OCR Interpretation


New-York tribune. [volume] (New York [N.Y.]) 1866-1924, September 20, 1914, Image 19

Image and text provided by Library of Congress, Washington, DC

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83030214/1914-09-20/ed-1/seq-19/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for 3

?OTES AND COMMENT FROM THE WORLD OF MUSIC
AMERICAN BASSO A
FRIEND OF PLANCON
tUntr W. Hughes.
Century's Acqui?
sition, Talks of
His E-arlier
Work.
'?sers sod bsrytones we have with I
is *** in?**"'"* ';un'bpr5- but '
? Htfcei
at least basses of the tradition
*u<
j and Pe Res ke. are of ;?
far more rare. In fact, the
? Vf WM ******- b,s,os 'ir,i"
"^ cf quality and range of yo.ee, ,
?aided style ef delivery, its all but
btlie-ed extinct. When poor Put
0 Gri>?-ol'l passed from the stage
,-tiprHU* America iosi a vtngcr lif- i
a^ ??deed to replace, and the Mct
-tliUn. weak enouch bef?te in the |
^ajits ef profundo, lest one of its few
?Sting prop- A' d 'hen just at
artest moment the hand of Otear
LWstein again ??.- seen, though ?
Lkf ??itse seen without the volition Of.
Tierely tried ownci. Henry Weldon ?
probably not have been heard !
a season 1P ?sew ^ ,r^ had n' noi
its engaged by Mr. llamn.erstein for,
m itillbcn opera venture in Lex
?ten a?., for the failure of tnis :
gave the Messrs. Ahorn the '
?ft el ? number of artists, all ca- :
?Ik of singtng ??pera in tne English !
egtsgf
glS SUCCESS IMMEDIATE.
Irfere Henr? Weldon had sung a,
ggt bsts of the mus'<- of Friar Lau
?ajtt last Momia? nigh? at the <'-n- '
4* Opera llou.-e New York realised
ntstls:'. <? ceat b.as- had cone toi
sfinres. a bass. too. ?vho ??as Ameri?
ta through anal through, thouph
jgffi in the French tradition. Mr.
Idaon'-" splendidly re-onant voice \ ; -
m which he used with ??race and '
an. and his healing and authority
?ndsiiTied him a- on? in the din et
acte-sien to the French basses that
wn fer so ong one of the chief,
?trie*, of the Metropolitan. To a T-ih
B?. reporter who called ?i him
ritk in his dressing room at the Con
Opera House Mr. Weldon. or.
??er, Mr. Hughes, Weldon beinfr; his
titaf? ?nd stage nane, -poke of he
?hgbt h? experienced in at last be-'
tag able to appe:?'' before an audience
fkisown co-.ii
*J'o you know. 1 was more nervous
: Monday night thai? I had been at
a* time previous i?i my career." ?-aid
h. Hughes "Strange to -a\. it was
?e frst time 1 ! ??d ever Ming in Eng
-0 in epers. and thit added to my
?icMifort I had sung Friar Laurence >
teat of time.- in th" various French
Sf-iscial oper* houses and at the
ltsuie. m Brussels, and I knew the
htmeh word- backward, but I con
"?*? the ne?? language pu-/.led me at
bit Ho??e\er. I un? told that my dic
'.igot o\er, and so I am happy. I?
fcl that, thii success 1 owe largely;
'??y French :(i-oolir,g, for in Prance'
??? insist en abrollte perfection o*"
?den, aid a inger ?vho ran sing in
? lsnguafa- ran sing in another. If
isiger shuns hi? ?owels he will never
* Biderstood. and th?? happy-go-lucky
O* of ?pr hav?- in America
tes not make l'or purity of diction.
HIS TRAINING IN FRANCE.
"The -tkfe training of a ?inger in
"?tuce is very thorough. An artist
i asde to Z'< over ami over a piece
?fkoMn-'s -ometim??- for hours until
??is entirely conversant with the tra
?tioes of the patt. This at times
nkes perhaps for a stereotyping of
?ios, hut for a beginner it is inval- .
akk. It gives eontidence. authority,
si a genera! professional attitude
??l*d his work which must come he- ;
en the ar'i-' -ar- out to create for
?Jtiflf. Thi- is ??hat I learned at the
l*M?ie. What further develop-,
sat I ma., have 1 owe largely '
i to Jacques Coinl, who couched nie when
I sang for Oscar Hammcratein in Lon?
don. He breathed spirit into my Im?
I personations, and I am too happy for
I words that he is with na at the Oii
i fury.
"I was very much pleased that some
critics thought they found a resem?
blance between my voice and thut of
Pol Plan?on. That was the highe?',
?ompliment 1 could have had pall mo.
for Plan?on was both my vocal hero
and a friend. I called to -er him the
day before he died, hut he ?rat
to receive me."
EUROPE'S MUSIC SILENCED
Dr. W. C. Carl Tells of Condi?
tions War Has Wrought.
Dr, William C. Carl, director 01' the
Guilmant Organ School an?! organist o?
the Fi:.-' PiYslv, ??:.:?. i Church, re?
turned on the Lusitania after his an?
nual European trip and visit with ihc
Guilmant family in Pari?.
"Musical Europe is com?, ?
moralized." said Mr, Carl, "In Switzer*
land, as soon as the mobilization was
cITecte?!. music in the pm k-.. ??ufes, boats
and even in the churches wus ?-up
pressed. The musicians made an ap?
peal through the press, as, with their
work taken ?way, nothing was left for
?dual support. At Bayreuth, when the ?
certain* closed on the hrst act of 'Par- '
sifal,' the day the troops were called,
the stage hands, artists and ?II who
were eligible for military service, in?
cluding Siegfried \Vagr;er, made a ??ash
to respond, and the audience was forced
to leave without the completion of the
opera,
"In France the Opera, the Opera
Comique and the Comedie Fran?aise, as
well a? every theatre and place of
amusement, have been closed for weeks.
I remained some time with M. Maurice
Kufferath. direcior of the Theatie ?!e la
Monnaie, Brussels, who. with .Mme. Kut
ferath. was (pending the summer in
Switzerland. If. Kufferath. who n>
head if the Grand Opera in the Belgian
capital, where so many stars, from the
d?but of Mme. Melba to the present
day have first made their success, la
in a wor*>e plight tha.i most of his con- I
freies. It will doubtless be a longtime
before operatic matters are normal in '
Belgium. Of the musicians. Fritz
Kreisler. the Austrian violinist, was
one th-^ tirst to >e.^{i nul. I halinpni. the
great Russian basso, a? well ?is all the
artists of his rnmpaiii : Rachmaninoff,
the Russian composer; Muratore, th<*
French tenor; Dohnanyi. the Austrian
pianist, and Main ice Aliamet. son-in
law of Alexander Guilmant, are hut a
few of those doing military service, 01
all Pave had to go.
"Felix Guilmant. the French artist,
was awaiting hi- rail a few days before
I left London and is probably helping
to defend Paris now. Henri Marteau,
the violinist, a Frenchman by birth, the '
succ?s? ir of Joachim In Bei ?in. refused
to fight against cither ?oui.try, and
therefore made himself a willing pri -
oner of war. Joseph Hofman. the fa
mo.is pianist, and Mr- Hofman were
reported a-- doing their own housework
in Mount P?lerin. Switzerland, the ser?
vants all being obliged to leave. If i
safe to predict that ti eie if not a
single artist left in either Germany,
France. Belgium or Russia, unless he is
beyond the age iimit.
"In Trinity College of Music. London,
I was told that four of the slaff had
already gone to the front, although the
mobilisation in Kngland is voluntary.
The only concerts given thus far in
London are thoi-e at the Queen'* Mall,
under the direction of Sir Henry
Wood."
THE WORCESTER FESTIVAL.
Worcester's fifty-seventh mush Fes
Ural will open in Mechanics' Hall on
Wednesday, and (hiring the week there
v ill be nine public rehearsals ami five
concerts. The works selected arc ,
"Vita Sueva," Wolf Ferrari; the "Te
Kanin." of Bruchner, and ihe "Elijah'
af Mendeltaohn. The soloist?! include
Alma Gluck, Florence Hinhle, Olivo
Kline,Mildred Potter. Christine (Schutz,
Evan Williame, William IL Paadia,
Herbert Withersaeon, Clarem-e White
hill, Rudolph Gen* and lli'rem Zinsbal
st, Arthur \Iee-; will rondo? t the con?
?eits. -..i,!' t;v- i,.-. St rube attitting.
i ?? it? .10 1 Symnhonj Orchestra, srltl
[he Worcester i. tival Choree, ?viil
omplete the personnel 01 1* ''? tival.
- - - _?
-WILLIAM TELL"-CEi\iTURY
That Opera and "Carmen ' on
the Week's Schedule.
"William Tel!" \? |] iia?e ? timely
revival at the Centuiy Ope a lIoUM
this \ve?.k. when iha. 1 ha?
not been heard loca!!;- for a number of
?tiiv . will enlist the services of a
number of the favorite artists of the
Century organisation. Miss Lois Ewell
will have the rale of Matilda, trhieh
: he will :ing for the i.? .; time in her
'?'-'if. ?'. ? Ule I '..: re d will
Arnold, and Henry Weldon Wa'ter
1 unit. The title it : ? .' :,r ? n
to Louis Kreidler, ai.d Muriel Gougtt,
an F.ngli-h aoprano, will effect her lo
?al debut a* Jemos? , Kathleen i.?.\\??i ? '
will sing the role of fledwiga. and Al?
fred Kaufman will have the part of
Gessiei.
Gilbert Wilson a* Melcthal. Loui
D'Angelo as Kudolph, Hardy William?
son as Ruodi and George Everett as
I-outbold lomplete the ca.-i Agide
Jacchit .?ill direct the performance.
The ballet ??.ill be seen in several di?
vertissement?. "William Tell" will b<
given for the Aral time Tue-day even?
ing anal will be repeated Friday and
Saturday evening-, and Thursday mati?
nee, while "Carmen" will be sung at
the other performances during the
?vea'k.
The cast for the Bizet opera will be
the .-?sine, with the exception of the
title role and the Kscamillo a.-, last
week. The name part will be intrusted
to Maud Santley, an F.nglish contralto,
who has sung at Covent (?arden, and
Thomas Chalmers will sing the Torea?
dor. Mvrna Sharlow, who sang the role
or Micaela last week, will continue in
'he part, and Josiah Zuro will direct
the perfoimance.
SOUSA IN TOIL'S THROES
Miss Duffield Tells of Birth of
a March.
Miss Blanche Dufield it a gir*: ? d
mirer of "The Invincible Ua?le." "The
Invincible Eagle" it i.ot the German
Kaiser, but a march b> .lohn Philip
Sousa. and the throes of Its crea;,on
??ere truly remarkable if we are to
nidge from Miss Duffield's account as
dispatched to an awe-atricken world
through the |?en of her press agent. '
The march va? composed on a railroad
train, p.nd hete is what occurred:
"1 a-a train between Huffal?? a:-d
Sew York. Outside the coach "ie
1 a?g 1 -?t- of to?vns a'ong the route flashed
bj !ikc ghostt fluttering a' the windlaW
paie-. The night was dark and the
few tars ?ib??\e twinkled fitfully. Mr.'
Sou St sat in a chair in the dimly lit
Pullman. At the further end of the
ear a porter diligently brushril cush?
ions. At interval.? the engine whistl-dj
as if in pain.
"Suddenly nnd without previous
warning Mr. Sou sa began to descriase
circles In the air with a pencil, je-k
?ng back and forth in his seat mean?
while, (?radually the circumference of
bis pencil's arc diminished and Mr.
Sousa drew g notebook from hie
pocket, still humming to himself.
"Notebook and pencil met. Breves
and semi-brevet ap;iearo?l on the pa?
per's virgin surface. Quarter notes
and sixteenth notes followed in order
ly array. Meanwhile Mr. Kouaa fur
lowed his brow, and from his purs'??
lips came a stirring air rather a nvir
tial blare, us if hidden trombones
tubas and saxophones were striving !?
gain utterance.
"Now Mr. Sousa's pencil travellei
faster and faster, and page after pag?
of the note book Were turned back
each filled ???ith martial bars."
Miss Duftield looked on from over th.
top of a magasine and listene?! with
enthusiasm as Mr. Sousa's famou.*
march, "The Invincible Eagle," took
form.
"I tried to attract Mr. Sousa's atten?
tion while he was supplying the nc
companimenl of the flutes, oboes, '?.*??
non^ and piccolos, bnl if was not until
he had picked out the march on a \io
1 in with h:-- fingers, put his noteb'iok
in his pocket, his violin in its ease ;, :d
his cigar back in his mouth thai h"
finally turned toward me and casually
remarked that It was a very dark night
outside.
"Later in New York." said Miss Duf*
field. "1 bud the pleasure of playing
the original se,ire on the piano at my
home while Mr. Ko.sa finished the ?,r
chestra'ion ami introduction. I hold
the honor of being the lirst prima
donna who intoned the march."
llnppy Mi> i Iiiiffrld!
The Symphony Society.
The Symphony Society of New York
Walter Damrosch, conductor! has en?
gaged its rntire quota of eighty-live
muficiana for the coming season.
While other organizations are endea?
oi:nc to complet.? their orchestra.' by
Uling the places left vacant by mu
nielan* who have gone to the front for
the various European nations now at
war. the New York Symphony is fortu?
nate ill the fact that none of it-5 ntem
h?>r rould be ?ailed for military <-i
vie?-. Alexander Saslavaky will ag?>:i'
h?- the ronrertmaster; Geor_o Barrer?,
who ha. been vit h the organization a
number of years, will remain as first
flute; Gustav Langenus, first clarinet.
anH Jacques Renard, firsl 'cellist. The
only newcomer i? Henri ?!?? Busscher,
formerly nrst oho?? ,,, the Queen'.'.
Hall Orchestra, London, of which Sir
llinry Wood is the conductor. Mr, dc
Bussrher tudie.i in ihe Brussels Con?
servatory and took vhe rir.-t prize for
lOlfege. TWO ears later he had first
prize honors for oboe, harmony and
transposition under Papen and Guide.
He al-o tudied , iano, singing and
dramatic art under Van Hani, I>e~ir-?t
and Vermandele. A; fourteen Mr. de
Buaachcr made hi* dein;* a< the Thea?
tre Poyal Galleries, Brussels, as lirst
oboe, and the same year was pianist
with an orchestra at \i:ddlekirkc, near
O.-ti n?l. Al Kixteen he began playing
oboe for ihe Y-??ye Orchestra under
many noted conductors. In the winter i
he played piano with the Society of
F'ine Ails, for which he composed a
musical play which ran '250 nights In
Brussels. He made a reputation as. .1
singing master, and at twenty-four
was offcied the conductoi ship of im?
portant choral societies ir. Bru- el?
and Antwerp, but accepted instead tue
po.-ition of lirst oboe in the Queen's
Hall Orchestra, where h? remained un?
til encaged by the Symphony Society.
The tust rehearsal of the season un?
der Cor-.duetor Walter Damrosch will
occur October ~> in preparation for the
two weeks' engagement of the orches?
tra at the Pittsburgh Exposition. The
New Voik setson will open F'riday af?
ternoon October L':;. at Aeolian Hall.
Th-* Oratorio Society.
Rehearsals for the forty-second ?ea
on of the oratorio Society of Kew
York i Louis Koc-mmenich, conductor?
bej?n en .September 24. The pro?
gramme for the sea'-on. including but
one novelty, is as follow.?:
"Tsst \'rr.\:\ ef Gerontbia" i Fugar?, !>?
?eiiiixr i Relolal?; MM.Ire- Poner, ?oti
tra;?n, i,er.?a,- Klw?.'. '?nor: Frank t'ro.v.on,
Tii? M?ja?lab" Hest?ei), affrnaen of ne
? ?moer "I an I earning o! PartWlbW :'0 Sol.?
:-:-: Klorena-e HlnMe. *?i?ri?no; M*rl?! Sinn?
1.4.811 .-..?.. -?!?? in... Riad Miller, tenor;
Pr?d< ;:? i ilngi e* bass.
".lo^ii nf V:-' Kniho Roast), Marah 'J4.
Sololaatai -,o ;.?? .inrioiini ??1 later.
The concerts will be given n Car?
negie Hall a? usual, with the assist?
ance of the orchestra of the Symphony
Society.
"The Dream of Cerontius." already
sung fire times by this society, was
produced first in F.ngland in 1000. Its
initial N'*w York performance was in
Manh, lf'0:-!. ??hen it was sung twice
by the society. In November of the
;-ame y.?ar it had two more perfnnn
an?e?. The fifth production. March,
I?09, enlisted the services of the emi?
nent F.nglish tenor Gervase Elwes, who
will be heard again in the great work
this season.
The society's annual "Messiah" con?
certs have long be-en one of the mvst
notable features of the metropolitin
music season. The forthcoming repe?
tition- v ill be their eighty-sixth and
eigh'y-seventh.
9
Enrico Bos.si, who has achieved a
wide and enviable fame in his own
country through his energetic devotion
to mu-ic of a lofty, ?'?versified bit*.
conservative typo, was born in Italy in
1861. His best known work here thus
far is the "Intermezzi Goldoniani.''
played in 1900 und 1907 by the Boston
Symphony Orchestra. His principal
effort in choral music hitherto was
"Paradise Lost" i IMS), based on Mil?
ton's poem. "Joan of Arc." designated
"Ein Mysterium," had its first h-aring
in Cologne last January, and at once
aroused intense enthusiasm union1;
French. German and Italian musicians
and critics.
Boston Symphony Orchestra.
The management ol th?. Bomop S.\r.'
phony Orchestra announces that that
Institution will give daring the carrent
season its usual number of concerts In
Boston and elsewhere. The war made
it necessary 'o po?tpo-.e for :: year the
preliminary nip to the West it had
planned last spring, for it was impos?
sible to get all the members of the
orchestra back from Europ?: in time to
prepare for these concert.*. The or?
chestra will undertake the season with
its personnel pra?-tically unchanged,
and Dr. Karl Muck, of course, -a ill be
the conductor.
In. Muck sails for this country the
?nd of thi? month, and rehearsals will
begin in Boston the second week of
October, The ftral Boston concerts
will be given as planned last yiar
I riday afternoon, October 16, and Sat?
urday evening. October 17.
The .sub 'crinf ion for the two series
of ?-onceo s which the orchestra is to
giv?* in Carnegie Hall i? entirely filled.
These concerts will be given November
? and 7. December .; and ."). ?lanuary "
' and P. Eebruary 18 and 20 and M?*ch
IS ;:id 20.
PLANS OP THREE ARTISTS.
Marcella Sembrich has cable?! ih"
Wolfrohn Musical Bureau ?.hat she will
sail from Europe on October 3. After
her .-arrival Mme. Sembrich will be the
guest of friends in Leno:.. ??l?ss. lier
recital appearances will be limited to
the months of .January and Pebruaiv. ?
Alma Gluck and Etreni Zimbalist,
the young Russian violinist, arrived
in New York from Havre on Sunday
last. Their marriage last June was |
followed by a honeymoon trip which
terminated in Switzerland when the
war broke out. During the approach
ire- sca.-on they will be heard in many '
joint recitals extending as far as ?he '
Pa?'ific Coast.
At Music Studios.
Alice Ganigue Mott. teacher of sing-,
ing, has returned to the city and re-j
sumed teaching at her studio, 172 West I
79th st.
Susannah Macaulay. teacher of sing-'
ing. will resume her le-ssons on Thur:s
ilay. October i. in her studio. Mo Car?
negie Hall. Misa Macaulay says that
her method of teaching the art of
breathing with ringing has kept her
busy during the summer with many
pupil:-. Thomps L'Esp?rance, barytone,
i ?; a promising pupil of Miss Macaulav
and will soon make his debut in public.
Included in the pages of a booklet en?
titled. "A Pew Reasons Why You
Should Study Music," prepared by Al?
fred E. Preckclton, jr.. of the Pouch
Gallery. "?40 Clinton av., Brooklyn, is
p. fac-aimile copy of a testimonial writ?
ten by Edward Morns Bowman, in 1911,
as follows: "To the musical young peo?
ple who desire competent, careful, up
to-dr.te instruction in the foundations '
of artistic piano playing, E. M. Bow?
man, of Steinway Hall, New York, takes
pleasure in recommending his talented
professional pupil, Alfred Edward
Fretkelton, jr."
The Hasscll Conservatory of Music, '
853 Marcy av., Brooklyn, held its first]
concert of the season on Wednesday
evening. September 9. On this occasion
Miss Bes.-?ie Smith, a piano pupil of
Mr. Hasscll, played Schumann's "Car
naval," which was well received, after
which she wii.i presented with a gold
medal for her progress in both study
and concert, work. She has played three
entire concertos -Tschaikowski, B flat
minor, hi.ii E flat, and Saint-Saens, G
minor be-ides a host of solo piece?.
The cons?rvatery covers every branch
of music study, and has a strong rac
ulty, ;;mong whom ar? Mme. Chal?a,
formerly with the Metropolitan Opera
company, who has been engaged for
operatic coachinc. The piano depart
ment will be in charge of Irwin Hassell
and aaaiatants; "iolin, Max Jacobs. Jo?
seph Pucha; harmony and composition,
I. Vr-.i: Br?khoven: voice culture, Mar?
guerite Rockhill. Mincha Ferenzo and
l'an Brockhoveo; Italian, Biuno Zirato,
am! many others.
Miss I"oronce McMiJlan was the ac
tompaniit at two concerts giv#n in the
(-bickering Hall of the Lord A Thomrs
Building, last Monday and Tuesda/
evening. Mm Yelena Van Savn. violhf
ist, assisted.
David Robinson, concert violini:?* and
teacher, /ctmerly concert master r.f
the Chicago Grand Opera Companv. h, -
opened his new sttudio in the Brenton
Arms apartment, 'j'iO Fox st.. Ti? ?
Bion:., and is preparing for a busy tat
?on a? soloist anal teacher. Mr. Robin
ion developed his talents at an early
age, leaving for. Paris, where he was
accepted a*, a pupil of the Paris fon
servatorium. and later received dr.?t
prize under Profes??or Reiny's instruc?
tion. Mr. Robinson has been the recip?
ient of flattering comments bv critic?
in Germany, where he tininhed his stul
ie? under the violinist. Michael Pre-v
Ha has written several orchestral
worka. string quartets, etc.
Esperan** Gairigtic. teacher of sing?
ing, is at Prag, Bohemia, stopoing with
her titter, Kit. Garrigue Massryk. She
writes ta The Tribune 'inder date ?>r
Augu.?: 1. as folio-s : "Have no idea
whe?t I ca:. return. Tbc war changes all
plans,"
Musical Entertainment?.
David Bispham h s i been engaged to
give one of his lectuie-recitals at
Columbia University ;- NovemSei.
i his i.- considered by many a -i?c edu?
cational move on the part of the Ne?
York institute, which bv th* engage?
ment of an artist ?jf th i - rank places
Use!" on record as will to do as ?fill
for.mutic as for other department
Xildred Dilling. harpi t. oi -;t Ka
6?? st., returned last week front Lurop
on La ?-'ranee after many trying > \
perience? in the war zone. Miss Dili
ing was in Paris until July th, when th.
crisis in Kurope occurred. In compar
with Henriette Renie, compo-ei aid
harpist, she left for Etretat. a amal!
nshing village, remaining there until
September 1, when the reported ao
proacli of the German." necessitated tn?
immediate departure of all foreign,
for Havre. Miss Dilling is now on her
way West, where -he will appear in
concerts in Indianapolis. Chicago, S
Louis, Cincinnati and several ?th ,
cities and towns. She will return ti
New Yor.\ in November.
Angel Agnes Chopounan. the Amer -
can soprano, has been spending her
-ummer in the Catskills. where she??*
heard in three recitals during the
month of August. On the evening o'"
August l." she presented a Programm?
of songs at the F.lka Park Club house,
Elka Park, N. Y. On ?he follow ir?
evening .-he repeated the same pru
gramme at the Ledge F.nd Inn, Haines
Falls. N. Y., and on the evening of Au?
gust 2t she sang songs by Meyerbee;,
Rossini. Mozart, Thomas, Verdi. Camp
bell-Tipton. Donizetti and Tineiri a'.
the Twilight Inn. Haine-? Falls. Ml
three recitals were well received and
given bef.ire capacity audienees. Mia?
Chopourian was oblige?! to give utany
encores. She is to arrive in New Torn
to-day.
Samuel Gardner, the young American
violinist, has been engaged as a raen?
Ber of the Kneisel Quartet. Mr. Gard?
ner succeeds Hans Letz, who is now vn
the German army. Mr. Gardner re?
ceived his entire musical education in
this country, and his engagement, oy
this eompany Is a high compl?a??;nt.
H?* will fill a limited number of ?olo
I engagements for next season.
ORATORIQ
Society of New York ^he?w
Vents KaMMMafch. ?>o**4iicta*f
/
?Ingen?, e-pei-tall? Trane? aad
Ba?*ei.. who are good reaOr? wttO
food voia-ei. will be iu-repted aa
member?. Kelieanaal* at ( ametr?a
Hall begin Ment. '.< S \aininalliiaa
private. Appl- to William Hnnsat
Tuthlll, Sa?e'j, ?M fourth Av.. N. Y.
rrors-s EL(jAR}, Daeafd of Geromi-g,
ko - rUENDELS The Messiah
m: BOSSI'S.loan of Arc (I st Tise)
Il TAXIDERMIST'S
WONDERFUL WORK
?Royal Duke's Elephant Trophy
and How It Was
Preserved.
bwlind Ward, --.hose de?'.h at his
i*nt _t Roscombe occurred recently,
"????1 ts-idermy to the level of a tine
?rt. This result he achieved not simrlv
tpttmining the carcass?s of animals
?what remain-d of them, but by ??*?
?Hag closely the behavior and iabits
?? tnimal..
Il "Tut- Sport.-men's Handbook" he
*? ae?criho<l in ?real detail the "bet*
?tup" ot a tiger, after orocurmg a
n in good condition. The dc
?H is obtained by selcctiTtg the ?ini
>I*st action of the creature?namely,
?ssteslthv w*,k through a grassy Jon?
s'?, when hi peculiar expression is
?Mf constant caution. A complote
ill framework has then to he made,
-?er which * ? irfacc ?>f modelling clay
?stabe worked. The ribs and promi
?st musrl- ..." the trunk, the muscu*
??develop:...' of the shoulders and
??the;, mui*t ill be carefully mod
?W on.
Whtn the mode! is ready to receive
'?he natural features of the animal the
'mart first carefully adjusted in a
?Ural manner and the claws next in
trwi in position. The skin, however,
?ahr-joes ? special preparation, is then
**w*d on the framework, the head
*-l| first manipulated, and particular
?Stnition pa:?1 to adjusting the lips.
T-1U1? in?! ear o that the rcouired
?"-Wnsion may be secured.
The Ungui modelled in paper
'??'??dur.!! plated " ?th glue and tinted.
? ,f- aii I no ?? a.? also tinted,
'?pi.-mii.* used being the tineit tube
???olor. Th? ,-hiskers which may have
?a w.v ?rom th.' -.kin are carefully
?fUeed. at..!. : missing, imitation ones
"t mide from se_l whiskers.
\tulden rule - never to cut the
*?? In cases where the skeleton is
????Red' and ,s available, much of
*? ?ork ma) be saved by utilizing
??* hones.
?? setting up birds, the symmetry
**? nttnrsl pose of the specimen
j*r- Ward wrote i should be a matter
? mou careful study, and no amount
J?J*?hriica| skill or of imaginative
7*-*f will in the lea?,t compensate for
??* *??Bt of knowledge of nature.
?? have ,Pa the bird alive in its
"???1 habitat, and to be able to re
'**?'?-? >t? natural appearance ia an
?tunable advantage. We cannot all
jj^?-u-d that but we may rely on
u\t "?^orn*'t'0:' communicated by
'Uiti* *h? **** er,J?yd such oppor
4?haB,(lw'r' wh,n ??'??veiling with Au
-?-?ulai a A"*eric*t" naturalist), ac
-.? .UT*d. ?<? e-tremelj --*ai liable store
>i*ari__i'n rm*tl0n- for a WB" t,c
??list a* pracli,-e of that great natu
? a'C_ a "Pecimen *'as *r
".'- htfore any treatment, to
??vch made of it in the care
Is*.
-**??? ???-.???? oi u in me care
t5Hrvcd natural position of
- *" ttior* of all toloru and con
view or Sarajevo, where murder, was committed,
WHICH DROUGHT ABOUT WAR,.
tiguous. or surrounding, natural feat
ures.
With regard to the preservation oi
specimens, Mr. Ward gave in the snin?
book a conspicuous example of the ad?
vantages in the process of brine pick?
ling which was afforded by the great
elephant trophy that was brought
: from .South Africa by the late Duke
1 of Edinburgh.
In this case the entire skin of the
' mighty beast was preserved, the ani
! mal being undoubtedly one of the tin
| est e.\ample< of the African species
| ever brought to this country. The
i weight of the whole skin ?vhen t.iker
? from the brine wa- J.OO? pounds, and
! the weight of the entire elephant in
! the flesh 8,h04 pound.-.
On the tield the skin, having been
j duly prepared, was carefully folded
and then rolled as lightly as pottiblc
I round the head and tied at both ends
Of the bale. In this condition it was
placed in a great bane!, which was
completely tilled with liquor and prop?
erly coopere?! for transmission to thi
country.
On arrival in London, when the head
of the barrel was removed, the perfect
i success of the method was at once ap
? paient. There was no unpleasant odor.
:nd on taking out the meat and un
! folding the skin, it ?vas noticeable that
everv part of the 101 faces had been
properly acted upon, and there was. not
a single tainted fold.
When received it had been upwards
Ol n year in the barrel The old pickle
was removed, the skin was refolded
and restored to the band with a top?
I ly oi fresh liquor, and the cask was
rrcoopered.
In thin manner the skin was pre?
served for three years more, until it
Wat decided how tin great trophy
should be Heated.
The mapniticint head ?vas modelled
land mounted in the Ward audio-, ar.d
i- now in Clarence House. The feet
wire utilized for ornamental purpose-,
ud tlv hide v.as cut up and converted
to various uses, a considerable portion
being made into walking sticks thai
foimed uppropiiate mementoes of th?
late duke.
Air. Royland Ward worked for many
members of the royal family, and for
practically all the crowned head- li"
wat also ?.he Rrtt taxidermist to group
trophies of wild ?animals on an exten?
sive scale in their natural surround?
ings, .ml to reproduce ?it various ex?
liinitioi?: ?deal scenes from th*? junde.
--P;i!l Mall Gaxette.
col BACK AT THi: DOMINIE
There had been friction between 'he
choir and minister for some time Bast,
but so far the singers had more th.tn
held their own. However, one Sunday
morning the minister, after listening to
the singing of the usual anthem, an?
nounced in a louil, clear voice. ''.My
text this morning will be, 'Now, when
the uproar iiad ceased.' '' For a mo?
ment the member- of the choir looked
crestfallen. They felt that the person
had scored for once. Then, in the soft?
est of whispers, they decided to ma'.;e
a slight alteration in the musical pro?
gramme, ami when the :-ermon con?
cluded the organ pealcil forth and the
choir triumphantly sang. "Now it is
high time to wake from .-lcep." The
Argonaut.
PROFESIONAL ENTKKTAINKRS.
UMBERTO
SORRENTINO
Emintnt Italian Ta?ar
In \inr-ii'it aru???n lili I -
'14, Opera, luoceM, Re
r ?tala. I'oropemlalet?a?l
tteeaa. .-l?ale Frleilberf.
14'.'_ Kroailwa.,. l>r?o__l
?rldre?.. 14 tCotat 4S4 **t.
L^WOOLFORDlvl
"The boy that Tickles tha Plano"
w || i a ' latea! dan-t-a music. Taacoaa.
?..liona, ?te Muaio l_inls!ie:l
for ?M ? . . aoioiis. Cull or writ?.
I.V.. t\. ?SIIi Kl. Tel. MM lll.e?aiile.
GEORGE CARRE RedUl. Ora"?"
VOCAL INM'Rt? TIO.N.
13 r.. m?ti ?t.. N. Y. Phono _u-7 mayy-Mant
I! \N UiDCCC?Ut? B-nt.iiir, I on. rrla,
non-ML,} i^.truetlsa. M t.. IM St
I !? \1 1
PROFESSIONAL ENTERTAINERS.
?L.BROWN 'S? i
,. ,,. ,. ... . . taca-? leo*. - mpboii*
i, 'DANCE MUSIC A ?SP^ALJfyi'n|n
?MARSHALL KERNOCHAN
-a Setena?? ??' H Villa.- Wo Two T?
' ga-her." Published bj ''. schirmsr._i
. i,*, nPBllPlf I ona-ert Piani.l,
"jJ?k PEAVEY ,2,-c?
i- Eut ill! St.. N. V. '!' '? M-' s.
i, l"lWTAW.. Brails?. Pi."' ?W E. N. V
MILDRED DILLING HARPIST
t o\( ?Rl? - R'< I FA? ?-,N*'**l< TION
??i;*< E \M)KR't)>,
ACCOMPANIST
LIM?O'BRIEN'^TA"
?I We?t .??h *??? fh*"'_M?-'??? *<? I7W
?-?aa.atll i ihcikiii.?. %??? ?mpaani.i.
Horra?-MOPlILLAal, ,,.? u g-tg w. l?tth.
WOMEN IN MEDICINE.
During the last year there v.-ere 631
?.?omen studying medicine, or 9 le.vi
than l;i<t vcar, a ?lecrca.se of 4s below
11'12 and a decrease of 198 ? 4-4.1 per
cent i below 1P04. when 1,129 womon
students, the largest number, were re?
ported. The percentage of all medical
students was 3.8, the same as last ye.r.
There were 121 women graduates this
year, or 3.1 per cent of all graduates.
Of all tbc women matriculants, 135
121.4 per cent) were in attendance at
the two medical colleges for worr.cn,
while the remaining 49t> i "8.6 per cent )
were matriculated in the 54 coeduca?
tional colleges. From the two worn-,
en's colleges there were _5, or 20.7 oer
cent of all women graduates, while 9fi,
or njS per cent, secured their degree:-?
t rein coeducational colleges. Journal
of the American Medical Association.
NOT YET FIT TO RE OIT.
The wayward young man, broken in
health, was sent to the Southwest to
recuperate. He was in jail for stealing
,i quarter of beet'. He wrote home:
"Dear Father: I've picked up some fle^h
since I came here, but am still confined
to my room. 1'lease send me $100." -
Chicago .News.
?a?*??-??*?**a****-? ?a*???
MUSICAL INSTRirilON.
New York German
Conservatory of Music,
306-30M Madison Av.. near i2d St.
: i u .??! :'*>>. I ? a. ? , us?.
ir.M-cut! ?iual PIANO, VIOM.V
'CELLO. ORGAN and ill ORCHESTRA IMS'im -
VI'M'S
Ml I al liattloa at lo-ifat tJ'a . 13
i.p.'?:' and ??*?:'?..r.o? . --rofaa-ara.
i ?' ? ? :??'? :?'.,..? i ana archaMra <n
in-lii .
Tl.l:\is III ??l.r. til ARTES I P.
i .... 7.- ou AtOll ?"?
o.-' n. '' ' ? ? Mamara an.I 'nun-.la? u/,,,1 i.
Aii'i-a','. .?s trot i stall .?-.', j . .c ma.ic
?
JOHN* DENNIS* MEHAN
?i >< HOOI KOR VOICI*.
BOOKLET sK!ST II'ON APPLICATION.
Suite '?'!. r-iiiesi? II- 11. N V. Tel. Co!. *>94.J.
A.CARBONE
T?v7^r?r,s!TT!rr^
M-iub-r .M;';uoollta1
oocra C'.mp?: .
v? ai stulia, AcsHaa KsO ?raacb, ?9 t-i
I? **.?r, A?. Plan., lr.-;r'j-tl.an !>;? LItU ? arlaane.
. School of Accompanying
Mr?. Manl.all Cillait Stawart. Olrattar.
s?j,| ',-f No:..': \ .oa [..?ait i a. _. .a..
AEOLIAN HALL. B Wnl 42n< Straal.
GWENDOLYN
CHARP NTIER
C'OLOHATl'R*. ?OPRANO: INSTRHTION
_?OS mon Kin. VI.. RROOWLY.V
?"ROBINSON-S^
Lai- !..>:? fl'ira _?_' | ' : "- ' " ' T*' *?*? M>l,
RE3NALD WERREHRATH ?--.?.??,.
... i. - fp?i.? ' VF. :?(:. s? . V.T.
W. J. KITCHENER
TtarSar Brnia. MaHalm, GuMar. Ill W. ISC S?.
Waaaaamm MACAULAT .,. ,',.?.?, h**i.\j*.
V,. ?nASaf leirh?r of >inain?."
t. BUUCn I \\ ,.,?,- Bid--.. ?J E .'.II h M.
-ft
MUSICAL INSTRITTION.
The National
Conservatory of Music
of America
Incorporated in l???.! and chartered in
1S9I by spa-aiai Act of Congress.
Jeannette M. Thurher, round, at Tre?.
established for the thorough edu?
cation ot serious students in music.
Dates of Extmitation and Enrollment
Sept. 21st to Sept. .Kith inclusive.
The Thtrtiefh SchoU?uc, Yeav Cper.s Oc'ober l>r.
Yes fiirth-r information aal.Iros? the
Secretary, lit West T/Jth Si.. N?u fork.
BirlUra?. Orticrlt.
Ccnctrt Rarltma.
Taaeher ?f Slntlni.
SPECIALIST IN FRENCH LYRIC DICTION.
.M-t ?>i?t* Hou??. 14.',. Kioauaii? sin,tin I?
i'lano SOd
Theory
I-.-tri!. lion.
TEX i KARS PtPII. OF a*C M. KOUVIW
htelnwa? Rail, Rm. 12. 1*9 B. Uth iTbural
ALKIN
SCHOOL OF MUSIC
MANFRED MALKIN. DIRECTOR.
M MT. MORRIS PARK WEST. NFAK 1--'NP ST
ALL BRANCHES TAUGHT BY MOST EMINENT
INSTRUCTORS. CATALOGUE ON REQUEST.
?"" LANGEVIN
SPECIALIST IN FRENCH LV
Met i)?.?!? lions-. 14.'.. hi-)*,.
HARRY ANDERTON
a VVAM Pirn. OF a*. :
^rl?LT?tBA-H
The Touch Otllllji. IMiatllljl : lienldrnae,
343 Clinton Aw .'Stuatlaaa. i 4.1 K?ia; Si.
MAX HEINRICH
VOCAL S It DIO.
Hotel Berkley. T4th st. ? Anata rala m a?
ANNE STEVENSON
SOPRANO TKACHKK
SCIENCE ANO AKT OF MX?.IN?..
?'.*,-> i.'arn'igte Hall. Phone Columbina *H2.
Sa""eiAR0ll$0ll??a- ^?"
"? SrWWOmw mw-w?mm Metlio?.'.
IOW RATES.
HOME sTl DIO. ?fi W. 141ST ST.
MIA >l tlUljU MAXliT
?II.TROrOI.:TAN OPKK*. HOl'Sl. BI.IM...
14 .!*? Broadway. ?tu?1lo IS. \\>.J. an .
!?? ? n I Plaalaat at teaober.
Viola Palmer i:r,::r"^xiy
Carr.eji? liai: studio *74 Every day except
mon.. Tiii'Rs. a svr.. untn a p. m _
RAGTIME PIANO jfgl-ft
Violin. BirijO. M?i?doli:>. Guiur. (at. milLH. Urot
Siboo?. ".'>' Na ?? .: . PraoilTta. I'tion? J74 Bua.hwli-1. .
IIHIM niDLCU I ea<- ?HrVaTf ?lotlrag
I ???? l l R rrtltnLn ?a all II? brana.be?.
ISA **,'.Jlj*? ?.t._Tel. C?St> (alumbuaa.
Tinco. VAN YORX TE>OR
VOCAl. STUDIO, -l WEjST JSTHj?T
?i.r .DEMAREST SSSg&.l
Inn'-u ... I'ii,, a- .v.;* -:
EDOUARD BUT2 XX\\
M . ', . A-ta I .-'--- ??> C?r???i? Hall
ma* ORNSTElNp^rr":
S?u4n 3?4e_7th iv._PI'??? ?OO Maralaf.
IIKRBKRT ? ? a y ? t? Thorough Artla.ll?
j. ?""nst??,| I ra?alo?.
Poiieh Caller). SSAJJIiilaa^t?^. Brookl>a.
?iitUL somqii ^ru:rsts?,o?
MEM \OSM COijJfUt ni Mt9ic.
I.'S K??t >Sth SI.
MUSICAL INSTRUCTION.
Institute of Musical Art
of the City of New York
I RANK DA-HtOaCH. Director.
S?.-.ion ap*n. Ortabar l?th.
Eaamlnatlan* far .-dmlnlon S?at. 71th ta Oct. 8th.
Th? Institute ?!**?* preferane? in tboaa -p
p.i.^'n? ?vhoae natural abillt* *< . *im*st
piirpov -;i?.- promise of musical ????> ce liante. ?
i ndojred and conducted without thoufhtof
I rofi'. th? Institute commaada th? aervicca
nf ar?i?t-te?.'ri*r.i ?bun private terms
?OUld be prohibitive trt most stnilents. Fees.
:,v* m.?.lorat? and 'inifo?m. Correspondence '
In? it^d from tlii?.ae il<?.irltie the best. A?i
rlreaa ? '
lite ?*e<retarT. IM) < liirernom A?e.. N. Y.
BERN-I
HARD
BARITONE
AVAII.ARI.K Uli;
CONCERT. ORATORIO. RKH?AI.
TKACIIF.R OF TMK
ART OF SINGING
NTIDIOS ??> WKMT ?8TH ST.
STEINBERG
CARUSON
Diitiniuitbed Italian Teacher of Vaice
THK SEVERN. 170 Writ 73d St.. N. V.
Tel _??_ rot.
DR.LAWS0N
THK ART OF SINGING.
Teacher <>t many relebratert an?i ku?
artists nor,- appearii'C before the public.
Aeolian Hall. :iSX\,'. 4 .'d St. Tel ?',.'44 Rrv>irn
CARL HAHN
Pianoforte Instruction*?Theory e>f Muaie.
17. v.'. 73; !i st. l'houe. Tito Hchuyl?r.
i'? ? Vul" WANT
orchestral training?
?jomi: to thi:
COR Y ELL VIOLIN SCHOOL i
VIOLINIaSTS-OVIDE MUSIN'S
Royal Coaaarvatorj ?*us? Sjrateaa 11,30 peri
I faun Claaat* ttm formlos?tschnlc and \
iperlorv; aluo private l??s???ii.
51 WEST 7HTH STREET._
AUGE GARRIGUE M0?T
ART OF KINGING.
17*.' VTFMT 78TH ST.. NKW TORK,_
MarksrCooservatoryli|'?V*'|
_NKW YORK. _ JitMdyt-,
t WARD T*-*rhrr ?' -**????
ANTOINETTE It-**1IW and Hamiasr,
MUSICAL RCAOINGS. PUBLIC RCCITALS.
Tan i','? stu.uo.. *?.? stii a ?a. at ;ath at
.?.It.NOR" I "" Itl-IMKU
Filotte ?rtco. vo< At^T^cTioN.
WILLIAM C. CARL
GUILMANT ORGAN SCHOOL 44 Waal 12th St.
ui-irAV BCplfEft Pianist sad Th
L. ?KI-mKIt steinwaiy Halt
Aeolla Hal' Waal lid > I Wad sod Sa-. i
HEMRIETTA SPEKE-SEELEY v ^ I
? Seea?mt WataapaMtai opera Hou *.
Liuv.'MU)- fllllll I Tom Placement. :
I WRWIfc-i i-.s H . ?7th ?I.. N. V.
Rroo-bn. 7T_ Bal-ib-Mia hi. Moo , Ti.ur. Kii
ttl^ieV, ftNSFRV?TO?Y~F'"r T <"? ?
L?rU' wm<-*.*"sni**ni t,.r ,-- vv U?f]1 ^
G??r?? |**_ A V Oaneart Organist. In*?r?<*
Hear*/ *f* ' t:on. **4T W?at .?th St.
Frederi,U BR|STQ|;T;,cli.r of Hln.inr
I
Mli SUAI. IVSTRICTION.
New York College
of Music
128-130 East ?&b St.. New York.
l'ARI- liri.N Al f?t ST ir.AVMCKR.
Brana Hra.ii.-i.. il": 1'-- ???? -? II >* : ' t*StX
A IliR-li S. hool o? Musi ? n?r K.arn<t*t
Students. All Hranrlie.x Tiinplit b? Km!
tient Instructors, sp. .?,.i I ? pertinent
for ?'.???tinners. Dept. of I'm tall? S hooi
Music iii ili?r?-e of lu. I'r.ink It. UU.
s>rul for C?talo**! i
vassa
Th?ary.
'laaeMte
0-?r 40 teit.fr. tdded to ?' - Rauwll Mrtfcad
fir.-int ourin? Un r?'t Siimmi-r iMr. IluMtU'*
Summ-i Normal*). A . I. >a S?- r??(?['v tor Hullrfln?,
(>rne|te Mali, M?nh??t?n, or ? -..??*?? "of ?lut..
N...I..N I ;<il ISAH'IHI It Kl ->I.II,. |)T.?oar.
or
i HI I.? H
MINK .
lnu.uif Sliool for Orean?*?! ?n?l ' .."i-i a.i?t,
FELIX LAMONO, Olr?ai?a)?f.
ftfrVa? Hour. 11 to 1; d..i. for i?f?*f?*rtu?
. ?? ^ .--. -, r>i, ,.- r , -
VIRGIL
PIANO CONSERVATORY
Mr?. A. H. YIR4.II. Ilireelor. ?! \\ . :?,' >?.
ALEXANDER BERNE PIANIST
REFERENCE. RAFAEL JOSEFFY.
Inatrur.llan. Matratalltan 0?*n H?u?e BuiUiaf.
142?. Braaa'way. Raan 2. (FrlSay.i.
s. CosTANTINO
Italian \axal InMriicmr.
I'IMRO A.
The Russell Studios ?
o??r 40 letsfeNi t??e? lot', n
fir.-int fliirin* Hi?, test WtSSSwe i
siimm??i NonaaOI. aVtdroa W?r>tirT
?'?rneajie Hall. Manhattan, i
N?.?i., N I ;<il IS ARTHI It at ->
TRINITY SCHOOL
YON
( ooi ert OrganUt and ( oni|>o?er.
sil dio s?.', a s:?? ? AHVHair-: HAM . w
Coarerl.
Oratoriu.
WM. STICKLES
MacConnell
DR. CARL E. DUFFT
VeefJ littriietUi. Atallaa Hill, 31 W. 4?4 St.
Heia*. 142 Cl*r-m*?t A??.. Mt. Varata
VOICE
< I I TIRE.
. ? ? . REPERTOIRE.
Pu?.ll* tr*?*r?S Hr ?par*. c??c?rt aratarit
A**ll?n Hall. H W. 428?. Mua I* : 928
MAX FRIEDMAN *?
2.7 V*raan A??.. Braaklyn. H. V. Ph??. :ui-l
VO'amSuft. Ma?., fauch Gal.. 34"? Clint*? Art
aeteotja
< on? en?.
Re? Ital? :
\aiiae Piada?. Inlerprelalioa. I Hot to?.
Studio: ?* H. 5Ttb_ra?. Phone i Plata ?S.'a?
---WOODRUFF
VOICE PIA? INC. BRKATHINU.
Prio.atatloii for Choir, ?'ona:?rt ar.?l Oraatorlo.
_l?jJ5>:ST_i*aTII ST.. NEW VOBll
JOHN CAMPBELL tenor
Ma??**no?at HAENhEI. * JON Es.
AEOUAN WALL.JNItt iOR*.
Beatrice Eberhard ?Has??
RraalaJaat al Gra?4 Caawvaia?-?/ el ttetU.
Ual?*r*tty ?? II?* ???ta ?? Hat? Y?/*
a WELLER SON
Or^.i-*'.- Mette U*|H . ftartVtV ColVf
l'. l?ii sa m, i.?.;?? A? i'-- ?? ?tal Ha?
Phillip Mitteil .?t
Tf?.lwr of t.? VIOLIN . I I ..Q,oir Mu?
Van 0>.t Otattla. til ti-ntti A,*, itar Jatn
T. TfcRTU/S NOBLE
ORGANIST ANO MASTER OF THE CHOIR
St. TMaaatl Char?? Flit* Ant. ?a? *,?* V.
a>r|an to. it* - I ? iXa.1
on?e ATWOOD '""'*f ?
f.. t*M WVWII 1. l- L<l<>Ot?t*a>M /<S!ci
S^-, ill T-*kh'a?' a'?iu. 1. .-'l,?y r -t a.
.'? w?t l?-J ?? s ^ i?' ?-. m e? ?

xml | txt