow of Ald?*r
? Willing, win arrei ted as a
di ig lle? al i ei apartment at 202
I ? ' B7tll : t , las! night. Shi ara
. un ?i the Ka-* llsi et station
Mi ion, Graham, Byron
and Schaudel, of the cocaine
d the flat a the result of infoi
motion obtained in arr?'M.? of drug
usera during the week. They say that
Mrs. Willing tried to throw out of a
w ndow a box containing more than
lt"*4*?0 v.orth of cocaine und heroin.
According to the police, they have
evidence that Mr.-. Willing ha-? been
selling habit forming drugs for ten
and that h< i homo has been the
* uf many young men mid girl
? place wa? fitted up for nee a? a
., in? den, 11 ? .-. ,.
Mrs. Wiihng was arrested
Frederick Furselland, eighteen, of 116
?he was charged with h?*.
Ing a nareotie in his possession. When
m broke In, Furselland threw
down a Si-cent packet of what j?i be-,
. tu be toianie.
HOWELL LOSES BIG SUIT
U. S. Court Reverses Finding
Which Relieves Liability.
The United States Circuit Court of
Appeals, in an opinion fled yesterday,
ri ?cried the finding of the federa!
court of Connecticut which held that
?.forge D Howell, of the defunct t.rm
of McCrum-Howell, of this city, was
not a bankrupt, antl, therefore, not li?
able for *'?:22f>A?.? of promissory notes
he indor?ed for the concern.
The plaintiffs in th? suit were the
Mechanics and Metals Bank of New
York and the Corn Exchange snd
Franklin National banks of Philadel?
phia, each holder of -'? B? te foi
i indorsed bv Howell. The lower
court held that Howell was released
from liability as indorser of the notes
through the action of the creditor! i
the McCrum-Howell Company under a
reorganization agreement and sale of
the property approved by the Federal
District Court of Penneylvania, in
March, 1012. Howell's contention wa?
based on the decision of the Supreme
Court in the case of the Kotrth?
tifie Railroad Company against Boyd.
This held that creditors in a
holders' reorganization were full
by sale of the road.
The Circuit Court of Appeals opin?
ion, written by Judge Rogers, held
that the facts in the Howell eaee
dissimilar in C at the ?ale of the Mc?
Crum-Howell property ?vas effect
means of a creditors' reorgan -
and not by the stockholders them?
?elver.
GOVERNMENT TO
FILE N. H. SUITS
Continued from l>a?e 1
ship properties by the New Haven
amounted to $inj,n00.nil0. and that un?
der the federal snti-trust act the New
Haven company is entitled to recover
from the defendants three times that
sum. or ISM.OOO.OOO.
NEW HAVEN WAITS
WASHINGTON MOVE
Contest with Federal Offi?
cial Considered Draw
In Financial Circles.
After ?heir action of Thursday in
deciding to stand on their position
in regard to disposing of the Boston
& Maine, official.1? of the New Haven
yesterday were waiting for some move
from \Va = hington. Officially nothing
was forthcoming. l'nofficially it be?
came known that the views of the
membere of the board as expressed
at the meeting had been Iran mitted
e Prei ?dent ami to Mr. McRey
nolds.
In financial circles the opinion pre?
vailed that the contest between the
nment and the directo
. much of a draw, with the
tion favoring the * < : H,.in, if
either fide. There ?va? no dispo i
tion to eritieise the | it for
the position i? had taken to conserve
the interests of the Itockhnld? I
the Ne.? Haven nnd Boston A Maine
companies.
Th?- proposition that the A"
present
nade to the New Haven is un?
toed to involve the acceptance by
the mad of the bisher Pilis bill,
pa . | m the closing hour, of the
I . . lature, which
ti? i I Mas IS ?'? Op
the Bosl ' " the ad
tration on i'.; par* promising to
good ofltc? ' '
.- on of the Gen? ral <
to amfid the law
make it mote at I ictory to the New
Haven.
Tin i would leave the actual situa
o far .-i i.rol of the !'
?*.- Ma
it is until the Legislature meel
January. Ihn- directora of the road
express inability to see where any?
thing is to be gained by agreeing to
the President's wl ih, ?? ipecis
there is no very cood reason for
thinking that the President can carrj
?? of the programme.
New Haven foci
?
th^t there ws i a large ?horl inti ? I
out -tan.ling, that foi thi pr< ent at
had become locki d in
continued to loan at a premium.
Boston ?peculators ??ho ??e-e ?-in
posed to have had advance informa?
tion of the Mini) of a suit in that
i it ? Wei S borro?'. 11 ?
the dispatch from Ro toi tl I '
granddaughter of /?le Rail, tee famous
violinist, wa- ?he nominal plaintiff In
h suit to place Ih? Sew Haven in the
of ? receiver, and to
from the direeton vasl sum? which, It
? i alleged, their earelessneaa or
neglect vas responsible for the lo i of
by t he companj. not s ripple
in the situation. This is the luit
which Sherman L. Whipple ha
threatening to bring '<>?.'
Tlv ,, ?il plaintiff i? believed to he I
Bo ton banking hou^e that las had
??rable to do with New Haven af?
fairs.
In thi* city Alvin C. Case, a lawyer,
ef Hfl William it . arranged lo meet
lo-eph \V. Kolk, solicitor of the i
late Commerc? Com? i Mon ?
day in Washington and pre ei ? to him
? 'I n af
fair". He'.ond saying that he rep re
? ? ?? d tome stockhold? : . with s
grievance, Mr. Cas? refused t.. d
the matter or say who he represented. ;
Wall Street had the imprei ion thai
they wire m tome way a ociated with
the Charles W. Morse interi (
Morse, ??ho blames everybody a?
ited with the old managemei ? of
the New JI a -. en for I ? nt to
prison at Atlanta, has be? n bi
'much litigation aimed at Ne??- Haven
?hip interests.
Jame H. Huatia, acting chairman
el 'he \(u- Ihr. etl, V. .1
tices during th" day. He ? not gel
i to appointing the eommil
reply to the Int?ntate Commerce
Commiasion, but will probably an?
nounce its make-up early in the Week
when he returns from New Haven.
? ? -?
TO SWIM IN SHACKLES
Elionsky Plans Freak Plunge
in Bay for 33 Miles.
"? ' ' '???? '? '??. or Ne?? ?London, ??? III
I ? a 33-mile freak .??? im in the ?
?"">? Elionsky, ??h>?
weighs 250 pound?, plant to eover the
tance in three tides, with .hackles
around his ankles and Wrists, He ex
to complete the feat ?? \~ hours
Elionsky will start from the Mattery at
l:4f> a. m. Hy the time the first tide
is ready to turn Elionsky hop, ; to have
reached Coney Island, when he will
come back with the incoming tide.
When abreael of Governor'? !
kv ??ill tutn again, comp
In ? ta?k on 'he second outg
ft Huntei Poinl
l in- New England iwimmei ha been
practising d.cl. in the II,am. River''
for the la?t three weeks.
! . ? rammer Elion k; t em IB mil* ?
??Hh hie hand.? ami t,?et shackled, and
later pulled a rowhoat containing seven
i" n - iiiilea.
SULZER IN RACE
TO STAY, HE SA1
No Opposition Can Ke
Him Out of Progressiv
Primaries.
HE CENSURES T. R.
AS ALLY OF MURPt
Asserts Effort to Sidetrack H
in Gubernatorial Contest
Will Fail.
Ex-Governor William Sulzer. **
less than a week ago asserted he wo
not run in the Progressive primar
if "his friend," <V.on?-I Roosevi
ran, announced yesterday that
would run for Governor in the P
re primaries again*1' any can
date.
K\-'iovernor Sulzer'" change
!.-..it is due t.. hia belief thai Coloi
? .?it''? attitude in the Inst f
days in the Whitman c
shown the Bull Moo te chief ?
of Charlea Y Murphy and Tamma
Hall
"Colonel Roosevelt's attitude," s;
Mr. Sulzer, "shows him to he playi
into the hand^ of ?'hurle? F. Murph;
The deposed Governor's determtr
tion to run in the Progre live p
?Ta? expressed in the nmst e
phatic language.
**l shall he a candidate in the Pi
gressive primaries." lie said, "and al
?un? i I a square deal."
Incidentally Mr. Sulzer believe?
can beat any candidate of any par
,1!, provided lie gets the Pr
,. nominal ? ' he h r?
indorsed by the Progre lives, he sb*
? Governor will be a Uepub
can. i
In par?, Mi. Sulzer'a ?tateme
re '-i i
"I am t"<t g.iihik' Sack to Congress.
am goi ng to b? " i nexl I ?overnor
New Voi rhe boss?
sending me back t., i 'oi .
a : h father to the thought. The? kne
I could go back to ? oi gross if I wan
ed t? without the aid or consent i
any boss. So much for that.
*i have been ? for Go
er-,"i by the 'William Sulzer Nom
? i of indep? nd? i
! i and by the Am? rie
which is composed of indi
penden! and Justice loving citizens,
haw accepted these nominatioi ai
I am in ?he race to stay. No power 0
ear'h can get me to withdraw. I.i
thai be - i by all. The votei
-.,-. , it, if the pol
. nol
"Thev say I know something aboi
For the information a ' *'-"
who like to bet 1 make this predi?
it if I am not the next <'o.
?he Rep?blica
party will I
i hen Mi. Sulzer Uros a little h<
?hot al Mr. Barnes and Mr. Murph;
that he he' ?
eondidata will 1
an ai ' man.
"No one challenge? my right t
make ?n off nit t'. ?erve out m) ten
?. Governoi tinua the work
began for refori " . ne? Mr. Sul
md 1 am appealing t
. - ? ? ?
tice and believes ?n a QjUare deal. I
they will support nie I can win. I
ipport me I ?hall ha?
? s consolation, a' least, of doing m
? for the taxpayers and not beim
the last in the race when the votes ar
counted."
TONG WOE AT C01.UMB!/
Girls Have No Plar*c to Hca
Onrling Irons.
Pi ofei.-. r Jan l I ? Egbei
confronted with ' I prob
U m of h ii ca? ' ' r in the Co
imbia 1 ? ' summer school
f?race Jlul.i.ard, profesaoi o
? h m Barnard College, has beet
ult with him.
This is the troublesome question
Where are the girls who are oecupyinf
for the summer the Furnal?) Hall dor
. built to house men student:
i curling ii
rhe building is equipped throughout
with electricity ??? It an no ga
?i which the curling irons can hi
h< it? -i
Miss llub'nard said last night thai
the gii!. probahlj would I"- forced t<
go back i" .niling ps:
HOPELESS LOVE
LEADS TO COURT
Youth Who Followed Girl Hay
by Day Told He Must End
Annoying Quest.
? upid wa - pu' under -r. '? ? ? boi
? '-'? i. ??>! -! bare ?
line for violation of the Sullivai
when he wa? arraigned in the Tombs
court yesterday. Magisti iti |!
reles ted the prisoner when 1 .
of New* Rochelle, put up the
rs teed I ? love god's
I.! h h ?vior.
? o ingster is -ill right, accord*
g to Haggerty, uni II izel Hoail
I? v, a Brool p , up,
Th"ti. strive a. Haggert) i
??. look rid
by : aid Cupid at Miss Hoadlej '
heels.
She ?a-i ?hp eomplainanl
against the New Ro, helle youth. She
? ? had constitnt? d him-eif her
guardian, following her to and from
work; dict.-ted the terms on which
young men should enjoy her
company and otherwise made hit
?m ?nnoj snee,
II gg? waited for her at Brook?
lyn Bridge . -, ery mor .? Hoad
hei to hei
U night hi met her
bridg \
? ipped a young
ho had accompanied l-.ei
the ot*fi,-,', sha sau!, nnl told him to
himself scares if he did nol
want to ??" I shot, The young man fled,
Hocdley said.
- "rnful testimony, the
lovelorn Haggerty paid the fair com*
; ' I r? pacts the moment he
* . rj
'I love you, Hazel, I lova you; and
though you spurn me. I will nol
you up, he burst
n S| its told Haggerty he
considered him a pretty decent ;<ort of
fellow, bul that he must not annoy
Miss Hoadl? ?? any longer.
Haggert*/ then promised to return to?
day with the bond.
Foreclose Late Jurist's Home.
A cult to foreclose a mortgage on
the h"ine of the bate Judge Thomas *
O'Sullivan of General Sessions, at
W ? ' 76th .*t., wa brought m th?
prema ? ourt resterday by Hem . r.
Platt Bgainal Mrs. Mum." K. O'Sullivan
and Ds - ? toi of the
sstal - i the |ui ii i Jud| a O'Sullivan
ted s in"i tg ige foi ? '''.o.i.i m
1912. Me d'.-d Jul\ 29, 1913, le.,. Ing hi?
? to Ins wife, nml .?JI.ihki due on
the mortgage. An exten ion was ?>l>
tained when the mortgage became i i
able October SI la I until April 1, bul
n remained unpaid. |
SENDS GLYIMN HIS ANSWER
District Attorney Smith De?
nies Neglect of Duty.
District Attorney Matthew J. Smith
? i' Queers County yesterday tiled an
answer with Governor (rlynn to the
' ? gleet of duty brought
* him in a case of alleged assault
preferred by a seventeen-year-old wifs
Bgainat two politicians of Pong Island
' '
Mr. Smith refuses to make his an
s?ver oublie, but it is said that it fol?
io??? the lines of a previous statement
by him, in which he claimed that
i not proeeeute the charge be?
cause he could secure no corroborative
testimony.
The charges before the Governor
were brought bv P. Nelson Ray nor, of
Richmond Hill, and were prepared by
ity Attorney ?..eiu-ral Willii
McQuaid, who was designated to pros?
ecute the cases against the two defen?
and who secured on? conviction.
Mr. Smith has engage?! .lames W. Os
borne to represent him.
The alleged asault was made upon
Mrs. Clara Filer? by James HefTernan
and Harry Scanlon in the Dem?
,? in Long Island City last
December. HefTernan was convicted.
The jury disagreed in the case of Sc in?
'on._
DUELL, JR.. JOINS
OWN GOAT CLUB
Ointltmeil from pn?e 1
Syracuee meeting was to be held In
tiro sessions, afternoon and morning.
?t. <vsi to be nominated at the after?
noon session and appear the next
morning and make his spec.h. In that
way, he said, he rould put Rarne? out
of business at Saratoga or else force
mm the nom!
hand ? down.
Bays Whitman hue?.
?With tfr Whitman's k/iowledge !
met Mr. Roosevelt el Quarantine on
.. tu, n from Europe and accom
d him to 0) it? f Bay, explaining
that despite his delay in denn.
? h b tterlj ?>; posed io
i ? and ?\ould now denounce hin.
'I he nexl day, June 25, I spent about
three hours with Mr. Whitman at
eon at the i'afe ?Lafayette, urg
In?? him to declare at once ?gainst
Barnei or it might be too late.
"Mr, Roo ? ?-It thai evening Issued
? ut in which lie assailed Mr.
V.'l iman's dilatory tactici In not a*
tacking Mr. 1 -l Mr. Murphy.' h
Concerning the 'letter of doubt,
which many, from Colonel Roose
statement attacking Mr. Whitman, in?
ferred had been written or drafted by
the District Attorney, Mr. Duell admits
lie himself prepared and drafted it.
He pl.-a.l . however, he did it at Mr.
? : eque I Mr. Muell also ad?
mitted thai it was he who put the inj?
?( . s W." Mr. Whitman1! ini?
tial! on ?he draft, which wai given
out by Colonel Roosevelt without any
ination ns to how the initials
to h? on it.
Mi Duell iayi h? put ?he initial* on
merely to identify the letter, an i
he then gave it to Colonel Roosevelt.
So the leeret is out as to how the
gol the draft.
And to what do you suppose young
Mr. Duell BSCribei hil failure to ob?
tain the i !( lonel'i indorsement ? To any
?' tact, m diplomacy, on
No. He modestly says, and It is the
?,.?.? md of h i statement, that if
Mr. Whitmai '- fault. And ree 1 ho.?
modestly he put it:
?| 'ailed only beeauee Mr. Whitman
_
HENNESSY PARRIES
AS COLONEL'S GUEST
Suiter Prnbor Fails to Get
Mnnsc Indorsenicnt for
Governor.
\ ver) prett) story of whal hnp
ii ifterm **amore
Hill, when .loim A. Hennesey wai
I test, went the
?.. tei la) A< the op? ing of
the talk, Colonel Roosevelt, opined, it
il san!, that a man of John A. Ilen
'i calibre would make a goo I
candidate for Governor.
Mr. Hei nei y thanked him, and
omething about ,i Hull
? t, but ; one
forthcoming. Then there was more
out pi ' in? ' on, wil
bnit thai H< - ? y n icht be sccept
able to thr Progre live . poeeibly n>r
? 'ice of Stati ' n.lier,
remarked tha? he
wo ild not be the candidate of any man
or of i ? which attacked Presi?
d? ? ? Wilson.
Mr. Roosevelt la'ighed and said
?omething about President v.
havin-r .-ranch frit id . il all -.??? ?
Mi. Henne sy. The till? then drifted
to the weather in South American
jungles'.
REPUBLICAN INDORSEST.R.
Cocks.Former Representative,
Asks for Nomination.
When former Representative Will?
iam W. Ci ? Old Westbury, made
i n appeal to the otei of thi 1st Dis
?'? i the Republicen
nomination f^r Congresi he gave the
on of Colonel Roo ? volt hi? un
qu ilit'u d ndoi >< menl
Following the linei of Colonel Ro
ecent sddresi in Pittsburgl
? - and bossism,
singling out Hani,-.? and Murph) i
of I i attack. II ?
also ex] ? disapproval of the
fr< ei ? ? ?.. ;;1. .? ,? ition because of tjie
Mexican policy, the Coloml
and the bad condition of bui
ZAPATA THE PUZZLE NOW
Question as to Whether His
24.000 Men Will Disarm.
W i hington, .Inly 17. Zapata. .,
cording to reliable report.? to the .
Peparfment, has 24,000 men, and
though most of thetn aie poor!)
i'1'uipped they would constitute a seri?
ous menace to a new government at
Mexico City if they remained in revo?
lution.
Zapata, ??ho demands agransn re?
forms immediately, made common
cauee with the Conatitutionalists and
obtained supplies from them with
"*hich to the Huerta government.
11 ii no* kn.i yet, however, whether
lie will lay down his arms in fa?or of ?
. .i
i'iie I nited States ii using its in
Ii oi Zapata, to
him into haimonv with the
peace programme, and an emissary
from Gen. < arrania ii now on hie era)
to confer with /apata. Washington of
Retail are keenly interested in the !
?UCeeee of this conference.
Tries to Steal Murillos.
Mexico City, .Inly 17. A hold Si
t< 'in?? ?m made la t night by Ignacio
Mutine/, a young Mexican painter
who recently returned fron Europe I i
-'??'l from tha Ban ? arloi Pine Art
School several of its ,??,( ?aliiuhle
paintinga, among them four Murilloi
worth about tfiOOfiti? :
Martine wai captured. He ?aid
he intended to ink.? the picture, to
New York or Kuropc and acli thctn.
VOORHIS DEPUTIES
IN BALLOT TANGLE
Evidence Brought Out at
Hearing Said To Be
Damaging to Defence.
WATCHERS TELL OF
ACTION AT POLLS
Inquiry Into Charges Against
State Superintendent Ad?
journed Until July 29.
Evidence which the prosecution con
sidera damaging * rice of State
Superintendent of Elections Voorhis.
who ia taciriji charr.es of neglect of
duty an?! gross incompetence before
a special commissioner, was obtained
yesterday at the heating at the Bar
I - ition .h W e ?? i i*.h it.
In ?wo instan? I it ? it. d that
deputy i-tate superintendents who
served in the la.-i election were elec?
tion district captain.?. Edward H. Sut
litT, of .'Ml 1st It . Brooklyn, a watcher
at the polls for the Honest Ball" \
socistion, the organization bntiguijr.
the charges against Voorhis, said that
Deputy Superintendent -lohn T. Mullen,
o'' Brooklyn, ?as arrested at election
time.
On Election Day, SutlifT said, Mullen
interfered with him whenever he at
fempt.^d to challenge a voter, declaring
that he knew the men to be all right
and that if they were challenged it
would hul.I up a long line of voters)
outside. "He did not oTcr objections
on legal ground? " the witness asserted
"Mullen." he added, "at various tunes
during the ?lay would look at the reg
i tration books and the names of
those who had voted, then he would
tend some one out with the name?, and
in a little while more mon would ar?
rive to vote."
"I aaked him if he were an election
district cap!
"'None of your business,' was the
reply." The witn til ed he later
learned that he was for the Demo?
cratic party. That SutlifT challenged
Mullen for falae registration and
caused his arrest was a!.-.., brought out
ter day.
Upon registering Mullen gave his ad
it 180 Sands st., Brooklyn. Su?
!i*T vent to that address and wa? told
by the woman who kept a lodging
house o.-er a saloon that there was
no Mullen living there. Before leav?
ing Sutliff said he Inquired of the
bartender if Mullen lived there
According to SutlifT, the bartender
drew forth a ?heel of paper on which
?rere written several nam? i, ?canned it '
and answered: "Sure, he lives here."
Sutii'.T, however, said he learned that
ident Mullen lived at
?jot Bridge st. He ehallengedMullen on
? ? d thr. ?tened to
h tu I' cm he learned that the
deputy state superintendent was al
under arrest on the ?ame charge.
When the ballots were counted at the
?f the poll-, SutlifT 'urth. | I
Mullen went behind 'he rail
and eounted ?he straight Democratic
?
The other deputy superinf enrletit,
? "ii diatrict cap?
tai n. ., ?
? other Hone I B I \ : ition
-.- Hurra) Dr Fras?
e?la " the l ' Election
| trlct of the 13th Assembly Di
Nathaniel W. Grupper, another
,, who testified a( a previous
? rday for
1 that
gaged m his duty in
the 20th Election District of the lJth
rhich Charlea
P, Murphy is Democratic lead."-, he
csured ? ' of a man for iile?.a:
registration.
When the case was called in court,
he said, tue man arrested was def
|,y H ; ?Gru? per i after
.. ,,d i ? in the office of the
Superintendent of Elections, v.here he
? mployed .->; a deputy. The
"deputy," it was learned, wa? Joaeph
I> Kelly, a D< puty Attorney General
assigned to Superintendent Voohis's
(It-upper is an employe in the
oner of Accounts.
The i ess of the da*
Meyer Goldblum, of 175 East 107th st.,
? 130th st last
ii. .., ; th ? Fl ink Schaffet-,
a depu ' ""'?' -?
form of '-''v
lenge on registration d * ihould
it election time, and
"i other'way? used his own methods
in preference to those prescribed by '
law.
Th?* hearing "is adjourned until
July 29 at ?o o'clock.
ICE WAGON *KILl.S BABY
Driver Attacked bv Crowd
Rescued by Chauffeur.
Bei sir in Lei owezs, eighteen n
rid, wa? killed la-' night by an ice
wagon in Berry ?t., Willian
m..'her -!,",' the accident and, scream?
ing, thre? hers? II on I le b
1 iwd threatened Stephen Nalkoski,
driver of the ice wagon, lit* was in
trouble when Rieland Lamport,
.ffeur. came to his rescue. He
the mother to put the body in
hi> automobile and get in herself. The '
moment she was in the car Lamport
motioned to N'alkoaki.
.hiv? ' lumped ;n'o the machine
: i ; ed ''? a) to I he William
al.
POWER COMPANY SUED i
Stockholders Ask Receiver for
the International.
Trenton. \. .1.. duly IT. Chancellor
Walker, in the Court of Chancery, to?
day ii.\ed Julj 28 for the Internatiom !
Power Companj to anawer charges of
mismanagement and to defend a rule
to show cauae \'.hy a receiver should
not be
Henry W. Bull, of New York, and
..ti ' r stockholders brought the ??uit, al?
leging that no dividend has been paid
since 1006, that the petitioners are un
able to sscei ? ? sneial status of
the eompan* mpany baa
ignored an order of the state Suprema
Court to briri'- it a hooks into the .-.'..r -
for inspection.
J. II. Hoadley, pre ident ?>f the In?
ternational Power Company said yes?
terday that the company's financial po?
sition was sound and there was no rea?
son for a rece i vi -ship. He added that
;. t was bi ougl ? beeause ,.,.i. ?
?mall stockholders wanted to have
ce ? t,, certain .>f the company's
Mr. Hoadlej believed that Information
?ught Indirect!) for the Consoli?
dated i.as Company, to b.? need to th*
detriment of the International PowerI
Company.
Leaps to Denth in Subway.
Alexander HeGIIligan, ? Tuxedo
blacksmith who came here seme months
age t.. he treated for paralysis, threw
himself tn fronl of a subwaj express
in the 72d ? ? n on yesterda* He
feared that, In addition t? his illness
from pai ilj I -, he was losing In* sight,
i he m ?i car p.. ted ever him, and
hi* i">,i' then became wedged under)
the platform of the ?ec.uid ,-.u 1'
took half mi hour to remove it and get ,
trahie on the northbound track moving |
UKiiin. j
Yellowstone Park
Pacific Coast
Canadian Rockies
T\ ?J-day peronnall? -rnnduct^il i?.lr
?hrnuKh Amerlr?'.. wondenanrt s|t
in.I une-htlf ilay? In ^ ello?? ateas
I'lik; Ihrer SHUTS ??? ?he I'i, IH.
I'aStaSj ?It? light rule through the
?anadian i;.....i.? ??.ith ?ole trip? t?
tl(e I.real (,lacier at ?he ?elMrk?
Ii,- l.iiiiUe. and dri?e through ihr
< i ? ri' in Natloinl l'arli at HanfT.
T?rate -.,? m.I., ? . .\uguat S.
?TKound-trli? rate from \e?r ?^rl?.
i uterlng neceaasry e\pen?e?, tl".:..
CUk Tl-kel \gent? t r hooklet. n,
sddreM U. i moj?, Mvtalea ? -, ?.,,
ser \u.-nt, .'(i.I llfili AvesMse, Ne?
\iirk.
OU \l l.\M ? TO?, i; ?.KIT! MRI R l
Pennsylvania R. R.
KAMAL NO SPHINX
IN ASKING FOR JOB
From Burning Sands of Eg>pt
Comes Plea of Man for
Fire Job Here.
It is generally known that a camel
^ ' elfht days without a drink, but
it iMi't known that a Kunial (wa
this ?a tearfully wink, hut It 11 ,
night) hai nerve of brass. Moi
the particular Kama! who is respon?
sible for this story has a style ?
infect i"'.- R< ad it in the fol
letter to Fire < ommissioner Ada,
"D< at- Sir;
"I am beefl In Alexandria, 1 -?
and I am 22 years old. My Dai
Mahomet Kami!, und I \?i?h to ^ot
over to America as I do not |
Stop 111 Alexandria. I am in good
health. I ha? 1 been twelve
employed as Soldier Fireman I
Humer, an i I am ??illmg to do any of
this work and if I do not give let
tion you cart discharge me at once. If
you think I am suitable you <-an send
? cket for my paaaage and stop it
out of my wages. 1 can speak and
writ? English. If you think I ???
you I ??ill be very thankful to you
( ommissioner Adamson yesterday
sent his regrets, and information that
he would have to pa ? a Civil Service
examination to get a Fire Department
place.
CUPID DUE FOR BUSY DAY
Two Marriages Will Be
Double Family Affair.
I I * Orange, N'. J July IT When
Clarence M. Dally, Off 108 Nor'h Clin?
ton . I . faces the minister In a mar
liage service Tuesday his prospective
father-in-law will be nil beet man and
hi? mother will be matron of honor for
hi- bride
A few mi'iufes later, when Silai ? IT?
penter, a retired Chicago businesi man,
Srd tO I".' ??edded to Mr*.
Maud Dally, the bride's son will he the
h, il man and her new daughter ;n-law
will be hei bridesmaid. It will be a
? .if alternate pi i
attenii ?
Mr. Dally' bride-elect is Miss Ang-ie
. ter of Mi ? ?
Ballen) ? Bur
t. The Rev, Dr. (liarle; To??n
?.end. i ? he first Preeb? -
? ill perform the
ony, The eouplc; will go an
their ho.noons together.
Itally 1.. the ton of ? ?arii.ee Malven*
Pally, ?me of Thomas A. ?Edison's e\
pert . who died from cancer caused '?:?
X-i.-.y burn-.
STARTS OMELET IN 3D AV.
Butter and Eggs Scattered
When Auto Hits Wagon.
When a wagon of Pressner Brother?,
ion merchai Jai st, was
.?truck b) an automobile In Thii '
Ith ?t? la ? ?. 'ht 10 much bu?t*r
greased the asphalt that tra'' ?- m .
held up for more than twenty mi
Nu sooner was the butter sera;
the eggs began t., run
of them were broken. Tw
looked likely to become an omelet big
enough for an army.
The wagon wa? overt II I and '"
driver. Samuel Strun. was Aung ? ' '
of the ?horse i. Patrolm i
trun and pulled him
the ??a-,- before he ?? a. kicked
? of the ca? gv? *n*
glane?, a* the wr? I and sn??i
on. With him were a man snd i well
I woman. Th? number
'?"?! *?.' V.. which ' r*}
? i t., m irtin H. Jinishian,
Prospect av.. Mount Yernon.
HELD ON MURDER CHARGE
Six Months' Vigil by Detec?
tives Ends in Arrest.
Patrick J. MeGurdy, of -
iv., Brooklyn, waa a
? 1 indictment charging hlf"
with I ?f
: ind City, Dec?
MeGurdy, it . of the
ho -hot down (
landing in fron
Mamie Manee, whom he ' -
from a dance at Jackson Avenue
Short!) after the murder M
disappeared, and .lames Cai :?. ?
- placed on 1 il ike
girl could not identify him ei
tho men who had d
wai acquitted
Both men ??ere indicted ihort
tei the murder, and deti
the Hunter'? Point police it I n i'?v<
been ??.a'chiii?' McGurdy'i ?
. in the hop,? that he would re*
he appeared ? i
\? si met by Detect ivee Powei .
iii 1 and V'an w sinstein
It in .-aid that Clair hud ar.v.
? enmity becau-e he won Mamie
M .gee's fas or by an exhibition ol
? g, A< a reward -he alio?
? . . icort ' er home. There the) areie
approached b) two mi ? *i<>
,-h?-t Clair down and ran.
AUTOIST IS CHASED
BY BULL HE THREW
Car Hits Animal. Which Takes
30-Poot Drop and lives
to Offer Battle.
v.. I Oral go, N. J . July 17 *'hi I
1 of lightning .-truck here thi.< ??*
tei noon a herd of cattle, o?>--.< 1 if
James Heaton. stampeded in an. ,"'*r
A bull jumped a fence snd **9
? ? in front of au auti
driven b) Edwin Hastings, of Hane**eJ?
I he car hit the animal and Bung ';
over a cliff to the ground, thir'y vea*
below,
The automobile swerved, snd would
ha?e followed the bull but for s Xtrnt
which blocked the psth.
Helic?.ni? the animal dead, Hantinf*
ed to the toot of the cliff. A?
he ?sassed a clump of bushoe the N
rusned out at him To eeeape, ?*?'?
Hastings climbed to the ton Of in**
curb of an sbsndoned well. His ?hout*
Ing eaused hi? t??o children, ??ho ??'''
??ith him m the car. t.? summon s><
from the nearest farmhouse.
A man armed with a pitchfork "*?*
cued Hastinga,
The hull's ?.'de was badly cut. Th*
radiator of ilie automobile also ***
damaged.

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