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New-York tribune. [volume] (New York [N.Y.]) 1866-1924, November 18, 1918, Image 9

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New Faces Turned TW^-i Versailles
100 Days' Campaign
Started by Women
ForOneSenateVote
Leaders Hope to Assure
Passage of Amendment
by End of Session
Watch New Hampshire
Contested Election May Be
Deciding Factor in Suf?
frage Fight
(Special VLipatch to The Tribune)
WASHINGTON, Nov. 17.?-Suffragists
will begin a campaign this week in
three states to obtain the one vote
needed for the passage of the Federal
amendment. They have one hundred
days before this Congress ends. Plans
for n demonstration at the capitol the
middle of December also are under
My.
The three best chances for this one
vote, they believe, are Senator Gay, of
I^ui'siana, a suffragist who witnessed
the defeat of suffrage in his state, but
T,ho may support the Federal method
of securing the reform; Senator Borah..
of Idaho, whose position is uncertain, !
and the successful candidate of the j
tontested election in New Hampshire. ?
Mr. Jameson, Democrat, is already a ?
gupporter of the suffrage amendment
and Mr. Moses, Republican, has not
vet announced his stand.
The amendment has passed the House
and noW lac^-s only one vote in the
Senate. When the amendment came to
8 vote in October it lacked two votes.
Since then one has been gained in the
election of Senator Pollock of South
Carolina.. _
"The winning cf Oklahoma for suf?
frage is the greatest victory of the
sufrrage party. It shows how strong
suffrage sentiment is throughout the
country and it represents real achieve?
ment ?n the part of suffrage workers.
Oklahoma representatives have bejii
lupporting the Federal suffrage amend?
ment in Congress in spite of strong
opposition in the state, but this ought
to have a wholesome effect on the situ?
ation when the measure comes up
ajrain."
Thus Mrs. Carrie Chapman Catt,
president of the National Woman Suf?
frage party, heralded yesterday the ad?
vent of the newest suffrage state, the
winning of which was made certain
Saturday night when the Governor of
Oklahoma, the State Board of Elections
and the strongest opposition newspa?
per conceded the adoption of the state
amendment.
At suffrage headquarters it was an?
nounced that the Oklahoma suffrage
amendaient had a plurality vote of
25,000. According to the law there it
i? necessary for an amendment to carry
a plurality of the votes cast on any
issue or for any candidate in order to
win.
"The Woman Citizen," the national
oi-jw of the Suffrage Association, has
prepared the following*: table showing
tie number of states where full or
partial suffrage now exists:
FULL SUFFRAGE STATES
Women
twenty-one
years and Electoral
State. over. vote.
Arizona . 48,410 3
California . 872,S?i'j *3
Colorado. 264.647 6
Idaho . 105,146 4 i
Kama? . 471,804 101
Michigan . 848,916 15 1
Montana. 10.*.,975 4
Nevada . 26,611 3
New York. 3,125.999 45
Oklahoma . 470,176 30
Oregon . 221,008 5 1
South Dakota. 161,024 5
Utah . 100,646 4|
Washington . 444,919 7|
Wyoming . 37,146 3J
Totals . 7,303,288 137
PRESIDENTIAL OR PRESIDENTIAL
AND MUNICIPAL
Illinois . 1,699,160 29 1
Nebraaka . 318,903 81
North Dakota.. 157,903 5 '
Rhode Island. 183,030 5
Totals . 2,358,996 47
PRI.MARY SUFFRAGE
Arkacaag . 35,**,514 9
Texas . 999,166 20
.Totals . 1,354,680 29
i?u_s for the twenty-one
itat? .11,016,96 4 213
Add Vermont, which has
itate-wide municipal
OfTrage. 128.328
This shows a grand total for the
??tnty-two statea where full or j?ar
>?l suffrage obtains in the United
Nates of 11,145,282 women voters.
On the Screen
Tnder Four Flags,'' the third of I
we government movies, wag shown at
*a* Ri_!to and Rivoli theatres yester- !
**'? The new nlm is not quite as
lood as "America's Answer." There is .
**?? continuity, but for all that the pict- {
Sfehas its share of interest compelling ?
lacidenta. The moht remarkable scene I
?now? a German airplane falling from '
**?aky and spinning all the way. Then
'ker. are excellent pictures of troop
^'Ps and convoya and destroyers and
^?Pth bomb?.
Of the fighting pictures the Italian
*'n>8 are easily the best. The Ameri- ,
**?a are shown in action at Chateau
?'erry and St. Mihiel. Here the pict
*r*? of the occupation at the end of
"?* attack are rather more interesting
??n those of the actual push. Trench
warfare doea not lend itself over well
?the camera man.
at ??'0n?c th* if'tercsting preliminaries
? the American advance is a tank re
?*??*!, in which the monsters jog down
WJM and climb out of trenches.
lb? producers have allowed interest
** |?g &t a few points by devoting too
j*?efc attention to artillery. As far as
?*' epectacle goes there in no reason
J* encore a cannon. Field piece? are
j*? methodical. The second perform
in^ l* Ccrtain to be the name as the
j. artillerymen," ?aid an American
?oghboy, "bave the softest job in all
*?? ?noie?. They get up late and after
?food breakfast they fire a long and
__?_*** at ?oa?0 battery or other and
,k*" *P'it the bracket and shoot a few
???II? at fcacb oth*r. Of course, they
_?*_' ?} **cJ* other, and after a while
r'f ?i<i?? knock off for lunch. They
tfc! _r*uy livjljr after lunch and bo
23 T-re*<*?* th* elevation a little and
*m hell out of the infantry."
Us* *?_-'" *? th? picture is done with
*_!,"' /dic** Kun* lt P?ck? UP in^rest
JKPj *r'd wlr,<fs up with some stirring
""** of American? on the march in
.** Street, nea. Fourth Avenue
Paris. Generah arc to be Been in tht
picture as well, as doughboys, tommies
and poilus. There is a fine animated
view of Foch and several good pictures
of Pcrshing, Haig and Diaz. Shortl.
\ after the Foch picture we were startled
j by a caption which r?}ad, "Watch close
| ly and you will see Miss Elsie De Wolfe
I snake hands with some one on the left."
And, sure enough, she did. Apparently
I there is no limit to the wonders whicn
a government camera man is permitted
to see.
K. C. B. is the author of the titles
for the government film. His work for
"America's Answer" was better. Sev?
eral of the present titles seem a bit
overwritten, dut they are all in good
taste. There is no nwank. A few pa?
triotic tableaus and allegorical pictures
are introduced, and these are quite aw?
ful, but for the most part the picture
is just soldier, and consequently vivid
and interesting.
HKYWOOD BROUN.
Frobably "The Make Believe Wife"
is not plausible. Jt may lack continuity
or construction or most anything that
those wise persons, who diagnose cine?
ma cases, consider necessary to the
success of a film. As for us, after we
have seen a picture wc ask ourself,
"Were we entertained ?" and if the
answer is "Yes" then it was a good
picture.
And we find, too, that our mind seems
to be a sort of composite mind of the
average audience. Yes, we know that
audience is not the proper word, but
movie audiences really do hear as much
as they see.
And the average audience wots not
of direction and photography and light?
ing and continuity. They wish to bo
entertained. They wish to read clever
title? and nee people who can either
look or act; both are, of course, an
unusual but moat satisfactory combi
?iation.
?iiiie Burke possesses beauty and
abilty, and beside? that she has charm.
There is no other actress who does the
funny little things in the funny little
way that Miss Burke does. The titles
arc delightful in this new picture, and
ilavid Powell i* the leading man. 80 if
any one doesn't like "The Make Believe
Wffi>'* we wish he would tell us about
it so we can convince him that he is
wrong.
Miss urke is Phyllis Ashbrook, and
?nnoceat but slightly indiscreet young
person of great comeliness, Phyllis is
engaged to a fine, upstanding man
jWomen to Plan Campaign to
Win Seat^rtie Peace Table
Dr. Anna Howard Shaw and Other Leaders of Sex Will!
Speak at Mass Meeting-English Programme Will
Be Indorsed by Suffragists Here
The movement to have women dele
gates on the Peace Commission will
have its first local demonstration to
| night at a meeting in the ballroom of
the Hotel McAlpin, where, under the
auspices of the National Woman's Suf
I frage Association, representative wom
i en from organizations in the city will
discuss the matter publicly.
The meeting will be presided over by
Miss Mary Garrett Hay, and Dr. Anna
i Howard Shaw, chairman of the wom?
en's committee, will speak for the first
time since her recent illness.
An effort will be made to coordinate
the demand of women in this country
for representation at the peace table
| with that of women in other countries.
Mrs. Carrie Chapman Catt, president
of the National Suffrage Association,
has learned that women in England in?
corporated a demand for sucn repre?
sentation in a programme issued as
early as October 11 by the National
Union of Woman Suffrage Societies in
Mrs M-,rtry\^rs' Catt has ?quested ?
den. ""lu6111 G?"?? Fawcett, presi?
dent of this organization, to aid in I
the w?n?rMmat,0n ?f W01Mn's dcmandsl
Lne world over. i
wolS? the ?!auses in the English-1
R i?PHW?"' Which Probably!
That '??? YLd?"?d here' is on<- seeking'
of tho fu?-frInternational "ganization
?_-, ,iu.ture women should have the ]
same cnoice of citizenship as men and
e?e. S?S vf tb,Ut thejr ?n wiU should
ever deprive them of their birthright '?
MrAsmCaKttthMC ???**><? to sneak are !
of tu w' Mrs,* F* Louis Slade, chief'
the Y M reA s ????? Division of !
KrrUir81 representative of the!
war Oamp Community Service and for
Uon W"* ??f **?OSS al Fel a" !
tion of Women's Clubs; Mrs James.
Lees Laid law, chairman of th" coE
NeV York sil? edfuc^L?nal ??S? I
Stion?rM? atCh?ies L Tfffadm?n?S? !
Mis? R-_ ? ~nalles **? Tiffany and;
York Tr^f, nCheKireman' of thli New:
jioric irade Union League.
Women of Red Cross
To Study Questions
Of Reconstruction
New York Chapter to Re?
open School of Informa?
tion for Bi-Weekly
Sessions
In anticipation of new problems at
home and abroad as the result of the
? armistice and approaching peace, the
School of Information of the New York
County Chapter of the American Red
Cross will be reopeneS" to-morrow and
all former members are invited to at?
tend.
Chief among the questions to be
studied is that of the political reor?
ganization of the world. Mrs. Alice
MacKay Kelley, a member of the Red
Cross Commission to Italy, will relate
her experiences in that country, and
Mrs. Malvina Hoffman, director of the
Bureau of Information of the New
York Chapter will lecture on "The New
Map of Europe," a subject of which
she has been making a special study.
There will be motion picture classes
showing French, Belgian and Serbian
refugees and problems among civilian
populations.
There will be an afternoon session
Thursday. Miss Isabel Lowden is di?
rector of the speakers' bureau of the
educational departments, which is issu?
ing the cards.
The Red Cross is also planning to
extend, at the request of the govern?
ment, the work of mending clothes for
soldiers.
Because of the curtailment of the
making of new apparel for soldiers
which the government has ordered, the
number of garments to be mended will
increase from 10,000 to 260,000 a
month, according to Mrs. Henry Ittle
son, supervisor of the mending station.
The Red Cross has announced that
Christmas parcels may be sent through
its service to workers overseas in the
Y. M. C. A., Knights of Columbus and
other welfare organizations. These
parcels must conform in every respect
to those 3ent to members of the Amer?
ican Expeditionary Forces.
Paris Council Will
Ask Suffrage Law
Memorial Is Planned for Pre?
sentation to Parliament,
Newspaper Reports
PARIS, Nov. 17.?The Municipal
Council of Paris will request Parlia?
ment to adopt a law granting suffrage
to women, according to "Le Petit
Parisien."
Woman's Law Class
Reopens Its Course
Students Are Instructed in
Handling of Big Estates
Fifty Attend Lectures
New York University's woman's law
class to aid women law students has
resumed its session for the year with
an attendance of fifty pupils.
This class, which is one of very few of
its kind in this country, was founded by
the Women's Legal Education Society,
whose members felt that women should
be equipped for conducting large busi?
ness operations. Some of its mem?
bers have been women of great wealth,
among them Mrs. Finley J. Shepard,
her sister, the Princess de Talleyrand,
formerly Anna Gould; Mrs. Dave
Hennen Morris, a member of the Van- !
derbilt family; Mrs. J. E. Lounsberry
Davis and Mrs. Robert Lee Morrell.
The alumna; of the class have formed
a Portia club, composed of women who
have studied law without practising
the profession.
Chancellor Elmer Ellsworth Brown,
of the university, takes a deep interest
in the class and visits it at intervals.
The lecturers include Dr. Frank H.
Sommer, director of the class and dean
of the University School of Law; Miss
Isabella M. Pettus, Miss Florence E.
Bruning, Miss Daisy Gaus, Professor
Frank A. Erwin, Professor William F.
Walsh, Messrs. Augustin Derby and
Benjamin P. De Witt. Mrs. Finley J.
Shepard has founded a scholarship and
another was established by Mrs. Rus?
sell Sage.
Baird Thanks Women
Senator Says Anti-Suffragists
Brought About His Election
Senator David Baird, elected to the
Senate from New Jersey in the face
of a bitterly concentrated attack from
the woman suffrage forces, gives much
of the credit for his success in the late
election to the New Jersey Association
Opposed to Woman Suffrage. In a
letter to Mrs. Carroll P. Bassett, pres?
ident of that organization, made pub?
lic to-day, he says, in part:
"The suffragettes sent their orators
and agitators from many states into
New Jersey and boasted that with
President Wilson's aid they would de?
feat me. I appealed to the New Jer?
sey voters on my record in the Senate.
The verdict speaks for itself, refuting
the statement made by Mr. Wilson, in
a letter to Mr. Hennessey, that I had
"certainlv not represented the true
feeling and spirit of the people of New
Jersey.' .
"I have nothing against the suffra?
gettes in general. The women who
want the franchise have the right to
use all proper methods to gain their!
end, just as the women who oppose it
have, but the methods of the suffra- !
gette leaders, who, after insulting the
President by burning his words in
front of the White House, posed in
New Jersey as supporters of the Presi?
dent in order to gain votes for my op?
ponent, was nauseating."
named Alfred Hickman, whom she re?
spects.
David Powell is n Don Juan who is
engaged to a splendid girl named May
Page. Neither is particularly thrilled,
so when Phyllis and the Don Juan get
lost in the woods and have to stay all
night in a deserted cabin every one
agrees, the next day, that they must !
marry, and immediately be divorced, to
save the family honor.
Complications arise, many of them,
but the funniest thing we ever saw is
where the deserted husband returns to
his own apartment and finds it locked.
"Doris," he calls softly through the
dcor, "Agnes!" "Isabel!" "Irene!" and
then hopefully, "G?raldine!" Then, des?
pairing, "Daisy!" "Eleanor!" "Kath?
erine'" "Mary!" but no response. It
happened to be Phyllis.
The picture has a moral. It proves
that there is no truth in the old super?
stition of the ladder.
There is an amusing comedy called '
"The Ghost of Slumber Mountain," pre?
sented by Herbert M. Dawley. It is
something different from anything we
have see on the screen. Dawley goes
( to sleep and dreams that he is living
in prehistoric times.
And all kinds of animals appear.
Mastadons and horned lizards and |
dinosaurs. We should like to know
how it was done and it might have been
done in one of three ways. Either the
creatures are magnified on the screen j
or else they have "supers" inside of ?
them to direct their movements, or per?
haps they move as do the animated |
things in mud, simply by taking mill- |
ions of pictures in different positions.!
The last net of "Faust" is produced, i
with Alyd Michot as Marguerita, Ralph j
Erodes as Faust, and Yon Collignon as
Mcphistophcles.
The overture is selections from "La
Boh?me," with Carl Edouarde conduct?
ing. H. U.
Drama
L-_J
"Daddy Long Legs" Revived
at the Henry Miller
Theatre
_
By Heywood Broun
"Daddy Long Legs," lonp- and favor- ;
ably known to New York audiences !
was revived at the Henry Miller The?
atre on Saturday night, with Henry
Miller and .Rut(l Chatterton in the i
1?1?* r?les- Th? pla-v was such ?
emphatic success when first produced
Here that there seems to be little
loason to comment on it now. It is
known as a sure-fire piece. Every!
laugh is plainly bidden for and with?
out doubt always received. At any :
5B??*iin_ r,e<Iuest f?r laughter went un?
fulfilled last night. If it were not
much too late and perfectly useless we
would insist that "Daddy Long Legs"
in spite of some first-class humorous ?
observation!?, is on rho whole a forced :
and artificial compositions.
"Daddy Long Legs" was one of the'
plays which did most to win Miss Ruth
Chatterton a ?arge following of New
-ork theatregoers. There is no indi?
cation that the numerical strength of
that following is diminishing, but there
is no doubt in our mind that Miss
Chatterton is not developing according
to her early promise. She has lost sim?
plicity. Miss Chatterton should not
crinkle her nose with every humorous
lino, -nor should she suppress her
voice to the merest whisper upon the
receipt of surprising news, as in hor
sibilant "Send me to college!" After
all, Vassar can't be as bad as all that.
Miss Chatterton does not do well
either to indicate great emotion by
biting her words off and swallowing
them without mastication.
Such a practice is good neither for !
digestion or drama. The only excuse j
we can give for these rude remarks is i
that Miss Chatterton can act well and i
has done so. She does so at times, ?
now, but not when she is imitating the j
timid mouse or the raging tiger.
It has always seemed to us that
Henry Miller did not play up to his '
highest standards in light comedy. We j
do not think his present performance ]
is a good one. Charles Trowbridge, j
who plays Jimmy McBride, gives the ?
best performance among those in sup- I
port of the stars.
Guilbert in Recital
Her Song Cycle Well Received
at the Maxine Elliott
Mme. Yvette Guilbert, at the Maxine
Elliott Theatre last evening, gave a
programme that included many of the
most delightful chansons in her re?
pertory. The story of Jesse James,
the cowboy, and of other outlaws, both
French and American, provided a strik?
ing contrast for the songs of the
seventeeth and eighteenth centuries,
which included Margoton's adventure
in the wood and an eighteenth century
mother's advice to her daughter. The
incomparable Yvette, with her genius
for characterization, voiced the spirit
of each song with characteristic force
and vividness.
Miss Emily Gresser, a young violin?
ist, played pieces by Tschaikowsky,
Rimsky-Korsakoff and other composers.
Next Thursday afternoon Mme. Guil?
bert will -rive a special matinee. Her
subject will be Paul Verlaine, his life
and works.
Urges Weekly Fast Day
Henry Morgenthau Thinks
Sacrifice Now Beneficial
Henry Morgenthau, former Ambassa?
dor to Turkey, declared last nipht at
the victory celebration of the Henrv
Street Settlement that the United
States must beware lost in the joy
and relaxation of victory it slip back
into the selfishness of the past.
It is no time for relaxation, he said,
with starving millions in Europe. Some
such visible national effort as declara?
tion of a fast day once a week until
widespread famine abroad had been
averted would be good for America's
soul, he thought.
"Now is the groat tost," he said.
"Are we going to stop forward boldly
to enthrone justice and right? Are we
goinc to be able to put behind the
government the force it requires?
That is our great problem."
? -?
Services Open Anniversary
Of Eighth Avenue Mission
Moro than 200 men and women wore
present at tho Eighth Avenue Mission,
2?I0 Eighth Avenue, last night at the
song service on the opening- night of
an eight-hour celebration of the mis?
sion's nineteenth anniversary, which
comes on next Saturday night.
Miss Sara Wray, who for eighteen
years has been superintendent of the
mission; the Rev. A. B. Simpson,
pastor of the Gospel Tabernacle and
president of the Christian and Mis?
sionary Alliance, and Mrs. Do Peyster
Field told of the founding of the mis?
sion and the hundreds of lives It has
redeemed.
Miss Wray also announced that
similar meetings would be held every
night this week and next Sunday.
MRS. GERTRUDE ASPELL
Mrs. Gertrude Staples Aspell, wife
of Captain J. Wheeler Aspell, of the
Old Guard, and a member of one of the
oldest Now York families, died Satur?
day at Stapleton, Staten Island. Mrs.
Aspell was the daughter of the late
William J. Staples, for whom Stapleton
was named. Her grandfather was
William Wright, well known as a ship?
ping merchant of old New York, who
gave the city Bryant Park out of his
extensive holdings in the region of
what now is Forty-second Street.
BEDFORD J. MOUNT
Bedford J. Mount, president of the
Essential Novelty Company, 396 Broad?
way, died yesterday at his home, 261
West Eighty-fifth Street. He was
eighty-three years old and was active
in his business until the day before
his death. For many years, before
forming his own company, Mr. Mount
was European purchasing representa?
tive for B. Altman &? Co. His widow
and one daughter survive. Funeral ser?
vices will be held in the Cumpbell
Funeral Church, Broadway and Sixty- I
sixth Street, at 10 o'clock this morning.
?i Ok Per MONTH ON
l7^ PLEDGE OF
PERSONAL PROPERTY
THE PROVIDENT LOAN SOCIETY
_OF NEW YORK
Applications for loans of large
amounts w\ll be considered at
tjw office at Fourth Avenue
and 25th Street._
MANHATTAN
Fourth Avenue, cor. 25th Street.
Kldridge St., cor. Rivington St.
?est Houtton St., cor Essex St.
Seventh Av., bet. 48th & 49th Sts.
Lexington Av., cor. 124th St.
Grand St., cor Clinton St.
E. 72d St., bet. Lexington & 3 Ati.
Eighth Av., cor. 127th St.
BRONX
CoortUndt Av., cor. 148th St.
"" BROOKLYN
Smith St., cor. Livingston St.
Graham Av., cor Debevoue St.
Pilkin Av., cor. Rockaway Av. J
Joseph B. Greenhut,'
Retired Merchant,
Dies at Home Here
Former Chicago Distiller:
Had Been Seriously 111
for Six Months
Captain Joseph B. Greenhut, former}
head of the Greenhut-Siegel-Cooper j
Company, died yesterday from heart i
disease at his home 325 West End J
Avenue. Re had been ill for six
months and had not left his bjed since;
October 14. When the terms of the i
armistice were read to him last week
he told his eldest son that he. would i
die content.
His wife and his three children, Miss ;
Fannie, Benedict J. and N'elson W. I
Greenhut were at his bedside. Funeral '
services will be held at 10 a. m. I
Wednesday at Temple Emanu-El, Rabbi ?
Joseph Silverman officiating.
Captain Greenhut came to this coun- ?
try with his parents when eight years
old. He was born in Bishop-Purnitz, !
Austria, February 28, 1843. His par?
ents went with him to Chicago, where
he received a public school education.
After leaving school he became a tin?
smith and was employed at that trade
until the Civil War broke out. He was |
the second man to volunteer in Chicago, j
He won promotion to the rank of cap?
tain and was cited for bravery by the
Secretary of War. He was wounded
at Fort Donolson and was discharged,
but he re?nlisted and was wounded |
agi?in at the Battle of Getrsburg.
In 1S G 6 Captain Greenhut married
Miss Clara Wolfner, of Chicago, who
survives him.
He organized several distilling com?
panies, one of which was destroyed
in the Chicago fire of 1872 and one of
which failed in 1S77. Later he became
president, of the Great Western Dis?
tillery Company, at that time the larg?
est in the world. He founded the
Organ-Glucknor Sugar Refining Com?
pany, which later became the Corn
Products Company.
Captain Greenhut was known best in
this city through his interest in the
Greenhut-Siegel-Cooper Company. He
retired from the company in March,
1917, and devoted his time principally!
to golf.
On the occasion of the fiftieth anni?
versary of the Battle of Gettysburg
Captain Greenhut was one of the com?
missioners from Illinois who arranged!
for the celebration. i
Music
____________I
A Concert of Schubert's Music
by the Society of the
Friends of Music
By H. E. Krehbiel
Sanctified by the name of Schubert
and with anathema removed from the
vocal numbers by performance in Eng?
lish paraphrase, a sweet and gentle
musical entertainment was given at
the Hotel Ritz yesterday afternoon un?
der the auspice? of the Society of
the Friends of Music. The society pro?
fesses to have set for its aim the culti?
vation of high class music in forms for
which our ordinary concert institutions
l'ail to make provision. An extremely
laudable purpose, but one which, some
will think, would be more effectively
subserved by encouraging existing or?
ganizations and thus enabling them to
supply the assumed want. The ques?
tion, however, does not enter into the
consideration invited by yesterday's
concerts, the music of which has long
heen at the disposal of conductors and
the forces necessary to its employment
at the command of every singing so?
ciety able to hire a small orchestra.
The compositions performed were those
written in 1823 for a romantic drama
entitled "Rosamunde"?all but the
overture, which, hough associated in
the published score with the rest of
the incidental music, was composed for
another play called "Die Zauberharfe."
The original "Rosamunde" overture
was tacked on to the opera "Alfonso
und E*trella." which Schubert com?
posed four years later. This does
not signify, however, as the shiny,
mirroring-faced piece which was heard
yesterday has long been known and ad?
mired in our concert rooms. So has the
piece of between-acts music in B flat,
the melody of which, with Sappho's
Adonic rhythm, haunted the mind of
Schubert when he wrote his marvellous
song "Death and the Maiden," the
theme which he varied in the D minor
quartet, the pianoforte impromptu Op.
142, ?o. 3; his exquisite cradle song,
"Wie sich der Aeuglelin," and which
pulses persistently in the Allegretto of
Beethoven's Seventh Symphony. Two
ballet pieces which also belong to the
set were unfamiliar -probably because
conductors who revere the genius of
Schubert have preferred to show their
reverence by leaving them in the limbo
of oblivion to which they were con?
signed after their performance in 1823,
Three choruses, one for men's voices.
I AMERICA'S FOREMOST THEATRES AND HITS UNDER THE DIRECTION OP
I.EE A J. J. SHIBERT
B'WAY au?*
.-.on? St.
Kvk?. ai 8:0Q.
Smoking Resumed nt Ihr Winter (?urik-n
MATINEE TO-MORROW AT t.
.*?3r<* WEEK IN NEW YORK.
AL JOLSON
And "ncomparable Company *< 150 m
SINBAD
ROOF CENTURY TU KA. l'hone Col. 8800
CENTURY GROVE MIB^?|fT u.m
BEAUTIFUL filRf.S *N* EVERYTHING
Smile t?it/i Lovely MOELIE KINO
ALICE BRADY
Returned to tfio Spoken Stage in
FOREVER AFTER
/4?TU ?T Tliea.. B. of B'way. Ktga. 9.30.
<iOin ?3 1. Matinees Tliurs. atut Sat., *J:30.
?iiiimifiiiM
MARY NASH
HIf?l><i?'SM Wwt iilh st- E??> ? 8:ts
S.lUSJrj\ji->t Matlnw_ VV(;d all(1 Sat__ 2;Jq
LOUIS MANN _ SAM BERNARD
"FRIENDLY ENEMIES"
Matin?'?, Wed. and Sat
* If ?
i.l.fiji 1,?C_
h_l UDLIV. M>t8, Wed. & Sat. _ :30.;Tlmei
IE
In "WHERE rOJPPIES BI.OOM."
HARRIS We8t 42d St- Evenings at S:i
nnniVli* Matinee? Wednesday & Sat , 2:1
- ? OEHTHA A.B. ANSON ? "JHE
CHBYSTAI? U?BN1 DInn, c
LEE BAKER ! R'^DLE:
ALBERT BBlNINGi WOMAN"
JAMES 111.0MB BILEY'S
HOME AGAIN
RftfiTH 45W*i VVoat of Bmadivay. Eves., S:30.
uuuln .Matinees Weilnesdny and Sat. 2;3p.
^?iT'8 BE CALM CAMILLA
"l* best performance and brightest
l>luy In town."?Tribune.
>e?ial: Afternoon. Tliurs. & Frl.. at 3.
ISADORA DUNCAN DANCERS
s? GEORGE COPELAND *wt
PRICE* .**??'.*)0 TO 5()r.
I YRir 42(l St- w of ***?-,iy. Etes. 8:30.
L, i ?*??*?. Matinees Wednesday and Sat. ?>a
Roland West's Thriller of Thrillers
With RICHARD BENNETT.
f|3M0U ^.^l?'in/^'l^ft
H.B.WARNER in j with IRENE
Sleeping Partners | BORDONI
JOHN BARRYMORE
m TOLsyors "REDEMPTION"
? I VMflllTil w 1:,ln -s'- Eva. 8.30 Bry 4*\
rtlRlUUliJ Matinees Wed. and Sat., 2:30.
SH?BEnT-RIVIERA^^i'^'Uest^is3.^
L?_hes? Price On-Iie'lra Seats. Evening!?. $1 00.
LEAVE IT TO JANE
i.'v? ,:s POST '"THE MASQ??R?DER
SH?BERT #_!?&, TO-NIGHT ,f?,
Last Thurs. Muht Tickets Rood TO-nlght.
Last Frl. Night. Tickets will be gnort To-morrow.
WINTHROE AMES PRESENTS
THE
BETROTHAL
TO
Ht M AI" RICE MAETERLINCK
FIRST MATINEE WEDNESDAY ;
MOROSCO ?- TO-MORROW^,,!
Eves, at 8:20. Mat?. Wed. & Sut. at 2:20.
(liarles Emerson Cook will present
FLORENCE NASH
Condon
Success
with ORRIN JOHNSON and Strong Cast
Eva. 8 15.
at.. 2:13.
_L_LTH ?T TI1?"?-- J"?' W. ofBway.
tt ??'Matinee? Wednesday & S,
MANTELL
TO-NIGHT
and Tue?.,
KINO LEAR
Wed. Mat., Richelieu; Wed. Nlffht, Thur
Night <?- Sat. .Mat.. Merchant of Venice;
Frl. and Sat. .Nights, Macbeth. ?
Prices 50c, $1.00. $1.50. Boxes $2.00. ?
-. St. Theatre.
Begin-nrfl_MI_^HTP at lOne Week Only. ;
nlng lV"i^Hl?Hl.X:30?Mats. Wed. &? Hat. I
FORT ONTARIO SOLDIERS
With Adeline O'Connor ami Izetta Jewel .
'" "PARRY f?N" ANI> THREE OTHER i
V-ARR* UW ONE-ACT PLAYS.
BENEFIT SICK & WO ENDED SOLDIERS ;
SEAT SALE TO-OAY.
FRI. EVE.,
NOV. 22
"THE CROWDED HOUR"
1QTU CT T)]?a . n'r B'way. Ets. 8:3?.
?Sin _l . Matinees Weil, ami Sat.. 2:30.
IZUol THE LONG DASH 1Jg^YL'
S Mats Wed. & Sat , 2:30."
If you buy in advance, choice
scuts for all performances
may be had at the bo-- office.
Seats now for ThansUglvtng, Christ?
mas and New Year's Matinees_
45th and B'?vay. Eva. 8:15.
; Wednesday and Sat.. 2:15.
New Leo & J, .
?h?ben Musi?
cal Play.
LITTLE SIMPLICITY
BROADHURST ?K?.". 4"* !"
NORA BAYESj ^rf
In a Musical Play,
aOlSinATRF ,v 4Si1' s' Evening? at 8:30.
mi*.*,-j/_v.-\& MutJ Wed aI1(1 gat_ 2.39
COLLIER
'NOTHING BET LIES.*
XX'. of B'way Eres. R 3d ?
-* "- "-' iPnp). 2.30. I
A STITCH I ?Up I IRENE
IN TIME j S?, ! FENWICK
B'way & 33th St. ?gs. 8:15
Malhiera Wed. and Sat o "IS
samoEB &
MERRY MESICAI. ROMANCE.
Thurs. and Sat . 2:13.
|l<ast Week at This Theatre,
OHCnr Wilde'? (?reute?t Comedy,
AN IDEAL HUSBAND
IBeg'e Tuesday, Nov. 26. Seats Now.
Norman Trevor?Cyril Hareuurt
Pe-rgy Hopkin?
Sol,%y A PLACE IN THE SUN
f
#3d U. S. Official War Feature
5 Reel? of the most stirring scene?
of the last big Battles of the War
Presented by
'Swn,0f Committee on Public Information
People'* Filmt'
DIVISION OF FILMS
__?_, 4_U> Assembled from Film taken by U. S. Sig
***B| ??jfS?s, n*" ^?,TM' U. S. N?yy and Camera
1fjrd1f<Hra^iJ?A men of Allied Governments
yJfflKf?S^aK More action than yon can realise
I ^L^_^^Ha^l^__l Bway at 42nil St- B way at 49th St'
the others for mixed, with orchestra,
have been left to the mercy of singing
societies.
A strcphic song, "Der Vollfond
scheint." of real beauty, which was
sung somewhat monotonously by Miss
Braslau, was unfamiliar to Schubert
lovers only in its orchestral dress,
to recover which, together with some
of the unpublished numbers, was the
object of a successful pilgrimage to
Vienna undertaken by George Grove
and ?Arthur Sullivan in 186?.
This music was performed yesterday
by a small orchvstra and chorus from
the Metropolitan Opera House and
Miss Braslau under the direction ol
Mr. Vodanzky. It wa? performed with
exquisite finish and in lovely devotion
and was heard by a refined and gentle
audience, whose faces at the end were
bright with innocent joy. "Not signifi?
cant, but, oh, so Schubertian," was the
comment of some of the knowing. Cer?
tainly; it couldn't well have beei
Brahminical or Wagnerian, since it wa
sweetest Schubert, Fancy's child, wh<
warbled his "native word notes wild.
But to whut extent was it an educatio:
even in appreciation of Schubert? Othe
music, quite as unfamiliar would hav<
been more to the purpose -the set
ting of Psalm xxiii, the "Song of th
Spirits over the Waters," "God in Ns
ture" or one of the beautiful masse!
for instance.
Willeke Is Heard at
Third Symphony Concer
Despite the rain, a large audienc
gathered yesterday afternoon in Ae?
lian Hall for the third Sunday afte
noon concert of the Symphony Sociei
of New York. The programme ii
eluded the Berlioz symphony "Haro
in Italy," which was on the society
programme Thursday afternoon. Tl
soloists were Mr. Pollain, who play?
the viola obbligato in the Berlioz syr
phony, and Willem Willeke, former
'cellist of the Kneisel Quartet and wl
now heads the 'cello section of t
Symphony Society.
Mr. Willeke's mastery of the art
chamber music playing has long be
a delight to its devotees. He w
favor last year as a soloist, and aga
yesterday, playing a concerto by Gei
with technical finish and tonal beau
in spite of the disastrous effect
damp weather on strings. The si
tained passages were played with fi
expressiveness and the closing Tars
THE WHITNEY STUDIO
8 West 8th St.
announces
an Exhibition of
Paintings
by m
Ernest Lawson
and
Guy Pene Du Bois
Opening November 15th
Weekdays 10 A. M. to 5 P. M.
Sundays 8 to 6 V. M.
' tella at a whirlwind tempo. He was
1 given enthusiastic applause.
i A suite from the music composed by
. Mr. Damrosch for the performance of
I "Electra" last year followed, music
1 which has a Greek simplicity of struct
I ure and is significant as part of the
i setting of the drama, illuminating its
; episodes, rather than in itself as pro
i gramme music. It was effectively
; played and heard with appreciation.
The programme ended with Rimsky
Korsakoff's shimmering and vivid
march from "Le Coq d'Or."
Ysaye and Elman Play
Together at Hippodrome
Eugene Ysaye and Mischa Elman
: appeared together at the Hippodrom?!
, last evening. Pianists Harold Bauer
snd Ossjp Gabrilowitsch, for instance,
j now and then give recitals together,
i but seldom are two violinists of such
; distinction heard together on the samo
; occasion. Bo?i were at their best.
. both on their mettle. Their playing
: was artistically in accord. Hearing
; them together, however, this fnct was
i apparent -Mr. Elman is an excellent
l violinist, but there Js only one Ysaye.
Jews Seek Rights for All.
| Nearly S00 representatives from 337
i Jewish organizations decided yesterday
at'a meeting at 175 East Broadway to
| demand equal rights for Jews in
Europe and Asia from President Wil
! son, the pence congress and new re
j publics of Europe. The Jewish Na?
tional Workmen's Council is to be or
I ganized to prosecute the claims.
NEW Y O It K ' S LEAPING T H E A T R E 8 AND SUCCESSES
CM DID P Broadway anil 40th
Eifirir-I- Mats, wed &
i>m> 8:2*.
MAUDE
in V. Hu Jiiiiri Chambers'
THE
SAVING GRACE
NEW AMSTERDAM
MAT
Seus
*Ullo!er*?r?*iK.
1h?
l
Wont 4 Cd St.
Kv? at S i'..
?. WEDNESDAY * SAT. 2:16.
Now for TliaiiksKlvlii? liny Matine?.
NOW IS OUR
TIME TO LAUGH ?
THE BIGGEST LAUGHING
MUSICAL SHOW IN TOWN
KUW & EK.r,ANGKK'S
GEM OF FIN AND MELODY
BEGINNING TO-NlGHT AT TH fc
rrxaf **H?ATPe west*b st _vt?wjo?
\->V*r\ I mats w?D.??w _?at at x yo J
?41
Kres. ?t 8J0.
(Pop) & Sat. 2.15.
A f% JOSEPH
* Cawthorn
LAUGHS AWAY THE NIGHT
AS ?F BY MAGIC ! !
AU?p N w Amsterdam Thentrp,
ZIEGFELD MIDNIGHT FROLIC
OPEN AU, TEAK. PHONE HKVANT 240.
globe r;_isy??u46,hst
S ?il LIA
ANDERSON.
SAM HAKDY :_ "Tk. ?Tai-iarv" LYCEUM w>Bt *6Ul st- Boning? at 8:2o.
DOYLE* DIXON* ,D ine Canary blVCU.U Matinees Thurg. &
Juten a? s:.u
Hat.. 2:2*.
HENRY MILLER'S Theat,?4 W. 43 St.
TO-NIGHT at 830. Tliurs. * Sat. Mat*.. 2 .30.
HENRY MILLER
RUTH CHATTERTON
ta "DADDY LONG-LEGS"
DAVID BEL?SCO Presents
DADDIES
Tliurs and Sat
FRANCES STARR
m "TIGER! TIGERI'-fc^S! _?_?-.
vSW?S?mm Vughtninj
PRITFRMN J*'?1?'- ?.* Kt E,vs 8 .*,? I ^ GAIETY. En.8:30. Mats.Wed.iSat. 2:30. W
CRITERION
Mats. Weil, and Sat., 2 30
POP. MAT. WED
Moilr f?sctnar\n? ny^frry lft?r fcvWWIiften
THREE FACES EAST
Humiii'iis Turned Away at Every Perfbrinali
K.e?. 8 30.
GEO /Till A Kl Tiiea.. H'y & *3d St.
M CUHAN I'OI'ri.AK, MAT. WED.. 2:
NITZI
LA8T 8 TIMES OF THE SAUCY STAR
_ _ *MEAC_? I
' OVER
Hec?S* I
MOND-X, NOV. to. Smt ?''?I'* Thurs.
BY PIBEON POST
SPECIAL MAI. THANKSGIVING DAT.
! LIBERTY Vv",f i2ii S"*?**- Kwnum? 8.15.
l_lDCn.II Matinees Wed. and Sat 2:15
file Kalnbow DItIaIoh of Musical Conjid.es
IGLORIANNA
. EM_g?_PAINTER
VANDERBILT Wcst im Si ?????*?#.
Mr.
?LEO
DITRICNSTEIN
in "THE
MATINEE
HERO."
QTANHARn P.way. ?o st. Kv? . 2?o to n.
O i AnVAIU* Mat?. Tum-w & Thur , 26-Wte.
FIDDLERS THREE wUiU,22?,ls
METROPOLITAN WSSi
To-niffht at 8:15. Tosca. Parrar; Crim!,
Se??tti. Malaysia. Cond., Moranzoni.
Wed. at 8:13. L'Eltstlr d'Amore. Hempel,
Sparkes; Caruso, Scott!. Didiir. Cond.. Papl.
Tliurs. Ht S. Carmen. Farrar, Peterson;
Crlmi, Couzinou, Segur?la. Cond.. Monteux.
Frl. at 8. Marouf. Alda, Howard. De Luca,
Rothler, Chalmers. Bada. Cond., Monteux.
Sat. at 2. Propl.ete. Muzlo. Homer; Caruso,
Rothler. Diaz, Mardones. Cond.. Bodanzky
Next Mon. at 8. Boris Godunow. Homer, I
Dldur. Althouse, Rothler. Bada. Cond.. Papl. :
THANKSGIVING DAY MATINEE
THl R8., NOV. 28/at 8 BUTTERFLY
(Prices $1 to $5) DU I I fc n I U I ?
Farrar. Fornla; Althouse, Scott), Bada.:
Cond., Moranzonl. Seats To-day. 9 A. M. ?
HARDMAN* PIANO USED.
'Twill Be Your Uniqu^e Privilege to See for
the First Time
MR. & MRS.
CHARLES CHAPLIN
In Their Latest Offerings 0n Same Prosram i
MKS.Chas.CHAPLIN ? MR.CHAS.CHAPI.IN I
(Mildred Harris* ( Himself)
in "BORROWED in "SHOL'LDER
CLOTHES" I ARMS'*
PDn&D U/ftV THEATRE at 41st St. j
BRUA?WAY Cont Noo_ to ii p.m.!
PH?lharMon?g
B SOCIETY OK NEW YORK ^^
JOSEF STRANSKY.Conductor
(ARM-XilK HALL
Next Thurs. Evi. at 8:30. Next Fr!. Aft. at 2:30.'
I? VIDAS
Saint-Saens, Mozart. Sibelius. Berlioi.
BEETHOVEN. "FIFTH SYMPHONY"
Tickets at Box um?*. PEUX I- i.K.'KiXS. Mgr.
Th.-atre. To-nigl.i
Columbus Tiurs
Circle. Evj. 8 13 Sat.Ngt... &f"?NZA*C?
orERA COMIQUEL_ &
Gilbert & Sullivan???A.tallf.?T.rt
Comic Opgra Classic-- Sat. Mat.. PlIlV/lI/V
MAXINE ELLIOTT'S THEATRE.
-Matinee NEXT Till RSDAY, Nov. ?1, at 3.
GUILBERT
Paul Verialne
In Songs I
Direction Daniel Mayer. K-.abc ?cano.
MANHATTAN FJ^?SF* ?*?? I
?. ... , .. ??* "? WejJ "? ? **ay. ?. 15.
MaUneea V.cU . tat. ar.-l TfcanksglTi?i, 2:15.
W?? A"_P p -^___" ? J=> *.-""*??"_
WarfielD
In "THE AUCTIONEER"
Prices _3c to ?_<*. Wed. Mat. .5c. to II.
Alwaya*_ftO Orch. Seats at Jl.
TO-DAY-V"PARIS 1918" ??v ]
PREKCHJHEAm v?_x Collier
(,3 XV. 3,'i!h. Kr S.13. Mat* Thur *t8-t..3 ?5.
Aeolian Hall. Thursday. Nov. *?l. Q
DKBCT RKCITAL WALTER at ?3
GREENE BARITONS !
Ticket!. T5c to ?- Mat Ilanlel Ma>er. ?"?bar Pim?o. !
C~??flWEi_X^ i
ROSE SYDELL'S LONDON BELIES j
SECOND BILTMORE
FRIDAY MORNING MUSICALE
Grand hn.irtj?m, Hotel liiltmorc-, Nov. 22, at IL
ALDA
-SEIDEL
CICCOLINI
Soprano
Violinist
Res. seats $3 now on sal? at Biltmoro
Box Office from ? to <* 'Balcony floor).
Mgment. R E. Johnston. Knalxj Piano.
? Again! _?
La Croix
Aeolian Hall, *ar Again!
This After?
noon at 3.
AURORE
BOc to $1.50. ?PIANIST?
M_t. Loudon Clinrlton. Steinway Piano.
Aeolian Hull,
TO-NIGHT
at 8:15
HELEN
Sue to |L?>0,
Mgl. London Char
PB F KEITH S ADELAIDE & HCGHKt*
A L A C E H,*rr.>; * "rr"l** "T?>_ it**
n a. <- w u re??/' with Frank Dob
B'way A- 17th at *????? .T,,'' ?Maft'ewinjrerB
M ..fat* ,,3e.? ^{i?ji?M&?
BF. KEITHS EDDIE LEONARD
IVEKSIDE i ^"^cavanach
B**ay & ?6th St. ; LALRIE & BRANSON'
R
10, 30, 30.
Cunt, li A. M to 11 P. M Roof to 1 A. M
"FATTTt" AHBL'CKLE In "The Sheriff**
Marjrurfta rteher, "Mantle of Charity."
Loe*'. Anirican Rooi UrT?^SS:
"Fatty" ARBCCKLE. "The ?All Seat.
Sheriff," Krmcott Ittirnn * H I??- Reserved
gen, J. Byron Totteu_-Co._; *; ots. i_5, 35, 60.
AEOLIAN HALL. Fri. Eve. Nov. 22, at 8:15
Benefit Duryea War Relief, inc.
Salzedo *m Ensemble
Assisted by POVLA FRMSH. Soprano
Dir. Catharine A. Ilnmman. ."3 W. 8?th Bt
Carnegie Hall, Sat. Aft , Nov.
I'lAN'l KK'TTAl,
HOFMANN
(jfCnJat THtJ?
$i oo Hippodrome
"Every Day
I? a
Holiday
at the ?Hip.' "
?N*. Y San.
Mat Tciaj.
HK8T .SKA
KVENLNUS AT ?:l
H II'I'ODROM E.Special
SUNDAY NIGHT su7^f?'K
Mi-ic France? Ai.ia !<*??i R?>tlii??r. Mauri?-?
i>Amt?>:i. I?.??'.**:: Dancer*. Stole PV?T_aon. Mme.
totilM Homer. Andrea? de Segur?:?. Mme. t?alirtelle
(??lis. Raymond Hltcfecock. llantuerito ?amara.
Tretta ?ul?wr*., Ch?I Maud?-. ".??>?> (?a.:?-?*: Iren?
iiorrtoid. t'arlps Halredo. Pedro ?li* Cord '^a.
Krat.? from $1 to t."> at Box ,'flli-i
BILLIE BURKE
11? ?T)?? Make U?lle,<? Wife"
'$*?Hm.*TmWm STRAND OnCHESTrlA.

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