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New-York tribune. [volume] (New York [N.Y.]) 1866-1924, May 30, 1918, Image 9

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Swann Sued
By Dawson
For $50,000
Father of Mount Vernon
Anti-Hearst Ordinance
Charges Libel
Based on Statement
Prosecutor Gave Out
District Attorney Accepts
Summons; Says He Will
Await Complaint
MOUNT VERNON, N. Y., May 29.?
Alderman William G. Dawson, father
of the ordinance barring William Ran?
dolph Hearst's "New York American"
and "Evening Journal" from circulation
here, to-day started a ?50,000 damage
suit against District Attorney Swann,
of New York County, for alleged libel.
The summons was served on Mr.
Swann at his office in the Criminal
Courts Building. Manhattan, at 2:50
o'clock this ofternon. It demands a
trial in Westchester County. The
complaint, it was announced, will be
filed in White Plains and a copy of it
served on Mr. Swann late this week.
The defendant must reply to the com?
plaint within, twenty days after he re?
ceives it.
Mr. Dawson's suit is brought in con?
nection with the District Attorney's
investigation of Hearst's complaint
that "certain persons and corpora?
tions" have conspired to prevent him
selling his "American" and "Journal."
Based on Swann Statement
J. Henry Essor, Corporation Coun?
sel of Mount Vernon, represents Alder- ;
man Dawson, who contends that Mr. ?
Swann libeled him in an interview j
printed in New York newspapers yes- j
terday, in which the District Attorney
was quoted as stating that Alderman j
Dawson r.nd all his associates who
voted for the anti-Hearst resolution |
were manifestly guilty of the crime of
"oppression." Mr. Swann also was
quoted as referring to these aldermen |
as "guilty persons."
The District Attorney gave out this ?
interview when he was informed that
Alderman Dawson, who on Saturday j
was questioned in the Criminal Courts !
Building, Manhattan, in connection !
with the Hearst conspiracy charges, i
had asserted that the attitude of Mr. !
Swann and his assistant, John T. Dool- j
ing. at that time made him feel he was j
in the office of "Hearst's attorneys."
Alderman Dawson would make no i
statement to-.lay concerning his action
against the District Attorney. Cor?
poration Counsel Esser, however, gave
out the following:
"The action commenced by Alderman
Dawson is for libel and the complaint I
will -Alege ?damages to the amount of :
S5C.000. The action is based upon Mr. ?
Swann's rtatement to the newspapers
that Mr. Dawson is guilty of the crime ;
of oppression. |
Calls Swann's Course Unusual
"I cannot understand the District !
Attorney'-- course in this matter. It is ?
most urui-ual for s prosecuting officer ,
r of a .county wherein the acts com- j
I plain .d of did not take place to attack :
a person in this way through the news- '
papers. I cannot understand how this
I falls within Mr. Swann's official duties.;
j Our sldc-rmcn were very glad to go to i
I New York to be of any service to the !
i District Attorney which they possibly j
I could be -when he said that he was]
| ?eking evidence . of a conspiracy |
i jjg?nst the Hearst new ..papers. But :
'???y did not go there to be called crim
| insls. ?
I "I cannot agree with Mr. Swann -that [
)Alderman Dawson. in violation of Sec-'
tion ?53 of th? penal law, 'unlawfully:
?and maliciously, under pretence or ?
?color of official authority, cad any act ?
{whereby another is injured in hin per
1MB, property or rights.' I certainly,
irnu.t insist that any such act, if corn-1
| mitted. was committed in Westchester?
County, and the orderly way to prose- ?
cate ? person fer an offence Is to ac-;
?Me him and indict him in the county,
in-wtoch the offence was committed.
"! know that we suburbanites are?
not fully conversant with the way.; of
the '?ig City,' but among the strange ?
thine? I have heard that people do in
the 'Biff City,' this freak method of:
? trial and conviction through the col- ?
I umn-s of the newspaper., exceeds any- ;
thing that as yet ha3 come to my!
lotice. I have yet to be initiated into
?he wisdom or justice of such a course
i>y a District Attorney.
Threat of Other Actions
"Up here in Westchester County we :
?re accustomed to a rliii'ojrent method;
of procedure and wc are ;?h.ip]y not;
S??2g to stand for any auch abuse of;
our public officials. Whether the judg- ;
ment of our aldermen in passing the ;
ordinance La question was good or bad,
*M..itr their'idea of the law was right
or wrong,as will be finally deterpiined
"> a proper court, they did not' pass
?J*t ordinance as ?i lot of criminals. |
Ju*K is no question of their patriot
>k*r.. There fs no question that they
passed that ordinance out of a sense
o? Public duty.
, " any cne else is willing to go o:i :
?A' as Mr- *;????*?" has done, and
will u-a lot of criminal*, he. too, j
im-v %W4 an ooporturi'.tv to come
?P mm mto Westchester County be
[?? one o? our trial juries and justify ?
*p* atcu.aUon."
mill* $lf*r, supplemented his state-!
DUtr?,?V..the ?ns-ouncement that, if
vmiU aAU,?nuv Swam, so desired, he
Jit" ?? hi* Power to have the
"'"ehester County Court.
S?*wnif Mayor Receives
FlJ?>d of Congratulations
^e^TheTribune
H?l*tt.,?^:,?W?t?l*ting him on ;
*&? The S Lam \*???M Hearst, :
^ro' Vste Put?\ishe<* Tuesday! ,
r? ??{mS.MMl(l he received ?
-?tt?. than v,l ges. c?mmending this
^??lod to ?*? ?? Vi?? wh<* he :
5? Mw,??l?rs Pt*tr,?-1S1?" of Sum- [
??? of Helrst niP dl?coRtinue the
&??? ? indcati^Tl5- IIc took
5^ the ?SS?!1?".?.the extent to ;
S***t has ?w?-rJ???timent against
oLJerwV aPndne?hU^h N?** York, I
?M of the fir.?rng states- !
. ?? nrst messages of
/
mendation was telegraphed bv the
Hamilton Sleight Post, G. A. R., of
Poughkeepsie. N. Y. Members of this
post burned copies of "The New York
American" in which the victory prayer
?was deleted from the President's Me?
in'rial Day message. The telegram
follows:
rouR.-.!.eepsie, N. Y., May 2S, 191?.
_Hon. Rufoi-d Franklin, Mayor, Summit,
><*. .T. : Please accept th. hearty epnsratu
lations c.f the comrades o? Hamilton
Sleight Tost, G. A. R., upon your 100 per
cent Jotter in to-day's Tribune rcfcrriii?
to the Hearst papers, and especially to the
deleted Memorial Day proclamation. We
are with you, fir... last and all the time.
1 had a part in the first Memorial Day
observance, and shall be with the boys on
Thursday. There are 12,. of us here, and
I know that a? we strew flowers upon the
gravea of our comrade?, the prayer will
UTO up from the heart of every man who
wore the blue or the Bray, for victory of
our Allies as they fight to-day {or freedom.
Spoken or unspoken, thnt prayer will
po up from the heart of 100,000,000 loyal
Americans, so loyal that when they know
the real meaning of the garbling: of the
President.? me. s a pc, no request not to buy
"The New York American" will be needed.
"My boy, too, is over there doing his
bit, and I am confident, that your boy and
mine would know just what to do with
editions like that of May 12. The ?ires
did it here?the sons are working along
the same lines over there.
CHARLES E. CHASE, Adjutant.
Swann Says Summons
Means Nothing; to
Await Complaint
District Attorney Swann accepted a
summon B without an accompanying
complaint in Alderman Dawson's libel
suit yesterday. It was served bv m
clerk from the office of Corporation
Counsel Ksser in Mount Vernon.
"I s'nall pay no attention to it until
I am served with a complaint," said
Mr. Swann. "I get threats of libe'
sui-jw every week; every District At?
torney of this county does, but I pay
no attention to them. This papei
means nothing. Any one can obtair
one of them for a penny."
The summons recites that Williar.
G. Dawson is plaintiff in an actior
brought against Edward Swann, de
fendant, and the defendant is sum
moned to answer the complaint withir
twenty days after May 29, or judg
ment will be found by default.
Mr. Swann was asked whether hi
cared to reply to Alderman Dawson':
statement in The Tribune Wednesda.
morning challenging Mr. Swann t<
prove his charge of "oppression
against him.
"Nothing to say," he replied.
Corporation Counsel Esser came ti
Mr. Swann's office yesterday unde
subpoena to be questioned by Assistan
District Attorney Dooling regardini
Mr. Hearst's complaint charging con
spiracy to prevent the sale of hi
newspapers in Mount Vernon. Mr. Es
ser declined to answer any question
on the ground that his relations to th
members of the Board of Aldezme?
were that of attorney and client an
therefore privileged.
Hearst Newspapers
Dropped by Soldiers
Of a Guard Compan
POUGHKEEPSIE, N. Y., May 29.
The members of Company F, First II
fantry, New York Guard, to-nig.
agreed not to purchase either "Th
New York American" or "The Evenin
Journal," and also agreed to di
courage the sale of the papers. Th
was not an official act of the cor
pany, but was the result of an addre:
made toy Captain A. S. Murray, wl
brought the matter to the attention <
the local militiamen, following the
regular weekly drill. .
Following the drill, Captain Murra
addressed his company, and said:
"In a recent, issue 'The New Yoi
American' published President Wilson
Memorial Day proclamation, but it wi
deleted. It is just these things thi
we should be on the lookout for. Th
action was in my estimation pro-Ge
man and we as individual membe:
should see that a stop is put to it.
"We can't take official action on th
question, but we as individuals ghou
refuse to purchase any papers editi
by Mr. Hearst and we should also di
courage others from buying h
papers."
It was then asrreed by the compai
that no member' would purchase
Hearst paper and in addition wou
discourage their sale.
Cranford Militia
Reserve Places Ban
On Hearst Papa
CRANFORD, N. J., Mav 29.?Tl
Cranford company of the New Jers
Militia Reserve last night took acti
to keep Hearst newspapers out
town. The members of the comna
pledged themselves to use every la
ful means within their power to di
courage the circulation of Hearst pu
licatioris in Cranford.
Captain J. II. Frazier read a coi
munication from the Defence Leag
of Now Jersey telling of the leagu
pledge to ?_c. all lawful moans to kr
Hearst papers out of the state. T
company unanimously indorsed t
leagua'_. action.
Members of the company said to-rl
that their action has the hearty st
port of Mayor Moon and the Cranfc
township committee.
Chance Sends Pupils' Comfort Kit
To "Corner Cop," Now in Navy
Thomas F. Dugan, U. S. N., who a3
? the "corner cop" used to guard the
: little folk of Public School #69, at
; Fifty-seventh Street and Second Ave
? nuc, has been gone a long time from
; his post. But he is not forgotten. And
! the long arm of chance, which does
j strange things, has just reached out
; across the seas and joined his hand
j again to those of his small wards.
A red Christmas kit, full of chocolate
: and books and playing cards and other
i necessary things, was the guiso that
j chance chose to bring them together
! again. It was one of a number which
' the children of the public school
| bought with their pennies last Christ
: mas and sent out through the Navy
; League to the men in service. And,
j strangely enough, it fell right into
! the hands of the "corner cop," Tommy
j Dugan, who was then at sea chasing
I submarines.
When Patrolman Dugan had recov?
ered from his joy and surprise he
?wrote this letter of thanks to the chil
! dren who sent him the kit:
! To the pupils of Public School 59, Man
! hattan.
Dear Children : Just received the
, Christmas bag that you, dear children,
| have sent to Uncle Sam's boys far over
j the sea.
Every article in the comfort kit is just
what I need at present and comes in very
! handy. I cannot find words in which I
i ran express my appreciation of this won
1 derful little gift. To just thank the chil
I dren would only ba saying I received
I the kit
I Before the war broke out I was a po
nceman in the City o? New York and
? performed police duty in the district that
i taltca in your school. At time? I have
had the pleasure of performing traffic
duty at. Fifty-seventh Street and Second
Avenue while the children of this school
used tfi pans Roinir for lunch and coming
i to school in the morning and returning in
the evening.
In this navy life "us" boys have some
very int?-resting happenings. We visit a
grcBt number of foreign ports and make
up . ightseeing parties.
The duty we are performing at present
ia pretty hard, hut very exciting?hunting
out the Hun's U-bouts.
I will send .orne pretty cards from the
I different port_ I stop at. Kindly answer
1 thlo letter. Reepectfully yours,
THOMAS F. DUG AN.
P. S.?To the principal: Please read
j this lett.r to the class that donated this
kit. No doubt some of the children
know nie. T. F. D.
But he forgot to tell which class had
! its name in this particular kit, so the
| children of the fourth B grade have
! volunteered to write tha answers which
; he asks.
They are not the only ones who re
i member him, however. Eva Kenedy,
220 East Fifty-seventh Street, in the
eighth grade, used to talk to him be?
cause he was so jolly. "I remember
once he pulled a little girl out from
in front of a street car," says Eva.
Helen Battersby, 249 East Fifty
second, also knows the kind-hearted
former Patrolman, and Emma Keider
cr, 1073 Second Avenue, is a bit
prouder than the rest "because he was
my uncle's best friend."
Patrolman Dugan resigned from the
force to enter the navy, but Arthur
Woods, fbrmer Commissioner of Police,
reinstated him, so when the war is
over he may come back a^nin to watch
the "kids" of Public School No. 59.
I Glen Ridge to Use
Handbills in Fight
On Hearst Papers
Committee of Public Safety
Will "Bill" Trains and
Nearby Towns
| GLEN RIDGE, N. J., May 29.?Hand
j bills, which expose the course of
j Hearst papers since the United StateB
| declared war, are to be the weapons
which Glen Ridge citizens will use next
in their fight to keep Hearst news?
papers out of town.
The Glen Ridge Committee of Publid
Safety ordered the handbills to-day.
Members of the committee will bear
the cost.
Committee members said the hand?
bills will give excerpts from Hearst
editorials showing that Hearst pleaded
against sending American troops to
France, and against sending food and
ammunition to our Allies until we were
I sure we had plenty of both at home;
j that Hearst tried to incite hatred of
| Great Britain, our strongest ally; and
that Hearst strove for an early peace
which- -would have been a German
peace.
j Besides setting forth what Hearst
! newspapers have done since America
entered the war for world freedom, tho
hamibills will recite the history of the
Glen Ridge movement to bar Hearst
publications.. The movement took con?
crete form May 19, when the borough
marshals passed a resolution pledging
each member, as a loyal American, to
do all he could do legally to stop the
| sale of Hearst newspapers. The local
j newsdealers promptly quit handling
i "The New York American" and "Jour
j nal." Then on May 21 the Committee on
I Public Sa.ety indorsed the action of the
I borough marshals and passed a resolu
i tion urging "all loyal Americans in
I Glen Ridge" to quit reading Hearst
j papers.
When all local dealers, with the
j exception of the Glen Ridge agent of
I the Union News Company at the rail
j roads station, ceased handling Hearst
publications. Hearst representatives
wore dispatched from New York to
hawk "Journals" and "Americans" on
j the streets of Glen Ridge.
The combined Hearst business of the
! Union News Company men and the spe
! cial agents has dwindled until among
j them they now only about ten
? Hearst? newspapers a day in Glen
! Ridge, according to the estimate of the
' Committee of Public Safety.
"The handbills are not being printed
! for the sole purpose of converting the
j few Glen Ridge residents who still
i vend Hearst paper:.." said Thomas L.
j Massen, a member of the Committee of
! Public Safety. Mr. MasBon is connect
i ed with "Life."
"The handbills will be sent to other
i towns and will be passed out on trains.
j Of courser, nandbi-its will be given to
' the few Glen Ridge citizens who still
Last Three Days of Great Exhibition
of nearly S0? Works of Art donated to the Am&ri
can-British-French-Belgian Permanent Blind Tie
lief War Fund for Soldiers and Sailors to be sold
to aid those blinded in the war.
YOUR LAST CHANCE TO SEE
the original of the famous Ridgway Knight painting
TAKING MONEY FROM THE STOCKING
( Le 4Bas de Laine), loaned by its owner, Mr.
James McLean, to be shown with photographic
reproduction, 31/? feet by 4 feet, of its companion
picture, AFTER THE RATTLE OF THE
MARKE. This superb masterpiece of Ridgway
Knight, now the sensation of the Paris Salon, has
been presented to the Fund and will be sold at
auction here next Wednesday evening.
CLOSING DAYS of "BLIND AUCTION"
You may be able to get at your own price any
object you desire in this magnificent collection.
The highest offer made up to Saturday evening wins.
ANDERSON GALLERIES, Park Ave. and 59th St.
ADMISSION 50 CENTS
$ Remember that the PRICE of ADMISSION,
everything you buy, helps to BUY EYES FOR
A BUNDED SOLDIER.
read Hearst papers," added Mr. Mas
son. "When Hearst agents were sentj
?to Glen Ridge after the local dealers i
quit handling Hearst papers they sue
ceeded in keeping about twenty-fivej
Hearst customers?at first.
"Personal talks by patriotic Glen !
Ridgers brought this number down to ;
; what now is apparently about ten. A !
j Glen Ridge man carrying a Hearst pa- j
per boarded the train this morning. |
Other Glen Ridgo men had a little talk i
with him. Before New York was ;
reached that paper had gone out the j
window, and Hearst had lost one more |
I reader."
? East Orange Club Starts
Move to Prohibit the Sale j
Of Hearst Papers There]
EAST ORANGE, N. Jv May 29.?j
The board of trustees of the East!
Orange Columbian Club to-day began
collecting evidence as to the attitude j
of Hearst newspapers since the United!
States declared war.
Club officers intend this evidence to
be the basis of an action by the East
Orange city council to prohibit the
salo or distribution of "The New York
American" and "Journal" within the ;
East Orange city limits.
At this week's meeting of the East
Orange council the Columbian Club
presented a petition asking the council
to take action to bar Hearst publica-;
i tions from the city. The petition was
; signed by the club's board of trustees j
1 and fifty leading members.
Councilman Louis C. Geils stated j
; that East Orange public sentiment!
: favored such action, and suggested thatj
I the matter be referred to the council's i
j legal questions committee. Jerome D. I
! Gedney, city councillor, suggested j
| that the club's trustees be asked if I
I they would collect the evidence on I
j which the council could base the
j Hearst action. j
j 0. J. Elder, president of the, club,!
; said to-day that tha trustees gladly j
; would gather the evidence.
! "All we will have to do," said Mr. ?
! Elder, "is to read Hearst newspaper ?
files for the last year or so and take \
I out certain excerpts as we come to i
'. them. We will get all the evidence
i from the Hearst newspapers them
I selves.
i "No action the ekib ever has taken
j has met with such unamimous approval !
j of the members as the Hearst petition, j
j Columbian Club members arc represent- ?
I ative East Orange citizens. The club's j
j petition that Hearst newspapers be
| barred is a reflection of the wishes of j
! the entire community."
10,000 Will Sing
In Thrift Festival
j. At Polo Grounds
John Philip Sousa to Con?
duct Oratorio "Elijah"
on Sunday
Preparations for the great Thrift j
Festival at the Polo Grounds on Sun?
day are in full swing. The huge
stands, for the chorus of 10,000, the
principals and the band, are being built j
in sections, so that they can be put j
together after Saturday's baseball
game.
This work is under the direction of
John B. Foster, secretary of the New '
York National League Club, which lent j
the grounds to the War Savings Com
mittee. The carpenters and others en- !
gaged on the work are being drilled !
to the efficiency of circus hands, for j
their task nextx Saturday night will be j
very much like that of a circus or?
ganization.
The entire field is to be covered with |
a level floor, on which benches will be
placed for the chorus. In the middle, I
just over second base, will be the band I
stand, in the form of a cone, with John j
Phillip Sousa, the conductor, at the j
apex, and the conductors of the various j
units, grouped around him.
About 14,000 singers are rehearsing I
at twenty-four place., but 4,000 will be |
dropped before the opening, for there i
is room for only 10,000. Four com-1
posers are at work on the score of |
"Elijah." It has-to he arranged for a
brass band of 200 pieces. Only once
before has it been performed by a
brass band, and then there were only
120 pieces. Sousa himself is conduct?
ing the most important rehearsals.
Saturday the entire work will he re?
hearsed at Madison Square Garden.
The sale of tickets is exceedir-g ex?
pectation;-;. Thousands have beon sold
at the Metropolitan Opera House, the
Hippodrome and other theatres and at
department stores, while every one of
the 100,000 stamp sellers has tickets to i
offer as well as stamps. With each j
ticket goe_? a thrift card with a 25-cont j
stamp attached.
The parade to-day on the. East Side j
is to be a war savings demonstration.
Thirty thousand East Siders will march !
from Rutgers Square up East Broadway I
at 2 o'clock, through Essex Strtet and I
Avenue A to Fourteenth Street and ?
back along Second Avenue and inter- j
mediate streets to Seward Park, where I
a mass meeting will be held. They will |
be headed by the 15th Coast Artillery!
band and a regiment of coast artillery- j
men from Forts Hamilton and Wads
worth, under Colonel J. D. Watson.
Governor Whitman will review the
parade at Second Avenue and Tenth
Street. He will speak from the review- !
ing stand and later at a mass meeting j
in Public School 62, Hester and Essex j
Streets.
I Mayor of Rahway to Issue
Proclamation Opposing
The Hearst Papers
RAHWAY, N. J? May 29,-Mayor D.
H. Trembley to-night was writing a
Memorial Day proclamation, which he
will issue to-morrow, calling upon all
citizens of Rahway to Quit reading
Hearst newspapers.
The Mayor expressed confidence that
citizens would observe the proclama?
tion and that Hearst publications would
cease to be read in this town.
Preparing the way for his proclama?
tion, Mayor Trembley has, since last
Saturday, stated his views concerning
Hearst newspapers to all Rahway
churches and lodges. Among the
lodges whose members he has asked to
quit reading Hearst publications are
the Elks, Masons, Oddfellows, Eagles,
Knights of Columbus and Knights of
Pythias. Ho also has put the issue be?
fore the Fire Department and the Po?
lice Department.
"I have the assurance that members
of those churches, lodges and organi?
zations will observe my Memorial Day
proclamation to bar Hearst newspapers
from Rahway," said Mayor Trembley
to-night. "Rahway is one of the most
patriotic towns in New Jersey."
How Memorial Day Will Be Observed
These arc some of the most important celebrations by which
Memorial Day -will be observed here to-day:
0 A. M.?Soldiers' parade on Riverside Drive, from Seventy-fourth to
Ninety-first street; reviewed at Eighty-ninth street and Riverside
Drive by Governor Whitman and his staff.
After the Riverside Drive parade there will be exercises at the Maine
monument and the Joan of Arc statue.
9 A. M.?Parade in Brooklyn. Line of march, Bedford avenue and
South Eighth street to St. John's Place, to Washington avenue, to
Eastern Parkway, to Soldiers and Sailors' arch, to Plaza. The
reviewing stand will be east of the arch. %
10 A. M.?Annual memorial mass, St. Andrew's Roman Catholic
Church, Duane street.
10:30 A. M.?Field mass at the Battery. All soldiers and sailors of
this and Allied countries are invited.
10:30 A. M.?Golden jubilee, Church of the Holy Name, Amsterdam
avenue and Ninety-sixth street.
10:30 A. M.?M?morial Day exercises at the Educational Alliance,
Jefferson street and East Broadway.
11 A. I,-.?Special service at Grace Protestant Episcopal Church,
Broadway and Tenth street; the Rev. Dr. Slattery, preacher.
1 P. M.?Thirty thousand persons, including mothers whose sons have
gone to war, will marcl? in an East Side parada, which will be
reviewed and addressed by Governor Whitman in Rutgers Square.
2 P. M.?Opening of the canteen for soldiers and sailors in Central
Park, near Sixty-third street and Fifth avenue, by the Mayor's
Committee of Women on National Defence.
2 P. M.?Memorial services at the tomb of General Grant, Riverside
Drive; oration by Governor Whitman.
During the day and night there will be other special exercises in all
parts of the city, each section having its own parade.
There also will be services in all the churches and synagogues.
Food for 40 Weeks in
United Kingdom Crops
LONDON, May 29.?The present con?
dition of crops in the United Kingdom !
is very promising, speaking generally, j
and gives reasonable hope of at least
an average yield, according to an in?
terim report published by the Director
General of Food Production to-day.
It is indicated that the total tillage
area in the United Kingdom for the !
year 1917-'18 will be well over 4.000,000 j
acres, with the highest acreage under
wheat, barley and oats ever recorded |
in the history of British agriculture.
The acreage under potatoes will be the j
greatest since 1872.
-a
Anna Held Has Quiet Day?
Cheered by Motion, Picture in ''
Her Own Rooms
Anna Held, the actress, passed a
quiet day yesterday. A bulletin, is?
sued late last night, reported her con- ;
dition as unchanged.
During the day a diversion was of- ?
fered the patient when two portable
motion picture machines were taken to
her apartment at the Hotel Savoy and j
a motion picture called "Joan of Platts- ]
burg," in which Mabel Normand, a per
; sonal friend of Miss Hold's, appears.!
| was thrown on a small screen fastened !
to a wall on one side of her bedroom.
I Miss Held chose the picture herself, as
I it is an Americanization of the story
of "Joan of Arc."
! Dr. Donald McCaskey, Miss Held's
personal physician, would offer no<
comment on her condition.
Miss Townsend To Be Bride
Of Lieut. Shotter Saturday
Miss Marion Townsend, daughter of
Mr. and Mrs. J. Allen Townsend, will
be nfarried to Lieutenant Spencer
Owens Sh'otter, son of Mr. and Mrs.
Spencer P. Shotter, of this city and
Lenox, Mass., on Saturday at noon in
the chantry of St. Thomas's Church.
The ceremony will be followed by a
reception at the home of the bride's
parents, 237 Madison Avenue.
Mrs. Robert C. Winmill will be her
sister's matron of honor, and Mr. Win
mill will be best man. Lieutenant Shot?
ter is here on leave from Camp Dick,
Dallas, Tex. He is in the aviation sec?
tion of the Signal Reserve Corps. .
Dar_:rosch to Conduct
Orchestra 'Over There'
Walter Damrosch. conductor of the
New York Symphony Orchestra, will
sail for France within a few days to
organize, under the auspices of the
Y. M. C. A., an orchestra of fifty French
musicians to entertain American sol?
diers over there.
Mr. Damrosch will rehearse th$ men
in Paris for a week and then start with
thorn on a tour of the American camps.
At times symphonic' concerts will be
given so close to the battle lines that
the rumble of the big guns will sup?
plement the -ork of the man with the
ksttle drums.
Maurice De Villiers has been select?
ing the musicians from the Lamoreux
and Colonne orchestras so that there
will be little for Mi-. Damrosch to do
after he lands, but to begin rehearsals.
All the expense except the salaries of
the French musicians is being borne by
the Y. M. C. A. The salaries are an
anonymous gift. Mr. Damrosch is giv?
ing his services.
BernstorfFs Degree
Cancelled by Brown
PROVIDENCE, R.T., May 29.?Formal
announcement that the Board of Fel?
lows of Brown University had can?
celled the honorary degree of Doctor
of Laws conferred in 191? upon Count
Johann Heinrich von BernstorfF.
former German Ambassador to the
United States, was made by President
William H. P. Faunce at the commence
! ment exercises to-day. President
Faunce said the board had voted to
^take this action because while Count
'von Bernstorff "was Ambassador of
the imperial German government to
the United States, and while the na?
tions were still at peace, he was
guilty of conduct dishonorable alike
in a gentleman and a diplomat."
The vote carried with it a provision
that von Bernstorff's name be stricken
from the list of honorary alumni and
omitted from future publications of
the university.
Frank Joseph MacDonald
Frank Joseph MacDonald, forty-four
years old, former editor in chief of
! "The Call," died yesterday at his
home, 1280 Clay Avenue, The Bronx,
after a long illness. He is survived by
his widow, Marie Breuckmann Mac?
Donald, and a son, Bert, seventeen
years old. Funeral arrangements have
not been completed.
Business Opposes
Curtailment of the
Mail Tube Service
Merchants' Association
Sends Agents to Washing?
ton to Fight Burleson Plan
Will Appeal to House
Material Interests of the City
at Stake, It Is De?
clared
The Merchants' Association has sent
George A. Gardner and F. B. De Berard
to Washington to oppose any steps
which would lead to the abandonment
or diminution of the pneumatic mail
tube service in New York City. They
will appear before the Committee on
Rules of the House of Representatives.
The Merchants' Association, together
with the Chamber of Commerce, has
made protests against Mr. Burleson's
proposal te curt?::! the tuba service.
The matter is now in the hands of the
conference committee on the postoffice
appropriation bill.
Among the documents before the
! conference committe is an affidavit
i in which Mr. Gardner declares that
i the Postmaster General's investigation
: of the pneumatic tube stations in New
I York was perfunctory, and that it was
j obvious that the majority of the com
I jnittee was hostile to the pneumatic
i tube system. Mr. Gardner was a mem
! ber of the investigating committee,
j For four years he has been Assistant
?Superintendent of the Railway Mail
j Service.
Ernest Harvier, real estate man, 1193
; Broadway, in a statement to The Trib
i une points out that the government's
annual orofit from the New York City
: Postoii.ce is more th:_n $20,000,000. that
'21,000.000 letters are received, ?nollect
' ed and distributed here every dav, and
! that 10.000,000 of them go through the
! tubes that the Federal government is
proposing to take over after July I, the
\ Senate having provided for this by ap
'. propriation.
Mr. Harvier also points out thnt nie
New York City delegation in the Hour,?
i of Representatives, which was largely
instrumental a year ago in preserving
the tubp r.crvicc. has been deoletc-d since
' -ben by the retirement cf Congressman
i Murray Hulbert, the death of Congress?
man Conry, the- election of Congress?
man Griffin as Sheriff of Kings County,
i the absence of Congressman La Guar
! (lia, %vho is in the av:::tir>n service in
! Italy, and the resignation of John J.
?Fitzgerald, of Kings, ??.ho was chair
! man of the Appropriation Committee
? of the Hcuse.
"The only objection urged against
; the present underground postal service
? is the item of expense." says Mr. Har
! vier. "It is claimed that the handling
of letters in bulk bv vans would be
cheaper than the underground system?
Against that is the claim of New York
merchants arid business men that the
I city is entitled to modern service in a
? matter . o close to its vast material in
? terests."
-.
Ellis Leaves $1,500,000
The will of William D. Ellis, former
! ly president of the Schenectady Loc.o
? motive Works, filed in the Surrogates'
? Court, di-poses of an estate valued at
! about $1,500,000.
Mr. Ellis left the following public
I beo.uests; Hospital Association of
! Schenectady, $30,000 and a portrait of
i his father: First Presbyterian Church,
I Schenectp y, $2,000; Fethesda Protes
j tant Epi.copal Church, Saratoga,
! 52,000; Children's Aid Society, $1,000;
j St. John'?< Guild, the West Side
. Nursery. Kindergarten and Industrial
? School, $1,000 each.
Effie C. Andrews, a half-sister, and
! George D. Cochran, half-brother, re
j ceive $300,000 each and the residuary
j estate. To James M. Andrews, a
; nephew, Mr. Ellis left $170,000. and to
I Lillian Warwick, a niece, $160,000.
m TKSATRE JUST WEST OF SWAY TWICE. tV__Y ZJ0?_.I0
'ST. EVGS* 5AI MAT. Z5tfl?9 OTHER MAT.&58?
MADE ON THE
BATTLEFIELDS OF FRANCE
SUPREME.
ACHIEVE ME NT
1
assVsW'
THE GREATEST BATTLE DRAMA-THE SWEETEST LOVE STORY
K E VV Y O R K ' S 1,EAI)IK(? THEATBKS AND HFCCESSBS
EMPIRE Mitinees TO-D?Y and Sai.lWEEK
fi ETHEL i) In the neu?-."-Ac. Comeilj
?ARRYMOf?E|?"BEL?MDA"
Pro. by J. M. Barrio's "The New Word."
HENRY MILLER'S TH??TRE
43 Pi T.a_t of IV way. 'Phone Bn-aut 7410.
BTuiilngs R:30. Mat.. TO-DAY and Sat. at 2:30.
B1LLIE BURKE
HENRY MILLER
,n "A Marriage of Convenience"
I IR'CDTV WEST 42 STKF.t-T f.c_. g;20.
Ll?LA-i MaUnees TO-DAY & Rat., 2:20.
I.XTRA HOLIDAY MATINEE TO-DAY.
THE TALK
or THE
TOWN
The Aviation Musical Comedy Sensation.
i Vi ?. i liV? Wert 16th s- Ktei. at ?-.. o
1_ 1 ^_-\J?H Mn,_ to.r>AY & Sat.. 2:30.
MATINEE TO-DAY AT ?:30.
?AMD BEI.ASfO pre_ent_
GEQrnUAM THtATFie BV/AY ?*3-?3T.
WVnrllV ?VES &:*_? MATS. WED?. SAT.
?CTMTO
SMACK.I..O MUSICAL SWCCE-Ss"
EXTRA HOLIDAY MATINEE TO-DAY.
BFI ASCO W#rt 44 St- EwKitnpi _30.
D_.Lft_ltt Mal_ TO-DAY A Sat, 2:30.
MATINEE TO-DAY AT 2:80.
DAVID BKLA8CO presents
win.
IO? ?.n w *S *'? TO-MGHT S:30.
B-CS.fiS Mats. Sat. A. Wad.. 2:30.
- Ur$Jl\j EXTRA POP. MAT. TODAY
BEDPOOM
"?BATH
Wllh
ILOKENCB
MOOBK
. B'WAY. Kica. -28.
, Sat. & Weil.. 2:20.
EXTRA MATINEE TO-DAY.
"Llv.ll--- Mu?'**1 S*-0* U Towa."?Era, ?un.
FLO-FLO
NEW AMSTERDAM fciM& "_-??vS
-"ricee 50c- to ?2.00. except Sat. Night?. $2.50.
KTjAW & SRI-ANGER'S
KADIANT MUSICAL COMEDY
frTw'W AWJiCftPAM THfjArtjT'
K
NEW ?.;M I ON I -KM* FROLlI
Evenings 3:15.
..,_,,,,,._ ... ... _.nd Sat. 2:15.
Her Honor the Mayor"
COHAN & HARRIS VtV?wA
EXTRA HOLIDAY MAT. TO-DAY
A FUNNIEST AMERICAN COMED-Y'
OF RECENT YEARS
Witt. CPANT MITCHELL
HUDbUN Matinee? TO-DAY A Sat.
NANCY LEE
W. 44 St. Er?. S.-20.
i-DAY A Sat.. 2:20.
l)y Kiigene Walter
with Charlotte Walker
and ___??_- ?ton?.
DAia.BC THKA., Col'. Circle. Urea. 3 20.
_r~Mnr% Matinees To-day and Sat-, 3:30.
HOLIDAY MAT. TO-DAY, 2:30.
LAST FIVE PERFORMANCES
fPAYS LEAVE
,K' Military-Naval Melodrama.
ELTINGE
W. 42 ST. To-Bljht ?M.
Mats. Wed. and Bat.. 3:30.
Pop. Prie? Mat TO-DAY.
EXTRA
MATINEE
TO-DAY
POP. PRICES
CTAMntDI. B'waj A SCth St. K*i. SSeto |1.
? A_E ??"so long, LEm?
Next Week?"SICK-A-BED."
LAST g PERFORMANCES
FRED STONE Gi??!E
*vlA,CK ??LANTKRN* Sat. 2 20.
SPECIAL MATINJEB TO-DAY.
SECURE RESERVED SEATS TO-DAY
THE EVENT OF THE DECADE
FESTIVAL
ELIJAH
?with
10,600 VOICES
lie?}. Jsbi. Philip Ssusa, U.S.H.R.F.
SOLOISTS: Mme. France? Aida, Mme.
Sophie Braslau, Mr. Charles Harrison,
Miss Betty McKenna. Mr. Leon Roth
ier. Mr. Oscar S_agle, Jlrac. Marie
Sundelius.
CONDUCTORS: Str. M. .1. Corcoran,
Mr. George II. Gartlau, Mr. Carl Hein,
Mr. Louis Koemmenich, Mr. Edw. ?.
Marquard, Mr. Tali Eson Morgan, Dr.
Frank Rix, Mr. C. Mortimer Wiske.
SOUSA'S BAND, 300 MUSiCi'NS
THRIFT PRICES, 50c, $1, $1.25
incl. THRIFT STAMP. NO WAR TAX
TICKETS NOW on Sale at Metr?poli
tan Opera House, the Hippodrome,
ticket agencies (who are handling them
at box office prices without commis?
sion) and also at all colleges, high
schools, at Wanamaker's, H. C. F.
Koch & Co. and Abraham & Straus.
ENTIRE proceeds for the National
War Savings Committee for Greater
{?Jew York (Educational Fund).
opening with a
'BIFF BANG'
AT Till!
CENTURY
ENGAGEMENT LIMITED
8:15
Holiday Mat.
By and for
the Biulsied
Men of
I'elham Naval
Training
Station.
TO SIX
NIGHTS AND FOUR MATINEES.
uatinee? To-day, Sat., Mon. and W,?
No perf. Sunday?Engagem't ends June 5th
ROOF OF CENTURY THEATRE
CENTURY GROVI
HIDNIOfT REVUS
DOLLY I Have Yoa See? | GEORGE
SISTERS i THE DOOLEYS? WHITE
STARTS
. AT
| 11:30 I
NATURE SPIRITS
aad
occtn/r ASPECT OF EVOLUTION.
Lecture Illustrated by lantern slide? of
Modern Artists on Nature's Builders.
TO-NIGHT. 8:15.
-Tbeoscphical Society, 222s Broadway,
between 79th and SOth Street?.
ADMISSION FREE.
?ST ST. ASP BROADWAY.
DOROTHY PHILLIPS
tn "A SOUL FOR SAUS."
Th? En-dette? Lady Orchestra of SO.
Mats. 26c to 75c Nights 25c to fl.
S P___UrOBM___{a__- DAILY. _?30--._.&?i-St.
.MniiiiiiiillllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllUIimillllillillllllllllllll?llllllllllllillll
? Returning After Its Huge Success At the Lyric Theatre
MON. EVE., JUNE 3RD
? BLANCHE HOLBROOK
BATES ? BLIIVN
! GETTING TOGETHER
? With PERCTVAL KNIGHT
? Lieut. Gits Rice & 100 Others.
THE REAL WAR PLAY THAT CAPTURED NEW YORK
? WITH ITS THRILLS, SONGS AND FUN.
SHUBERT (??) *??l3
: AUSPICES BRITISH-CANADIAN RECRUITING MISSION.
CO-OPERATION UNITED STATES MILITARY AND NAVAL FORCES.
WINTER GARDEN gtUttStfift
AL J ?LX UN in ''SINBAD
SUNDAY NICHT CONCERT
A ROUND-UP OF TOP-LINERS.
Mailne Elliott's R," IK..?^ *-_;
:m.jm.ii*h:i:U!.i
m EYES OF YOUTH
Matinee? TO-DAY A Sax.. 2:15.
WM. Uf\r\f*F A Cur? *or Curable?
"Ul-?fc .T.AST K TIMES
?LAST 5 TIMES.
DDIMrP?? ??th, nr. I-'wuy. Ew. 8:20. Mats.
r-U-XV-___.__ TO-DAY and Saturday. 2:20.
"A Musical
Comedy Mas?
terpiece."
OHiADY lady::
Broadhmt?J??,
Lee __ J. J
. of B'way Era 8.
Matlneei TO-DAY and Sat.. 2.
Shubert's Model Musical Production.
MAYTIME W
Charle? Purcell, Peggy Wood aud Wm. ?orrls.
LYRIC ?1?V?.4
AUSPICES LIBERTY
FILM COMMITTEE
PERSHING'S
CRUSADERS
Beleajed by Committee on Public Information.
GEOHGE CREEL. C'halrraau.
-?~_-?-??---_?l_wirn?lliam___MII-_UI--_--l__l
ASTOR,_iTH Su? B'WAY. -Bts. 8:80. I
JUST The Hummer Show 1
For Tired Bustoe? Women.
(BOOTH ????"SSb.SSrcSUb"1!
?fear SE?EMTEEll)
and Sat., 2:30. FIFTH MONTH #
mUnUMAl Mat*. TO-DAY and 8al_, 230
HOLIDAY MATINEE TO-DAtf.
BIGGEST COMEDY HIT IN NEW YORK
Ca C I H ft li'waj? A 8-th. B*t. 8 15. Mat*.
Ad ! NU TO-DAY and SUAitftj. 2:13.
CLIFTON CRAWFORD in "FAKCTFREE"
f larry Conor?Ray Baymo-id?Mai-Orte Gat? i
AST H <IT TITICA.. B. of B'way. Er?. 8:80.
*>ln ?.I. HOLIDAY MAT. TO-DAY. i:M.
"? MAN who STAYED AT HOME
Famous "Spy" Play?Star Ca*t.
^rV?fs5 SHUBERT SfcK^
/ Ew _ I? Util. TO-DAY A Sat., J.15. V
LIONEL BARRYMORE
in THE COPPERHEAD.
LUCW O I TB AW. jj^. TO-DAY. He and 56e
TURN TO THE RIGHT!
R
I V ? 1_ I FRANK KEKNAN in.
I V ?_-__? t ?Miore Trouble."
B'way. 49th St. Soloist?. Comedy.
20,30.60. Us. tl.l Ki.oll Orcl-entr.^
1 A |1 T O FANNIE" WARD" in
I M __? I W,.-xue Yellow Ticket."
nmea Square. Soloists. Com? dy und
20. 30. 60. ' Kialto Orchestra.
LOEW'S NEW YORK THEATRE f0. ?:
Coot. 11 A. M. to 11 P. M. Roof to 1 A. .VL
WM. FARNU? in "TRUE BLUE."
Lww't Awrican Roif 8U\An?WB:
FRANK BUSH. Corse Pay- I AU Seat?
ton, Ed. M. Hpooner & Co.. Reserved
GyiMty Son*~ter? ?nil 5 Others, t 85, 35. 50
GREENWICH VILLAGE 7^%^lAf
?Efentn? ?:45. Matinee Sat. 2:30, 30?., ?1. $1.50.
LAST 4 ? "WOMAN'S HONOR": "II.B";
? TIMES I'THJB MAID OF FRANCE."
P B.F.KEITH'?; EADY DUFF-GORmvir
Dally Mata. ISc-H J. SOPH IK Wckicii*"
RB. F. KEITH'S *??j~?\~WsvrT?*a7~
IVERSIDE Si?v^?jf?ftGb.
B WAY A ?6 ST. "AlSERg^^."^.*
COLUMBIA ?^S?i^
HELLO AMEMCA_g^^
BRIGHTON g' ?*3U 1?
Brighton Bca.h \%& .^?J^ C-gJJ;

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