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New-York tribune. [volume] (New York [N.Y.]) 1866-1924, June 09, 1918, Image 33

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WHAT THE MOTION PICTURE PLAYERS ARE" DOING
Roosevelt Hunts
Alligators at
The Strand
Double Feature Programme >
This Week With
Mae Marsh
The Strand Theatre is presenting
B double feature programme, headed
Dy pictures of "Colonel Theodore
Roosevelt's Expedition Into the Wilds."
Jt reveals the Colonel and his com
p?nions commencing the expedition at
Rio de Janero via steamer to Guana
hara, from which point the party
travels via mule and ox teams to
Corumba, Fazcnda and Tapiorpcnn.
Colonel Roosevelt and his son Kermit i
j.re seen shooting alligators as their \
boat glides up along the banks of the
Bio Socro River. Some exceptionally j
interesting scenes are shown of some j
friendly Indians, their habits, mode of ?
living, sr?rte, including rwimming, I
diving and "head ball," played with a !
b?H resembling a football. Further ?
inland Colonel Roosevelt and his
party encountered tho Coreado In?
dians, a mediaeval tribe of wild and
treacherous redskins. Pictures of
these Indians, the like of which have
never hitherto been seen on the screen,
reveal them executing weird and pict- ;
nresque funeral ceremonies and dances.
Colonel Roosevelt's pictures are of un
usnal interest They were photo- |
jjrsphed at random and no posing or
staging has been attempted. The
titles were written by Colonel Roose?
velt himself, being excerpts from his
book relating the story of the trip.
In the phcto-dramatic feature Mae
Marsh will be seen in her latest Gold- ;
wyn production, "All Woman."
The musical programme is a varied :
one. Betty Brown will sing "May ;
Morning" ?Denza) and "Venetian j
Song" ?BembergV Joseph Tushinsky |
will piny the "Berceuse" from "Joce- i
lyn," as a viola solo. The symphony or- ?
chestra will play operatic selections ,
from "Rigoletto."
George M. Cohan's Artcraft picture,
"Hit-th?-Trail Holliday," is being pre
tested this week at the Rivoli. The j
picture, of course, is a film version of
Mr. Cohan's own successful comedy
drama of the same name, in which the
title r?le is frankly a good-natured !
Stape portraiture of Billy Sunday, the
Epcctacular evangelist. Fred Niblo
played the part in the original produc?
tion here, but in the screen story Mr.
Cohan plays it himself. John Emer?
son and Anita Loos, who were respon?
sible for many of Douglas Fairbanks's
most entertaining pictures, have made
the adaptation of "Hit-the-Trail Holii- '
day" and Marshall Nellan is the
director. Mr. Cohan's portrayal of j
the celebrated bartender who turns
temperance advocate and wins a bride ;
for himself while campaigning against ;
the liquor interests in her home town
is a thoroughly characteristic piece
of acting. Tho girl in the case is
played by Marguerite Clayton.
The Rivoli Orchestra, conducted by
Hugo Riesenfeld and Erno Rapee, will
render the overture to Nicolai's "The
Merry Wives of Windsor." As a light j
number the orchestra will play gems :
from the songs of Stephen Foster.
Gladys Rice will sing "Mighty Lak' a
Rose," by Nevin, and Greek Evans, ?
long a favorite with Mr. Rothapfel's
?udiences, will be heard in "The Amer?
icans Come!" a new patriotic, song by
Fay Foster.
A Becond series of scenes in modem
Mexico will constitute the educational
feature of the bill.
Elsie Ferguson, in an Artcraft screen
version of Ibsen's drama "A Doll's
House," is the attraction which Mr.
Rothapfel announces as the feature of
his programme at the Rialto this week.
The picture was directed by Maurice
Tourneur. Miss Ferguson's portrayal
of Nora, the child wife who is trans?
formed into a discerning and self-re?
liant woman, ranks with the best in?
terpretations of the role which have
been given by a long line of famous
actresses on the legitimate stage. The
suspense, which is one of the drama's
strongest points, has been well sus?
tained throughout a photodramatic
version, and Mr. Tourneur has man?
aged to create a satisfying illusion
that the action took place in Norway,
?s it was supposed to. H. E. Herbert
i? Helmar, Nora's self-centred hus?
band. Alex. K. Shannon plays Krog
?tadt, and Ethel Grey Terry is seen as
Mrs. Linden.
The Rialto orchestra will render
Svendsen's "Norwegian Rhapsody" as
it? overture. By way of a lighter num?
ber the orchestra will play "An Oper?
atic Nightmare," by Felix Arndt.
Annie Rosner will sing "Solveig's
Song," by Grieg. Carlos Mejia, tenor,
'?"ill be heard in "Una Furtiva La?
grima," from Donizetti's "Elisir
d'Amore." Professor Firrain Swinnen
?ill contribute a solo on the pipe
organ.
The first official United States gov?
ernment film, "Pershing's Crusaders,"
continues to attract enormous crowds
to th? Lyric Theatre. A departure
which has been most cordially wel?
comed by men in the service has been
ths ?ale of seats to men in the uni?
form of the United States and allied
governments at half the box offlco
Price. Hundreds of soldier? and sail?
**? have taken advantage of this les
?ened scale of admission, and it has
enabled them to see for a mere nom?
inal cost what our boy? are doing in
'''?ne*. A?rrfoHt at every performance
"ome special feature is added in the
*J? of addresses by notable persons,
together with music and soloists.
At the Forty-fourth Street Theatre
?Uatta of th? Wacld" wi?l r^Mnwt
On the Altar of Mammon
One day last week we had the pleas?
ure of dining at the Englewood Coun?
try Club with the wickedest man in the
world. Of course, we mean the World
Film Company, otherwise Bill Hohen
zollern would have the honors, and we
never have dined with him. We hope
never to.
The man who was our host was War?
ner Oland, and he isn't wicked at all,
much to our surprise. He likes all
sorts of nice, innocuous things like
golf, dancing and painting and some
things which are nice but not so in?
nocuous, liko broiled lobster and mo?
toring.
There is a Mrs. Oland too, a diminu?
tive person who paints big, wonderful
pictures?snatches of a forest at dusk
where you can hear the wind whisper
and smell the pines, ?nd bits of emer?
ald hills outlined against turquoise
skies. There are portraits, too, and al?
though Mrs. Oland does a picture
mostly in one sitting they are remark?
able likenesses. As you enter the
studio you find yourself face to face
with Mrs. Vernon Castle, Mrs. Foote,
Irene's mamma; Milton Sills, and any
number of others, all looking as though
they had been especially invited to bo
present and take tea with you.
But this story was to be about Mr.
Oland and not about Mrs. Oland, al?
though we are enough of a feminist
to believe that Mr. Oland might not
have been just as he is if Mrs. Oland
had not been Just as erne is.
The first time we saw Mr. Oland on
the screen was as Baron Hurokl in
"Patria." We hated him, for ho was
the wily Japanese who frustrated Mrs.
Castlo whenever she wished to do any?
thing patriotic or interesting. If it
hadn't been for him, she and Milton
Sills could have been married in the
first instalment. The funny part of
it is that we thought that Mr. Oland
was a Japanese, although we had seen
I him so many times on the stage and
j he doesn't look at all Japanese. He'
comes of Viking and Russian stock and
was born in Sweden. He came to the
United States before college days set
in and finished hia education at Wil?
liams College, where later he occupied
: the chair of drama for three years.
Mr. Oland has idealst For instance,
he is called "The father of the little
theatre movoment in America," and he
is the pioneer of the intimate theatre.
j AU of his work in this direction was
; done at his own expense. Ho was con
; tent to slave in stock to earn money
necessary to stage dramas of real
I merit. As soon as his money was gone
Oland went cheerfully back to tho grind
i of popular productions until he had
|saved enough for another venture in
fine art.
We didn't understand everything Mr.
Oland talked about, for he is the high?
est authority in the country on Scan?
dinavian, German and Russian drama.
But when he told us about doing parts
which you hated for a long time so that
you might, for a short time, play parts
which you loved we knew just how he
felt.
It was like writing society notes for
ten months in tho year bo you could
afford to go to Bermuda or Palm Beach
and be written about for tho other two
months.
A year before Richard Mansfield pro?
duced "Peer Gynt" Mr. Oland leased
Berkeley Lyceum and put on a number
of scenes from that play. Then after
an engagement in a Broadway success
he produced Ibsen's "Love Comedy."
Then followed a long road engagement
and when he had secured the necessary
funds he came back to New York and
put on Strindberg1? "The Father," mak?
ing a world's record of thirty-seven
?ctwasMtutive performances of th? play.
Mr. Oland has a wonderful sense of j
humor and he thinks it is very funny [
comparing these literary gems and their j
returns with the popular plays which j
he has done.
As a matter of fact we are glad that '
Mr. Oland has decided to amass some
of this world's goods by appearing in
the movies, although we shouldn't be ;
surprised any day to hear that he had
left tho screen and was going to a
"Theatre Intime" devoted to the ex- '
ploitation of Johann Sigurjonsson's
plays. However, at present, he isn't
doing anything like it at all. He has
just finished a World drama called
"The Mandarin's Gold." Mr. Oland has
played villains of all nationalities, but j
this is his first Chinese.
"I enjoyed it, too," he said when we |
asked him how he liked living on rice j
and eating with chopsticks, figuratively
speaking. "Those old mandarins had
the right idea about comfort in dress I
and coif?eur." We were so elated at
being back on our own ground that
wo nearly asked him if he didn't miss
his quoue, but we remembered what
S?lita Solano said to us about puns
and desisted. We were afraid that
Mr. and Mrs. Oland shared her aversion
as they share her admiration for Ib?
sen and Sigurjonsson.
Oscar Apfel, who directed "The Man?
darin's Gold," told us that Mr. Oland's
Chinaman was the most remarkable
portrayal of a Celestial that he ever
had seen and he offered in support of
this statement the fact that when Mrs.
Oland came over to the studio to see j
her husband she passed him by and
didn't know him. This Mrs. Oland I
says is quite true, adding, "You know
my husband is really very handsome
and I couldn't believe that he could
look so ugly." H. U.
Petrova* s Tour
The New York War Savings Stamp
Committee at 51 Chambers Street,
which has been enthusiastically co?
operating with Mme. Petrova on the
big thrift stamp driva she is making,
has given her permission to have the
official government war saving stamp
letterhead on her stationery, including
the lighted torch insignia. Moreover,
they have furnished all the cuts for the
tour, stationery, posters, booklets, etc.
The tour as mappod out by Mme.
Petrova embraces the following cities:
' Philadelphia, Washington, Baltimore,
Boston, Atlanta, Houston, Dallas, Kan?
sas City, St. Louis, Des Moines, Omaha,
Denver, Salt Lake City, Los Angeles,
San Francisco, Portland, Seattle, Butle,
Minneapolis, St. Paul, Chicago, Louis?
ville, Indianapolis, Cincinnati, Cleve?
land, Pittsburgh.
-?
New York Roof
Loew's New York Roof, the most
popular place in New York City in the
summer time to see the latest photo?
plays, because of the breezes that blow
in from the four sides, will have as
the big attraction on the daily change
i of programme the following: Mar?
guerite Clark, In "Prunella," on Mon?
day; Jewel Carmen, in "Confession,"
on Tuesday; Creighton Hale, in "For
Sale," on Wednesday; Alice Joyce, in
"Find the Woman," on Thursday;
and Belle Bennet, In "The Last Rebel."
AMUSEMENTS
Casting the First Stone!
By Harriette Underhill
On the back page of The Tribune
every morning Mr. Briggs draws a <
picture. Sometimes he says, "Ain't It :
a Grand and Glorious Feeling?" and ?
sometimes "When a Feller Needs a
Friend," but the series we have in mind
is called "Somebody Is Always Taking ',
the Joy Out of Life," and we mean to
give him an idea for a picture. It is
to be about us rushing joyously up to
some one and saying, "I'm going to in?
terview Fred Stone," and about their
reply, "I wish you luck. He Is the
most difficult person in the world to
interview." Crape hanger!
Not that any one could take the joy |
out of life while there are motion pict?
ures and plays and dramatic and
photodramatic persons to interview. |
We consider our job the only one in
the world without a flaw, and any one
who aspires to swat the fly won't find
any in the vicinity of our syrup.
However, it is rather a grand and
glorious feeling when you meet Fred ;
Stone and realize that you are going i
to be wonderfully entertained for an
hour. He would have talked even
longer than that, only we saw him
after the theatre, and we had a supper
to eat, which a heartless Mayor says
must be eaten before 1 o'clock.
Fred Stone is like a child in his en?
thusiasm for his work, past, present and
future. And he calls working before
the camera this summer taking a vaca?
tion!
We saw him the night before he
closed in "Jack o' Lantern."
Tho line which pleased us the most
was ono which Bobby speaks. Jack is
reading to the children the tale of
Little Red Riding Hood, and ho says,
"And there beside her Red Riding
Hood saw, standing with bristling hair
and gleaming white teeth?whom do
you think?" "Theodore Roosevelt!"
shouts Bobby.
After we heard this we decided that
we should not interview Stone until
the last line had been spoken, for if
we went back between the acts we
might ruin some of it. So we ?ent
back word and Mr. Stone amiably con
, Bented to stay in town all night and
j be interviewed. That is how unap
I proachable he is. Later he told us
? that when he received the message he
AMUSEMENTS
said to Aliene Crater, who In private
life is Mrs. Fred Stone, "We do not
take tho 11:30 to Long Island to?
night."
Mr. Stone is going to begin work
to-morrow in the Paramount studios in
Los Angeles. This will be the first
time he ever has appeared in front of
the camera. He always has appeared
behind It, for in all of his hunting
tours in Yellowstone Park and the
Grand Canyon and the Rocky Moun?
tains he has taken motion pictures of
the lions and tigers and bears which
he trapped. Rex Beach does the same
thing. So does Bob Baker.
"Well," said Stone, "I'm looking for?
ward to this vacation as I never have
before." He looked so funny as he
said it, for he was sitting on a table
swinging his feet, and he had tho
make-up of "Charlotte Russe, the
greatest female skater in the world,"
left on his two extremities, viz., his
feet and his head. He still wore the
wig and the white satin shoes. The
rest of him was wrapped in a blue"
bathrobe. "That new ice they have
out there is frozen differently," he
said, "and it's so hard to skate on.
Hard to fall on, too, I learned to
skate just for this production. Hired
an expert and said, 'Now show me some
effective figures and I'll do them.' I
did, too, although I'll warrant yom I
fell more In the month I was learning j
than Charlotte ever fell in her whole
life.
"In my motion pictures which I am
going to mako I shall have a chance
to use all of my circus stunts which I
have not thought of for years. My :
first picture will be a circus story and
most of it will portray my early life. ;
You know I was brought up on a ;
trapeze, after being born on a bronco ?
out in Wyoming." At least we think j
he said Wyoming. If we have care?
lessly misplaced the state of his na-j
tivity we beg his pardon; all states
west of the Mississippi are alike to us. j
And then Mr. Stone told us all about i
his career from the cradle, or rather
the saddle, up, and of how he and Mr. I
Montgomery had their first big sue-,
cess in "The Wizard of Oz," and of how
he got his effects, and he wound up
by saying, "Why, I'm so crazy to get
out West and start work that I'd go
for nothing. Think of it?a trapeze
to swing on and a horse to ride and
a rope to swing, and Doug Fairbanks
I waiting for me. Hurrah!"
Movie Notes
The Betzwood Film Company's first
i big production at its plant on the
| Schuylkill River at Betzwood, Penn.,
is rapidly ncaring completion, under
j the direction of Ira M. Lowry. Lady
Tsen Mei, a star of the vaudeville cir?
cuits, will make her screen d?but in
this picture.
Quite apart from the novelty of
Tsen Mei's nationality, her ability to
portray many types other than Celestial
ones makes her a real "find." It is the
purpose of the Betzwood Film Com?
pany to present its star in various
r?les of the Far East and other exotic
nations, in big, gripping stories writ?
ten around these typos.
The supporting cast is composed of
Robert Elliott, Ben Hendricks, jr., Her?
bert Pattee, and others, including a
host of real Chinese actors and ac- j
tresses.
Herbert Feldman, the head office boy, |
whose contributions to "Shoes and j
Ships and Sealing Wax" and reviews of
Broadway "burlecues" have recently
made him famous, is now breaking into
the film world. Witness: "As only
forty-five people were expected at the
Broadway Theatre Monday night the
management did not have programmes
printed. Instead, they had new slip?
covers put on all the seats. And all
the seats were used, thus disappointing
the management. The picture was
'The Model's Confession,' but the model
was not an artist's model and she did
not economize in clothes.
"The best part of the theatre is the
u.sherettes. There were only two of
them, but they were some Janes. I
would of liked to turn around and look
at them, only I had on a tight collar
and a sunburnt neck.
"The show was late. It was plain
that the management would not start
until they got a 'full house.' But
pretty soon they landed 'a pair of
queens,' and the show began.
"The first picture was an education?
al Universal Weekly, very patriotic
and al! that. The next was a comedy
starring Eddie Lyons and Lee Moran.
: Very thrilling. ? And then came th?
? feature. It had a very unusual plot
What was it about? Ask H. U. Sh<
I knows. As for me, I was busy witt
j the pair of Queens."
Here is another:
" 'A pair of sixes' played at Loew'i
to a record-breaking crowd. There
; were many notables present, including
! myself. The 'poker hounds' were ir
i all their glory, and there was much
1 betting in the audience as to who
would get the highest spade. Well
here is the plot?Some friends were in
the pill business. Customers were sc
rare that when one did come in the>
would all jump on him. The result
was heated arguments. At last one ol
the partners left in disgust. The othoi
! two threw insults at each other unti
Taylor Holmes got a Cholly Horse am
they called it otf.
"Taylor is supposed to be the come
dian, but I think that tho servant ii
! the house has a better batting averag
' than he. She was insanely in love witl
! him?and in these days, when there i
a shortage of cooks, he should of mar
' ried her."
Lawrence Grant
To Play "To Hell
With the Kaiser"
"To Hell With the Kaiser" is th?
name of the new picture which Screen
Classics is about to launch, following
"My Own United States," "Lest We
Forgot," "The Slacker," "Draft 258."
"The Legion of Death" and others.
In quite an original manner the new
picture will .show tho machinations of
Europe's military master before and
during the war, his contempt for Amer?
icans, his plans to crush France and
destroy Russia and distribute the
world, including the United States,
among his son3 and court favorite?.
Tho producers have made a most
happy selection in choosing the player
to portray the Kaiser. He is Lawrence
Grant, an Englishman, who has made a
study of the Emperor. Years before
the war Mr. Grant's phv.-ical likeness
to the German ruler was noted by a
high official of the Kaiser's court, and a
proposition was made for Grant to play
the Kaiser in a dramatizaron of a book
of this diplomat's. Tho declaration of
war by the Allies caused Graut to re?
fuse to interpret tho r?les under these
auspices. However, hi .i photograph
showing him made up 113 the Kaiser
bore such a striking resemblance to
Wilhelm that Grant rifrreed to play the
character in vaudeville. He wrote on
?act called "The Final Arbiter," which
after a long run he followed with a
dramatic sketch called "Efficiency." He
was playing this when engaged for the
picture.
The hero and heroine are played by
Olive Tell and John Sunderland. Miss
! Tell is a former Frohman star and
I only recently left Broadway to appear
especially In this production.
Mr. Sunderland is an aviator, hero of
! many battles around Li?ge and Namur
'? and Ypres at the beginning of the war.
' The son of a wealthy Belgian, who
! turned his fortune over to his country
when Germany's hordes poured Into its
! cities and towns, Mr. Sunderland irome
! diately gave up his profession and en?
tered the airplane service of Belgium,
He was wounded and came to America,
after engaging in moro than ono hun?
dred air duels.
The Crown Prince is played by Earl
Schenck, who has previously distin?
guished himself in this despicable r?le
Al! of the Kaiser's retinue, including
von Hindenburg, von Bethmann-Holl
weg, von Tirpitz, Field Marshal vor
Mackensen, von Moltke and Genera'
TrucheB8, are portrayed with tru<
characterization. Frank Currier play!
Miss Tell's father and W. P. Lewis ha:
the part of Satan, the Kaiser's co
partner.
Shorter Photoplays Coming
Maurice Tourneur believes that th<
world war is creating a trend tovan
shorter picture dramas.
"The movement, as I see it, is dis
tinctly away from the full evening pho
j toplay," declares Mr. Tourneur. "Thii
?3 psychological in its cause. The
! world war, with its attendant excite
j ment, sacrifice and v^orry, is playing
1 upon the nervous system of the world
j Whether we know or realise, it, the wai
! has keyed up our nerves to a high pitch
; We nre keenly restless, highstrung, un
! able to concentrate for any length oi
? time upon anything but the world's
j tragedy.
"This nervous reaction la reflecting
j itself in every walk of life. Short
i stories, requiring but fifteen minute? 01
i so to read, were never ?0 popular ai
1 now. Poetry, which is, after all, bu
the drama of life condensed into mor<
or less beautiful particles, is tremen
dously popular, too. '
AMUSEMENTS
TRIUMPH OF THE
MOTION PICTURE
irechon of S.LRO?HAPFEL
OOMMKNCTXO TO-BAy
BROADWAYS FAVORITE SON
IN HIS OWN SUCCESSFUL PLAY
i ?
HIT-THE-TRAIL HOLLIDAY"!
SCHEKN VERSION HY PlItECTED BY
JOHN EMERSON and ANITA LOOS MARSHALL NE1LAN
AN ARTCRAFT PICTURE
NEW PICTURES OF OUR FIGHTING MARINES
-SOLOISTS
GREEK EVANS, Baritone GLADYS RICE, Sopran?.
THE RIVOLI ORCHESTRA
HUGO R1K8ENFKLB and ERNO RAPEE
('onductlnK
DOORS OPEN TO-DAY AT 1 P. M. ?TBST DE M'XE PETtFOHMANCE :
TIMES SOUARESm
TEMPLE OF THE
MOTION PICTURE"
0.rectK>n of SLROTHAPFEL
"A DOLL'S HOUSE"
By HENRIK IBSEN . Direct?? by MAFBICH TOURNEUR.
THE RIALTO ORCHESTRA
HUGO RIESENI'EL? & NAT W. EINSTON, Conducting
ANNIE ROSNE?, Soprano CARLOS MKJIA. Toatir
"Scene? in St. Croix "?Animated M?r*.r!ri??Parsmount-Sennett Comedy
iKKina orEV to pay at i v. >?. kib?t dk luxb PCVOBM?NOD ? i?
AMUSEMENTS
Metropolitan Opera House
TO-MORROW NIGHT
Direction sime. FRANCES AI.DA
U. S. NAVY MUSIC FESTIVAL
EAHANCE OP
Earner,
POSITIVE API
Caruso,
Mi'CormfwU,
Muratore.
Martlnelli,
1 .azaro,
Mi-<hn Flu?an,
Harold Buu?r,
Mme?.
Alda,
Muslo,
lirtiklau,
llnuanl.
('a??',
Smu-ke?,
Mat If eld.
Garriao n,
Mc??r?.?
Scottl,
Amato,
Rot h 1er,
Be l.iu-n,
Dldur,
lie Segur?la,
Baria,
All ?M11IM",
AudUlo,
Metropolitan Opera House Orchi-alra
and Chorus.
Conductora: Roberto Moranzoni, Pierre
MotueuK, Ulullo Settl, Uoaiioro Pltpl,
John Philip Sousa.
Prices from $1.50 to $8.00
at Rox tillU?-.
MUSICAL INSTRUCTION_
IX?MS
ASCHEN FELDER
TEACHER OF SINGING, WITH SUP?
PLEMENTARY subjects.
Studio?: 161 W. 71?t St.
ApiwIutruffiU OolJ,
'I'hona Columbus i-.73. Mi?,itilj Rec?tala
ANTOI W |/ ? W%W% PIANO
nette VW/IKU HARMONY
Ail Technical Restriction Eliminated
Concentration Developed?Memory Trained
Reading Made Rapid and Accurate
DEMONSTRATION? AND STUDIO RECITALS
FRIDAYS AT i P. M. PUBLIC INVITED.
3U?K VAN DYCK STUDIOS ????*.
lEAGHEN or
VOICE
_ and PIANO.
STUDIO: ISO CARNEGIE HALL. N. V.
BROOKLYN STUnici: 0? EUCLID AVENUE,
? STEINBERG, ?-.to?
Teach*r of the AKT OF SINGING.
818 W. 04th HT. Tel. Hiver, ?eis.
aiairaiiaa iiiw 8M w 42<J g|
BEATRICE TOWERS
PIANO INfcTKlTTlUN.
34g W. 40TI1 HT. Tel. 847? Ilrynnt.
rKATZEIBEIK???
(DO CATHEDRAL PARKWAY. Tal Aoad?w UM.
$?? rirra avkni'k.
M?SICA!. INSTRUCTION
EFFA ELUS PERFIELD
Teaches
Creative Keyboard and
WrittenHarmonyDictation
95220 Modulations, Etc.
Address BETA Kill- ri.RriBCO
ST. JAME? HOTEL.
ID*1 WEST *>TH STRETT
New York City. Tel. Bryant 8247
M'?!E- T E T A H ft ?'lANOFORTK
" IClftiTlU IN8THUCTION
Eminent pianoforte Inatructor, affiliated with
leading New ?opk oonaervaujry last tare?
year?, will talc? pupil? at rmtdenoe.
Individuality tarnperume.nt encouraged.
Term* attractive
30l W. 1Z1M M.M<.n,l!.?ld&??l?8.
1st
N JW REHEAR8IN? HIS OPERA COMPANY FR?
DAY EVENINGS; EXCEPTIONAL V11CE8 GIVE*
COMPLETE TRAINING AT SPECIAL BATES;
CHORUS V0ICE6 TRAINED FREE. APPOINT
MENT FOR VOICE TRIAL BY MAIL ONLY.
ADDRESS SUS CARNEGIE HALL. N. Y.
ITTEll
TE/.CHER
UP
VIOLIN.
BEST AND MOST SIMPLIFIED METHOD.
"VAN DYKE." 83U EIGHTH AVE.. NEAR 5cTH.
FRED H. GKEESWRI6HT
l'l.VMST ACCOM i'ANIBT COACH
16UH BROADWAY, near ?Sd. Tel Circle lili
DR. CARL E. DUFFT m
?tele Halt, N. Y. Maa. fc
i*nt A*?.. Ml. Veraea.
KAMIT'iNP
BACHER OF VOICE
AND SINGING
Author o? "Voioe. It? Or?jiu "en.i VHri'v Raw?!"
S*S CARMCGIK HACK M?VV VOUK.
THEO. VAN YORX TENOR
VOCAL STUDIO, ?3 WK>T SSTH ST.
School of Mi.-i.--l Art. I'HOK AMIKKWI
Director. 1S40 ?ruado?), Cor. ?6th.
flKOOhlV>
LFRECKELTOfl,JF.:?*r?
A.
E.
The Pouch Gallery, S HrooklJO ! < ?ulmr-?,
346 Clinton Avo. ! ?tudlet. 116 Liaweed to,
ORCHESTRAS AND KM IKT UVKKS
I. R A L L I II | Crvhfatra? 1er twelej ft

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