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New-York tribune. [volume] (New York [N.Y.]) 1866-1924, October 20, 1914, Image 14

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MYSTERY CAR
RIDES STIR
B?ICSDUPB
DepositorsXommittec, In?
dignant, to Ask Parole
Board to Investigate.
DEMAND CONVICT
SERVE FULL SENTENCE
District Attorney Cropsey
Will Call on Warden for
Truth of Auto Story.
WOULD ASK STATE
TO START PROBE
Kings County Prosecutor Feels
That He Has No Jurisdic
.?on in Case.
Intente indignation ivas expressed
'?st night at a meeting of the I'nion
Bank depotitors' committee when the
chairman, J. E. Rohrer, of 410 Feni
snore at, Brooklyn, called to the at?
tention of the committee the fact, ex?
posed by The Tribune, that Bank
Wrecker David A, Sullivan was ac?
corded unusual privil?ge? at Sing Sing. |
The meeting of the depositors' com?
mittee waa held in Room 208, in the
s larendon Hotel, and the chief speaker
was Assistant District Attorney Gold
ttein. of Kings County.
Earlier in the day District Attorney
S'ropss-y had taid to a reporter for The
Tribune that, although he was much
interested in the disclosures of Mr.
Sullivhn's automobile rides, he felt
?ha* he had no jurisdiction over the
matter.
"It is clearly n case *"or the State
Prisons' Department to deal with,"
ssid Mr. Cropsey.
"Certainly, su infringement of the
regulations and rules of that depart?
ment has been committed if Mr. Sulli?
van has been allowed these unusual
privileges, but I do not know that any
crime has been committed.
Cropsey May Demand Proof.
"I feel, however, that I am justified
In sending a letter of inquiry to War?
den McCormick. end, if he does not
prove these ?tories to be false, I have
alto a right to call upon the state au?
thorities to investigate.
Mr. Goldstein, who conducted tne
case of the Union Bank depositors
against Sullivan, was even more em?
phatic at the meeting of the depositors'
?ommittee, which was held to urge
upon the candidates for Assembly and
Senate the necessity for the passage
of the so-called Union Bank bill.
This bill it intended to reimburse
the depositors for their losses in the
bank. As Mr. Goldstein explained, the
I'nion Bank was closed in January,
Iribs and was reopened the following
August, despite the fact that the State
Banking Department realized that trie
bank was undoubtedly insolvent.
"In new of the evidence in the p.it
session of the 6'ate banking authori?
ties," said Mr. Goldstein, "t 1? a
gra.e iiiie?tion whether or not these
authorities bad any right to permit
the opening of the institution.
S so-called Unioi 1 pro- ?
simply for the review of the evi
in this case by the Board of
' -. In the ?
action is found, then tl i depositors will
have a cas? in civil law against trie
state.
"I! is rnosl portant not only to the
depositors hut to the publie at large to
r.scertain whether or not the nocturnal
motor-rides attributed to Mr. Sullivan
''ally taken place. In the event
that such ineidents in the prison life
of thi? con- cted bank official are mat?
ters of common knowledge, then cer?
tainly this committee of depositors has
s. right to demand bj whose authority
such unusual rights were grunted to
this convict in preference to hie fel?
lows.
"There thould be no discrimination
in his favor, ?nil if it can be shown that
any such discrimination has been
shown to him. then this committee of
depositor* and the District Attorney's
office have the right to lay the facts
before the Board of Parole.
Should Serve Sentence.
"Sullivan wae sentenced te
indo termina!
a minimum o? four ye?i
month? as a maximum. If it ?e true
tlit?? prison regulation? have h, >
iated in his fa. is properly
within the rights of this comm,
depositors to bring the ca-" before the
State Board of Parole and Insist that
the convict in qu etee his
meximuni term ol imprisonment with
out the interference of the Parolo
it..aril."
,1. K. Rohrer, chairman of the ?
live commit!-? of the Union Bank de?
positors, ?aid thnt the principal object
?>f the committee vas to determine
whether or not the stale should be held
responsible to the depositor? foi the
lost they have sustained, due to the
negligenr? ami misconduct oi the Bunk?
ing Depnitsnent in permitting the Inion
Bar k to ??'?.,. ? 1908. He added :
"li is a mattei
for th? defrauded depositors to know
whether or no! the cl n their
losses arid tne reputed wrecker of the
bank was being permitted to ride
around the country as thong
free." It such conduct wa-. permitted
him, he .?aid. then tne depositor? had a
right to demand an investigation.
Sullivan spent all of yesterday at
eterices] vvork in Sing Sing, an.)
the mysteriout automobile in which he
i cured Weetcheeter with Warden
McCormn-k, didn't burn up many
road?. The vv.-.rtlon. disturbed I
Tribute's itory of the life of ee
Brooklyn bank wrecker was leading at
his psrial institution, denied I
to *?! n he tu ?peeled of
beir.tr m ?rested m the movements of
the raarhiae.
The Secretary of State's office in
Albsny took up the matter restartiay,
and learned ovei the long distance
telephone from the New Yon offic?, at
ttl West 74th st. that McCormiek, aa
agent and warden of Sing Sin?;, ore
tented an affidavit September .'t for
an automobile license ami got L4651,
which is exempt from oayment.
Almost all af Weetchester Count-.
remember,-d ? <--'i-i o?- h?1 the car had
- with the '
ly dressed Sullivan in the baol
and tl ? t the a/he '
Mourn )? ,
?
?
1
lcad
EAGLE AT POSTOFFICE
Big Bird Steals Pigeon and
Dines Atop the Woolworth.
A bald-headed eagle, or a hawk,
downtown ornithologists disagreeing
as to the species, paid a visit to th? ?
Woolworth tower vesterday afternoon I
and kept tenants of surrounding build- i
inrs busy looking out of windows.
The bird was first seen flying laxily ,
over the Postofie? building. After
cutting half a doren circle?, it swooped
down suddenly anil seized one of the
fat, sophisticated pigeon? that make
the Bostofflce a base of operation. Tho
bird then flew with its quarry to a
gargoyle that .iuts from the twenty
seventh floor of the Woolworth tov er
and disposed of its luncheon.
An adventurous photographer, who
attempted to get a full face portrait
of the bird of prey, ?uceeeded in ?car?
ing it away.
DR. SEARS IN CONTEMPT
New Thought Head Fails to
Pay Ex-Wife's Counsel Fee.
Dr. Frans W. Sears, leader of one
faction of the New Thought Church,
whose wife, Dr. Julia Seton Beers,
obtained a du one from him last
spring, was adjudged in contempt of
court yesterday by Justice Blanchard i
for his failure to pay Ins wife $500
as counsel fees.
The trial of the suit, in which the
wife named Miss Pauline 1.angel?n, an
actress and member of the husband'a
faction of the church, produced much
bitterness between supporters of the
two loaders of the New Thought move?
ment. The testimony of Mrs. Sears
was strengthened by thai furnished
by a group of women who had consti
? lag sngels"
?o keep wateh over Dr. Seen.
The next move will be a jail com- i
mitment, unless Dr. Seats pays.
IN QUICKSAND'S
GRIP, BUT SAVED
Well Borer Fed Through Tube
for 48 Hours, 25 Feet
Under Ground.
Ware, Mass* ??ft. IP. After forty?
tight *nent ?n quick
Karid twenty- '? ? feel below the surface
of the earth, Maurice A'l?n was rea
cued late to-day by n gang of fifty
firemen, policemen and citizens, who
du? a ditch fifty feel long and thirty
:) to reach him.
Allen was boring a well on Satur?
day, when he struck quicksand and
sank. All attempts at rescue by lad?
ders and i opes failed owing to ear'h
slides. Tl-.c trench was then dug to
. a foot of Allen's position, and
a man lowered on a rone carefully re?
, the remaining sand and brought
Allen to the surface.
Alien was conscious when rescued,
but very weak. He said he had been
unable to help himself, as his feet
were firmly held by n piece of plank?
ing. A bit and law, which were low?
ered to him this morning, enabled him
to work one of his feet free, but an- '
other cave-in buried the tools and left :
him as helpless as before.
An improvised diver's helmet made
from a barrel was lowered into the
hole just about midnight last night.
nnd th? man was supplied with sir by a
pump. Pood and stimulants were fed
to him through a tube. Physicians who
have beer, in attendance during the .
dir. seid that he probably would suffer
no permanent ill effect from bis expert-,
enee.
MISS PANKHURST IN COURT
Militant Only a Visitor and
Likes Judges Lenient.
Miss ( hristabel Pankhnrst 'ikes
American courts better than English
though she has no intention of
?.pending any great amount of time
enjoying their hospitality on this
visited
court yesterday afternoon,
with Miss Carol Beckwith.
low wi
so Miss Pankhurst was denii th?
I how America
handles obstreperous women.
Miss Pankhnrst plans to make a
? ?
ter her met I I Sat?
urday aftemooi
number oi ts at
luncheon at the Ritz Carlton to-day.
Six boxes for the Carnegie Hall meet
ing have been given I lera of
the New York suffrage societii
show th.it there i no ill will between :
the militant and the local leaders,who
are getting np meetings of their own. j
HONOR FOR CAPT. BARON
Bronze Tablet To Be Placed
on the Nieuw Amsterdam.
A hand (um bronze tablet in honor!
the Holland-American Line and of
-, Jan Baron, of the steamship
Nieuw Amsterdam, will be presented to
the shin on its return to this country.
Th? tablet, which commemorates the
i rip of the ? ei sel to Amei ica,
has been made by the Gorham Com?
pany, and is the gift of h'-i passengers
. ? voyagi
tin the bronze is inscribed the s
eiation of the passengers of the rup
tain's effort t.. render "safe, comfort
nil pleasant a hazardoui voyage,
when American citizens were compelled
to leave Kurope on the outbreak of the
war." The Inscription it Ranked by two
Columna; above u the Dutch ami i
crossed, wreathed ?i
laurels and beneath are carved sprigs
symbol?, of llutrh
strength.
The tablet will be placed over the
main companion way of the Nieuw Am
ste-dam, ?nd will be exhibited in the
Gorham Fifth av. window later in the
month.
FEARS WIFE WOULD
BURN HIM ALIVE
Husband Swears She Threatened
to Set Bed Afire While
He Slept.
Joseph A. Hersberg, n a suit for
' separation tiled yesterday in the Su?
preme Court, against Mr". Ray Hen
berg, allege* thai his wife threatened
urate the bed with gasolene while
he slept ami then set him afire. Herr.
bergt who charges erual and inhuman
1 treatment, says that he found it un
j safe to live with his a
Herzberg is - manufacturer at 11
W, ? ail wifs bai s dress?
, making establishment a' 2388 Broad
I way. They were ?married in H
San Francisco. They parted in May
j last, after Herzberg had warned his
wife that he would not contribute to
her support unless she changed her
conduct toward him and quit in her
persistence that it was her mission to
kill him. There was a temporary trues
on this basis, but the alleged jpirtt
vhich the husband said
? i. again manifest
?
one occa-ion. said Herzberg, his
?truck bin ngs on hei
.,-e.
Another time, the husband alleged,
rTerzberg followed him
place of business and shouted: "1 will
kill .ou! 1 will shoot a'n?y.'' |
ROADS PLEAD AGA
FOR HIGHER RAT
President of B. & 0. Ch
Witness Before Inter
state Commission.
BRANDEIS ATTACKS (i
PER CENT DIVIDEN.
Daniel Willard Says War Is G
ing Cause for Anxiety as tl
Knlisting New Capital.
\\ ?ishinsrtoi!. Ott. It. I'rging 1
business dspreeeioa and the war
Europe had caused a shrinkage of c
$70,000,000 in their annual net rs
nue?, representatives of thirty-ei
Eastern lailroad?. operating more t
69,001' miles of transportation Hi
appeased before the Interstate O
nierce Commission to-day, reopen
their request for authority to incre
freight rate? at least ? per cent.
Daniel Willard, president of the ?
timor? & Ohio Railroad and also h
of the conference of pr?sidents of
lines involved, was the principal v
ness. Me was supported by a m
of statistics presented by victvPrs
dent Shriver of the same line, act
for all the roads
In i ? the plea of
carriers, Clifford Thome appeared
ti,- publis sei ' ice i orporal 'on? of s
eral Middle Weetern end ?nter-aw
tirn stau-.-, ami also for shippers'
Sanitations in the region effected.
I.ouis Brand?is, counsel for the cc
mission, assailed Mr. V, illurtl's pi
tion in cross-examination, part?cula
calling attention to the fact that '
Baltimore & Ohio had adhered t
year to its policy of declsring 6 |
cent dividends, despite an annual ch
cit of more than $3,000,000. The
fairs of this sy?tem were the only 01
to receive detailed attention to-d
as ofllcors of the other lines were t
present. Mr. Brandeis implied in '.
questions, however, that a similar p
icy had been followed by all the liiu
Justified by Big Surplus.
Mr. Willard salt! the dividend h
been maintained at ?"> per cent tl
year on his recommendation. He r
claret! lie believed it would be justiti
by the fact that the road had $3
000,000 in surplus.
He had recommended it, he ?a
because it was r.ocessaiy to mainta
the credit of the line. A recent no
issue of Soo.OOO.OOO by the road w
marketed at par. bearing 4Vi per ce
interest, and a commission of one-hl
of ' per eent was paid, making tl
total cost ? per cent. This issue mu
he met in .lune next year, Mr. Willa
snid, and the present outlook was th
money then would be 7 or 8 per cent
Mr. Brand?is took exception to tl
statement of the surplus. He insist?
thai S2l',000.000 cf the $32,000,000 wi
represented in the line's investment
securities of the Cincinnati, Hamiltc
?v- 1'ayton Railroad, now in the h?ns
of a receiver. Mr. Willaid admitts
this, hut declared that the purchase i
that road was not at issue in the hea
inc.
"Whatever our necessitier," he sai
"they aie not due to the Cincinnat
Hamilton ? Dayton."
"Yet you have $86,000,000 in notes!
?ay n?Xt veai,' said Mr. Brandei
"and you have advanced $?2.000,000 t
the Cincinnati, Hamilton A- Dayton."
Scc-s No New s .m-?-s
Mr. Brand?is declared the staterr.er
of the railroads had disclosed so fs
nothing originating since the comnii
?lion's recent ruling rejecting the East
ern lines' previous plea for a 6 per c"r
advance in rates. In reopening th
ia?i the commission epeeifleally limit
e<l ?- ? Dg Mnce that timi
Mr Brands .;?.'! that decision lia
Bst s? falling off in revenue o
$75.000,000 loi the period embrace,
inpanics' statement of $76,
000,000 shrinkage served only to con
firm that e t?mate.
"Ti on also forecast im
ment iri btisiness condition
Mr. Willard, "whereas there actual!
n ri-ir'.gres ion."
Mr. Willard told Mr. Thome, in an
ewer to a question, that he did no
know of any company that had her:
able to market its securities at a bet
tte thin the Baltimore it Ohm.
"Can you mention any increase li
labor eo ' since 1912?" pursued Ml
Thornc.
?"les," sHid Mr. Willard. "We hav
advanced our laborers engaged 01
maintenance work in the aggregate he
tween IS.0 ; r.d $700,000 a y,,ir."
"Aro these inereesei asked for t
:ish credit or to obtain money t<
"" aeked Commmione
Clenii ??,'
Value of tho It. & O.
"Both, m a measure," said Mr. Will
ard. "The Baltimore A sih;o ,
worth its outstanding obligations am
?much mor?, but our returni have beei
Ismail. We nave put $80,04)0,000 ?nt
the property in the laet two or tine,
,,' ively, it v\ -I' -
|$16,000,000 a year for nsny yeai
Mr. Brandei drew from Mr. Shrive
a statement that the ratio of operatini
?xpenses a mile hau decreased in 191
trou the 1913 figure. In th same eon
nee* iou, Mr. Thorite hegan a cro
lamination tending to show that th.
cost i plios, with t ii .
cepti, . was lower thi" yes
*.i.?m in preceding \oar ?.
Mr. Willard said in his sta-'
before the commission that the need
of the cai - ling and un
.mediate, ami i" described th*> situs
tion as "extremely critical." He addei
i that m his opinion the measures of re
lief proposed by the commission wouh
no' meet the situation. Continuing, ni
"The anm-.al statements of all thi
railroad? involved In this procerdmi
combined for the i,s<h1 year endos
'.lune 30. 1914, ?how roundly that tin
total operating revenues during tha
. .roximately $68,000,001
than during the previous year
\th:!e the operating expenses .cere ap
prox'.mately $18,000,000 greater.
"The net operating income of thess
companies for the same period wen
$77.700,000 less than in the previou'
\car at-.d equal to but 3.98 per cent
upon the property investment, a lowei
return than was shown at any tune ii
n yean.
Lowest in Fifteen >.ear?.
"The income, applicable ro interest,
dividends and urplus, during the fiscal
year .iust. closed was $?.'64,900.o
4.02 per cent upon the total Capital
obliga return ?leo hein?
than SB) ti '.'.ftee:i years."
As to '.he war, be said that in so far
?as it tended to change -he conditions
.surrounding the entietaent o?
i capital it would affect ?lie fundamental
.relation between railroad and shipper,
'for .he cost of capital \as one of th?
moot importanl -lements of -he es
transpi - t g :
"Il hat the rti?roads of
-re over $520,000,
000 of on i .- ibllgations
. ' ne met s\ it h ill the
: i alone. I
shown .n thi ?! ? el record in *his
?htt the ra, efl rial elas
, ?iticfi' ? i -. only hn.i spe I
. provtmately $200.000,601 ps ;
I upon then proparti?! tor ?SB]
I ment? snii rxteoBiens during the lest
ten-ye?! period, and ft will be neces?
sary to continue such expenditures II
'the roads are to maintain their stand?
ard of service and provide for the
growing needs of the future.
"Further, as nearly ss can be asrer
taini'd. tin re hih more than f.1,000.
1100,(101" par value of American rait
iund securities held abroad as invest?
ments. The demands for cash in SU?
grnv. ing eol ef the present sit?
uation, will doubtless result in large
.telling of siii'h rerurities when the
markets or stork exchange? are again
opened, sad the peeeible effect of such
?Mllinjr upon railroad credit and rc
intei! subject?, is rauiing much con
i -ern."
LAUNCH BURNED IN RIVER
Gasolene Fire Destroys Motor
Graft off Jersey Shore.
The 4?-foot motor launch of Dr. J, j
Herman Bfaath. a lecturer, was burned
to the water's edge und sunk off the
New Jersey shore eppoelte Pyckman
St. late yesterday afternoon.
The doctor, With his engineer. John
Hoffman. Mrs. Hoffman and then tWO
daughters, !ive antl seven wears old,
had landed on the Jersey shore for n
walk. When they returned and Hoff-|
man cranked the engino the gasolene j
tank exploded.
Tho lire spread so quicklv that the ?
party had barely time enough to board '
a skiff before the entire launch was a
masa of flames. In an effort to sink j
the boat, with the intention of saving
part of it, Hoffman was severely
burned on the face und hand?. Dr.
Ilranth. who lives at IM West B7th st.,
estimates his lot? at 17,000
?___??- ?
VILLA COOS WITH
THE PEACE DOVE
Hostilities Now End, He
Says, Embracing Obre
gon and Kissing Flag.
Washington. Oct. 19. ?ieneral Villa!
has informed the I'nited States that
unless something unforeseen occurs
hostilities in .Mexico are at an end
and that he will support any pro?
visional government set up by the na?
tional convention at Aguas Calientes.
Villa said he would not accept Car- i
ranza as provisional President, but
was satisfied he would not be chosen.
The latent official reports to tho j
State Department describe in detail
the visit last Saturday of ('eneral Villa,
to the convention at Aguas ('alientes.
He said he came to pledge his support
to the mt~ of tli.' convention and to
take the oath and that he wanted to
go on record so that no one could
ever say that he was unpatriotic. Later
he embracetl General ('breg?n.
General Villareal, chairman of the
convention, made a speech praising
A ' 111 a. and the latter wrote his name
on the Mexican flag, as did all the
other delegates, and Kissed the banner,
i ledging again to abide by the dccl
of the convention.
To American Consular Agent Car
others, ivh.i accompanied him, Villa
fated he would support any choice of
the convention except Carranza and
that he thought permanent peace in
Mexico was now in ?- iKht. The prev/s?
lent belief i< that Ceneral Yillarcal
w ill be ?-elected.
ADD TO COST OF DYING
Cofhnmakers Join Strike and
Demand Living Wages.
The coffinmakers joined yesterday in
odworkers in the In?
ternational Woodworkers' Cnion, which
bevan a week si.'".
"The cofhnmakers want only lr. irig
and fair working condition?.
neither of which they aere getting,''
said one of the .strike leaders. "Coffin
makiriir is no! a ehoorful occupation,
ceii v, ith good wages and th"
working conditions, but as things were
the men had to Mi ike. ?t might be
naturally thought th-?t when n member
oi a family died no one would qui
i1 i coal ' ; th. funeral, thus perm
good wages for the coffinmakera. Tnis
bar not been the i;.-e. and the coffin
makers could stand it no longer."
?
BABY WINS $50
BY GETTING WELL
Ruth Was Very III When Picked
by Settlement, but She's
Now Rated at 975.
Although she was ju*t about ar, ill i
as a baby can be. Ruth Silverstein hns
imprnvi d *o wonderfully in five
month- that th< I i rersity Settle?
ment has bestowed a 160 prize on her.
: Ruth, like the fifty other r.ick babies
picked out m May for a special test,
was less than s.\ months o'il al 'he
time, She improved 17"> points, and is
now rated
libli 1,000, Th? $60 ii in the postal
savings bs lecausa right now Ruth
does little hopping, r- ms ninj
of ; bs t me in her hoi 155 I
Houston '.
The ?nil.-;, that won the second pr?7c
? Sarah Smalriff, 123 Pitt
mprotid 160 point - and
low put down i
Fannie Krumptemholi . of 228 Riv
?ii oi . showed un points improve
snd ;- rated a* 960; Mathilda
Kopp?-, of 91 Allen ? ? ed : 3 !
?'oint i ?mpi d is rated ai '?'".
? ' . ? SUl b .'.)"? ?
chosen from th? ? "? ?? milk -'
They were sent to floating
pensaries and to *; e coun
try. Every uay Miss ( ooke, the social
i -
of 'he bab:??. ar,i viewi prog?
ress.
The figures ?? the Settlement ?how
thst out of ?he lest twenty-eight
babies who have come back for e
amination twenty-one ? pet
ceatage of 000 out of * ooi). fifteen
showed 960 <> it of 1,000 and
showed 975 points out of 1.000. Two
babiei were rated ss igb ss ?9?
points.
Jason War Xmns Ship.
Washington, Oet, ir The naval col
lier Jason I retarv
Daniels of the N as the of?
ficial "<"hi i" to carry gifts
from the I e war
orpha' re of
Kurope. The Jason will ?ail from the
Mew Vorh ?iavy Yard SS November 1 ? ?
LOCAL BREVITIES.
: ?. i ?? || ? ??- a?
- I!?i?ir?
.
If I
?
I
ft?
? ?
...
?
IFltibm
? a,? Ih? p?ltc? a. i -i ?aS i"a- ,r> f h? i
?n?w, Tb? lavaa MIS -? ?u ,'oon Bs? I
GROCERS JOIN TO
FIGHT MARKETS
Plan Political Propaganda
In Every Store to
Win Voters.
OPPOSITION SHOWS
SUCCESS, SAYS MARKS
Many I armers to Bring in More,
Produce as the Weather
Grows Colder.
The four local orgaalsatiena of re-1
tail grucei-, repreMBtin?! ?v?rj/ bor-!
ough in the city except Richmond, met
In-' night at Ml Am-'.erdaiii av. .md,
resolved to light through politic? the
open markets gad OthoC institution? or
legislation deti nnental to their tintie.
If their plan? an- tarried out, everyone
?f the 1,200 grocery stores whose own
?fa are members of the associations
will become a political headquarters.
There will be no partisan politics in
the generally understood tense, but,
every grocer will be a zealous partisan '
of grocers' rights. Through personal
conversations with customers, the gro?
cers believe, they will be able to per?
suade them of the indirect beiietit ac?
cruing to eustomera throogh th? defeat
indid?tei who stand for hoetile
legislation. Pamphlets will he deliv?
ered with groceries, to the same end.
< atiiiidiitei will be informed ?f the gro?
cer-' -land OH legislative qU?8ti?BC af
lei-ting grocers, and also of the meas?
ures the grocers will take to elect can
d.tintes who indorse their views.
It wat easy to see where Borough |
President Marks, originator of the open
market idea, would stand with the gro?
cer? were he nominated for any office.
"Mr. Marks and several of his men,"
said Benjamin Wieting, "are a detri?
ment to the city, and nothing else,
i Applause. I There is nothing but
politics in this open market game, gen?
tlemen, from start to finish. Through
politics we have to tight it."
George Stadtlander said the best
thing to tin at the moment was to de?
mand not the abolition of the open
markets, but the elimination of the
middleman from their precine'v
Would Drop Middlemen.
??\\" -hould demand." he said, "thai
goods be sold only by the producer he
he farmer or manufacturer direct to ?
the consumer in these markets. They're j
here. It's no use to holler. The more j
you holler the more markets there'll
be. That's just what they want."
A winter supply of farm produce for
tho new open markets is already ifl '
sight, Borough Pr?sident Marks an-'
nounced yesterday. He asserted em?
phatically that winter weather would
not freeze out his markets. The Open
Market Committee, of which he is
chairman, has made arrangements to i
build booths for the farmers before
cold weather comes. Those who have
stalls in the markets have already be?
gun to provide protection for them
One butcher has ?pent upward
of $2,000 on his stand.
"Those who imagine that with the
coming of cold weather and the freez?
ing of the ground." -aid Mr. Marks,
"vegetables will eesse to be brought in
from the farm greatiy underestimate
the enterprise and activity of the mod?
ern farmer and the possibilities of j
production of the New York and Now
Jersey farms near the city. Instead
of the frost putting a stop to the cart?
ing by the farmers, many of them say
they will be able to bring in more
stuff within the next three months than ?
they have In the past
"For weeks p.i-* the farmers have
hen -tnrnig east nuantities of pota
sbbages, he.-t., turnip?, carrots,
parsnips, knob celery, leeks and tahlo
OUI daily
from the stornge bins and brought to
the city m largn quantities. One of1
? ng l-land farmer-, at the Queen?
horo Bndgfi i-aid this morning that
able to deliver a five-ton
truckload of 'his stored produce daily
until i ?
"Another wintCI soiree of supply is
the hoi ' svhich many of the ,
farmers have large numbers, some of I
them total
Domestic science ? \\if,
?ng their classes
throogh the public markets for it
tion in economical buying. William
Laamkie, director of the Government
House of New York University School
of Commerce, Account end f?nanc,
wrote to the Borough President that
he considered the open markets most
eary, and thai with his students
lid be glad to assist in picking
tit a cite for a i.ew- market in me
reenwich Village .section.
In addressing the Prospect Heights
itizens' A soeiation at Berkeley In
. Bros kl] i . last night, Bo-, ?0
?nt Marks said:
"If the open markets had been a fail
re th?-? woultl have been no oppo.-i
proving the
ement of the masses, has nat
rally brought out some opposition.
ed more ?n fear
han ou feet."
TO TRY "TANGO BURGLAR"
Police Will Take Eaton from
Believue to Court To-day.
The authorities at Bellevu? Hospital
notified Police Headquarters last night
that Herbert .1. Eaton, the 'tango
burglar." who robbed the apartment of
Mr-. Arthur E. Pike, of 640 Riverside
DriM-. would be able 'o appear :n court I
to day. , , . . I
The police shot Katori when ne Inert j
'o eeeape following n conference with
Mrs. I'll..-, on the Bight "f October 1.
regarding the return of the articles j
aken from her bom?, r'aton got hi?
nickname from his habit of frequen'
ing tungo teas, at one of which he met ;
Mrs. 1'ike. Through the acquaintance!
he got possession of the keys to her j
apartment.
BOY KILLS MAN BY BLOW
Brooklyn Youth Charged with
Homicide Alter Quarrel.
.tames Carroll, n boy O? se^.
years, living at t'-l I (ir.nd av.. Brook?
looked no, charged ?ritfa homi?
cide in causing i lie death of John
Scheppers, proprietor of a confection?
ery store at 77:' Washington ?v.
According to ths police), Carroll was
a member of S crowd of boys who an ? S
raising a disturhaace in frost of ?
Bcheppers'a stoie, and when the owner;
attempted to drive them away he stood
his ground and struck Srbeppers overj
the heart. Srhrppers fell to the side?
walk, and Dr. UebowitS, of the Jewish
Hospital, said that death was almost
instantaneous. The boys fled, but
Carroll was arrested later.
JUDGE A FATHER AT 70
Fall?n Has Family of Seven?
Eldest Only Ten.
Judge .Toseph T. Fall?n, who is mor? ?
i than seventy years old and has been ,
I on tho municipal b.nch since 1W87, be
j came the father of a baby girl yester
1 day. The newcomer is the seventh in
! the judge's family, the eldest of whom
is only ten years old.
Judge Fall?n was supposed to be
sitting in the Hth District Court, at
Sylvan Place and 121st at., and a tele-,
gram from his farm at Rangall,
Dutches? County, announcing the
event, arrived there. Tho judge, in?
stead, was downtown, but no one knew
whe'e.
( ity Marshal Curley finally lo
Judge Fall?n in the '-d District Court,
adison St.. and delivered the tele?
gram, along ?nth the congratulations
oi' half r. dosen magistrates and court
officials who had heard the news. The
judge immediately left for the farm.
Judge Fall?n lias been married three
times. Three grown children by his
tirst marriage are living in this city.
BINNEY WON'T FILE
BOND; IS IN CELL
Speeder, Often Arrested, to Stay
Three Months Unless lie
Changes His Mind.
Harold Osgood Binnev, a lawyer, of
2 Rector st., whose philosophy used to
bo "The faster you go the safer you
are," went to Blackweli's Island yes?
terday morning. He will stay there
thre* months unless he changes his
mind and files a bond of SI,000 to keep
the peace for six months.
The records show that on October
?S he paid one tine for speeding and
another for using rough language to
a police lieutcnan* over the letter's
alleged treatment of a dog which was
with Binnoy when he was held a? a
Speeder, la I Wednesday he was ar?
rested for slapping another man on
the chest. Mo celebrated Saturday by
appearing, for t change, as complain?
ant instead i ' defendant. Re l ad
made an arrest himself, but th.
oner was let go when the lawyer be?
rime bilious because of the ne?
be was playing.
Later in the day !.e get h im sell
locked in a eell. In night
I ?? had beer, found guilty, he informed
Magistrate Deuel that tie... musl be
? ildn't
pay.
Binney's moi * -1 .'ion
of the speed law cost him $100
he had gone to trial in Special
? ions for making ?. cup course out of
the triangle of :
and 42d st,
V\ hen he married a ?
February, ?" !, - .. .,,,...-?
kept the new? secret
?vet!.?. A
let a young wont n ? an overland
rain and ;n three day- hi ! won her
romi?c to wed. She ? ng at
.he church, but hasn't seen him
In March of last yen- the '.ever';
i year-old daughter, Constance,
sked Surrogate Cohalan t.. remove
He denied
'"? charge? thai there was reason for
1er to live with her mother through
ar of his behavior toward her. Th"
urrogato. believed him.
WOMEN PREY FOR
DE LUXE BOOK MEN
Lure of Big Profit on Re?
sale of "Rare" Sets
Opens Pocketbooks.
MRS. MOORE SWEARS
SHE PAID $80,000
Another Woman Avers She Was
Duped- Didn't Get Roose?
velt Picture.
ihe (luisijit of literature through
the meiiitim of de luSM edition? snd
i agent? is siuit? as expensive to
readere as ?' j? to starviag ?atber?,
SCCOrdiug to Mrs. F.lizubelh .-'. Moore,
of Creensbiirg. Penn., who took the
stand yesterday in the trial of Glenn
II. farmer, ? clone) William J, Hartley.1
Samuel F. Wartield and other?, charged ?
with Nwindling to the extent of $10,
000,000 by mean? of editions de luxe
frauds. Mrs. Moore te?'.:fio<J ?he paid j
about $80,000 for books, with the un?
derstanding that they were to be resold !
at a large profit.
one of the iritaeeMs was Urs. Mary
A w.itt-, of Hanehester, N. II.. wh?
said thai in 1012 Giern Farmer, who
recently was convicted in Boston, called
to Show her a Mar edition of OSCBT
Wilde for 1900. Shi nought It Later,
?he ?aid, she hotight a tweni |
volume set of Colon*-! Roosevelt'?
works for $10,000, a set of Briti?h
poets for $7.600 and another of Mark
Twain for .11.000.
She further testified that she pur?
chased from Colonel Hartley, at $5,000
each, two Shakerpearian volume?,
which, she ?aid. ?he was told would be
S?o!d late?- it ft big profit.
"I paid $:JO,000 in all for the book?.
I bought from these men," Mrs. Wa'ts
said. "I also was told I would receive
a large picture of Theodore Roosevelt,
signed by him, and a public document,
loth of which ?ere highly valuable."
"What made them valuable?" Mrs.
Walts was a^keii.
"Roosevelt's signature," she replletl.
Mrs. Manon W. Preston, of Westor..
Mass., testified that in 1910 Scott and
Glenn Farmer wanted her to buy a set
of books. She did, she said, and paid
$?,000 for two set? of Britith poets
and Roosevelt. later she bought set?
of Thackeray, "The A-abiun Nights"
and Lincoln about $4<>,000 in ?1
which "Colonel HuatUy, a gentleman
in L'uropc." was to pay a huge sum.
He nevi
A battli of letters written by Colonel
Hartley to Glenn Farmer were read.
One war :
"My Deer Jim: As loon *% you get
this letter please dictate and mail me a
full description of Oriental series. Am
waiting for it here to show a party
you know ai-o. at the same time, a
full description of the Cassinavo. I've
r.or a party going.
"I have a long letter from the widow
I in reply to one I wrote Thursday last.
?She tel.'s me *o take good care of her
I photo and al?o of her good reputation,
?which she nas placed IB my safekecp
1 ing, been- <? Tie, arid may tut?
e?me hook* from Bio if I am a real
?good boy tor a little while. I shall go
there us her gw ? : in S few days and
spring on her your ?eitcr to me about
the new company > nd make her pro?
cure. Leave it to me.
"I g?t r\ wire Sa'urrfay and one to?
day from R, EL W., Baying she'd be here
to see tne to-mor.-o"- for a visit. Sho
is a bird. Oh, why am I so popular
with I ? I ursei on my fatal
beauty! Would 1 might be a poor, pi?
ing, prodigal book
0, at !oa?t, I might be htsppy.
Your old pal, BILL.
"P. S. How's th? beeutiful cloak
model downstairs ?"
The tri I will be resumed to-morrow
morniiiE.
Wilson Frowns on War Loan-!.
r. T1 ? TrtbUn? !' .i<
Washington, Oct. 19. President Wi!
?on intimated to hi? eallari ?<n.
while it w?* within th? t_TT??,
American banker* to make loi? u ?
b.lligsrent nation?, yet th! u'*
ment hoped that they would ??]*?*
He ..id that the govem??ntt??.
ehanged it? .ttitnd. of mor?l ;??"?
Mon toward the making of ntfe
by American hankers. l%
You young mon may fc.
impressed with this weight ?
evidence: ?
We have about double
our sales of youths' suit? >
the past few years.
This is all the more rernart
able when one considers t?*
comparatively few men m
wear youths' sizes?oui
those with 32 to 3)inch chettj
Variety, moreover, hasic
, creased in even preater pro
1 portion than quantity.
Nowadays, we cut youth'
suits in four or five modeli
as against one or two a ft*
years ago?range of p*.
terns, too, is twice as great
Youths' suits, $16 to $31
32 to 33 chest.
"Scotch Mist" coats cok?
in youths' sizes.
Ideal Fall and Winter coett
?smart styles, handW
Scotch cheviots, rainproof?
Rogers Peet Compaxt
Three Broadway Storm
st st it
Warren St. 13th St MfcfJ
Ask Your Dealer For
DOTWOOD
The Latest Style in Fancy
Madras Collars, it's sa
MitV in America
I for 25 cent?
EARL & WILSON
\MI SKMFATS. ? AMUSEMENTS.
THFSS. NEW YOnK LFADINIi THEATRE9 HAVE NO DEALINGS WITH THE TYSON CO.
EMPIRE
G
.1 m st. Ets?. ? shirr. I I IQIDTV11 "l W "' '!r"?
i Uni Kl I ||ttt. Tm iIV
TONIL-HT AT ? SHARP.
WILLIAM SSLANCHI. pa. M ARIL
Bi
?% - ?
Doro
DOUGLAS FAIRBANKS in
i;i*<'sa!$?'j*i:iin:r<
SI. Bi
rroi? A Sa' .: IS.
ILLtTTf DATES
I ? ? n .-, ? DIPLOMACY _
LYCEUM' ' ,/"? j^lOAlETY^nKg^
THE BEftUTIFUL ADVENTURE RUTH CHATTERTON
WITH ITS I.BEAT CAST. ' * a^sVu/' 'w araVVafV aT^sAar??r
KNICKERBOCKER I 11:11 . DADDY LONG-LEGS
MlM I |l ?I -1 ^
,, us ix.xAui -M-ii FIJI TON-...'.. .. _L*Ap *S?
SANDERSON HRIAN CAV.V THORN * ^ *"? * KJl 1 T Uf I II B C ft 0
THF GIRL FROM UTAH ? ?W?M DtUd
bllasco" . republic
;\;;-? leo ditrichstein
The Phantom Rival
OSO. pnHAN'S ?EATRE- **-?r?j a l S.-i 67
??XJv^i.I1ii;ii'Vi'b1i0 HARRIS, OPENS FRIDAY
i A LAUGHING SIQT-ta VC i "/i
ZIEGFELD DANSE DE FOLLIES ^dZ?Vfflll?UWr
NII.HTLY I itemi Bai I 8:30. A'np \.? Ain- l'-a: ?? i.'*-l UM s.
ThMtr?. T- IJryj YflDK Bw? a ? | , m, .
Eltingea?r* *???- -? Nt" TUN* ." w m
1
iwm-M?;- a v.- ? ? 11 mi i ? rj n
"? BIC JW
GARRITY
GLOBfc.
j. .- H s. Et,
FIRST NIGHT TONIGHT ?f SJJ.' 2 '5
GRIND 0? HO
^fjr'lTTlT^- ; MONTGOMERY * STONE
^^ ' URST MATINEE TO-MORRoiy.
Ar
Mit
HOTELS AM) RESTAI RANTS.
Will S ?>? NKWAI'.K. N . no? 4t
BACH'S HOTEL
Ml Broal M . er? StOSS .'.-"m P.. L. ? W.
R. R ? ,..),.. M? ,. - . a ? -.
rl.rTl I. I ?NGDON,
I ilh M. 4M.I Mh \??
nwriM. IVSTKlTTIOV.
DANCING CARNIVAL
i i ?? ?
Latstacton ?> . ? satra.ci
Branch UX Ji? ? ?at Ultfe at.
??nasa-mmt. gal. ? P)d?.?n
WSEsUOfi?SWATtE 5
Stasi ? . ?? . .,,",.' M
riiiRi* h \..i i>, .?, ,. ,?, s( >?
B'WAV ROSI: 6AIDENS
'.*..? -
\dml?.u n HtKi: t,M 9 p \|
i44'-*rwAy
niw-.i.~ri,? --;-.w*8jo
? TMl TANt.lf
Jln^. I'. : THE 10CKF0 COOS'
AMVESSTtl?, S-Oall? Mail?.? ?,
OICK SOOOLPH 4 HANK (,UV??.
?tmjua Bojion B.'.Krj. 4 U Bis Acu.
H
AM?SEMENTS.
maausm
WARS '?""'WORLD
1000
$1.50
25o &50c
PRINaSS ^?VWi?fsf^
"New York'? ! Five Wonderful
Smartest Theatre" One-Act Plays
CASINO. ?? ?fis. MatlOM TornwrrW, St.M
Frltzl Seheff In Pretty Mrs. Smith
COMEDY. Kts, S r Mai at I
Ztm CONSEQUENCES
,0TH ST. Thai. ! i I.I Ul
Holm??
ion"?
MANUEL QUIRQG?,
, ? ??? isaUadfd
TWO QUIR0GA RECITALS
it s?
I II
r to ?l.'.u Km
i - - ! I" ion?
I ???. ?i ? 13. .Mil?.
mm
?'??I'HiH'Mil
SYMPHONY
f BAI II.It DAMsU>?H II. Iiinduclor.
I ir?l ( on. .rl ?
irii>\\ ?ft., octobkb tad. ** "??
siMiti mi. OCTOBBB :*iih. at a,
ZIMBALIST
llruli.n?. - pbpni llrii.h. \
im Concerto; ILmaarl. "1.- . .'stln ue
?????? i first um?' : Detasa]
turn? So .
V II.?Uarelpts from tin? first pair or
..i'.-., ta ?i ?
Anirrlcail R*il ? ro.? mm irtjr.
\M)l.l \N M*l I
\ I o I. I A V H A LI
\.n
K
NEISEL QUARTET
6 CHaMiER MUSIC CONCERTS
T I BSD Al K \ K N I N I. ? .
i MatcS -. April ?
r.1 subscription Sal? '
Low. i W?
century;;.,;: .
_ aw Kri * sat. nun?.
? lEWtLS OF THE MADONNA." wllli ??rsi-?-'.
Url t Tour.. Mstata * *?' V|?
"MADAM BUTTtBFLV."
t.raasl. H.H. S?t. AB- ?*?**. ?ZJ**
,isi v mim; RECITAL THIS SBatSwi
ALMA GLUCK
KNABI MA!
MANA?
. m
lis m BEAI
Oo?umbia BURLESQUE ?,r;?.
U , I III. IKI/r. HINM.Kv
IRVING PLACE" THEATRE
I Ml Ni?ut at ?IS 'DER MUEOE THEOOOR. '
I J |a%m ird A Mal >l
I Vi., L.i \lata.
\Ml 'SEMENTS.
WINTER GARDEN *?&
tut i , i:.. DANCING' Auoia?
?.,..? , AROUND |b, ?Miirato
LITTLE riA-7 ',!,sr V-Vr
TO-NIGHT, FIRST PUBLIC PERFOft???
? A PAIrl OF SILK STJCKII0]
?*??aaTa???J????????????????at?a?aat*?ai
w,u,AnpLAYHOUSF^?
BRA0VSl4rt'-s; irw or v-a-i LA*:^
\ M \N Ml III I IINKSI
MY LADY'S DRESS
? i. ?a? i ? i,,,.,,.'.,,. I,
II- Mniinl Kn.ililaiiili
LYRIC i:
??S. EVIDE^C?
BOOTH
THE MONEY MAKERS
M?T IMf*. '
MR.FAVERSHAM J*
vin nciRfiAr. HA??
rw.^r'.. Wh?teside w?
IQTU CT
4oln ol.
thi: law land .
standard
OUi.l H TROVA in "l'ANTHM'
IONGACRI * __
A Play ?f *?? Yar? Lit? ?> s?'M*r4 ?**
WALLACK'S ii
MONDAY, OCT. I
"THE HIGHWAY OF UFE
r N P?, . ' ' ar'"^
li \\ HI I i.l'I'UlHrll?
?-?' .. ?
PA it*la r;,,A ' ' " '!?'??f*
MRS. PATRICK CallJ
,vv,, PYGMAll
A-STOR ?? RaVJ
U.lln^. tITT?w.- ,1'nl'l I l?l * T|
clgu ii '.-,v.'-.-?' ?r?s.
EVELYN NESBIT J
'-.' MaRhallP.f!?
' sC-l
?trand

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