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New-York tribune. [volume] (New York [N.Y.]) 1866-1924, October 01, 1914, Image 12

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HINT ROCKEFELLER
TOLD TO QUIT N. H.
Ex-Senator Crane Feared
Federal Quiz Would Em?
barrass Director.
MELLEN GIVES MORE
FACTS TO U. S. JURY
Ex.President Straightens Out
Taigled Testimony Offered
in Washington.
William Rockafaller'a resigaatien
the New Haven board wae
to ail intents and purpose's by request,
according to the story told in inside
official circles, with ex-Senator W. Mur?
ray Crane in the position of the diplo
inatist who arranged for the filing of
document.
Mr. Cran? is one of the directors j
from Massachusetts and leader of the
movement to rid the road of every one j
closely identified with Mellen.
It is understood that the Senator,
pointed out to the Standard Oil man
that as his health is not good this
w ould be an excellent time for him to ',
from the board, especially as !
developments in the grund jury inves- ?
tigation now on in the federal courte I
might cause some embarrassment to i
the company if ho were still a director. (
And, further, with winn r coming on,
Mr Rockefeller could not give the af?
fairs of the company the attention a ,
director should on account of his plans !
to spend the season at Jekyl Island
and, aa his retirement had been looked
for, this was as good a time as any to
quit.
As pleasantly as possible, it is said,
?nan from Palto told Mr. liocke
I that it would be better for him j
to resign now than to be dropped at
the annuai meeting of directors at New
Haven one month hence, but that he
might wait until then if he preferred
that mode of exit. Anyway. Mr. Crane ;
urged it would be embarrassing to the I
company if as a result of the inquiry '
now on the magnate should be indicted :
while btill a meml'-T of the board.
Mr. Rockefeller's objection, made '.
during the period of weeks that the
Massachusetts director was trying to
work him around to his way of think?
ing, was in the main tu placing him
tion of quitting under
Tire. Mellen or no Mellen, he said, he
hud done nothing wrong, and while he
had rench?ri that age that ho was grad?
ually relinquishing hi? burdens, he did
not wish to appear as one running
away from anything and fearful that
his retirement would be construed by
enemies a? a partial co-.fession of
wrongdo
The decision of George F. Baker to
retire at this time, in line with his
policy announced months ago of get?
ting off many uf the boards on which
he was serving, finally decided Mr.
Rockefeller that he might as well go.
And to make easier the work
of the slate-makers, who will arrange
the ticket to be elected at next, month's
meeting, Mr. Brooker and Mr. Elton de?
cided that '.cy. too, had Lad enough,
particularly as it had been determined
to reduce the board to fifteen members.
The retirement of thia quartet leaves
only thirteen men now on the New
Haven board of the twenty-seven that
d it when Charles S. Mellen was
prime, and of theae two?A. S.
May, treasurer of the company, and
('lurk, secretary?are directors
ex-officio. It is expected that this num?
ber m be further reduced next
month, in accordance with the policy
of eliminating every possible taint of
Mellenism from the board. However,
of those remaining nono were promt
a nent in the Mellon duys, with tl
tion of William Skinner.
Charles S. Mellen, the former ?
dent of the New Haven, continued his
testimony before the federal grand
jury yesterday afternoon, and at ad?
journment was invited to appear again
this afternoon. The only other witness
culled yesterday was A. N. Hempntead,
.Ksistant secretary of the New
Haven, who appeared with record* of
the company that had been subp?naed.
Herapstead's evidence was intended
to fill in and confirm part of the story
Mellen had told, his being called at
this time evidencing a desire on the
part of the prosecutors to get the story
of the New Haven before the grand
jury in connected form. It was ?aid
yesterday that Howard Elliott, chair?
man of the New Haven, had informed
the Department of Justice that any and
all records of the company are at its
disposal and that the management ?ill
extend any aid thut may be asked m
expediting the inquiry.
Mellon'? story, as it is being told to
the granif jury,*is understood to be
more full in some respects than that
given before the Interstate Commerce
Commission. The witness explain?
more fully some points that he asserts
aa misunderstood on when he tes
: in Washington. In the main,
however, the story li essentially the
-atnc as that told before.
Mellen yesterday refused to comment
on the resignation of Rockefeller, El?
ton, Brooker und Buker beyond the
arment that he was "surprised Mr.
Rockefeller, on account of his health,"
had remained as long as he did.
BIG STORE CLOSES
FOR STOCK TAKING
Rumor Current That O'Neill
Adams Will Not Open
Doors Again.
Th? O'Neill-Adams Company closed
its stores last night for the purpose of
stock taking, according to Alexander
MacLacblan, its president. The opinion
prevailed in drygoods circles, however,
that the stores would never reopen. It
was reported that the stock on hand
would he distributed to the various
other stores controlled by the Associa?
ted Merchants' Company.
The O'Ncill-Aduin* t'ompanv cm
ployed about 1.300 persons. M*ost of
them will be placed in other positions
by the management. The puddest man
about the stores yesterday afternoon
v-aa Mr. MacLacblan. By hard work in
the last two year? he has increased the
business of the company more than 60
rit, and felt that there were good
possibilities in the enterprise, All em?
ploy?? will be paid to the end of this
The closing of the O'N'cillAdams
stores is one of the echoes of the fail?
ure of the H. B. Claflin Company. The1
firm was indebted to the latter com-,
pany approximately $4,000,000. This |
was settled by the Associated Mer?
chants' Company, which controlled the !
' the l
nl will be trans- |
Crawford
has been
?rth floor. Th* O'Neill-Adam?I
??redit fore? will remain in charge. I
riREBOATS FLOOD LINER
Blase on Bart' Anna Causes
$10,000 Loss.
Fire broke out. in the bold of the
Fabre liner Sent' Anna yeaterday morn?
ing aa ?he lay at her dock tn South
Brooklyn, and two flreboata and en?
gines on ?hore pumped fifteen feet of
water Into her hold. CapUin Paivov
?aid that the cargo consisted of silks,
olive oil and seeds, and attributed the
fire to spontaneous combustion, ecof
rlng at the Idea that any sympathiser?
with the mutineers on board had any?
thing to do with tha blata.
The loss was estimated at about $10,
000. The Sent' Anna arrived from
Naples and Marseilles with Cardinal
Parley on Monday night
? ? ?
GIRL, JOBLESS, KILLS SELF
-
Business Man's Daughter, ai
Stenographer, Inhales Gas.
I By Telegraph to The Tribe?a J
Orange. N. J., Sept, 30. -Despondent
because unsettled business conditions
had prevented her from obtaining
rteady employment. Miss Mary M.San
I ocrson, a stenographer, twenty-four
old, of 100 Gotland st, com?
mitted suicide by inhaling illuminating
gen in her room here late to-day.
Her sister Edith discovered her body
fully clothed stretched across the bed
when she returned to the house short?
ly after 6 o'clock. .
Benjamin Sanderson, the girl-,
father, who is a business man of this
city, could give no definite reason for
her action, but said she had !>een a
prey to melancholy for some time.
planIewmarket
to aid brooklyn
Goodacre andPrendergast!
May Get Terminal on
Wallabout Lands.
A terminal market in all probability
will be established on the Wallabout
Market lands, Brooklyn, as the result
of a report made yesterday by 8. H.
Goodacre, Collector of City Revenue, '
to Controller 1'rendergast.
This report, which will form the ,
basis of recommendations by Geort-e
W. Perkins, chairman of the Mayor's
food committee, points out the reduc- ?
tion in food prices which would result '
frofh such a market, where the cars !
from various railroads could be t'n
loaded at one point, eliminating double!
cartage and reloading of wagons.
The cost of the necessary tracks and |
storage facilities and improvements;
has not yet been accurately estimated, ;
but it is believed that the initial out
lay would not be over $100,000. Mr.
Perkins, Borough President Pounds
and several engineers went over the
ground yesterday.
In his report Mr. Goodacre rays the
Wallabout lands total thirty-six acres.
?in j:!8 lessees have erectc
building?, which are used for coninus
r wholesale business. During
1913 i:>,:i25 wagons offered product? in
the market?an average of 125 a day.,
The market has become the main point
of distribution for food supplies for
the Borough of Brooklyn and a large ;
part of the Borough of Queens.
"Its central location upon the water?
front of Brooklyn makes it an ideal I
place for the location of a terminal
market," continues the report, "where .
steamship and railroad shipments could '
be handled at low cost."
Mr. Goodacre says that "if a part of
the Wallabout Market lands was ret
aside for a terminal market and the
necessary tracks and buildings pro?
vided, the cars from various roads
could be unloaded at one point." This,
he says, would mean great bavin* in
inspection, loading of wagons, cartage,
etc.
Of the two plots available for su^h a
purpose the larger, which is of 150,000
square feet, he thinks the more suita
It i: vacant and bounded by
Washington av.. F st.. Market Pinza
and Wallabout Place. A terminal mar
i ket, he adds, would necessitate deepen?
ing and widening the channel of the
basin in order to permit smaller ships
access to the bulkheads. Tracks could
then be laid from the bulkheads into
the market.
Borough President Marks will make
his weekly inspection of the city's open
marketb this morning, starting at Fort
Lee Ferry at ?:3(i o'clock. He will be
accompanied by Henry Bruerc mid ?.
A. C. Smith.
RESERVrTOFFiaALS
FOR N.Y. APPOINTED
I Pierre Jay Designated Class C
Chairman System to
Operate Soon.
Washington. S\pt. 80. With the an
1 tiouncement that the new currency sys?
tem would probably be in full operation
: within the next three week?, the Fed?
eral Reserve Board to-day made pub?
lic the names of the Clase C directors
, of the reserve banks, with headquar?
ters ?? New York, St. Louis, Boston.
Richmond and Minneapolis. Directors
for the other seven reserve banks will
he announced this week.
Pierre Jay, vice-president of the Bank
i cf the Manhattan Company, of New
I York City, ?as depilated chairman
of the New York board, and Charles
Starek. national bank examiner for
New York, was made deputy agent and
vice-chairman. The third Class C di
, rector of the New York bank will be
George F. Peabody, of Lake George,
j N. Y.
i Mr. Jay, who will direet the affairs
; of the New York reserve bank, ic forty
four years old. He was graduated from
; Vale University in 1892 and later be?
came associated with tho Stock Ex?
change firm ot Post & Flagg. For thir
I teen years he was vice-president of the
I Old Colony Trust Company, of Boston,
j and from 1906 until 1909 wat; Bank
; t'omii or the State of Massa?
chusetts He has been vice-president
, of the Bank ef the Manhattan Company
? for the last five years.
j Charles Starek hue been national
| bank examiner of the New York banks
j for the last six years and previously
j did important work for the govern?
ment in cexes involving the construe
I tion of the national bank act. Prior to
i his assignment to the New York die*
j trict in 19UK Mr. Starek was the spe
j cial representative of the Treasury
Department when national banks were
! wrecked by the misapplication of funds
by trusted ofllei ef the most
| interesting of these cases was that la
j which the late Cassic Chadwick was
the principal figure.
George F. Peaked? was born at i'o
? lumbus, Go., in If ? from
I active busine*.? in IMS, withdrawing
? from the banking firm of Spencer
Trask i Co. Pivm l*.?? to 1905 he
was treasurer of the Democratic Na?
tional Committee.
A Wy for funds to perfect the or?
ganization of the Federal Reserve
Board ?rill be made on the reserve
1.links within the next few weeks, tho
t.mount needed being about >ll
far the elerieel force end
completing the organiza- I
tion work hi aid from th
appropriated for the organization com-!
mittet. '
EX-CONVICT SHOT
DEAD IN FEUD
Fired On as He Eats Sand?
wich in Front of a
Street Stand.
ASSAILANT CAUGHT
HIDING UNDER BED
Tells Police Victim Had Threat?
ened Him and He Feared
the Gang.
Pasquale Melio, a big, swarthy,
heavy-aet truck driver, loft his home
at 1. I Washington Place yesterdsy with
a loaded revolver in hi? hip pocket
He started for the Italian colony just
south of Washington Square. Turning
down Macdougal st. ar.d east on reach
ing Spring st, ho stopped at Clark st,
where on the corner "Joe" Domenico
keeps a stand and sells candles, to?
bacco, cakes, pies, coffee and frank?
furter sandwiches.
Here Melio found Joseph Palletare,
an undersixed youth who since his
marriage, two years ago has been liv?
ing to live down a pust that included a
prison record with two penitentiary
sentences.
Melio called to Palletare, who, ?till
munching a frankfurter sandwich,
turned to look. Melio tired his re- j
volver and Pallctare put up his hand
as if to ward off the bullet, which
struck bim in the breast.
Fifty feet away Mrs. Mary Murray, ?
of 213 Spring st., was buying vegeta?
bles from a street pedler. She heard
tb? shot and turned around.
"It seemed a long time before tha i
second shot was fired." said Mrs. Mur- ?
ray to Detective Frederick F. Frank
lin, on the way to Police Headquarters.
"I saw the second shot fired. It hit tho
man in the body. I screamed, 'Catch I
that man! He's killed a man!' The;
man who was hit sat down on the side- :
walk. I saw him sit down. Then he
lay down. First he lay on his tide.!
Then he turned over and lay on his ;
back, ?Then everybody ran. I saw ?ba
man who did the shooting run into 21R .
Spring st., jast near where I was ouy-!
ing vegetables to cook with the little .
steak I bought for my daughter's
luncheon. I said he ran. He didn't.
ilc staggered. He was so frighteaed
that I could see it, and when he came
toward me J wasn't frightened, lor I
knew he couldn't shoot any more.
"I went with the crowd. I taw- a man
open the dead man's shirt. There were
two holes where the bullets hit him. i
Then I went home. That's all I know." j
Before Detective Fianklin took Mrs.
Murray to Police Headquarters D
tives Castone, Devons and several po- j
licemen surrounded the house wh.-re ;
the slayer had taken refuge and nr
restad him under a bed on the first
floor.
When he was taken before Captain
Cray, head of the detective bureau,
Cray, who knew the dead man, said lo
Melio:
"Why did you have \o use a gun on I
that little fellow'.' Why, you could J
have handled him with your fists."
"Say. 'Cap,' " replied Melio, who wa.? :
trembling with fear, "it wasn't that..
It was my life or his. I was afraid of
his aansr. He threatened to kill me, !
and a month ago he shot at my brother
John."
Palletare's widow. Angelina, told ,
Captain Cray a different story. She j
said:
"Melio owned the liltle candy and
cigar store at ??.'l Bre?me st., which I
my husband bought from him last !
April. He couldn't make it a success
and we did. Then he tried to buy it |
back. My husband refused and he
threatened to kill him. One of the as- j
histant district attorneys will tell you j
that. I went to him, to the Assistant j
District Attorney, and he said: 'He!
hasn't hurt your husband yet?' I said:
'No.' 'hen he said: 'We can't do any?
thing. Tell the police ' "
The records show she told the police
and a patrolman was placed in front of
the store on several occasions, and
then when nothing happened the watch
was taken off.
- ? ?
FARM PRODUCE BY MAIL
Brooklyn Postmaster Plans
Direct Service.
1 run, farm tu table by parcel post is
likely to gai a trial in Brooklyn, ac
cordi i Kelly of that
borough, who returned yesterday from
| a conference wit hPostmaster General
Burleson in Washington. He said ho
| had obtained h "partial promise" to
j give the plan a trial. A simile
| teni of direct parcel post shipment
from farm to consumer is In operation
I in at least ten Western cities.
"Long Island is covered with truck
gardens, and there is a sjlendid oppor?
tunity to copy the Western idea right
here in Brooklyn." said Postmaster
! Kelly. "I would have a big parcel post
depot at the Atlantic nv. station of the
Long Island road, where fresh eggs,
vegetables and other produce could be
received and distributed direct to the
consumers."
Postmaster Kelly has also planned
to act on the suggestion of George W.
Perkins, of the Mayor's committee on
food supply, and establish a new parcel
. post station at Wallabout Market,
making it possible for telephone orders
to be delivered quickly at a moderate
co?t.
HINT AT THREAT
STIRS COTTON MEN
Officers and members of the board of
managers of the New York Cotton Ex?
change were aroused yesterday over a
letter which they said had been re
' eeived from a member of 'ie firm of
W. R. Craig & Co., threatening to hold
the exchange liable for the losses he
was feeing through the exchange re
| maining closed. The inference was
I drawn by those who were familiar
with the contents of the letter that
suit would be brought to reopen the
exchange unless torn, action in that
direction was taken by the board of
managers in the near future.
At the offices of W. R. Ouig & Ca.,
at H broad st., it wat Mated that no I
?ait had been tiled to force the re- I
opening >f the Cotton Exchange, nor!
wat. such a suit contemplated by a '
member of that firm. Regarding any i
ot'.ier communication which a member
of the firm may have had with the ex- j
change authorities on the question of \
reopening no statement would be
made.
In Cotton Exchange circles the gos?
sip was that the member of the firm
mentioned had been involved in the S.
H. P. Pell failure and was endeavor- ,
ing to recoup his losaes through short i
contracts entered into sinee the dos- i
ing of the exchange. According to a '
resolution passed by the board of man
aera, such transactions should not be ?
recognized. One member said j
day that the board had not considered '
seriously the letter received from tho I
member of W. R. Craig & Co. '
TRAPPED BY WOMAN
SHOT AS HE FLEES
Man Accused of Robbing
Apartment Dying from
Detective's Bullet.
LURED TO RETURN
LOOT, HE'S ARRESTED
Wife of Woollen Dealer Says
She Losr Key to Riverside
Home on 'Bill
Following the robbery of a River
Ida I'rive apartment last week, Hubert
J. Eaton, who snys he is a privat
rotary In the aaaaloj ?f the Morara
Champagne Company, was shot by de?
tect iv i- when tie tried to escape from
them laM night, and is nt the point o(
death in the Knickerbocker Hospital.
Eaton [a thirty years old and lives
with his wife and child at 010 West
178th at lie confessed, the police say,
to robbing the apartment of Arthur E.
Pike, ut mo Rirereide Drtre. Mr. Pike
is in the woollen and cotton business
at H Leonard at.
Mr* Pike said that she wa.i intro?
duced to Eaton in the Hotel Astor lost
Thursday, he representing himself as
H. W. Williams. Later he rode on e
'bus as far aa I.er BOOM. <>n thi.i
journey Mrs. Piha dropped her bag and
the contents were spilled out. upon
reaching her apartment she discovered
that the key to the apartment. ?a.i
missing.
tin Pridoy the ;'lk.?. apartment wan
entered and twenty-five pieces of jew
ilry were taken, in addition to a large
quantity of gloves and silk stockings.
On Tuesday lire. Pike received a tele?
phone call from Eaton, in the course of
which ho boasted that he had com- i
mitted the burglary and that he would '
return the stolen goods for ?500.
Mrs. Pike asked him to call up the !
following day. and put the matter in i
the hands of Detectives Thomas Horan
end David Poley. The detective? in?
structed ber to agree to Eaton's plan
and to arrange a meeting place. Eaton
suggested West End av. and 103d ?'.,
and named 9 o'clock on Wednesday
evening as the tin: .
Last night Mr?. Pike met Eaton at
'?pulaled hour, while tl.
tectives hovered In the background,
ready to make the arrest as toon :is ,
Katon accepted the money. Katon,,
f ho was carrying a small te
walked with the woman to Riverside i
Drive, and there the detectives pounced I
upon him.
Ksioii escaped and ran down-River?
side Drive, but gave himself up when
tha detective- fired erer his h end. At '
the headquarters of th" -1th DetOCtiva
Branch, 342 West 123d -t.. he gave hie
correct name and asked that his wife
be notified. The stolen jewelry, tho
police lay, was found in his pockets,
the satchel containing only paper.
While being searched the arrested
man suddenly wrenched hinirelf free
and made a dash for the street, then
ran up l2Sd st. to Manhattan av. The
detectives followed and Folcy fired,
whereupon the man fell. The bullet
entered his left side.
Dr. Kilcourse, of the Knickerbocker
Hospital, said that there is slight
ehaaee for the man's roeovi
At the West 178th at address Eaton
hr.c an apartment on the fourth floor,
where he lived with his wife, two-year,
old child and a brother-in-law. The
wife and child are in Canada.
When the detectives searched Eaton's
clothing in the hospital they say they
found a typewritten letter addressed
to Mrs. Piko demanding IS.OOQ on
penalty of cxposui i
Mrs. Pike, the defectives said, is the
daughter of .1. Spencer Turner, a cot?
ton broker.
WOUNDED, H? QUITS
HOSPITAL, "CURED"
Case of Man Police Sought on
Murder Charge Called
"Alcoholism."
Sought by the police on a charge of
murder and with two bullet wounds
in his body, one in the left breast
perilously near the heart and another
? ?eft arm, Timothy McNally,
twenty-nine years old, of J.'';2 Eaal
st., was dragged out of the Kast River
by the crew of a Blackwell'^ Island
boat late last Saturday night and taken
to the Metropolitan Hospital, on the
island.
There his case was diagnosed merely
as otic of "alcoholism and submer?
sion." He remained in the hospital un?
til lute Tuesday afternoon, wht
WOO discharged as "cured," without
any of the attending physicians or
nurses detecting the fact that he was
severely wounded.
The police fonnd McNally at his
home Tuesday night, following hi
chnrge from the hospital, and he wa
taken before Captain Cray, of the hom?
icide bureau, at Police Headquarters,
early yesterday morning, where he col
froni weakness and loss of
blood. It was then discovered that he
was- dangerously wounded, and he was
rushed to Belleroe Hospital. The bul?
let was removed. It was the first time.
according to the physicians at Belle
vue, that the wound hud received at?
tention.
The police charge that on Saturday
night McNally, while drinking heavily,
shot and killed Miss Margret O'Con?
nor, of 50;i Third av., after she had
upbraided him for his intemperance.
After slaying the girl, they say, the
murderer turned his weapon on him?
self, in an effort to end his life. Fail?
ing, he made his way to the foot of
lOth st., and jumped into the
river.
At the hospital he gave his name as
Timothy ReilK- and his address as
:>:ir> East KHh it He was disrobed and
bundled into bed, and his case was re?
corded as one of "alcoholism and sub?
mersion "
STORM BANKER'S HOUSE
Depositors Qnelled by Police
?Bomb T reat Alleged.
A crowd of about fifty depositors in
the bank of Adolph Mandel, 1D5 Riv
ington st.. stormed Mendel's home, at
60 East B7( t, and de?
manded admittance to the banKer's
apartment. There has been a run on
Mandel'* banking house for several
weeks.
The police reserves were called, and
arrested Nathan Goldhaum. of 605 East
6th st. Goldbaum, according to the
elevator boy of the apartment, had
made two previous visits during the
day and had threatened to produce a ]
Lomb if he were not taken to the Man- ?
del apartment.
?
College Men in Moose League.
Now York State Progressives organ?
ized the Davenport-Hamlin-Colby Col
lrn's League last night in a meet?
ing at headquarters at tha Hotel Man?
hattan. William 11. Hotchkiss pre?
sided, and Mr. Ilamlin and Mr. Colby
atldreeaed the gathering. The details
of organization will be perfect.-d at a
ir.eetioa Tuesday night, when tha mem?
bers ?ill take up the work of spread?
ing the Progressive propaganda.
GAS LOG LEAK FATAL
Ex-Harvard Man Pound Dead
in Brooklyn Home.
Frvlng Vldaud, twenty-nine years
eld, a member of the Harvard Club and
a salesman for the Ftrastone Tire <"m
pany, 1871 Br-j.-dway, was found dead
In his bed at hij home, 1?1 Joraletnon
at., Brooklyn, yesterday. Gas was
??scaping from a partly opened jet in n
gas log. Vidaud's parent-?., Mr. and
Mi:.. Robert P. Vidaud, who are old
i residents of the heights, were at th?-ir
I sumi:i> ity. The
bafty wum oiseovercd h> las dead man'.
| sh?tcr, Mrs. Honnanct Howard, of 10'i
Joralemon st., when sh?- treat to open
j the house to get r the home
? coming of tkl
Young Vidaud came homo from
I Washington on Tuesday night. It is
! supposed lie lighted the gas log to
warm the ,iou . tad "n retiring failed
i completely to ihut off the gas. He was
a ineinl. i o? Harvard, class '<'?'?
?
PREACHER WARRIOR SLAIN
Missionary Killed Leading
Germans at Verdun.
Montclait, N. J., Sept. 29. Informa
lion iva?; received here to-day by the
Rev. Dr. Herbert F. Randolph, pastor
i of the First M.-thodist Episcopal
Church, that the Rev. Dr. Frederick
; Roesch, missionary pastor from the
? Montclnir church, utationed in Algiers,
had b*>en killed leaiiing a company of
Geraten troops at Verdun.
I>r. ?.poach was a lieutenant in the
German army. He had represented tho
?lair church for four years, going
to hi-: t'.-l.l din-el from Germany. He
was a graduate of Heidelberg In ?ver?
ity. When i'r. Roesch was appointed
a missionary John R. Mott, of Mont?
clnir, ?aid that the appointee was one
of the most promising missionaries of
his acquaintance.
tei?pIo?Tinquiry
further delayed
Commission Grants Time
to Get Data on Value of
Company's Property.
Investigation of the rates charged by
fh? N'ew York Telephone Company in
this city was resumed yesterday by the
Public Berries Commission for tho Jd
Distrirt in the assembly room of the
>1( tropolitan Life Building. It is con?
tends! by the commission that the
complainants already have made out :i
prima facie case for the reduction of
certain rates, and that the burden fall??
on the company l?i introduce evidence
in rebuttal hs to the value of its New
Vor!, plant.
The hearing yesterday led to spar?
ring an.i argument between Seymour
Van Sar tvoord, chairman of the com ?
ion, und John I.. Swayse, counsel
for the company. The chairman made
a determined effort to pin down the
company'?- representative to a definite
date on which the company could sub?
mit n completo valuation and inventory
of its property in this city. Mr.
Swayte stated that the company could
| probably submit such a report by June
1 nex'
in while Mr. Swayze promised to
submit supplementary figures to tho
approximate valuation of the con?
property furnished the commis?
sion in 1910. He said he could do this
within a week, und Chair.nan Van
Santvoord adjourned the hearing to
Octobi r J
An attempt was made by L. P. Hair,
counsel for the commission, to intro?
duce in evidence data relative to the
' cost of telephone equipment, picture?,
?raya? made strenuous ob?
jection, contending that evidence of
| that kind would open the doors to
company which manufactures
telephone equipment to rush in with
their own picture gallery.
"if you want tr> get such evidence op
, the record." said Mr. Swayze, "subp?n.?
representatives of the company and
get them on the stand, where we can
I crosa-e?amine them and find out if
they know what they are talking
. about."
The objection was sustained. While
? counsel for the company declared that
he had no evidence to offer at this
time, he urged the necessity of going
' slow with the investigation in order
to get at all the facts and arrive at an
.-quitable conclusion. He said that the
telephone company would co-operate
in every way possible with the com
, mission s experts to facilitate the la?
I vestigation._
3 DEAD, 2 MISSING,
IN FIREWORKS FIRE
, Explosion Destroys Building,
Killing Pain Company's
President.
Chicago, Sent. 30. ?H. H. Thearle,
president of the Pain Fireworks Dis?
play Company of America, and two em
were killed here to-day in a
lire and ?eries of explosions which de?
stroyed the one story brick building
occupied solely by the company at
1820 South Wabash av.
Two missing employes also are be?
lieved to have lost their lives. Three
persona were injured and taken to hos
! pit?is. Identification of the dead wis
made by R. J. Byrnes, manager of the
company, who owes hin life to the fact
that he had just stepped into the street
when the first explosion from an un
located cause occurred.
II.? dead are H. B. Thearle, presi?
dent of the company; E. M. Connor, a
salesman, and Florence Hill, stenog?
rapher.
The missing are John Costello and
H. 1. Wolfe.
Thearle was a member of the Green
Room Club, Friars Club and Pleiades
Club in New York and of a number of
Chicago clubs. He became president
of the Pain Company when it was pur
i chased and reorganized after going into
iver's hands in 1911. The origi?
nal Pain company was forced to the
wall by the sane Fourth agitation.
? ?
| Tuckerton Ready to Reopen.
Washington, Sept. 30.?The Tucker?
ton ?rirtlaaa station, which was put out
of commission by the burning out of
it? generator, will resume operatiohs
either Friday or Saturday, it was
learned ?it the Navy Department to?
night.
The naval ?aMffti who have been
working to re pi i r the damage ?
to complete their task Friday, when it
is planned to reopen the station to
communication tetween the (Jaita 1
and Germany.
IIUIKI.S AMI KKSTAI KANT.H.
N IN Nl.WAKK. N J., ?ton ?t
BACH'S HOTLL
441 Broad bt . or.? bloes from D. L. a W
R. R. All car? p?a? door it??!? ? la cart?
HOI i I I \M.!XI\
V.tli ?. ?oil Mil Ant.
PA?S CINC. INSTRUCTION.
DANCING CARNIVAL ,D.? ? ? ?" ?
" ? 4 r j after*
r.ooo teil emitas. Oran-' Cactral I'aJict. I.-ii <
I ?> . uv- ??"Hi it. ?ntrav? T(r?; ?h?-.. ?fll, ?J
Lut lata it. aed ?M. SU Watt lista et,
MRS. S?ATON FREED
BY YOUNG JURORS
Talesmen Quickly Decide
on Verdict in Death
Case of Actor.
Hackeneack, N. J-, Sept. 30. A jury
of young men decided this afternoon
that Mr?. Alice L. Seaton did not kill
her husband, Frederick R. .Seaton, who
'was found dead in hia home on Elm
'av., Bogota, Hackensack, August 11.
In his charge to the jury Justice
I Pnrker- -possibly because of Mr
'ton's admission that she was intox.
? cated when the actor was shot to death
!?intimated that a verdict of guilty of
'murder In the second degree would pl??
cete justice.
Only one juror went Into the jury
; room believing Mrs. Seaton guilty. Ho
voted again her three times. The
?other eleven got to work on him, tut
they consumed one hour and a half in
convincing him that the woman had not
committed the deed.
The jury's announcement brought no
hvstcrics from Mr- Seaton. It brought
? some from women spectators; any ver?
dict would have. Mrs. Seaton looked at
i the women. Her eyes and mouth ex
' pressed ennui, .'she rose, faced the
judge without a bit of nervousness and
i said:
"F want to thank every one who has
'? aided me in my case."
"The court has only done its dutv,"
Justice Parker remarked. He then told
, her she was free.
Her sister brought the woman's
three-year-old child, George Cohan Boa?
| ton, to her side. She kiaaod both. They
slipped by the waiting crowd to the
jail. Mrs. Seaton took a final look at
her cell, told a matron to send the few
articles of clothing home and, with her
boy and her sister, motored to her
house. i
There was nothing striking in the
proceedings prior to the jury's decision.
Mrs. Seaton's lawyer in his summing
i up said the name and career of her
child would be stained if she were
found guilty. The prosecutor said she
had besmirched her child by testifying
! that her husband had engaged in af
I fairs with other women.
: Held for Shooting Playmate.
Philip Gerard, sixteen, of 1127 Cley '
av., The Bronx, who was arrested
! Tuesday, charged with shooting John
McShane, hie playmate, of 6 Gouve-I
neur Place, was held in 51,000 for ex- '
amination Wednesday by Magistrate
Hou (i- in the West Farms court yes- ;
tcrday. McShane is in the Fordham
Hospital.
eejV
May we he)})?
We've everything to make
motoring comfortable, at
prices that add to its attrac?
tions.
Motor coats for crisp Fail
weather.
Complete chauffeurs' out?
fit livery, Norfolk suits,
i puttees and leggins,caps, gog?
gles, gloves and gauntlets.
Irish wool steamer nigs,
liandwoven? mighty attrac?
tive and comfortable for
Fall motoring.
Scotch knitted jackets and;
waistcoats, sweaters, macki-j
naws, Thermos bottles.
Everything for owner and
chauffeur.
October first!
Fall suits and overcoats.
Fall hats, shoes.underwear.
Everything for Fall for
men and boys.
Roukrs Pf.et Company,
Three Broadway Stores
at at at
Warren St. 13th St 34th St.
THE NEW FALL STYLE
2 for 25 Cta.
EARL A WILSON
_AM?SEMENTS.
44TH ST THfATRC, Hm si. v.. ?f rrw.v 2V~
TW1C0 HA.U.Y (tad. bur.l?>). : 30 A S-30,iaa'
"IRELAND A NATION"
' "ira made I
V,0,,u " Oe?aeare a 9???
w ' <-iha ot it-., L,..
CENTURY.!!;,V vV,;1,"!',,'-""
To-<la? Mat.. Frl. * sal. Ntohc. THAVIAT? ??
I I I Oal WUUA1I T>U ?
Vast Wrik. TnAVUTA ' * XOHEN<lHl\ ?
l-ol'l r.AH COXCtOT rvTMT aVKDAl nicht
IRVING PLACE THEATRE
Tin RODAT, KUlliAY. I yfli UC| u -rriT ?
HATL'KHAY i.vt.-.vr.a. } wILHCLII TELL I
COLUMBIA BURLESQUE
Bli-LY WAT80N ANO HI? BIU MOW
. COLONIAL '*?'??:
"uni, ?ut. sic. j atetp. ooodrka 'u?Ktoi
Housekeeping
Linen Month
at McCutcheon's
Now is the time to replenish your stock of
Bed Linens and Towellings for fall and winter
use, and at no place in America can you find
as attractive and comprehensive a collection
as at "The Linen Store." The prices quoted
are regular McCutcheon values. They arc
not reduced, but we know that you cannot get
better values anywhere:
Pillow Com??$1.25. 1.50. 2.00. 2.50. 3.00pair.
Single Bed SAeef#-$5.50. 7.50. 6.50. 9.00 pair.
Double Bed Sheets?W>. 9.00. 10.50, 14.50 pr.
Hand embroidered and lace trimmed Bed
Linens, of all kinds, in large variety.
*
Hemmed Towels
per dozen.
$2.75, 3.00, 3.50, 4.50, 6.00
$3.00, 3.50. 4.50, 6.00.
Hemstitched Towels
8.00 per dozen.
Guest Room Towels ?Very elegant and exquis?
ite Towels for Gueat Room use ranging as high as
$36.00 per dozen.
Turkish Bath Towels?25c. 30c. 40c. 50cand 60c.
James McCutcheon & Co.
5th Avenue, 34th and 33d Streets
AMUSEMENTS.
AMU8EMEVT8.
COHAN
HARRIS'
4 ASTOR
THEATRE
H'w*r a 4Sth hi.
TeL 187 Brjraut.
NOW
En?, at 1 30. Ha?.
Wad A flat, at 2 1?.
Pr?ralar Mit lei
GS? COHAN'S BIGGEST TRIUMPH
PLAY ASTONISHED
"EASILY THE MOST INTERESTING
PLAY OF THE SEASON. "?Eve. Sun.
A VITAL AMERICAN DRAMA
APPEALING TO ALL HUMANITY
B'?aJ A 4*ii St. Ef?a. at s : 0. fi A ICTX/ 'r,U?*TrU!. B'?a
Mala. Wf.L and Bat. at I SO. ! ?fil A. I I aaaAOaMi Ha '
THESE NEW YORK LEAOINQ THEATRES HAVE NO 0EALIN08 WITH THE TYSON CO.
lmpiri;
M? DREW ??I RUTH CHATTERTON
???a. aaraaaa,.. .. w? ?_ H.rald. ! ,N A M\V IOMKDY BT ISA? "
HE PRODIGAL HUSBAND DADDY LONG-LEGS
LYCEUM '
Bt, i rar B'wa>. rjra. 8:10.
:ay a: 1 .Sal.. 2 10.
niii
ZIZGFELD DANSE DE FOUIE,
|>L: A I ?TI Cl II <r.RRY NIUHTLY 'Kr-apt Sun.).
DC/\?J 1 IrUL i\\ Mi-RIKM K "" Thaatrt.
Af iVFNTI IDFf:i<NK8T LAWp,,)RD
r\U r l_,l^ I ?^r?;U. MI(rt WHIP-KKN
BELASCO HEXT TUESDAY
Jj-BOX OFFICE 0PEN8 TO-DAY.
DAVIS
LEO DITRICHSTEIN
The Phantom Rival
I IHF H I V U s' * ' ' l''w?r" En. 8 50!
L,UL ' ? ? Mats. (Tod (l'r>p.) A Hat
DOUGLAS FAIRBANKS in
HE COMES UP SMILING
1:30. l'ip Nm? km
Tal. 3W3 Bninl_
KNICKERBOCKER. Ratl. 3K?IV Kn. 114
Mr.tlTVM) Wadn?<1a? A FatuMa? at : It
JIMA !)? IN A 1.1) "."1 Til
8ANDEH60N BRIAN CAWTH0M
THE GIRL FROM L TAB
GEO. rnillirC THEATRE. B*?Tbj ?;,1 IM O.
M. UUnAn a vt?t., u? ii?op.i a 8?t. ia
i?i7nii?f.wmiH<
I A LAUGHING RIOT ;
HUDSON
Waal 44th st. Laut Mat. Bat??,
LA8T 4 TIMES.
A UitrrtlTe ro?My, THE
nCrUBI.IV vui3 ?Tod (Pop.) A SU.,'.':30. I PALL
LEW FIELDS ?n
DUV1MY
V MONDAY, OCT. 5, Seats Toil)
IMLaM?II'I'IIa?
CHAJILiS PROHMAV pr'awtl
IHE HcAnT . Trllcf
FULTOM M' t iV ?"sVTT3
? TWIN BEDS
a? in. ala to ii.
THE MI8LEADINQ LADY."
Sat Mart vv>r? THK DClOaT."
_I Efaninfi
GRANDO.H.
Mat, Sat
flLOBE' Jft -J 1.1 ? 1 OAILY.
! Tha.Mr Wll ?1 111 f 1 \ IS 811. I
tLTINGE1,1 m ?w ** B'"*>- ????
MU Wrl (Pit
mum
232
Thaatra and Dama Oa Plarrarte
Broadway at 32d St.. at 2. 3:30, 8 4 S:30 P.M.
LEAGUES UNDER lile SEA THRILL.
llr?l ?n.l i* 1> Submarine M.nlon Picture?.
DANSE DE PIERRETTE.
g. llrllfhtllil ?
Frank McKa?'t B?cl?ty Orehwtr?.
?special Afu-rnuou Tea? ?i.d DanrUif.
? ATOP NEW YORK TMeATPa O30n?2*?
Jardin dloansl
B'flnnlni To-nl|ht.
EVELYN NESBIT
(KaU
THAW)
AND JACK CLIFFORD.
BONNIE CLASS I LEWIS SL0DEN.
I flURAPRP " ,r,i* ,e * !0
LUriUAunc; . . v r MA1INEh; SAT._ a:M.
EDITH TALIAFERRO. Molly Paar???.
Mara? ! a Hi.--.UI Co. hi
TIPPINI. THE WINNER." _
Pit.ni F R 1:i w"t ?2d st. Km. tm\
wanuLtn -,Utj1 Wrd (1,(1I), 4 S?, ? M
S^CiaEEEDI
SYMPHONY
Society of New York
1VAI.TKR ?AMRONCH. Conduct?*.
Eighi Friday Aftt.
Subscription* Three to Klfht'Dollar*
Sixtei n Sunday !
Sub?eript|..n<i Six to Eighteen Dollar?
Mm?. ?CHUMANN-HEINK Mr. ?ABRILOWIlMI
Mm?. FREMSTAU Mr riSBUIIT
I M ma. UERHARDT Mr da GOiOrttt
' Mr. filTTELSON Mr SAM.AVS.tr
I Mr. KREISLER Mr. MOFMAN?
' Mm?. GLUCK Mr. BORWICK
Mr. BARRER? Mr. BUSORI
: Mr. BAUER Mr. FLESCH
| Buba. -
H? Amsterdam u!^ ?
NEXT SAT. NIGHT. OCT. J. Saab Se?.
BENEFIT AMERICAN
RED CROSS
Kla* A riaaasaa i M?*te?l r.?m?i/ Ma*4?i?w?
THE LITTLE CAFE
OBIOINAL SKW VnltK COKPAXT
HKiir i ?
AMMfRSTEIN'S?D?iry Matlao?
KIU*betj Brlc? ?i.d t'La?. Kir?. Coon?J
Ia M air?-. Mr?. Oto. Toa Ttm?it>. I? I
H
tH.PBQDSOMEI
wja*jg{^?aygaa?B?^Bna?^aa?as?v^?aBa>^a?Baw??~.
WINTER GARDEN
B'tvaj ? 'Oth. ?**
-, T..-Sari'
B?'!*aL..ll
NUIi ta.
PASSING SHOW OF IM
.Mat?.
WARS ?Sk _^._
?HUBERT Th??. ft. * ?"?< ? TU CT
THE ^.. .? . *
.#>?_-k-_ _?. COMEDY TU?*, ?MflniilR? TONI?MT al ??
WORLD Eis.., coNaSEQUtN
?i- FAVERSHAM
MLLE. DORZIAT.
BOOTH
MONO?, OCT. 5, SilO
"THE MONEY
MAKERS"
ni ARLE? KLEIN'S NEWEKT 1'LAT.
SEAT SALE TO-DAY
THEATlt?;. a -
11.M M?ll"?? i?'"
HAWK THELAWr?; LAND
CASINO. Em. ?US. M?t?. W?rJ * ??*"*?[
Frllil Scheffln Pretty Mra. $*?
JIT H ST. The?. I-;??.
THE THIRD PARTY :^Vy?gJ?!
Muln? EHMttt. Urn. a H Mat? ? at * **
^c^^'WHATISLOVE?
LYRIC. 1-fcnlrra ?IS. M?I?M? ??????<?>?**
"?TAT MISS DAISY TB
THKArKl..
?Ma as.,
IV. of B'waj
CORT
1 :
K?a?. at 1:11 P. M. <B:T?nt
i
-1
STANDARD
s
THE MARRIAGE GAME
?*
.1 . HOfif
.. ?f.V
THE STORY ?

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