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New-York tribune. [volume] (New York [N.Y.]) 1866-1924, June 09, 1918, Image 31

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NEWS AND NOTES OF PLAYS AND PLAYERS
Wanted: Three Twins
By Harriette Underhill
Clifton Crawford suffers from stage
fright! That is why he won't do
"Gunga Din" any more nor sing
"Come into the garden, Maud." And
this isn't something that somebody
told us who knew a man who knew
Crawford. It is something which he
himself told us.
All of the interviews which we ever
have read with Mr. Crawford stated,
principally, that he used to be a golf
instructor. So we made up our mind
that we should not let this startling
fact embellish our tale, and then it
crept in?but it happened like this:
It was in "Fancy Free." The first act
was pretty.well along and Albert Van
Wyck, alias Clifton Crawford, had not
appeared. Every time you thought it
was his cue to come on a pretty girl
would rush up to the hotel clerk and
ask for Mr. Van Wyck, and then he
would non-appear again. The idea
was finally forced upon us that he was
trying to dodge the girls. Heavens!
What if he should succeed in dodging
them all night? What would the show
he? We like chatter and pretty girls
and dances by Jack Mason, but we do
tire of them sometimes, and we never
tire of Clifton Crawford. But he
finally appeared, and then, in just a
minute, the curtain fell on the first
act. Or so it seem?L
In fear and trembling lest he should'
not recite "Gunga Din" nor sing
"Come into the garden, Maud," we
trailed him to his dressing-room and
learned, firstly, that he would do nei?
ther of those things, and, secondly, I
that the reason was because he suf- ?
fered from stage fright. We agreed :
to let him off with Gunga if he would |
but wander once more in the garden
*ith Maud, but he remained obdu?
rate, ?n one of his scenes Cawford
likens himself to "a worm crawling I
along on his little journey," but if he |
is a worm he refused to turn. Never ?
again would he recite nor sing, and i
this is the reason?stage fright.
"Why, do you know that at one of ;
my recent appearances they called for {
some of the old stuff, and right in the
middle of it I forgot my lines?blew j
UP' Yes, sir. Just as completely as
though I never had heard a word of it
before. I can't do the old stuff. I'm '
frightened, that's all, and I never .
made a speech of any kind in my life !
until I had to make Liberty Loan
speeches. I don't mind that, now, for .
no one cares what you say, but it was ?
awful at first.
"Yes, I'm Scotch, and I've been here
for twenty years, though I would have ;
been back in England these many ?
F?ars if I'd had my own way. I was I
?orking in a Dillingham show at the
?id Victoria Theatre. They decided
to Put the show on in London, and
*nen I expressed my delight to Mr.
Dillingham he said: 'Oh, you're not!
??ing back. We Bhan't take the j
chorus.' And so I remained behind !
and went to work in a haberdasher's [
'hop. Fortunate for me, too, oy I
probably should be in England now,
earning, perhaps, ten pounds.
* was born in a profensional at
mo?phere. All of my people were
*t?ge folk, and the only reason I be
AMUSEMENTS
LOEWS NEW KORK THEATRE f0.W5|
?lOl.A da.VA, "THE ONLY KOAl>."j
Kv/iv.i. C " "BOi Ktm-y KwDlng at 8:13.
KSS???!*.,NO '*'<*? MOKKOW (MON.) KV.
1 ?Y, ?l.K,s- 'AL. K. HAM. [ AUKiatai
&*?&?. %A??ER' BUNCK ?Reserve?]
"AMU*, ? 01 il Mi BIO ACTS. M. 35, 50 i
came a golf instructor after I came to
America was because the managers
were not sufficiently impressed with
me to give me a trial. I could have
managed all right if I hadn't had to
eat, but, unfortunately, I did, so I
went to work, doing anything I could
find to do. That was the time when I
thought that the original made-in
America article was the marble heart.
But I've changed my mind since.
America has been very good to me.
But I want another 'Three Twins.'
Can't you find me, or better yet, write
me, another 'Three Twins'?"
Write "Three Twins"! Why, man
alive, we couldn't even write one of
them, but we didn't say so. Touched
by this pathetic appeal, we promised
to try; so any one who has twins, pref?
erably three, for sale may dispose of
them to Clifton Crawford.
"Man Who Stayed at
Home" Not Improbable
The recent advent of German sub?
marines along the Atlantic Coast re?
minds one of comments made earlier
in the season about "The,. Man Who
Stayed at Home," at the Forty-eighth
Street Theatre. The plot of the play
is centred around the activity of Ger?
man submarines which have been or?
dered to destroy American shipping
and transports. Until now people have
not treated the play seriously. "It is
very exciting and interesting, hut, of
course, impossible," was what they Baid.
With war no longer 3,000 miles away,
"The Man Who Stayed at Home" has
an added appeal. Not only does it out?
line the German determination to de?
stroy American commerce in the At?
lantic Ocean, but it points out that
Teutonic spies are on all sides.
Last Tuesday night one hundred
members of the Department of Justice
in. New York attended the performance
of "The Man Who Stayed at Home" In
a body.
The entire story of "The Man Who
Stayed at Home" revolves around a se?
cret plant for wireless, hidden in the
chimney place of a summer hotel, and
installed to report the movements of
troops.
Sunday Vaudeville
One of the best and most thoroughly
diversified Sunday vaudeville bills so
far offered to the soldiers and sailors
spending their week end in this city is
announced for the Casino Theatre this
afternoon. Mabel Beardsley, director
of the amusement department for the
New York War Camp Community Ser?
vice, has formed a programme consist-,
ing of the principal characters in "Biff
Bang" and the orchestra, with the
leader; Earl Fuller's jazz band from
Rector's, featuring Ted Lewis, the
singing comedian, John Dooley, come?
dian, and others from both the legiti?
mate and vaudeville stages for to-day's
?matinee. "Your uniform is your pass"
will take the place of the regular box
office, the entertainment being free to
the men in uniform.
AMUSEMENTS
MIDNIGHT REVUE sTll,30
"THE ENI> OI-' A PERFECT DAY"
Where Bmart New Yorker? Nightly Gather
DOLLY
SISTERS
Have You See? I GEORGE
THE DOOLEYS? ! WHITE
OTHER TOUNQ UTAHS AND
80 Moet Ueautlful Girl? In New York.
I'huno Colvirobiu shoo for table nervations.
Urov? Open for Ueneral Dancing 10:30 P. M
Postcards That Cost $10
Unlike New York and other large I
American cities, there is no centralized j
theatre district in any of the South j
American towns. In Buenos Ayres the
best theatres are spread about all over
the city, and the stranger who has been
living in and near the business section
will be surprised to find that some
fashionable theatre is located miles
from the Colon or Coliseo. It Is
claimed that having no centralized
district for amusements is one of the
discouragements of ticket speculation.
But speculators in the Argentine have
found little profit in the game. The
government does not hesitate to get
after all such brokers, and any one
caught selling theatre tickets at an ad?
vanced price is fined or jailed. j
Again, the public has impressed on
government officials that the opera and
drama are not things for brokers, mid?
dlemen and thugs to control. Any
public officer who favors such knows
that he stands little chance for re?
election.
It is a pleasure to go to a gala per?
formance at any Buenos Ayres theatre.
If the house ha3 been sold out one can
depend absolutely upon it. There are
no chances for purchasing tickets at
some hotel or side door shop at three
times the original price. There aro ?
many games of chance to be played in j
all Latin-American countries, but the- i
atre tickets are the property of the
public. A few years ago a certain !
American came to Buenos Ayres and j
went into the novelty business. He
opened a unique little store on Calle
Florida, and in a short time attracted I
considerable trade. Not finding busi?
ness as profitable as he would like it,
the brilliant thought came to him that
a few opera tickets sold at advanced
prices might boost his bankroll. One
morning there appeared in his show
window a basket of picture postcards.
The cards were marked $10 apiece.
Such a price for a postcard naturally
attracted the attention of the curious.
One man, wanting to "get wise" to the
newcomer's scheme, entered the shop
and offered to purchase a card.
The salesman stated that there was
a prize with each purchase, and when
the sale was completed a pair of opera
tickets was handed-him. This was im?
mediately reported, the proprietor of
the shop arrested and heavily fined.
When asked why he had taken such a
chance he stated that he was of the
impression that a merchant had a right
to sell his merchandise at any price I
he pleased, and if he wanted to give
his purchasers a couple of theatre
tickets as a little present, it was no
business of the law whatever. But the |
Argentine courts could not see this !
man's side of the case, and the fine im
posed was sufficient to convince him ;
that ticket speculation under any guise j
was not a business'that would yield
profit.
But it is to the newspapers and their
music critics that the theatregoing
public of Buenos Ayres owes its pro?
tection from ticket sharks. "La Prensa,"
the most powerful of all South Ameri?
can papers (and one of the most power?
ful in the world), started a crusade
against ticket speculation years ago.
No matter how small a man may he in
business, just so soon as he attempts
to make money out of theatre tickets
"La Prensa" will come down upon him
so hard and create such public
opinion that it is best for that person
to pull up stakes and move to some
other city.
Some of the theatres charge very
AMUSEMENTS
KJEITH'S RIVERSIDE At 8? St.
Two Big Sunday Concert?. Week Juna_1?.
The American Comedienne
Miss IRENE FRANKLIN
and Mr. BURTON GREEN
In a repertoire of New Bones. _
Crawford* Broderlck|Kennoy * Nobody
"CHARLES WITHERS & CO.
in 'Tor Plly't 8ake."
Ma?folT-lVADIE A GYG??O'?
Ir. Their Repertoire of_ Clsiwlcal M a? toi pi euer
; duran | Eddie I WUltau?
& N'ewell I Miller Duo | Kerry
RAY SAMUELS
"The Blue Streak of Vaudeirtlle."
low scale prices, and when a house
establishes a reputation for fairness
the manager sees that it is deserved.
It is true that the Argentinos know
more about the people of the States
than Americans know about the Argen?
tinos. In all the big technical schools
one finds numerous South American
students. These students aro frequent
New York visitors, and, as a rule, they
spend money freely. They are fond of
our theatres, and when some of them
are forced to pay outrageous prices
for tickets such news soon gets back
to their homes. The Argentine stu?
dents are fond of their northern school
chums and many an American boy
owes his good position in Buenos
Ayres to some classmate. The one
advantage the South American student
has is the learning of the
English language. JOHN LYMAN.
JIOSHANARA
one of the features of "Sinbad" at the Winter Garden
AMUSEMENTS
AMUSEMENTS
Mat. Daily at 2
25, 50^ 75c.
2,000 CHOICE
SEATS, 50c.
Except Sat.
and Holiday?.
B-r-KBitrs
BROADWAY'AMP 47*"ST
EVERY NIGHT
25, Se, 75cJH, $1.50
1,000 ORCH.
SEATS, $1.00
Except Sat., Saa.
and Holiday?.
TWO 1HO CONCERTS SUNDAY, 2 and 8 P. M. | Beginning Monday, Jnne 10.
ENGAGEMENT DE LUXE?THE STAR OP MANY BROADWAY SUCCESSES
Christie McDonald
Assisted by IRENE ROWAN and WFMJLAM HAIO
In a musical fantasy, "CUPID'S MIRKOK"
EXTRA ATTRACTION?THE FAVORITE BLACKFACE COMEDIAN
JACK WILSON
Assisted by BBN'N BARR and GLADYS MOFFATT In "AN IMPROMPTU REVUE"
Extra Feature?The Unsurpassable Exponent of Choreographic Art
ALBERTINA RASCH
PREMIERE DANSEUSE ETOILE
Asslstftd by M. CONSTANTIN KOBELOFF and CORYPHEE?
REGINA (Extra Feature) RUBY
CONNELLI& CRAVEN
in the Washington Square Players'
Surwaa, "MOQNDOWN," by John Reea.
HERBERT ( Extra Feature) HILDA
WILLIAMS & WOLFUS
in Their Comidy Classic,
"HARK! MARK! HABK!"
T> \T>? I ADDED ATTRACTION
Si?n? JACK DONAHUE & STEWART ALICB
JJflUa. I_In tha Big Scream. "NATURAL NONSENSE"
KARL
EMMY'S
PETS
EXTRA ADDED FEATURE. JOS. HART presents
HOBART BOSWORTH
In "THE SF.A WOLF," JACK LONDON'S IMMORTAL TALE OF THF SPA
WITH AN EXCELLENT CAST OF PLAYERS.
Ever See a Fat Vamp?
There's a very pretty, more than
plump Nemesis in that youthful comedy
"Seventeen," at the Booth Theatre. She
gets Willie Baxter?or rather Willie
gets her?when he comes In late to the
party and finds all the other girls with
their dance programmes full. Agnes
Horton is her name and teaching school
was her vocation until Stuart Walker
met her one day and found her suited
to her present r?le.
Miss Horton does not shrink from the
epithets "fat" and "enormous" and the
; signs of compassion that are wafted to
Willie Baxter.
"I don't mind being as big as I am,"
said Miss Horton, in her dressing room,
"as long as there's a place on the stage
for big women. And there must be.
Count them up, there's any number of
them."
Miss Horton does not intend to be a
comedienne. She wants to create a
new r?le. But the play, ye dramatists,
has yet to be written. The play must
be romantic; none of your soul-search?
ing up-in-the-air tragedies. And this
is the most important item to be kept
in mind: the play must be woven around
a fat heroine. Miss Horton is looking
for just such a play.
"Why not?" asked Miss Horton. "No
one ever admits or even considers for
a moment that a fat woman has a
heart and wants just the same things
that other girls do. But that mustn't
be the topic of the play. I want to
forget that I'm overweight and to
make othera forget it, too. You don't
laugh at all the skinny, bony people on
the stage; but let a fat man or woman
come out?the audience laughs before
he or she says a word.
"And if you think fat people were
[ created solely to laugh at, look up
your history. There's Balzac; his
j weight didn't prevent him from writ
I ing. There were heaps of fat kings.
I And living at the present time there
I are a dozen men and women who are
' both fat and famous. One's a writer?
; Irvin Cobb. Another is a poet?a
! woman, and they say she has a special
' chair she takes with her when she
: gees to a banquet. Think of Tetra
zinni. It never affected her voice.
; There's Trixie Friganza, of course, and
i Eva Davenport; and even Ellen Key,
judging from her photographs, isn't
a small woman. I don't mind being
classed in such good company."
But, all joking aside, Miss Horton
is ambitious; and since sh.e has given
up all hope of ever changing her style
she wants to hear of any opportunity
for work along serious lines.
"Yes, I know the saying, *Nobedy
loves a fat man?or a fat woman.' But
I've noticed that everybody likes them
to be around. Did you ever see ar fat
vampire? There's an idea for you,"
said Miss Horton, delighted with the
inspiration. "I want to be a fat vam?
pire, and a successful one, too."
AMUSEMENTS
AMUSEMENTS
AMUSEMENTS
NEW YORK'S LEADING THEATRES AND SUCCESSES
294 TO 301 TIMES
L Y C E U
Presented by
DAVID BELASCO
AT THE
as W. 45 ST.,
B'
Eve. 8:3?.
Mats. Thurs. & Sat. at 2:3?.
CAST INCLUDES:
L.ENORE TjLRIC, WILL
IAM COUKTLEIGr*. BER?
NA HD McOWLN, THOMAS
FIND LAY. PEDRO <ie COR
DOBA, EDWIN HOLT,
CALVIN THOMAS. FUL?
LER MELLLS11. ARTHUR
J. WOOD. JEAN FERRELL.
NUBS.HU
e Distinctive beautiful
P/jy/lOJSe' TeLBrranl-74lO
Ewsa!* Mali-munySat230
LAST WEEK
BILLIE PURKE
HENRY MILLER
LOWELL SHERMAN
LUCILE WATSON
FRANK K. COOPER
FREDERICK LLOYD
in
A Marriage of
Convenience
^^^AUAftll THEATlte
M. VAJWPJlr^ ewAy?w?43?st
EVES 8?? MATS. WED am) SAT. 2-30
Tl
THE SHACKIH? MUSICAL SUCCESS
jBgokbaPKDteGaesaC Music bqSWO HE?
THEATRE. W. 42 St. KLAW & EttLAXfiER. Mgn.
E\enlncs. 8:15. M&tlnees Wed. and Bat.. I:15.
PRICES 60c to $2.00 esccept Bat. Nichts $2.50.
NEW AMSTERDAM
LAST WEEK AT THIS THEATRE
KLAW & ERLANGER'S RADIANT MUSICAL COMEDY
The RAINBOW GIRL
by Rennold Wolf (Founded nn Comwly by Jeromo K. Jerome). Music by Lou'.* A. Illrsch,
CONTINUING ITS SENSATIONAL
T~~l?^ SUCCESS NEXT WEEK AT THE
^^ GAIETY THEATRE ( 5SF$7 )
SAME BIG ORIGINAL CAST, CHORUS & PRODUCTION!
SEATS ON SALE AT THE GAIETY TO-MORROW
NEW ArtgTEROAM THCWTtE ROOT V. tkg?? St MgETtNC PlACt Of TH1 WM|
JUNE 10th?FOURTH ANNIVERSARY GALA WEEK?SIX BROWN BROTHERS
rsr
PMJSIERD?M {THJEAlR??
?S?XT;'T#l:U;RS;?^vATil9?A;'.:M.
'?Kfii?Jfelfl r:'ST'-' E TG ..HT *EEKS OF
FIRST.PERFORMANCE [ Wf?l??t?ffls'
jmm%l AMERICAN
somn OF RECENT
YEARSi
JIBEI??Y
COHANs
HARRIS
THEATRE
TWEAIP6->WA2??r
Klawltriander
Managers'
Eves 820 Mafff Ved ?. Sah al- 220
COHANS HAD?S
pro?enf
3
First in Mus i o,
Lsuqhter, Fun?
First in the Heart of Evenjone.
?FUL1
FULTON
rriEATRE, B'way 4? 8t.
1'hone Bryant 700. Ets. 8:
Mats. Wed. & Sat.2:20.
ACTORS & AUTHORS Theatre
presents Four One Act Playa
BEG. TO-MORROW EVE., 8:20
"MUGGINS" wlth "Katnfeobd
"THE BEST SELLERS"
with EDITH TALIAFEBRO
"NOCTURNE" "^?SSSS
M. and Mme. Edouard de Kury?o
In National Character Dances.
"ART'S REJUVENATION
with HARRISON BROCKBANK
and HAL FORDE
HUDSON THEATRE
West 44th St. Estate of Henry B. Harris, Mrrs.
SALE OF SEATS TOMORROW FOR
* LADIES' ANNUAL *
_LAMBS' GAMBOL
EMBRACING ALL THE BEST FEATURES OF THE
YEAR'S SERIES OF THE LAMBS' PRIVATE QAMB0LS
AMONO THE MANY VOLUNTEERS. THE FOLLOWING WILL APPEALS'!
FRIDAY EVE.,
JUNE 14th.
De Waif Hopper
Joseph Grismer
Georg-e North
Arthur Draxun
Joseph KUcour
O. F. Outcault
Doyle & Dixon
Frederick Burton
Herbert Corthell
Malcolm Duncan
Eddie Fo.v Morcan Coman
Edwin Milton Royle Frederick Ward?
Ernest True*
Leon Errol
George McManui
Tom E. Power?
Ralph Ince
Robert Ober
Scott Wel?h
George Howell
Thomas B. 1'indUy Donald Brian
Frank Belcher William Danforth
Earl Benbam Kduard Farle
K. H. ?uncirte -
H. Cooper Cliff
Frederick Tl
Jed Prouty
Rube Goldberg
H msor Mcliiv
Walter Cat let t
Percy Wenrlch
George Mack
Edwin Mordant
Frank Moulan
Carl Gun forth
Glen Hall
Andrew Mack
Raymond Hitchcock
Ignacio Martin?
Taylor Holme?
Hy Mayer
Claire Brian
Oswald York?
James Doyle
Wm. J. Keller
Efflngham Plato
Frank < mi it on
Sam Hardy
Chas. A. Prince
THE SAME BILL TOi SAT. MAT., JUNE 15, Y. M. C. A
?OR Th!S BENEFIT SAT- EVE" JUNE 1 5? RED CR<>SS
OF the foi?owlngSUN. MAT. STAGE WOMEN'S WAR RELIEF
R GAN I z at ions SUN. EVE., JUNE 16, ACTORS' FUND
GLOBE THEATRE
By & 46 St. Eva. 8:2?
Mats. Wed. & Sat. 2:29
"Funniest Man
in New York"
Louis Sherwln, Glob?
RAYMOND
HITCHCOCK
presents himself in
HITCHY
KQ01918
New Summer Kevut by
?LBN McDONOUCH and
RAYMOND HXBBELL
WITH
LEON ERROL
IRENE BORDONI
ALSO
A Chorus of 40 Under 20.
A.M.WOODS Prmnd
# TKI PUN FEAST fa
.?MthFLQ&ENCE MOORE "
BFPHHI ?fTWCATRE W42VSTI

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