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New-York tribune. [volume] (New York [N.Y.]) 1866-1924, February 20, 1918, Image 6

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Stock Yard Men
Not Underpaid,
Declares Morris
Head of Packing Firm De?
fends Living Conditions
of Employes
Opposes 8-Hour Day
It Would Take Six Months to
Make Change, He
Testifies
CHICAGO, Feb. 19. Nelson Morris,
twenty-six-year-old chairman of the
hoard of directors of Morris & Co.,
who vas the principal witness at the
stockyards wage arbitration proceed?
ings to-day, denied the chargo of or?
ganized labor that packing: house em?
ployes arc not paid a fair living; wage.
He paid packing house workers arc
paid as high wages as were received
by men of the same class in other in?
dustries, and that living conditions In
the district adjacent to the stockyards
are not nearly as bad as pictured by
employe witnesses. He said he fa?
vored equal pay for men and women
doing the same amount of work.
The ten-hour day, he said, waa bet?
ter suited to ?ho needs of tho meat
packing industry than the eight-hour
btandard, and he thought it would be a
mistake to change the system while
the country is at war. He said, how?
ever, he was willing for thu arbitrator
to decide the question after hearing
tt Limony and arguments of both sides.
Mr. Morris declared that the profits
of his company had been reduced 50
p? r cent since the plant began opera?
tion under government control last
fall.
James G. Condon, attorney for the
packers, declared the government sur?
vey of the cost of keeping a family of
five, which amounts to ?1,288 a year,
and was used by the employes' side at
the hearing, was based on the prices
of rent, food and clothing in Washing?
ton, in an inquiry to fix clerks' sala?
ries, ?le Baid it could not properly be
considered in connection with the cost
of living of stockyards laborers in Chi?
cago.
Victor A. Olander, secretary of the
Illinois Federation of l?abor, was re?
called to complete previous testimony.
He read a number of official labor re?
ports in support of the eight-hour law.
On cross-examination attorneys for
the packers attempted to show that
less than half of the 13,000.000 wage
carncrs of the country worked more
than eight hours a day. The witness
said he had no figures on this subject.
The packers' representatives indicat?
ed that the adoption of the eight-hour
day at the stockyards would require
reconstruction of practically all the
plants, which would take six months to
complete.
Attorney Condon and the witness
clashed over a suggestion that pro
German influence might have caused
unrest among packing house employes.
"Is it not true," asked Mr. Condon,
"that there is a well defined impression
among government officials at Wash?
ington that pro-German propaganda is
responsible for the labor trouble in
the packing plants, oil fields, lumber
camps and copper fields since the be?
ginning of the war?"
"Ves, there has been such an impres?
sion,-' answered the witness, "and I
want to say that the mariner in which
these industries treated their labor
furnished a fertile field for this an<\
other propaganda. The government
realized this and began this investiga?
tion of the packing industry to remove
the causes which- make these condi?
tions possible, and that is what we
hope to accomplish here."
Seek Leather Bag as
Hammel Murder Clew
Woman Strangled to Death Kept
Her Valuables in It
If the police are able to find the
black leather bag which was in the
possession of Mrs. Helen ?ammel
shortly before she was strangled to
death In her home, at 507 West Twen
t.y-third Street, last Wednesday they
believe that they will then learn who
killed the woman.
Mrs. Hammel, it Is said, kept most
of her money in the bag, and had it
with her almost continually. Friends
saw It in her possession Bhortly be?
fore her body was found. Since then
it has not been Been.
Detectives yesterday subjected Eliza?
beth Buska, laundress in the Hammel
house, who says she left shortly be?
fore the time the murder is believed
to have taken Mace, to a lengthy cross
examination. They are now checking
up the story she told.
Staten Island Yard
Launches Third Ship
Fourth Vessel Ordered by Emer?
gency Fleet Board Will Be
Floated Monday
The third steel steamship construct
ed by the Staten Island Shipbuilding
Company for the Emergency Fleet was
launched yesterday in Mariner's Har?
bor, Staten Island. The vessel is called
the Mariner's Harbor, has a tonnage of
.",500, is 270 feet long and has a _1
foot beam. She will have Scotch en?
gines of 1,400 horsepower, and a speed
of ten and a half knots an hour, and
will carry either freight or troops.
The launching, in a heavy rain, was
directed by James P. Davidson, gen?
eral superintendent. Miss Helen
Steers, of West New Brighton, was the
sponsor.
The fourth vessel of the ten con?
tracted for by the Staten Island com?
pany will be launched next Monday.
New Yorkers Commissioned
Seven More Are Made Officers
in Reserve Corps
I St a ff Correspondence']
WASHINGTON', Feb. 19. TJae War
Department announced to-day the issu?
ance of reserve corps commissions to I
the following New Yorkers:
Aviation Section. Signal Corns,?Clifford B. !
(iriawolil, 74 We.t Sixty-ninth Street, cap
t.iin.
Medical Ros-pve Corps--Harry L. l'utdy.
966 Lexington Avenue, captain ; Rustin Mo
lntosh. 1..") Riverside Drive, first lieutenant.
Quartermaster's Corps, National Army
Robert W. Kelsey, Pier ?;. St. George, Staten
Island, second lieutenant.
Sanitary Corps. National \rtnj Albert T.
roffenbei-Ker, 405 Went 118th Street, captain:
ICdward B. Kllis. 45U West Thirty-fourth
Street, and Walter Lewis, Camp Dix, first
lieutenant*.
>."
ADVERTISEMENT
1 "'?.
ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT
Rotary's Certified Advertisers
on
?o
J? Keen Interest
o? taken by the officers
m i he business prob'
?ems of deposiLorj
\ NEW NETHERLAND BANK i
1 -*l WtJT .?5111? S.T ?if?? BROADWAY Q
Save that Overtime on
your books by using a
REMINGTON
ACCOUNTING M?CBINI
(Wahl M?charn_m)
Juntt> <? U? 1?r prinUi matttr
REMINGTON
TYP^WRITERCa/zK
AMrwr ? ?
NwVbrkMJfr
rrcnkUrv Slab
SOUDSILK^SCARVES
LOUIS AUERBACH. Muker, NW Y?rk
Codes -A. B. C?Bentley??Scott
American Code Co., Inc.
M Fulton St. Tel. Seek man it
Quick-Change s
WIRE WHEELS
For Beauty and Economy
DD distinction to
your Ford car with
a set of Pasco Wire "
Wheels. They give the
appearance of style,
strength and speed. They
are easy to ?"hange?the av?
erage time required in 2
minutes.
Price, for set of five wheels, !jjT.5.
Not the cheapest, hut the best
wire wheels for a Ford ear.
At the Brooklyn Show this com?
pany will display the latest im?
proved accessories for Fords in
addition to complete cars,
trucks and commercial bodies.
Tins is a ?rood time to become
familiar with tin- Mulford Haas
Service.
MULFORD
HAAS CO. inc.
FORD BUILDING
Bedford Av. & Eastern P'kway
Brooklyn, New York.
Telephone Prospect 8100.
For the idle Moment
The open door to the mcw.a
uinc lounge shows a beautiful
four-sided gallery, overlooking
the Main Lobby. Soft divans
and room)- easy chairs invite
you. it is mi attractive spot
in which to keep nn appoint?
ment or pass an idle moment.
Hotel McAlpin
Broadway and 34th St.
1.. M. BOOMER, Manaijing Director
IP??ll__?
PERFECTION
Motor Car Heaters
heat and complete
your motor car.
ELEVATORS
The World's Standard
Buy
WARD'S
Food Conservation
OATEN-LOAF
DEFENDER BRAN
CAPITAL CORN
WHEATHEART
Wholesome, nutritious and wheat ?av
ing loaves which will help win the war.
French ?read and Kolls of Superb
t.uallty.
ZAMPIERI BROS.,
17 Cornelia St.. Spring 6205
Crouch &
?^ Fitzgerald
iife? Lcaihcr <?d Luggage
\kw-.- t-7 Broadway
14 W. 40th St.
"Tr.
QUALITY F?jplTURE]
^r the home/of
I; thoi^e who know
eJ| Exclusive furniture*
BJ and furniture-ex?
clusively . .
?. HER/CHMANN
(.25 Sixth Avenue - Now- YorR
Between itUiana37tlx -?.
Will write advertis?
ing material for you
that appeals in?
stantly to the reader.
And follows ti]) that ap?
peal so humanly and
forcefully that, nine times
out of ten, the reader he
comes a purchaser.
To increase your publicity
and your sales consult A.
W., which stands for Ar?
thur and Alma Woodward,
writers and advertising ex?
perts of extensive experi?
ence and results.
I'honc for appointment.
Bryant 6480,
Artlmr "Wbodward
A ?ri v ertisin?
A?fency <_?_> Service
147 6 Broadway. New York
? r-jSk The shortest route to the mail-chute
! ? ||?sl??a is via The Dictaphone. Letters are
jl^^pf^ written o/?/// once?on the typewriter.
^*-w"v-J% They are typed swiftly, accurately, un?
interruptedly, without i'ret or friction.
THE UCTHHrW/IE
NM1W
Phone Barclay 3043?Call at 55 Warren St.
This advertisement was dictated to The Dictaphone
Do Your Two Bits.
| An Editorial by ?A. W.
IT'S the constant drip, drip that wears away the
stone. It's the piling of tiny grain upon grain
that makes the shore. It's the accumulation
of many little joys that results in the most lasting
happiness.
hi this huge war, the day-after-day attacks, monoto?
nously similar in character, are what give the hundred yards
advantage in the end. There arc no spectacular accomplish?
ments. As a motion picture producer, who has been in the
front line trenches, said: "The real thing is ?so much less
dramatic than the imitations I have put on the screen so
many times."
There arc many of us who have felt during the Liberty
j Loan drives that wc really could not afford to put aside the
j required amount of money, at one time?even though it was
; a splendid investment opportunity. The spirit "to do" was
there. But with it, was a helplessness?a feeling that we
were out of it because our working capital A\as so pitifully
small?we could do nothing spectacular, nothing big.
To rectify that condition the government lias issued the War Savings
Stamps, approached by easy stages through Thrift Stamps. Thrift
| ?Stamps arc going to be the drops of water whose drip, drip will wear
! away the stone defence of the Huns. The)' will be the tiny grains piled
! one iidiiii the oilier that Avili rebuild the torn l.mdn n( tiriH.hr-rn l<f.:n.?f>
! They are within reach of all. IC
| will not be a question of a sudden
; spurt, of funds and thru an idle in
?
? terini, but a ceaseless stream cnm
i ing from 100,000,000 sources?the
j pockets of the American people.
On the Pacific coast they talk in
terms of "two bits." Interpreted
for the East, two bits become a
quarter. A Thrift Stamp cost's a
quarter. Thus, in buying one, you
do your bit, by giving two bits.
Let this be our slogan from now on
"DO YOUR TWO BITS?TO
WIN TDK WAR."
To tin- poor man it will mean a
quarter now and then. To the man in
moderate circumstances it will he ;?
quarter every day. To the fortunate one
who looks upon silver money merely
as "chicken feed" it should mean every
quarter that finds ils way into his
pocket. At this rate the War Savings
Stamp sale will prow to gigantic pro?
portions and prove a death-dealing
weapon against the enemy.
There are not many people in this
world who are fort?nale enough to dis?
regard the face value of money. Five
dollars means n pair of shoes. Fifty
dollars means the rent. Five hundred
dollars means a nest egg.
Beginning to-day lei every silver
?piarter mean on si^ht one Thrift
Stamp. Set aside a pocket. Call it.
your "thrift pocket.'' Whenever it's
possible slip a quarter into it. And
don't worry about wearing out the lin?
ing too quickly !
District Conference at Newark
Kotarians of the second district, which
comprises all the cities of N'ew York
Stale, Connecticut and lb?' northern
part of New Jersey, will hold a two
days conference at Newark, \. J., on
February '_- and 23. These annual
meetings of representatives front twen?
ty-seven clubs have a large attendance.
This year Rotary activities In war
movements will lie the principal subject
of discussion. The Rotary Club of
Newark is the host. A larpe banquet
will be held at the Robert Treat Hotel
Friday night. Motar) is now one of
the greatest forces in the business world
and it has been found necessary I?
divide the country up into twenty-twi
districts and hold u local conference
in each district, previous to the Inter?
national Convention, which takes place
in June.
Pianos Wanted!
i
".Make every old piano work" was the'
way Motar?an Milbauer put it. For
several months Mr. Milbauer has been
receiving old and unused pianos from
generous citizens, and shipping them to
the soldiers in the camps. Here is a
typical letter received from Camp i
Upton:
Mr. c. Milbauer:
The piano nrrivpd yesterday, and
llie men had a fino concert last
night. My whole company .???Ins me
in thanking yen f,,r your thought
fiiln? sa. ( '.I own and sen us.
JAMES ROBBKTS,
Capt. Ord. 1" pt, \. A.
If liiere arc any more pianos in stor?
age or dusty corners ?u New York City,
no matter what their condition, so long
as they play, and the owner wants to du
a worthy act, communicate with C
Milbauer of the Trans-Continental
Freight Co., Wuolworth Building, and
he will send for the piano and see thai
it jitls to the hoys.
This is Mr. Miibaucr's way of render?
ing extra service during the war. ff
you're not using your piano, let Ihe
hoys have il -no expense to you.
Rotary Club News Gets a Star
This page which has appeared in New !
York newspapers weekly for almost two j
years and bus come to he looked up to i
by the public as a standard of reliabil- ,
?ty. both in text matter and advertising,:
gets its first service star. Two months j
ago ?Sidney Friend, the assistant editor '
in the office of A. \V\, enlisted in the
Signal Corps of the Regular Army, and
then waited for his call. It came Wed?
nesday of last week in the form of a
registered letter. Young Friend, who is
known to every member of the Rotary
Club, promptly answered on his way
downtown. So speedy is the govern?
ment's action when it starts that the
new recruit was in at once and the
Rotary Club News hangs out its first
service star. Alma and Arthur Wood?
ward, who sign A. W. to their copy,
will personally write and edit both the
advertising and the text until the war
is over.
Former Yssistant Editor Friend is
now a private in the United ?Stales
School of Cinematography at Columbia
University. Mr. Friend, in addition to
his advertising ability, is an expert pho- '
tographer, qualified in both operating !
and dark room work. JI is training will i
New Degree
Conferred
By Rotary
College Degrees Pale Alongside
of the Three Letter Sig?
nificance of M. A. N.
Conferred by
Rotary.
Rotar?an Joe Chappie, publisher of
the. National Magazine, cx-U. S. Con?
gressman, orator and leader of men,
spoke before his fellow members at the
MeAlpin Lunch meeting. Mr. Chappie
said that h?' would rather have the
three letter cognomen of M. A. N. after
his name and live up to it, than any
other held. Abraham Lincoln was one
of the first examples of the true Rotar?
?an spirit?he had a big honest heart for
the other fellow. Rotary teaches men
to be honest, fearless and natural. The
whole world is beginning to feel the
great whirl of Rotary.
Vice-President Arthur Doreinus pre?
sided and introduced Dr. Hainbridge, of
the United Stales Navy, one of Uncle
Sam's important medical men. The
doctor was here for only a few days and
will return to the American fleet and
the front where he has previously been
assigned. Here was a man of force,
who painted word pictures of the act?
ual conditions on the other side. Not
pink and rosy, but in their actual colors.
If everybody in the United States could
have heard this talk there wouldn't be
even a food slacker left. "France,"
said the doctor, "has sublime confidence
in us to finish the deliverance neces?
sary to eiui this war successfully.
I?'ranee bas suffercd?almost died. She
\> ill fight to the last man, but for God's
sake come and come quickly ! It will
take every man, woman and child work?
ing at full strength to provide and
maintain the force necessary to crush
Hi?' Germans. All classes are working
'over there," millionaires, plutocrats
and common people, side by side, and
you can't tell one from the other. The
blue stars of your service flair are worth
nothing unless the white that form.s the
background, representing the people at
home, does its duty. The real drive is
in the I Fnited States."
enable him to advance rapidly in the
photogruphic division to which he is
al lachet!.
I lis only comment on his first day off
was that you could alwa\ s borrow a
cigarette from a fellow soldier, but no
one ever had a match. Accordingly he '
stocked up with matches on his return
to quarters.
Next Issue Globe, Feb. 27.
Published Every Week by the
Rotary Club of .Yer?' Turk.
President.Wm. H. Brady
Secretary.Wm. J. Beamish
Hotel Me A ?pin, S4th .St. aiKj B'way
Telephone Ureeley 4V47.
Tills poor bit A.W.?Office of Arthur
Woodicard, 1476 Broadway
The Rotary Club imites publish?
er:; and the public to reprint, in any
form desired, any or all of the
articles on this pape -giving
credit to A. W. and the Rotary
Club of N. Y.
Specify MATHESON
the best White Lead
MathPBon Lead Co., Lone Inland City
MONUMENTS
HARRISON GRANITE CO?
200 Fifth Ave., N. Y.
L I T H O G R A P H I N G
for the trad:
Lutz .- Sheinkman, 2 Duane .St., N. T.
E. M. Gattle & Co.?Jewelers
630 Fifth Ave, N. Y.
Opposite the Cathedral
For the Meatless Day
Pancakes of HECKER'S
Old Homestead Pancake Flour.
For the Wheatless Day
Pancakes of HECKER'S
Prepared Buckwheat Flour.
Originated
O -on
F?t th Avenue
?.?.??*!*???!??-???-?<????.?? g
Society uses it
for its purity,
charm and com?
plexion-building
qualities.
? RAMJDELL' 5 ?
, OLIVE CREAM,
1 Wrilt for comphmenlory tube ?
tj SAMJOrLlj DRUO CO I
1 7ij FIFTH AVENUE NV
pnoovcT er T*e.i amo yim i
imiiininniiiniii-ii-niiiniiiimiiniiiiiiiiiniiiiiiuminiiiiiifli
Rotary Certified Advertisers.
BELL BAG CO., /n_.
BAGS ? BURLAP
6--6S Front Ht. Tel. 682 Hanover.
NOLLMAN & COMPANY
Butter and Eggs
HI R-ade St. Tel. Worth IS??
Grade A?Sealect Milk
Pure?Wholesome
S'hfffipj.i Vum-.r.?Slawson Drok?r Co
CROCKER-WHEELER CO.
Electric motors, c/cnerators, etc.
N.Y.Office: 30 CHURCH ST
AC-WEAVER
sells GOODdotkes
Where Columbus meets
Broadway at 66* St.
announces the
Regular
i| Semi-Annual
SALEl
:? i:
!; of smart Shoes for I
?. Men and Women ? f
I now in progress I
1 FIFTH AVENU*.
at 4ZHS. street .
FLOWER STEEL. ELECTROTYPE CO
461 Eighth Ave.,
216 William St..
Tel. Greeley 6154
Tel. Beek. 1.31
WINTERROTH PIANOS
Another new ?tore. No. 141 West 42d Street.
Piano?. Talklnj Machlnos and Records.
Writ? to u? for KB Et fcook'.ct
u.iiuj; tear parmtnt ;>
? . ...?/ fcv lending umvtrsihe
! ? orrinii \.'u(i?m- of l..ii.n_([f?
? :' .:* ID. 12 K-?t <?'li St.. \>? York
SrltiusS French tntth'ih-lfuiian itcrmarr'.
AWNINGS and FLAGS
for decoration
and utility
McHUGH^'-vv^l1
iC Co.,
St.
J
BURNS BROS. ICE
Corporation, 103 Park Ave.
Certified Natural and Hygeia Ice
of superior quality at lowest mar?
ket rates.
Tel. Yanderbilt 5050.
Franklin Thrift
was a great idea when Old Ben was alive
The Franklin Motor Car may be a
KUle liifc-h at the start, but it costs
a whole lot less lu the end. Franklin
Thrift means war time economy.
FRANKLIN MOTOR CAK CO.,
1800 Broadway, New York.
1176 Bedford Ave.. Brooklyn.
Something to Crow About
The linprecendentfl srowih of our
business?due to selling the best
Same and poultry In the best way. ?
Nathan Schweitzer Co., Inc. poultry and
400-411 W. 14U> SU. .V Y. ,,Gf'!?e f?r,
Hotels, Club:?,
?...(durants.
i'h.ii. L'liolie? 3!J0U.
"The very health of every relation re?
quires that the relation lo God should
be made supreme."
Henry Churchill King
FRANK E. CAMPBELL
Tin funeral i htirch
1.70 Broadway, N. Y. City.
notary's Certified Advertisers
PAKKAVEN?E,
HOTEL
V
f"lL;-____^:_^?'
JAe Epitome of
All That's Desir?
able in Hoteldom
Park Avenue ai 33 rd 5tr
New York
Opticians
5 West 42nd St.
Eyeglasses
Spectacles
Opera Glasses
Lorgnettes
Oxfords
Radium Wrist
Watches
Radium Traveling
Clocks
Kodaks
Oldest Retail Optical
House in X. Y. City
id
the best?5 cents
Dieges & Gust?!5 John St.
Jewelry, Class IMns, Class Kins?
Athletic Medals . nd Krat< rni: IM,
1%mnSch?ss?-Co
SKIRTS OF QUALITY
WALDORF BUILDING
. THIRTY THIR3 STREFT AND f IFIH AVE
NEW YORK
H. C. ivl?NER |
LITHOGRAPHING CO.
Litliographiny?Type \
and Block Printing ?
626 West 26th St., New York. !
PAREES
^ Cleaners
and Dyers
Preservers of Gowns
9
"UliUUil__4UjW
Remember the Name
STORES'EVERYWHERE
?___naa
.=_Jf
/Ae Lawyer
needs Corona
?ETTER than
hastily - pen?
ciled, soon - mis?
laid notes, are the
legible memoran?
da so easily writ?
ten on
\_,
IHtTHOONALWRff?Mi MACHINE
1 ) ?? s k ci r ;>. \v c r size.
Weighs only <>! ;'. lbs
Carry it am vvl? re. 'ost,
in ease, $50.
?s'y?? cial ( 'orona Luygc. <?
?'/ j/ou icon/ i'.
Corona Typewriter Co., Inc.
123 West 42r.d St., New York Citv.
._e-uin ? : . ?? I
eai run things ai .. \ ?\ j
things. Hverj ? - <f- \ \ j
wants ;:; * ?5 _J ?sc\7 I
a ?f? ?nvrs.l ?? ^ f?v
Send r..:? i; ??'?%T
Alexander Hamilton Institution y 1
PUBLIC ACCOUNTANTS I
POGS( IN BROTHERS _c CO.
&CA?/ON
AHDAVENP0RT6
SOI F IR TM AVEZ Ni UE
FURNITURE <od
DECORATION/
Il ill tain ?il, a.ittrt
min. charming bits ?f ' ? ? ' ' i
?which will add to flu beault) of
miur lininc without areat ???utr.
"For Men May Come
And Men May Go
But I Go On Forever"-TKsx?sox
1880 February 12th 1918
RILLIANT lawyers, skilful
doctors, gifted actors, braim
diplomats and powerful kings of
industry, all have recorded their
life's work and the world's progress
with a Waterman's Ideal Foun?
tain Pen.
And now, on February 12th, tlic thirty
f.i'tli Anniversary of the birth of our busi
ness, those who have risen to take their
places in the affairs of the world arc
using the selfsame faitliful
I.. K. WATERMAN CO., 191 Broadway, New TorU
Frmii Waterman, Preside
M moer of V V. Rotary
L
Un End. the Pen Shall P
Ihr P
,( Ihr H

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