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New-York tribune. [volume] (New York [N.Y.]) 1866-1924, July 08, 1917, Image 29

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?nside Workings of Censorship
Explained by British Secretary
li Pherson Tells How All Possible News Leaks Are
la 1 d L'p. Describes Creation of Boards and Reveals
Privileged Position of the Press
By ARTHUR S. DRAPER
?^-don. July 1 Perhaps the censor i
" ,,.fDd,, but so has the income tax ?
'""' ".er Certainly they both have j
"'".a ?cd the censor numbers his
,.,-*.lf?. ?-*-?*
...'lions, ahilt the tax collector can
'ajtbi? on!>* ,n thousands. The ccn
?jatj ever-.- one who reads
? ,*-?raP?'r*' ?***" ma*?.a--,nC?*? he opens
.., :<?'??'- (folag out and coming
'. th? c???' ' paeeea at blue
K,|, ?very cabio neaaage. He is [
. -, dered sitbei I i kt or an enemy,
moM ? W*?4*1
? censor is not the swarthy.
aegaadtd villain, with a head filled!
aaha*etietl * -ci from your letters,
..,: yea imagine. If he is the kind of
..,. whom ? havi eoatt in more or
^close tentad ? th in this war, he ,
? i b'.gaTi'h fellow, with a good story
? > i hearty lauph and a tine assort- ?
-at?of eaplanal i ?????l exeaace. He
, u officer in the army or navy, and
., j, ? stickler for rules and regu- ;
,:ios?. but he il not the double-dyed
:?;ri to many of us have painted him.
? ; r? i ?or at the Admiralty is
Brownrigg, of the
aad tarty General tieorgc 4'ockerill, '
.??he Genen.'. Staff, director of special
.?.?''igence at the War Office, directs
?e iarerisl cable and postal censor- j
i;:?!. They are big men?big in bulk,!
- ? in brains and big in power. They :
-.m ?? three. Around them they have
-,???:??] t trem?rdr.us force of train-? 1
forkers. In tbt last three years Btill
... cf wor?i? . ? I -les of copy haw
??wunder their sharp eyes. Mistakes
ut? been atad? gl have gone
?p the rf??i:?rer? and lefers have
let -a?sed which have been of as- [
-fehaa/to tht enemy; other articles
-?re been "killed" and other
haatftd which would have done no \
nan, But the hattinp average of th?
(essor is higher than that of Ty Cobb,
??i tmediai te laat reports, he still
?ei the league.
Catching Cross-fire
Delivery of M. P.'a
he MscPhersc-i. Under Secretary of
?Ute for War. bai tht pleasant little ?
cb of standir.? a| la the House of
Commons and catching th?s ereaa-flre ,
haatatfl of M. P.'t enxioea to "bean"'
B? W?r Office. It ll i? wild pitch which j
??espes him. and when I tossed him a
fea censorship curves he picked them ?
?ut of the air with r.o more effort than ?
Uief Meyers expended when he was '?
Xitty's battery Batte. Said Mr. Mc
:????--:
??nbibly the cause of aaeat of the ?
-geading In regard to the ?
people
tatet d it they are si ;
I fat MM I This arise? from
rib bet that in thit cooatry three de
:?i'T.?nt?-the Admiralty, War Office
tad Press Bureau- conduct a censor- ;
*?ip, and abroad every commander of aj
. force whether
r. Prance, :n Egypt, in Sal?nica, in j
Meiopot?ir.:a or - Beat Africa?is re
**BBBaMl fee the censorship of all
.-??.ions from the area of opera- ;
?
Then he expie a? ; that the Admiralty
? of all communi- '
? ? i ta an?l
?? i K?nK
Etions on the
? ichant ship?, the
in normal
'tf are lpt1 1 * and receive pub
'.e message?, ?n all intents and
;srpo?es naval itations. The amount
tf Continent?. - omparativaly
?d tad tht ?' T of a score actually
(?rtged under orders ban
clea the wort set I ictorilf.
MBB Originated
I Russian \r*. ar
i
1 ?M aakad hba ta describe the
aahbej ti ? ? III Bureau, which
Mues a great smoni * I I official and j
?aide] aews 4 the papers.
"To tra ? Presi
weiu i ? ? bach to the time
War," he
?arid ?as tren deeply im
ireued by thi ikill with which the
... ?_ . _ * . i-.
aafaaMtl VI
'.nation 01 news
are re
; .rilication it
-, peace and kept
tttchr fur ? . . ?....,.?n/.?
-^Merecy sad ^.ty oi me
TOWm. He declare.; >? ? , govern
out the co
- on of the
***< and t: ; bil fellow
^rjtr.T- ,, Wlt?1 m v?ew
A diaenva t -T ,? . ,_._i ........~
? - ??? ' ?? i<w, i ne limes on .?my
????***-?? published a .
i" ? - Agent ia
ImL? , '*,r*' ' % sertee af
mEl**; ring nearly the
?J* ?- irv, t?.
- ? '.(.?tion
great d?*riment to
'"" ,?-.| how
? - ?-.??-! ?gainst
? ''irrr.ation
v. He
ma knew ?11 that
?gjJN toteaded to do, and wei
?ttJal i ?' 'f 'hey
? ??
?W^. th? enemy in ?II
I
7?m Information
?"Q^IWai
?are tttracl turn
cbi ?how clearly ,,.? nUnt
^ ??7,**? ?**??? "
>*?? of-In f *''*?".?* ?*? aafaillag
txam
'
'/?a to
S ta]
red?rate
'
Vb?a,
**W..7,..; : ?V" ?-* e-eaa
mm **? '??aa^fi-eastae
i War, wl nh prove that ti.e Oonra
.1 "?WnrT ?ras indebted to I
French newspaper?, directly or ir?
rectly, tirst. m July, for Information
the Strategic deployment of the Fren
army, and, sec?.ml. in Augu*t,
time toui'li wai loit, for knowledge
three facts which had m, much i nil
rnce on later ?vents MicMahon'i ?,
centra tion ;-t < halon?, ! ?i retreat up
Rheimi and lubiequent advance to
ard the Meuse. Within ;. w< -ck of t
?-ruer which changed the direct
the German armiei Napoleon ill can
nlate-d at Sedan. "The Time--" pu
li-hid a leading article on their crt
dent's communication. ob?erxi
that they recognized the difficulty
th.- problem of press eensorahip
Great Britain on grounds which won
..i ?cry strcngly to the Ameriei
Biitish Opposed
To Censorship
" 'Ws are not accustom?.1 in Uli
country to any form of press con
?onhip.' taid the writer. 'The v. r;
name is abhorrent to our tradition?
Tne British people would ??inckly !?'
como impatient under pi"' ,
, ..ranee of what their Beet am
arrri? ? wei . oing, and if Mich It
strictions ai would meet the le
quirementi of the case wer?- to b?
telerated it must be ?>n the eloa
understanding that the Admirait;
and War Office would never xvithholr
information xvhich could be properl;
disclosed or delay its publieatioi
Merely to suit official convenience
"He laid down as axioms that tl
legitimate anxiety of the country to I
informed of what concerns it must 1
treated with all possible consideratio
and that no restraint should be in
i on the fr?*e criticism of pa(
?vents, nor of those responsible f?
the action taken; only the premntut
diielosureguyhether wilful or inadve:
tent, o?, wdjft is happening or about t
happen shnTO1' be guarded against.
"Negotiationi on these lines wet
opened with the press, but attempt
to proceed by way of legislation falle?
and the problem xvas l? ft UBSolve
until about a year before the outbrea
of the presen! war. Then, as a resu
?'f negotiations between the press, 0
the one hand, and the Admiralty an
War Office, on the other, a joint con
mittee. called the Admiralty, Wai-wO'
t\-p and Press Committee, xvas set I
and xvas intrusted xvith the task o
watching the working of a voluntar
agreement, under which the press ui,
dertook to respect official warning
and to withhold from publication in
formation xvhich. in the opinion of th
Admiralty and War office, could no
i.. published without detriment to na
tional interests.
Official Press
Bureau Created
"When war broke oat this agree
ment was working smoothly, but tin
greatly increased volume of war!
xvhich fell to the committee to be deal
with at the outbreak of the war prove?
to be beyond the powers of the ofllcia
members of the committee, who ? ha<
other dutiei of an exacting nature t<
rm. /accordingly a special d?
partr- i reatad, called tl ?
cial Pre ?J?areau, through xvhich th<
wa? t^rj.". h I of wan ng? to th?
oasB?t '.he publication of anj
- \si.lrn it was desired to exeludi
from the ijewspaper in the public in
"It may be said with truth, then
that the principles on which the cen
sr.rship of the press is conducted to
day are virtually those on xvhich th?
Admiralty, War Office and Press Com
mittee acted in peace. The bureau e\
rot to dictate to the pre
?o coerce them, but to afford then
guidance on any matter connected witV
the publication of news ?n regard tr
they may find themselves ii
doubt. Bo far. therefore, as the pub
lication of matter iri tl..- country il
? hip performed by
P . - Bureau is advisory rsthei
than mandatory. It is based upon th?
original voluntary agreement, and nol
on any special statutory powers.
"Since the war began, however, op?
portunity has been taken, iti regulation?
issued under the defence of the realm
act, to prohibit the publication of new?
I likely to assist the enemy. These regu
1 lations apply generally to all persons
| in the United Kingdom, and in so fat
: as press offences have been created
they have not been created in order to
I control the press more effectively oi
subject them to more drastic regula
! tions than the rest of the community,
but rather to place them in a privileged
' position. The only special press Ian
' exists In thil country takes the
1 case out of the bands of the military
authorities and intrusts the adminis?
tration of certain regulations to the
civil authorities whenever the offender
? is connected xvith the press."
Offending Editors
Open to Punishment
The editor, who is more or le-, a
? official, is, under the British
? regulations, treated in the same man?
ner as the private citizen. If the for?
mer publishes naval or military news
j of value to the enemy or the latt.-r
; communicates it by letter or word of
: mouth, each is guilty of an offence
? under the regulations, hut it is the job
? D roetoi of l'uic ,<- Prosecution
to i*et a convie* Ii
"There is, however, a further privi
..?Tord?-,l t.. thoae connected with
the prest?a" continue?! Mr. MaePh?
"If in doubt, the ordinary citiion bal
to rely on his own judgment, but if an
editor is in doubt he ? <,, r-ub
, mit a proof to the Official Press Btt*
r?-au, arid he will be advised whether
the publieat.on of the news in qu?
v.F,.j?,j i,,.. Hr. offence against the regu?
lations. It !? obviOUl that th;? VolUB?
?ary subrr,.* OS O? nCWI far the
opinion of a cen.-or before publication
Is in no sense a preii censorship; yol
SO far ;.? t i.?? publication 111 the I
Kingdom of HOWI ?inginatiri<- then il
?Tied, this is the only form ?-'
i re? i ' ? oi hip thai <x: ? "
I then put my own ease before the
?ary. Correspondent! un- fnr<-<-'i
? to submit ever;, '
"A broad distinction i- and na | '?
drawn between the eoatrol of publica?
tion In the United Kingdom ami the
control of communication between the
United Km,"!?.'?*, an?! other countries,**
?he said. "Withm the United Kingdom
! MOWS muy bi? published ?o long ah the
'? -?? ot'mXbt realm regulations.are
atiaba? ? <|. If th.y ar<-, the law
?may be i^BaVed h(/M?r,?t th? offender
?ml h (.tn^H may he Inflicted, bttl the
I mischief ?wBir.e Thanhs, however, to
the loyal eSoporatlon of the prosa it i?
' v*ry seldom that an m.l acre!
Sad OI ' e whole the voliintaiy
"hip i? as effective a? any <"rn
j pulsory ' ? ? * i bo.
\)?\t?%rr of
New? I .r rtk?-"**
"It ?? ?,n ?hi? aeeeeat, so doabt, that
?rr- oentry ?uffer? wh?f might . ?
\ light **eri, U be an ?pallm?* menace lo j
? he i -,. f ?,f lu soldiers ar.it toiler
if laftnastlta ?r- t?j what u going oui
Jrithla the I nited Kingdom It to rear
t-ip enemy otherwise than throug
publication in the preis, which is th
quickest channel of all it must I i
to him or to some intermediary in com
mumeation with him. either tl
ye post, or by telegraph, or b] I
h there WI -?? DO compulsory eensorh:
'" ,' . '?'" matter, informant,
cou d be sent with the grca'r-- -
' <*der to avoid leakage ,., ?
wsy it i., obvioaaly necessary thai si
' ' ' d innels of commuiuca
ion between 11,?- I nited Kingdom an?
rid, i. ... communies
l,?" ?''? ?" '? '*'' graph and bv hand
mu.-t r. controlled. In t h t - eonnec
too, " mu t be remembered tha
postal packet? or (atterri earn.! ?
fun*? ' tain messages writ!
:'lf writing, and telegram
be worded SO as to convev a | -
ge. It is the duty of the ..
ship to detect and destroy the value of
the-e devices.
"From aueh a censorship as this it it
not possible to exempt the presa. Bu?
i? is possible to facilitate then
ties? by every legitimate means, go
her.* again the press has been given
privilege*-, not enjoyed by the ordinary
public. Every pftst cable to and
the I nited KingBom is diverted to t'.?
Itess Bureau, and there censored and
placed at the disposal of the directors
of the bureau for this puna, ? i ?
this arrangement the pre?-s den\?
great a?! vantages priority over 1>
urgent messages, and cen*sorship by
men who are in touch with the censors
of press copy voluntarily subi
and under the same executive control.
Press Stands in
Favored Position
"It will thus be seen that the press
r-tan'ls m a favored position. As re?
gards the publication in this country
of matter originating here, it is aneen
lOred, except on the initiative of the
editor. It is bound by the same laWI
as the re*t of the community, but no
prosecution can be instituted by the
naval or military authorities in the
e:i-e of a press ?.'Tenet , except by di
reetion of the public prosecutor. As
regards the receipt or dispatch of new-?
in nr from the Cnited Kingdom, the
press is subject to the same control as
the rest of the public, but is accorded
special facilities and privileges.
"Tho actual censorship of press copy
and nre-< eablei is dono by th? eoasors
of the Press Bureau under the or,Its
of?the directors. But the instructions
on which they work are framed by thl
government departments r?...cerned
Thus, 10 far as naval questions are
concerned. Sir Pouglas Brownrigg aid,
in regard to military matters. General
erill lav down the principles on
which the press censors should act;
are, Oi course, similar, respec?
tively, to those by which the eonsort
with the flee*.' and atthe general heail
quarten <>f the various expeditionary
fi rcr-s are guided. In all cases of
,* or special difficulty the direr
tors of the Prest Bureau refer to the
chief censor at. the Admiralty or the
director of special intelligence at the
War Office, according as the subject of
th? article or telegram refers to naval
or military matters."
Fifty Censors
In Press Bureau
The Press Bureau is not a large in?
stitution. It consists of two? directors,
? t director, a secretary and
some tifty censors. The bulk ?>f the
6,000 p?r<ons cmpliyed in the British
censorship is engaged in censoring
communications received in or dis?
patched from the United Kingdom by
post, by telegraph and by hand. These
are all under the jurisdiction of Gen-j
' ockerill, the director of special
intelligence. From 10,000 to f."..'
telegrams pass through the hands of
tho cable censors in the 1'nited Kint**
<!or*i every twenty-foot hours. Nearly
<> a are employed ?u this work
Their duties are:
Firs' To prevent a?-'ictar:cc being
given or naval and military informa
tion being transmitted to the enemy.
Second To prevent the ?pread of
false report ?> or r?'pnrt? likely to
cause disaffection or to interfere di?
rectly or indirectly with th" success (
llitary operations of
h or Allied forces, or likely to
prejudice relations xvith fore'gn
powers "r the security, training, dis?
cipline or administration of the Brit?
ish force?.
Third To collect and distribute to
the several government departments
ami branches of the War Office con?
cerned all naval and military in?
formation derived from the cens.i .
ship that may be of Use to them.
Fourth To deny the use of British
cable? ?,., any person or firm, whether
Bi *ish, Allied or neutral, for com?
mercial transactions intended for
the benefit of the enemy.
Subject to tjie efficient discharge
of these duties, they have orders to
interfere as little as possible with
legitimate British and neutral trade.
The postal censors have practically
the same duties, but their job is a
much larger one. Linguists who can
read and translate every language ate
employed in this branch of the ser?
vice. Letters which are examined fall
into three main categories:
First The correspondence of pris?
oners of war in the United Kingdom
and in the working companies with
the British expeditionary forces and
of British prisoners in enemy and
neutral countries.
Second Private correspondence to
anl from ortain foreign countries.
Third ' ommercial and financial
?"i respondence with the same coun
tlies.
Fourth Printed matter and prest
Sgas teal into and out of the
Cnited Kingdom by other means
t ban bv cable.
1 Parcels.
Letton corning direct from the area
of military operations are in most
cases ?ensured locally, under the or?
ders of th?- field marshal or general
officer commanding the British forces
in the held. Those xvhi'h appear to
.. escaped censorship are sent by the
(Bee to the consort in London for
examin?t ion.
Th?re is considerable difference be
Britain and America in regard
to the needs of censorship, chief of
is their different geographical
position . An English newspaper
reaches Holland the ?lay of its pub
i ition, while an American paper is
at least t?-n days old when it arrives
ndl of military la?
formation must be fresh to he valu?
er.',? British officials are watching cen
,, development! with the greatest
ir,'- : -t
xii su m, INSTRUCTION
Faust School of Tuning
' | . '. I ?. -' HOOL < '!?' XMI'KI' \
- ?/, f li
Sa,,, I .,.,-,,,,' ?.',,
Mpe ... i Keril (Iron. I'lano. nn.l I'Uj
?. More i",?Hi..i.? tIn?i? ?se ran Mil.
Xe.ir I1....1? Ire/.
2729 Ci'NSBORCUGH ST..
BOSrOM MISS
MAUD MORGAN
?010
HARPIST
AND
INSTRUCTOR
NI fl'??? T?l ..rFi? 1 ',03.
MMf M A N I *"?oww*,lnt"
IMMA |*g| ?*% a?*U? B Volt. Cullur?.
C0ACHINI. TOR OPIRA ORATORIO. RECITAL.
?41 WIST INI) AVE. 1.1. llH.r I M
KATHERYNEfSHARY ?|?
IKXniKIt ?I ?ilNf.lMi.
?14 IX l.-.-.lll "I. Ttl A ,1 lla.ll Mil
; V GOLDENBERG STV.'^?g^
Th??,.,, URQU-HART
Indiana Graft
Hunt Still On
After 3 Years
Indianapolis Chief's Con?
viction Ends One Period
of Campaign
Big Game Is in Sight
Ex-Gunman's Ambition Helped
State to Cast Off Shackles
of Corruption
' . ? ' ? ' n-|
Indianapolis, .Inly 7. The |.o.1?e.
? d i rojed which the State of
Indiana itaited on it- way Ihrer ?.ear?
age iboa no tign of flagging enero
nor are there any indications that the
end of the labors i.? In sight A few
days airo there was printed a brief
1 I arajrraph tellinp f?f tin- conviction of
\ the chief of police of Indianapolis for
Conspiracy to commit, fraud in the
Indiana elections of l'HJ. In itself the
paragraph recorded only another short
step m the, history ?if Indiana's political
rej-eneration. I'.uf actually it marks the
4nd of one period of the campaign for
clean govcrnmrnr tad the beginning of
another. For, much as Indiana ha? beea
able to diselosi of the rotten system of
government under which the peo?,:.> of
the state have hreri forced to rv-t, a
great deal more remains to be un?
covered.
And close upon the conviction of the
he?<] of the Indianapolis police machine
has come the announcement that the
disclosures of the trial will form the
basis for further grand jury investifra
tions into governaiental rraft and elec?
tion fraud. Rigger Ash still remain lo
he caught.
Conditions in 1 f? 11
What happened m Indianapolis in
l?M-l to draw the verdicts of guilty for
these nx men is plainly des>cnlici! i di?
tonally in "The Indianapolis New?";
"There could not have been a more
corrupt an?! braten attempt to defeat
the will of the people. Roth violence
and fraud were resortcil to. Hun? ?t
voters were driven away from the polls
and the ici;, ?ration booths; anil re?
peaters \\er>' voted in ?troves voted in
one precinel o rapidly that it was im?
possible to record th?Mr name?. A groat
i alaed by levying on
saloonkeepers, against whom the 'law
enforced* if they refaced to eon?
tribute, bul who were allowed to do as
they pleased if they 'cane ecroea."*
In Indianapolis the laloon sln?h fund
amounted to |48,000. Hut Indianapolil
wai only on?, pivot m the machinery of
a state-wnle Organisation that kept the
people of the commonwealth powerless
to accomplish anything contrary to the
will of the machine.
Indianapolis always supplied enoup-h
votes to win win n the machine in Terre
Haute faced a ?Illicit. \oters were
carted around the statt and voted Bt
the polls almost openly, from town to
town and precinct to precinct.
Th>' ambitioni of a onetime tjunman
made i? possible to sma?h the bondi
that heid the itate prisoner. Donn V-.--1
erts, Mayor of Terre Haute, wen* to tl *
Federal** prison a' Leavenworth because
day he taunt? d Joseph I?. i.< si h
wi'h hi? prison record. And Roach, who
bad been pardoned by Thomai H
Marshall, then Governor af Indiana,
ami who then had entered politics,
?wore to pu* I;..! ? i ? bel .?.?! the '?.??? ?.
In I?M'4 Roach brought rharj-e.? of
brib. ry ?gainst Roberts and hit gang,
but the Terre Haute Mayor eacaped. It
was only when Roach brought to his aid
the long arm of the Federal govern?
ment that the Terre Haute politicians
were 1 Bally Ct Ight and sent to pn?on.
Two weehe an'? the United State? Su?
preme Court refoeed to prant a writ of
habeas corpus f?ir th<? release of Ron
ei ta,
Torro Haute a Hi*|r?nnin
Rut Terre Haute was only the be
i-uinir.f,'.
Two years ago indictment? were re?
lumed against Mayor Bell of Indian?
apolis, ami Tom Taggart, botelheeper at
French Lick and chief of the Demo?
cratic organization in the state. Hell
was acquitted. The case apainst Tag?
gart wa? dismi'sed. But Indiana,
hacked by the Federal government, kent
on. Eighty-three F.vansville Republi?
cans were indicted, forty-one Demo?
crat?. Most of them pleaded guiltv.
Politicians indicted at Frankfort plead
ed guilty. A conspiracy charge at Gary
is still awaiting trial.
It was Roach who started the prose
eution in the ca?-<- which finally marked
the Indianapolis police chief as a crim?
inal. Roach il out of it now, but
Indiana ?loes not intend to let up. The
people of the s'ate inten.l to give the
, ne inch n iraashing blow that it
wjll never to ahl- to " ??pulate again
MISICAI. INSTRUCTION
MR. I MRS. U F 11 I I) SCHOOL
JOHN DENNIS |T| C tl H N yQ|Sg
special Summer Session otmooVva.
i 1W ?'?-?,? i?;;
- -r- I. ??? .-It: ?,,
CARNEGIE HALL
VOICE
V P'ii?lo, t* ? ??.-?-?-? Ha fa ?..?. i?;;.
Mehari S'u.i'.. M . .r I Hume for 1er i? BUvianU).
y.,r pan la JO CARNEGIE HALL.
SCHOOL
FOR
;0 CARNEGIE HALL. N. V.
I Man?- Hn.r? for Sorlau? Pufll?.
Ut RIVERDALE AVE.. SOUTH YONKERS. N. V.
Ma... r rmm ? ? ' ???'? I ? '
tT??T WOODRUFF
VOICE PLACING. BREATHING.
Pr?aaratlon for Choir. Conc?rt aad Oralarl?.
171 WEST 57TH ST.. NEW YORK.
FERRARO
GRANO
!? h ?V ?VUKlJoPiR?
INC..
!??' BROADWAY (ENTRANCE 40TH ST.)
?, ,i.i '*,'?? * - ..* ?*? ***?'?? rr.rO'T T***?'!
, 0000 VOICE?
- ACCEPTED. WHITE I0H VOICE TRIAL.
PAnii"' B
TEACHER OF VOICE
AND SINGING
A '. I I ? l'a Or??
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RPF? lALI/f S CHILD RI N A 01, LIS. BEGINNER?.
F.UMMEH RATIR TELEPHONE ?47?>-B/-,??f.
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iMI SEMENTS
AMUSEMENTS
\x|i SEME-NTS
IMESLMENTB
Personally Guaranteed
by S. L. Rothapfel
Manager Rialto
SEE IT
Ml
'esvaqe
Who moulds the moral character
of your children?
Who told YOU the Vital Truths
of Life?
How Have Your Parents In?
fluenced YOUR life?
Vital questions?powerful in
their personal appeal, make t'ois
Heart Drama of genuine interest
to YOU.
"Wid," the famous him critic,
says: "It is the most forceful com
binat'tnn oi thought, pathos n:d
fun ever screened."
It is a film you will long re?
member.
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B'WAY
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422 ST
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TO-DAY
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program Is the final i "r.J i motion picture
pr?sentation, No advance* in Prie?.**.
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says the wax
to stop the
war i s to
drive the Ger?
mans from the
skies.
DA1LV AT 2.30 and 8:30
PRICES EVE'S 25 to 100 MATS 25 h>50
Tht 'Lint Wait K.r
tl? m the Air ih?wi
hew thit will b? accora
...iih? 1
TODAY AND
EVERYDAY
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JACK NORWORTH
LILLIAN LORRAINE
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CANSINOS STANLEY
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BENNETT & LEO
RICHARDS BEERS
MUSICAL INSTaT? TION
TEACHER OF
VOICE
i. PIANO.
STUDIO: HI CARNEGIE HALL. N. V.
BROOKLYN STL'U'1 9? EUCLID AVENU!.
val PEAVEY
?.?-nu, WAKEFIELD
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THEO. VAN YORX TENOR
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CARL EDOUARDE
CCNf?'J.-.TCB
FREDERICK
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Mat. D?ily ;,t 2
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I I hi.* V IS \ 1*1 IK ? II XI?.!.. l.Itl X ! ! X < <<\l MX I ,< \ N . > <, I'. ', I , '. II lll.ll.
DONALD BRIAN
"SOMEWHERE IN YEXJUV'
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I'-,' j _ _ _ _j__ '!?? 'Itl.n
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EDWIN GEORGE
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Ston ?oiir? mu? a 'I run!? lull >.f Ne.? -innnier lr?,'.<.
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Wm.PockandF?nce/V/hi|-e.
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11th MONTH* Mi TIMES
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GEO. WHITE & EMMA HAIG
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