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New-York tribune. [volume] (New York [N.Y.]) 1866-1924, March 22, 1919, Image 13

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Polish Plight |
Shown by Wife
Of Paderewski
Letter to Son Says Nation
Stiil Battles on Four
Fronts; Truce Is Called
Merc Figure of Speech
Need for Help Is Urged
Soldiers Fight in Rass and
Barefooted; Brutalities
of Bolsheviki Kevealed
The story of the desperate strugglc
that Poland is waging to preserve her
lnnd and freedom from the onslaughts
of the barbarous Bolsheviki is told in
n letter written by Madamo Helena
Paderewski, wifo of the pianist and
premier of Poland, to her son, W. 0.
Gorski of tho Polish Victima Kelicf
Fund.
The first stage of tho lettcr's jour
ney from Warsaw to New York was
aecomplished by couricr. It was writ?
ten on February 23, 1919, moro than
three month3 after the armistice was
signed. Yet at that time Polish armies
were fighting on four fronts to protect
their nation.
"The life we are leading," writcs
Mme. Paderewski, "is like a fairy tale.
Mr. Paderewski stands at tho head of
thc government?Prime Minister and
Minister of Foreign Affairs. He hus
the love of the whole nation, which
trusts him and regards him as a savior.
And all around us are the Polish peo?
ple, the Polish army, tho Polish gov
ernment and the Polish Assembly?and
our hearts and souls go out to God in
expressions of gratitude for having ac
complished this miracle?for a miraclo
it is indced."
Soldiers Fight Barefooted
"War is raging on four fronts," tho
letter continues. "Our wonderful sol?
diers, in rags, without shoes, often
times without even shirts on their
backs. hungry and cold, stubbornly re
sist the onsiaught of our enemies.
While our own boys frequently lack
weapons and shells, the Bolsheviski
around Bialystock, and the Ukrainians
in Galicia, are using poisonous gas in
their light against the Poles. They
obtain it from the Germans, who also
supply them with arms, ammunition
and officers.
"Thousands of university and high
school students already "have been
kiiled. Lemberg is still resisting, de
fended as it is by women and mere
bo\\<. li.e spirit of its defenders rc
tnaina unbroken despite the atrocities
committed by the Ukrainians on capt?
ured Polish prisoners. The other day
there were brought back from Lem?
berg to Warsaw and placed in one of
the hospitals whtch I visit daily six
Polish nurses and four boy scouts.
"They had had the misfortune of fall
ing into Ukrainian hands. Tho nurses
had been impuled and then, after a few
hours of torture in order that their
agony might ba prolonged, taken off
and thrown into a field to die at leis
ure. Tho boy scouts had been tied to?
gether with barbed wire and buried
up to their necks in an isolated spot
out within sight of the Polish lines.
* w were rescued at great aacrifice
of life by some of our men. I doubt
whether any of the nurses will sur
vive. Four already have died. The
boys, I hopc, will recover.
Bolshevik Brutalities Cited
"The Bolsheviki gouge the eyes and
cut out the tongues of the prisoners
they capture and bury them alive after
breaking every bone in their legs and
arms with harnmers. Their Chinese
mercer.aries excel in that sort of
cruelty~-and I thought that peace had
come back to cartfr bringing with it
good will toward men!"
Prosbvtrriaiis to Seek
$40,000,000 Fund
Three-Honu* Campaign Will Be
Started at 2 P. M. To-morrow
by 130,000 Canvassers
The Presbytcriana of the country
expect to break all records in the mat?
ter of drives for campaign funds to
morrow afternoon. They plan to raise
$40,000,000 in tho United States in
three hours.
At 2 o'clock 1"(),000 canvassers
throughout thc country will start on
their rounds. Before 5 o'clock they
expect to visit the home of ovcry Pres
byterian in the United States. In this
city alone $1,000,000 has been set as
the amount to be collected.
Thousands of plctlges have ooen re?
ceived in advance, one man in this city
havingpromised to contribute $100,000,
it is said.
In a statement from headquarters
of the committee in charge of the
drive in Xew York yesterday the is?
sues confrorrting the nation at present
are discussed as follows:
"Labor and capital, once at each
othor's throats, are now both threat
erted by thc Bolsheviki. Socialism
awaits its day of opportunity. Unem
ployment is increasing. Breadlines aro
prophesied. Between the alley and the
avenue a great chasm yawns. Nation
is still set against nation. The prin?
ciples and practices of governments
are in the crucible.
"The way to victory is through the
Church of Christ. Christianity has
not failed?it has not yc*t been tried."
Romance Lures Girl
In Russia 20,000
Miles Around Globe
Nearly Every Mode of Travel
Through Famines and
Revohs Experienced on
Way to South Anierica
Sarah Reutman, twenty-four years
old, of Kishineff, Russia, will marry
Jacob Stichbaum, twenty-six years old,
of Buenos Ayres, in the South Ameri?
can metropolis some time in April.
When that occurs. the last chapter to
an unusual international romance will
have been spun, and Miss Reutman's
20,000-mile joux-ney from the far
provinces of Russia to the arms of her
former school-boy sweetheart will have
reached a deserved fruition.
This journey, begun on June 26,
191S, extending toward the East by way
of the Trans-Siberian route to Yoka
homa and the Orient, thence to San
Francisco and across a continent to
i Xew York, will be resumed March 28,
I when Miss Reutman is placed aboard
j a South American-bound steamer for
I the final leg of her long travels.
Miss Reutman and Stichbaum were
I schcol-day sweethearts in Kishineff,
Russia, tifteen years ago. In 1911,
! Stichbaum obtained employment with
Dreyfuss Sons & Co., international
I bankers. and was assigned to tho com
j pany's South American counting house.
! He promised to send for his fiancee
; and did.
Last June Miss Reutman boarded a
train for Charkoff as the beginning
' of a journey that led her into scores
of famino-marked, revolution-swept
: cities. She travelled by train, boat,
j canoe, horseback and steamship. In
I Yokahoma she was given protection
[ by ?the Hebrew Sheltering and Immi
j grant Aid Society of America.
I With comparative ease she reached
I San Francisco and then New York,
where she is now stopping at the East
j Broadway establishment of the Hebrew
. Sheltering Society.
Miss Reutman is a brunette of
| medium size. In Charkoff she met Mrs.
Fanny Dubin with her two children.
I Mary, nine, and Samuel, seven, who
[ have accommpanied Miss Reutman
upon her journey and shared in her
: unusual experienccs.
??-??__
No More Iee Controller
ALBANY, March 21. ? The Sage
Machold bill abolishing the office of
State Ico Controller, which was held
; by former Governor Benjamin B,
Odell, was signed by Governor Smith
to-day. The position was created for
: the war emergency.
ANNOUNCEMENT
THE PICCADILLY
170 West 72d Street
(near Broadway)
Will open an extension to
the preaent Tea Room at the
above address Monday even?
ing, March 24. Double seat
ing capacity.
Under the same excluaive
management.
miRmg.
Dellclous Home Cooklno
For busineet men 4. *:m?n
80 Nuiau 8t.
Spl. Saturday luncheon .75
ii5W?pi6E.37^ST.
T 'ii"t\ '?* -4 LUNCHEON'TEA'WAFMtf
i!L!H*^2^ DINNER ?1??
^IflliWiPK 'BrcaXfast-SPO
V?MW?I#' LuneK--ll-.30
rm\\ocsK tg*~ 3
32dSt-Btoai|-33dSl. ^^
r^eOPENDOORl
SOOMAD, AVE at 55fA. ST.
um:i!|-.o.n$i?j'.ti:a-ihniwjU*?5
club lvnciimin 7jc
-WArn.ee
Vut" &!?T ?""";f "-uneheon Wo. D1i.n?r 78s.
WEO t fBl. Altemoon Tae
??-.. WtH SUNDAYS 1 te 7 P. tt.
Hotel Thorndyke Restaurant
('"IiLr .:*"w M?n?*< ment)
$&! ?"?""??;;?? ,-??.?.s,.*,,AK'r-.?r
UHCKKN D1N -I i:
BROWN BETTY TEA ROOM
* ? ? " ' ? ' ??? ? ? d'pi KiirHt).
^^l.uat-heon. Aflrrrioon '|>tt, jj|ttn(,,.
Offers lieal
food at a
I'ixed Price
I T1L 1 mUUC 1 1E. i/Vln(.|K.on 40c: Dinner ?5e
!M .. l-JrU1,:'*:* tAinch88o (hl.V.ii l.iinnhOOo
IHE ADELAIDE uJESBlBSen.
MARY AUGUSTA TEA ROOM
MO W. 7'4ii<* St. Tei. 308 Columliui).
BreaKiast 40o. I.unrhtion r.Oc Te&SDo.
Dinner 'jOo. aiko a la carto Mi-nu.
DOROTHY LOUISE lft^mM ft
1U1 W/m * liU-kr.fi |M,??.r Tn.-,. i.i?l K?t.
AMERICAN LUNCHE3
--1 JAPANESE DINNFna
40 W. ?'ifh Slraet. u'"?NEBi
ffaul
RUSS1AN 1NN
m w. MTH kt
I.Uii.'hron * Dinner.
Table <l'llot?.
A la t'aria A Aftrrriaon Tea.
lAVSCHMX
MRS. COPELAND
MAT5 RI?,\V IJINNP.K?ffOAsT TLKKf'.Y,
AVTKKNOO.N TKA
16 E. 43rd St.
A'f-j i (o x/cteJ i/an/tailw
IHNNKft
Th* oul.of.ihe-ordmery pfc,*. 0f New York, where ur!',? elmoiphertt
!*!L '-r ^"jl,?r fe ??'??^ U??ea invite ihe di?enminr:ing. will appear
"*' 'iw-hwiiMif Te? Room*" ?*d) Monday, Wedne*r,*y and Saturday.
Etthiger Asks f o4r
Alienist to Examine
Retiring Teachers
Four or Five Cases Demand
Attention, He Declares to
Board; Schools to Close
Tuesday for the Parade
An alienist ia wanted in the De?
partment of Education to aid in obtain
ing thc retirement of teachers affeeted
with mental disorders. Thia fact was
revealed yesterday afternoon at tho
meeting of thc Board of Education,
when Supcrintendent of Schools Will?
iam L. Ettinger submitted a recom
mendation.
Dr, Ettinger said there were four or
live cases at present that demanded the
services of an alienist. One of the
members asked Dr. Ettinger if an ex
pert who is devoting attention to the
ungraded classes could be used, but Dr.
Ettinger said that with these classes it
is a quetion of psychology and that
such an expert could not give the ser?
vices that are required of an alienist.
The board reforred the matter to
Dr. Ettinger, with power.
Dr. Ettinger, in a letter to the board,
submitted the complete history of the
controversy between the Board of Edu
caion and the city authoritics, includ?
ing Mayor Hylan, Comptroller Craig
and Commissioner of Accounts Hirsch
field, relative to the school finances
and the demand by the city officials
that these finances be investigated by
them.
New Law Changed Power
When the Board of Education was
constituted a body of soven members
by the new education law, Dr. Ettinger
says in his letter, the administration
of city educational affairs was thoreby
placed in the hands of the new board
and passed from the control of the
city officers.
"It soon became apparent," says Dr.
Ettinger, in his letter, "that the Board
of Education was not to be permitted
to control its own affaira by the failure
of Controller Craig to honor payrolls
and bills duly audited."
More recent detailu of tho contro?
versy were brought out in Dr. Ettin
ger's letter in citing the demand of the
city officials to investigate the school
accounts, the refusal by the auditor of
the board by direction of Dr. Ettinger !
and the subpeena on March 11 of the !
auditor by Commissioner Hirschfield to !
testify regarding the methods of the |
school finances, which Dr. Ettinger told
Auditor Henry R. M. Cook to disregard.!
Wants Charges Substantiated
Dr. Ettinger declared the charges j
that principals are oppressing the i
teachers in their endeavors for higher I
salaries made recently by Clara C.
Calkins. principal of Public School 6,
Brooklyn, in a letter to a local after?
noon newspaper, ought to be substan?
tiated.
The board disapproved a recom
mendation from the body of superin
tendents that when, in the opinion of
the division supcrintendent, it is im?
possible to obtain substitutes for ab
sent teachers, the principal of Public
School 109, Brooklyn, be authorized to
employ regular teachers overtime, not
to exceed two hours a day, with com- j
pensation at the rate of $1.50 an hour,
in addition to their regular salaries.
The school children in Manhattan, it
was voted, will have a holidav Tuesday i
in honor of the 27th Divis'ion. Thc I
board decided that the schools be
closed Monday morning in Brooklyn
only when the celebration is held
there, and it was voted to excuse all
employcs of the department who wish
to join in the exercises there that
morning.
?"?>?-? ?*? ,
Prohibition Will Booni
Drugs, Says Copeland
Traffic in Cocaine Already
Shows Huge Increase,
He Tells Women
Health Commissioner Royal S. Cope?
land, addressing the Now York Colony
of the National Society of New Eng?
land Women, and Mrs. Copeland, ad?
dressing the Daughters of the Empire
State in an adjoining room at the Wal
dorf yesterday afternoon, predicted In?
creased drug traffic under national
prohibiiton.
"In January, 191P," Dr. Copeland said,
"there was more wholesale cocaine
traffic in New York than in the entire
year of 1918.
"Almost every crimo is committcd by
a drug addict, but their numbers are
not cohfined to the lower classes. They
aro in every level of society, the busi?
ness and professional classes and
among society people. On the East
Sidc there,aro many physicians, a dis
grace to their profession, who are giv
ing prescriptions calling for drugs to
addietB. This drug trade is the only
practice they have, and often they
write out two or threo hundred of these
prescriptions a day. The drug stores
fill the prescriptions. One drug store
alone lilled prescriptions for 500
ounces in a single day."
? --??-'
Anti-Saloon League to
Fife Brief in Beer Suits
William H. Anderson, state supcrin?
tendent of the Anti-Saloon League, said
yesterday that tlie league would take a
hand in the action bepun by Elihu Root
and William D. Guthrie, in behalf of
the brewers, to test the validity of the
war prohibition law.
"Our national counsel, Waync B.
Wheeler, will rcprcsent us in the suits,"
said Mr. Anderson. "I have been as
sured by Mr. Guthrie, counsel for the
brewing interests, that the plaintiffs
will not oppose any application by Mr.
Wheeler to file a brief as amicus curia
in either of tho pending suits.
"Elihu Root, leader of the American
bar, is eminent in spite of, and not be?
cause of, his connection with tho liquor
question.
"AU thc brewers aro getting out of
this disturbanco is about six weeks"
time," continued Mr. Anderson, "for,
even if the authority of the Internal
Revenue Commissioner to construe the
law should be Ruccessfully questioned,
tho emergency law itself in prohibiting
tho manufacture after May 1 expressly
useB the word 'beer,' and in prohibiting
the sale after June 80 expressly says
?beer.' Robert G. Davey, counsel and
Huperlntendcnt of the law enforcement
department of tho Now York 8tatc
leuguc is looking after preliminary
matters in the pending Htigation in
behalf of Mr. Wheeler."
Gen. Booth Talks Humanity
Real Babis, for Civilization, Ho
Tells Theatre Assembly
General Balllngton Booth, president
of the Volunteers of America, apeaking
before n meeting of tho Theatre As
aembly at the Hotel Astor yestorday
dwelt upon humanity aa the roal basla
on which to found tho highest civili?
zation.
Tho Volunteem of America will open
a new hotel .for sailors on Sovonth
Avenue, betwocn Thlrty-fifth and
Thiity-aixth streets, next week. Ac?
cording to tho report, tho organization
hun slxty-ono homen and institutions
where benevolent work is being ao
complifshed, j
Rev. Dr. Aked Called by
Seattle Congregation
Former Pastor of "Rockefellcr
Church" Has Invitation
From the West
Announcemcnt was ftade here to-day
that an invitation had been extended by
Plymouth Congregational Church, Seat?
tle, to the Rev. Dr. Charles F. Aked,
formerly pastor of thc Fifth Avenue
Baptist Church here, to become its pas?
tor. Dr. Aked left New York yesterday
for the West, where hc will make known
his decision.
f)r> Aked was born in England in
1864 and early in his ministry there
gaincd a reputation for his advanced
views. IIc was called to thc Fifth Ave?
nue Baptist Church--"the Rockefellcr
Church"?in 1907, and rcmained there
four years, accepting upon his resigna
tion the pustorate of thc First Congre?
gational Church in San Francisco. In
1916 he left this work'to becomo asso?
ciated with Henry Ford in his "peace
pilgrimage" to Europe, resigning from
that body in Copcnhagen.
He is well known as a lecturer and
the author of many religious and so
ciological works. He was one of the
founders of thc Passive Rcsistance
League in England.
-?-.-?
League Is Started
To Fight German
Music Propaganda
Mrs. William Jay, avowed foe of
German music, made public yesterday
a letter from President Arthur Somers,
of the Board of Education, concerning
German music in the city's schools and
announced that she was organizing an
"Anti-German Music League." Mr.
Somers's letter, Mrs. Jay said, was in
answer to one sho had sent him in
closing a letter signed "An American
Mother," protest ing because her chil?
dren, whose clder brother Germans
had kilied, had to sing and learn Ger?
man songs in school.
Mr. Somers wrote that six selections
of German origin had been approved
for use in public schools. They are:
Schubcrt's songs: "Ave Maria,"
"Who is Sylvia?" and "Hark, Hark the
Lark;" Mendclssohn's "Spring Song,"
Handel's "Messiah" and Beethoven's
"Andante" from the "Fifth Symphony."
The rejected songs are Schuman's
"Traumerei," Wagner's "Evening Star"
and "Pilgrim's Chorus" fron Tannhau
scr and Listz's "Hungarian Rhapsodie."
Beethoven Work Played in France
According to President Somers, the
decision was left to George H. Gartlan,
assistant director of music, and was
indoraed by tho board. The reason ad?
vanced for retaining the Schubert
songs, Mr. Gartlan said, was becauso
they were inspired by English poetry.
In the case of the Bcethoven symphony
Mr! Gartlan called attention to the fact
that this was played in France during
the war. As i'or the songs that were
rejected, Mr. Gartlan sn;d they were
eliminated to "forestall criticism."
"Tho board's action to my mind is
lamentably weak," said Mrs. Jay. "lt
would have been far better either to
havo eliminated all the music of Ger?
man origin or let it all stand. This is
not a fight against German composers.
It is against German propaganda, and
music is the most powerful weapon it
; has. We don't fear German litcruture
or painting or sculpture."
Mrs. Jay's "Anti-Germnn Music
League" is to be a country-wide organi?
zation to boycott tho most "insidious
and subtle form of German propa?
ganda" until Germany ?ives the world
some token of her "reform and re
pentance."
Music Most Subtle Propaganda
"The attempt to resume opera at the
, Lexington Opera House and the bold at?
tempt to give a Bcethoven concert next
week at the McAlpin by the so-called
'Social Scicntiiic Society of New York,'
with a programme printcd partly in
German script, simply shows that Ger?
man propaganda is now putting forth
its most insidious and subtle weapon
to save what it can from tho wrock,"
said Mrs. Jay.
"Those associated with me in fight
ing German propaganda are thoroughly
aroused. We realize now that some?
thing must be done quickly. The best
way to act is to turn the spotlight ot*
pitiless publicity against this return
of German music. Anybody in the
country may join by signing our
pledge."
Mr3, Jay said all who wish to join
the league should send their names
to her address, 21 West Fifty-eighth
Street.
More Aid for Russian*
VLADIVOSTOK, March 21.--Thc
Canadian Red Cross is sending an?
other trainload of supplies and diain
fectants to the Omsk district for Rus?
sian refugees.
METROPOLITAN OPERA
Today at 2:ir>. Amoro del tre Re. Muzlo: Mnr
tlnclll. Didur, Clialmors, Badn. Cond., Moranzonl.
Ttnlght at 8. Caruso Jubilon. Ocn'l Adm. $:).00.
i Sun. Eve. Concort, r>0c to *?'.:. Elman, viollnut.
; Marsh. Contr. Hackett, Ton. Orcli. Cond., IlnKcnian.
Next Mon., 8:15. Obcron. Pontelln, Howard:
.Martinelli. Althouae, Bclss. Kotliicr, Cd., Bodanzky.
Wed. Mat. at 2. Faust. Farrar, Delaunois; Mar?
tinelli. llotlitor, Werrcnrath. Cond., Monleui.
Wed. at 8:1". Rigoletto. Barrlontos, liraslau;
i Ilachott, DeLuca, Segurola, llossl. Cond., Moranzont.
Thurt. at'8:15. Marta. Barrientoa, Ilomur; C'a
i ru?o, Didur, MalatcBta. Cond., Bodanzky.
Frl. at 8. Carmen. Farrar, Suiidellu.'); Marti?
nelli, Whltehtll, Rothier. Cond., Alontoux.
| Sat. Mat. al ". Bohemo. Muzlo, Romalne;
j l.aziro, Hcottl, Segurola, Malatoata. Cond., Papl.
Sat. at 8. <7*>n to *:i). Borls Godunow. Mauc
! nauer, Delaunois; Didur, Altliuuse, Murdoucs.
I Coiid., l'apl.
UABDMAN PIANO USED.
METROPOLITAN OPERA HOT*SB
MARY
GARDEN
FESTIVAL
MARY GARDEN
In her two greatoot roles, supportorl by
Alfred MaRuenat, Loulse TWnt, M. O'Stilll
van anrl othcrH, In "Loulsei" & "Cleopolrn."
ARTHUR RUBINSTEIN
Groat Polish IManlst.
GEORGES BAKLANOFF
ItuRHlan Barltonc
PAVLEY & OUKRAINSKY
ln "L'Apren-Mldl d'uno fnum" by Dx-busay.
Tlcketi $1.50, S2, $? nnd so.
NOW ON SALE AT HOX OFFICE.
TUESDAY
EVENING
MAH( II 85th
AT 8:?0
CARNEOIB HALL, To-nlght at 8:15.
oncert R??l|>iiv?n ? Musical 8o<\
DeetnOVen (Onmrnunliy Orch.)
on<iu<'tor, HENRY LEFKOWITCH.
MAItCELLA?Bo'ir. ISAMCIIA? Violin.
UMABCKL
RAFT
JACQBSEN
Tickets 60o to $2.00. Now on Half.
"Every day lt ?
hollday at th*
Hlp."?Harald.
Neat Tuuday Mat.
fltarts at 8.
Mat. To-Day 2:15 fftppOfipjJflE
KVKMNG8 AT8:1I. ? "' W W?f" ?"*?
IIIPPODROME?SUNDAY NIOHT AT 8:15
RAOIIt VIDA'" J"amous Hrrnrli Vlnllnl.il
IVrtV/UL. V1UAO KHANK STEDMAN, l'lanlat
HIPPODROME 8TARJS and fOMPANY
Rrneflt 80th STREET TEMI'LE.
AEOLIAN HALL, Mon. Eve., Mar 34, 8:18
BIRKSHIRESf
AKOLIAN HALL, Monday Aft., March 24, ?t 3.
TORPADIE&LIFSCHEY
BOI-RANO (Jolnt Recital) VTOLA
Miss Mary Kent Proves Herself
in Song Reeital at
Aeolian Hali
Miss Mary Kent, who gave a song
reeital yesterday afternoon in Aeolian
Hall, is a young artist djstinctly out
of the ordinary. Atnid tho waste of
aspiring mediocrity which constitutes
the average reeital season it is a re?
lief to meet a new talent so vital as
appeared this young woman's. Tho war
has metamorphized the world, and
among its metamorphoses has been
that of Miss Marie von Essen into
Miss Mary Kent. "Miss von Essen ap?
peared once with the Society of Amer?
ican Singers and at that time showed
a strong operatic bentj now Miss Kent
shows a talent no less veritable in the
world of song reeital.
Miss Kent is a mezzo-soprano whose
j range might permit her to enter thc
| contralto ranks. Her voice is a beau
jtiful one, of sufflcient volume, and in
j the xipper register of a peculiarly fas
; Clliating quality, a voice, in short,
j which is distinctly personal. Morc
< over, she is already an artist. She
| has a keen feeling for nuance, she
knows how to color her tone, she
knows the value of a smooth legato,
and she has a rare command of mezzo
voce. Those who heard her sing the
two sonss of Wolf-Perrari and Four
drain's "Fleurs de Paravent" realized
this, and in Gcorges's difficult "Hymne
au Soliel'' she proved that she has
temperament and power.
In two new songs of Carl Deis?and
excellent songs they were, too?-she
again proved her delicacy of feeling,
and in Richard Hageman's charming
"The Cunnin' Little Thing," which thc
audience forced her lo repeat, her
humor. It is indced rare to (ind a
young singer with the combination of
voice, temperament, variety of mood,
tnste and intelligence such as is pos
sessed by Miss Kent. And, moreover,
she is good to look unon. Richard
Hageman furnished her" with sympa
thetic accompaniments and Mr. Deis
accompanied her in his own songs.
Aurelio Giorni gave a piano reeital
last night at Aeolian Hall in aid of the
Constantinople College for Women.
He was assisted by Hans Kronold, 'cel
list. The audience -was of good size
and showed much interest. G. V.
Mrs. Catt in St. Louis for
National Suffrage Congress
ST. LOUIS. March 21.?Mrs. Carrie
Chapman Catt, president, and many
other national officers of the National
Woman Suffrage Association have ar?
rived here to prepafe for the national
jubilee convention, which opens Mon?
day.
"The important work of the conven?
tion," said .Mrs. Catt, "will be tne or?
ganization of a union, a party or league
which will unite the voting women into
a body which may be effective in car?
rying out a legislative programme in
the interest of women.
"The organization would concentrate
its attention upon Congress, state leg
islatures and boards of aldermen."
Charles Dillingham's next produc?
tion will be a musical comedy by Anne
Caldwell and Jerome Kern entitled "A
New Girl."
A special performance of "Tea for
Three" was given for the benefit of
the boys of the 27th Division at Camp
Mills yesterday.
Avcrell Harris has been cngaged to
play the leading male part in "Susan
Lenox."
Butler Davonport will produeo a new
play entitled "The Doubter's Faith," at
the Bramhall Playhouse on Thursday,
March 27.
A portrait of Otis Skinner in the
1 role of Colonel Brideau in "The Honor
I of the Family," by Victor D. Heeht,
j which was exhibited at the Academy
, of Fine Arts in Philadelphia, has been
! hung in the lobby of the Empire The
i atre.
The company that is to present
"Business Before Pleasure" in Lon
i don sailed the other day. It includes
Julia Bruns, Lillian Davis, Vera
Gordon, Ted W. Gibson, Louis Mor
rell and James T. Ford.
For the Sunday concert at the
Winter Garden the programme will
include Elizabeth Murray. Sophie
Tucker, Adelaide and Hughes, Bert
Hanlon, Dorothy Brenner, Low Cooper
and Frank Westfal.
A Victory Day matinee of "Please
Get Married" will be given at the
Fulton Theatre on Tuesday.
AMERTCA'S FOREMOST THEATRES AND II1TS UNDER THE DIRECTION OP
LEE .V: J. J. SHl'UERT
WINTER GARDEN
?\Ylntrr Garden's
Mld-Wtnter
Extravaganza
Ercnlnn at S.
MAT. TO-DAY,
"IJSJI'W7"'"^
ltl'Ji!Wlul?jKffI'JH^'*0
A MIC.IITY BILL OF M EKKYMAKEKS
>?"^ENTURy GRCVE ROOFOf '[NTUFY THEATRE
OirMBDNIGHT WHIRL
%?*? AT ll^tt-A Se.NSATIOfi-PHOHt C0L8600
fi Rri MfiNT 48th a* ? K- ?" B'way. Ets. 8:30.
UJ DLLlUUrtl MaMnco Today 2:30.
PENNY W!SE jp&SSSi*
Bei?. MON. EVE., Mnreh 24. Soata Now.
Maeterllnck'i Dramatlo Master-Stroke
"A Burgomaster of Belgium'
With An AH-KniflTsti Company.
Special Mat. Next Tues., a P. M.
44TH ?JT Theatre, nr. B'way. Eves 8:00.
iiiii Ol. Matinees To-day & Wed.. 2 00
Special Matinoe Next Tucs. at 3 P. M.
East 'i Weeks. Mr. Jolson will posl
tively appear at every performnnco.
44TH ST. THEATRE?SPECIAL
T0M0RR0W (Sunday) NIGHT
CARNIVAL [!KeT;es,tok,1,'s
OF IA77 (MELODISTS
BIIHIY (dl.MORE jIHANK WITH ERS
(Makes the trap {(Taught the trom
druin tulk) \bona to sob)
II OTHERS ana 1 Peer of
N.Y.SYNCOPATED 0RCHESTRAof5i)i &&?"
Broadhurst ?&%.? jPthEt, "?{,.
A CRACKING. 8MACKING MUSICAL HIT.
THE KISS BURCLAR
Marla Carroll, Dinman Malc/, Harry Clarlte.
TO-MORROW, SUNDAY NIGHT, at 8:20
BENEFIT OF THE ACTORS' FUND
Blanche Bates, Margaret Wveherly, Isa
belle Lowe, Tom Wise, Alphniiz Ethier
la THE GOLDEN BTJSECE
EL'l.NGE Z'ZL? s'- EvcnlnCT at R::,?
Today & Wed.
BEEEHHI
RAYFQ 4:"'- w- ?r B'way. Ktrs. 8:15.
DrWLO Last Matlnco To-day, 2:15.
GREATEST JAZZ MELODIST8 EXTANT
| S8R- SYNCOPATED ORCHESTRAc^1! ??
I Sun. Kre. Concert?Wm. & Cordnn Ponltr. Ellza
nimcAM West 41th st. Etenlnra at 8:13. b''"' M"rray' (!'">- & Dick "???? >- M"?
ntlUW" Mattnecs Today tc Wed. 'J^O. ! "~
??? BERNARD & >-?? MANN ! 39lh Sr- 5,.??"V-& IS 8B.'?&
SHf KEEP ?? YOURSELF
"Breahs all records for laufthter."
43. B, of B'y. Evs. 8:39.
To-day and Wed., 2:30.
iirilliant Comedy,
Vanderbilt HJ5?
Rachal Crothen
Month
with Cyrll Kelghtley & Ethel Dane.
Special Matinee Next Tucs. at 3 P. M.
LVRI? ?SS %h# ?'E-?vP?*rr.eanwBKi
ay * Wed. 2:30.
EXTRA MATINEE NEXT TCESDAY
COURTEWAY&WISE
&?TS.VCAPPY RICKS
MWTtt!
SPECIAL VICTORY MAT., Tl ES., 3 P.M.
PLAYHOUSE
4Sth st., E. of Brnadv.ay.
KTenlnw 8:30.
Muts. To-day, Tues., IHil. and Tluirs.,
ALIC
f p>mr?*al <7'11 arid Broadway. Kves. p:15.
central Mftt& To.llay & W(,d-_ ^;15
A MiiBlral Play?DIlTerent
SOMEBODY'S SWEETHEART
Special Matinee Next Tucs. at 3 P. M.
Sun. Eve. Concert?Wm, and Gordon Dooley,
Kaloli Jlerz, Elizaheth Murray. 12 Others,
Casuio %$*?%?$ ^eTli1
ffioman'ce SOME TIME $&?0
Speeial Matinee Next Tues. at 3 P. M.
Special Matinee Next Tues. at 3 P. M.
fc-fV
48TH ST.
| Absorbing-f*
?Mail I
Tliratro. E. or B'way. Evgs. S.30.
i.ast Matioco To-day, L':30.
BIJOU
$?2 A SLEEPLESS NIGHT
43th, W. of - -vay. Evs., 8:45.
Mattnees To-day & Wed., 2:45.
fTfLAST 2 iroMFDY "**"???41 "'-^ evS.r:2o.
i TIUCQ |VU?1DUI Matinceg To-day & Thurs.. 2:20.
^.f- MONDAY EVE.
Seats
Now.
A Modern I.oro Comedy by MAUVIN TAVBOlt
with MABEL TALIAFERRO. ROLAND
VOl'NO, ROBEKT C. F1SCHER.
Bpoclal Mat. Next Tucs., ,'! i'. Al.
?A$T is WEST
Wirn FAY BAINTER
ASTOR WrZ&.fiX:^.
SHUBERT JJ& ^yna-? >?$
GOOD MORNING, JUDGE
PI VMOIITH w- *,5,? Sr- Eto- 8:30.|La?t3 f;P?r?? ?? ? ,. ?. ?. '
rLimUUln Mut,, To-day & Wed.lWooks I "jeor**?Hassell,MoUte King:. Charles Kin?
JOHN BARRYMORE RED2ffii'oN
PRINCESS BJi?iJjSS -TP--P*.vA >.-n
PARK t?"' rir ' phnno IKre.8:15. Mat.
? ***? e]e, B9th l?nso c.i ISaturdav 215
SOCIETY OF AMEKIGAN SINGEK9
EE TUESDAY, 2:48. | To-day, 2:1!
Last Timo.
OH, MY DEAR!
Hmarterit A Brlgliiont
(,t All Princess
Musical Buccesses,
"Helter Tliun 'Oh, Boy!" "?N. Y. Hrrald.
REPUBLIC
Tlir-alrc, W. 42d St. Ets, 8:30.
Matlneea Today A: Wed. 2:30.
AUTIIIU HOl'KINa l'rcscnts
PATSENCE
To-nlKht, aino
Next Mon., Wed., Frl.
Evs. and Sat. Mat.
SS':V MIKADO
orvlllo llarroM. JelTeMon de Angella, Wm. Dan
rortn, Uerherl Uatorous, Bertram Pcacock, Kate
Cpndon, Blancho Dufflcld, Gladys Caldwell!
lliy Arrangcmrnt with A. II. WOODS) Ua
"THE FORTUNE TELLER"
Clll TI1U Wost 46th St Eves. at 8 30.,
rULIUri &fts. Today & Wed. (Pop.)2:30/
SPECIAL MAT. NEXT TUES. AT 3.
Ollvrr Morosco'i Wliirlwlnd Fnrco
PLEASE GET MARRIED
with Ernest Tru<-x & Edith Tallaforro.
SELWYN,r!.'P,. NXT.MON.^,,?^?
"tumble nrm*
EXTBA "VICTORY" MAT. NEXT TUES, at 3
FLORENCE HEED
Mm TDday 2.r>i- to 7:.o lu "Roads of ncsilny."'
NeXtlLoo turrillo ln Lnmharili, Etd
Waekl with OrauQ Yulutitlnc
s^-wm.
JANE
COWL
in THE
\CR0WDED
Vhour
Solw.vn Theatre
W. 42 .St. Kvs. B:3
Mnts Wed A-Rsl.,2:
Mc
Mantiattaii Op.
ilay H
ii.
Extra "Victory"
Mat. Next Tues. at 3
Maxlne Etllott'a
W, 30 St. Kvs. R 30
Mata.Wi-d .V.S.Ht..^ :i0
French Thea.vu', Colo-nbiw
"SW85. Bt8:18, Mts.Tdsy tc Th? 2:15.
Iv^kr LE MISANTHR0PE
CARNEGIE HALL TO-MORROW EVE, 8:30
MAJ.-GEN.SIRF.B.
AU RICE
IIEAR UI*iI TEI.L
"HOW THE WAR WAS WON"
Illustrated with rvmarhaolt aUdeia,
Maj.-Gen. John F. O'Ryan
COMM. 27th DIVISION. PRE8IDINQ.
Si'ii'M BOo to $2.fi0 on unl" at Box OfTlen
and at Offloa LBH KBBDICK, 437 Rth
Ave., Sole ManagT Gen. Maurlco'a Tour,
nut-'PiuwirM yiLy\ut T,i??t'?'. ?h ?t.
UntCPIt"H/n * 7lh Ave. I'Monn Spring fl?o?
Tahs 7ih Ave.l
En, 8:80 Main. Today A- W?d."8.80,
BireeL 1 A Cuuicily ot Urceuwlcb Vlilix*.
Carnegie Hall Tomorrow Aft. at 3
LAST RECITAL TIIIM SEASON JOHEP j
IVATIlf A -il?r
BEATS NOW AT CARNEOIH IIALU
LOEW'S NEW YORK THEATRE %??
Cont. 11 A. M. tn 11 P. M. Roof to l' A.*M.
CARLYLE MLACKWKLL, "lllt or MIb?.?*
Loew'a American Roof ^g^SgfJ^
"THE REEL fiOV", CJIIAM. i All Seats
MORATI & CO.; WM. IHCK Itrwrvnl
AN!> SIX OTIIKR At'-TH. SS, 8.1. fiO
??OLUMBIA, Il'way and 4Tth. Twlce Dally.l Pop.
* QURL.E8QUE WONOER SHOW. iPrlcea
Exhibition of American Paint
ings Opens To-day at the
Lotos Club
An exhibition of American paintings
from the collection of C. Lansing Bald?
win opens to-day at the Lotos Club.
Sixty-four canvases in all are shown,
including examples by the most promi
nent American painters in landscape
and figure, including twelve character?
istic landscapes by J. Francis Murphy
and ten figure paintings of the earlier
work of Arthur P. Davies. Only one
example by George Inness is shown,
but this is a delightful rendering of
"Summer Foliage," with eool greens in
light and shadow.
Three canvases by Henry Golden
Dearth show the changes that took
place in the artist's technique and
appreciation of color during his life
time. "The Day's \Vork Done" is quiet
in color and simple m design, while
"After the Storm" is filled with move?
ment.
Ernest Lawson is represented by
"The Creek in Winter" and "Early
Morning," two of his best works. and
Horatio Walker's "Spring Ploughing"
holcls the mood of spring in subtle .col
oring. The exhibition also shows many
good examples by Ii. A, Blakelock,
Dines Carlsen, Emil Carlson, Louis
P. Dessar, Childe Hassam and others.
Sales from the Hamilton Easter Field
collection of modern etching and paint?
ing reported last night by the Ander
son Galleries amounted to $2,385. The
two-day sale of old and modern oils,
conducted by the American Art Asso?
ciation, ended last night with a total
of $(',406, of which $4,092 represented
purchases last night. Sales by the
latter included:
"The Adventures of Philopemen," an
example of the Flemish school, to R.
H. Lorenz, agent, for $1,250; "The
Banqueting Scene," a Tiepolo, $260;
"Portrait of Aloysius 111,"" a Spanish
work, $180; "Christopher de Lignjviile,"
$150, and "Vanity," an eighteenth cen?
tury Neapolitan, for $135.
Purchases from the Field collection
at the Anderson Gnllories included:
Whistier's "Rotherhithe," by C. W.
Kraushaar for $300; "The Writer," an
Alphonse Lcgros etching, by Freder
ick Keppei Company. i'or $50; a dry
point by Mary Cassatt, "Mother Hold
ing a Little Girl," Kepjicl Company,
$50; :?. comnlete set of the French "La
Caricatura," Miss Brandt, $270, and
? i Manct's lithograph, "Execu
tion of Emperor Maximilian of Mex?
ico," F. S. Mncomber, $7<h
Engaged to Pittsburgher
Mrs. M. Horsman Swain, of 151 West
57th Street, announces the engagemcnt
of her daughter, Miss \pple
ton Swr.in. to Clarke Milholland, son
of Mr. and Mrs. Harry <'. Milholland,
of Tittsburgh. Mr. Milholland is h
graduate of the class of 1910 Yale
Sheffield. He recently returned from
France.
Bridal Party Named
Miss Ruth Dean, daughter of Mr.
and Mrs. Herbert HolHngsworth
of 420 Park Avenue, will be married
to David S. Cowles on April 2S, in Bt.
Thomas's Church. Tho bride will be
attended by Mrs. John Starr Taber,
Miss Katharine E. Hall, Miss Alice
Haight, Miss Julia L. Talcott, Miss
Marion Hodenpyl, Miss Maria F. Cook
and Miss Margaret Van V. Powers.
-?
Miss Ingoldsby Engaged
Mrs. Grenville F. Watcrbury, of 81
Riverside Drive, gave a dinner lasi.
night at which she announced the en
gagement of her daughter, Miss Alice
M. Ingoldsby, to Donald C. Walton,
son pl Mr. and Mrs. William T. Wal?
ton. jr., of this city. Mr. Walton re?
turned from France with the 27th Di?
vision.
New Britain-Paris Air Reeord
PARIS, March 21.?Major General
John E. B. Seeley, of the British War
Office, on Sunday flew from Folkptom
to Paris, a distance of 172 miles in
seventy-four minutes, establishing n
new record for the flight, it was
learned to-day.
NEW YOBK'S I.EADINQ THEATREB AND SCCCESHES
NEW AMSTERDAM ??**" *?'
FvVJPiRF B'w?** '""' 4t>'!l St- E?** ?t 8:20.
11 *"** Matlncea To-day nnd Wod? 2:80.
WiLLiAM
GiLLETTE
BAKIUE'S
HK?T
COMUUY
DEAR
BRUTUS
G L O R F lr'v"5' ** 4'! ?*? Ews. atf-'O.
u1jVI>i:' Matuieea To-day A- Wed., 2:20.
OTIS ?i THEHONOR
SKINNER G8*? OF THE FAMILY
LYCEUM 1)'??' 45th St Ewnlnw at R it.
L.1VE.U1U Matliicro Tu-<lay & Tliurs.. 8:20.
DAVID BEI.ASCO Prsaents
COHAN&HARRB'
r4'Bio HiTSl
THEATRE W'jt42 5tS
COjiAN&HARRIS SK^
8PEC. MAT. TIKS.. MAR ??*-,
BIGGE5T 5UCCES5 SINci''
' "THE tIERRY WIDOW*
sROYALYASABOND
A C0HAN1ZED OPERA COrllOUE
? B THE CUTE LITTLE PLAY
9 THATTURNS^Efl AWAY
GepM COHAN
MATINKKS TO-DAY A.M) WKO.. 2:15.
The Laugbing Mimcal'Comedy Hit
Klaw & ErUiik-efa Kcvf Musical Hllarlty
Spec'l Hollrtay
Matinee Next
Tuesday at2:45
o
THE
LADY
RnnrilLWIUvniM'I'T FROUC
l\UUS TWO tNTIRElY DlFrERCNT SHOWS
I IDCDTV TTTEA, W. 42 Bt. Trs. ?:20.
a-IE?C!T*? I T Mstc Ti,-(inv & W?L, I 10,
S3T "TRITFMril ?- San.
Henry Miller, Blanche Bates
Holbrook Blinn, EsteHe Winwood
*A&r?2& "MOLIERE"
Special Holiduy Mat. Next Taeaday at S.
HENRY MILLER5.JNftF*;
in MIS'NELLYOFN'ORLEANS
ACotno?dy of Moon.shino
r.aanpSS Ond Mnke Beli.-?/e
IftMf". Af~DP ^5t13<,l'Nr-arBway
ITHf M05T FASC1NATING MYSTERY
PLAY EVER WRITTEN
THREE FACES EASI
?*.|h trnmclt Crrigan SVicJot nemm^
VICTORY DAY MAT. TUESDAY, 3 P. M.
LIGHTNIN
dAIFTY B'way, 415 Bt, Era. 8:30. Mat?.
vinic 1 i T.d.y_ jyjg Wed & },M^ g;30
AND ANOTHER SMITH & COLDEN HIT
3 WISE FOOLS
CRITERION ??*%" ?*??* ?-S
VIOTORY DAY MAT. TCESDAY, sV^Sfc
S^1fDA??i,^r-oadw'iy' ^ St- MAT. TO-DAY.
LEO DITRICKSTMN "SftSSS**
Next Wk.?Booth Tarktngton's "Periroil."
ft\ ***?"*? Wost ',stn St. Ev<??. 8:20.
VLUK I MU. Todoy & Wed., 2:20.
^fh<Be11er'0le
jr*S?? a If <*ith MR.?, MRS. CO&URN
Sl'EC'L MATINEE TITES.. MARCH 2?.
RFf AVf> w'"1* 44?' ""*??' EmiSnii ??'.??.
oc-rtjJVI/ Mathjew Tuday & Ihura. 2:20
FRANCES STARR
in'TlGERl TIGER!'7,^ ,;;;,y?:;
KNICKERROCKER T',:.ViT.ri MO ?
| Evs. ?:ir? Mats. TWay,'ttTESDAY& Wod 2?!}
JOHN COKTS ni:\v MUSICAL coinr?T
HARRIS ^^h^^l??
MATINEE TO-DAY at 2:30
THE 816 SENSATI0M
OFSFIRiT MYSTERY
GRIPS NEW YORK!
F0110WTHE CROWD T0
!THE INVISIBLE FOE
'77?r///s //??/? tite ro rhe
marrow" _ Dorothy af?
PUNCH&JIIDY iWi?,;?''?*" i'-'j*. J
runtno-juui matinee today. 2:30.
M\T STDABT tVAJLKEK PreoentM
rav The Book of Job
and The Tcnts of the Arsba,
NEXT WEEK ONLY. EverTE*. i 3 MaM. S?4rta
16. Mat?. Thure.. Fri. & Bat.. l!::.o Now.
PROM | gnlv\^t,
Draouti ic
Association
?
THE FIRST PE8SHISG SQUARE KQSICALE
? Commodore
Grand Ballroom, Wed. Eve., April 2, at8:30
Tha artists appt-aring on this occasion are:
Re;?crved seats, $.". and $3; Boxes, $r.O
(seatincr six), plus 10% War Tax. Mail or?
ders now recelvi tl at the offlce of th^ man
agement, It. E. Joliniiton, 1451 Broadway.
ANNUAL EXHIBI
I0NALA
OF DESIGN
Metropolitan Museum o! Art
FREE CONCERT T0-H3GHT
AT 8 O'CLOCK
Symphony Orchestra, under David Mannes. ' |
Xo tickets requlred. Museum open from 10
A. M. to 10:45 P. M. Restaurant until 8 P.M.
ITiaaildlldU Evs, R is I>iLst Mat Toilay, 2:J5. ,
Funnlrst Comedy ?->: Kecent Years
IAf ! A TAILOR-MADE MAN
TIMES with GRANT MITCBEIX
Always 600 Orchestra .S<-nts at Jl 00.
aEExE}< JANE COWL T& GROWDED HOUR ggj?'
215 WEST 57TH ST.
PAINTING
and
SCULPTURE
ADMISSiONi
IX l.l DK8 A
CENTURY THEATRE
Opening Monday Eve., Mar. 24
Tickets -Now On Sale nt Box Offlr*
The 27th Dhrision Player* Preient
i i
LET'S
IT"
Aeolian Ilnll. Thurs., Mar. S7, nt 3 r. M
80NG RECITAJL
MILDRED
MniMin-IIanilln
I'laitn
Tickets .50 to $2. Mgt. Winton-Llvincsto.l.
Aeolian IIuJI, Tuea. Aft., Marrh 2*>, at S:15
CURTISS
80NO
KECITA*L
CAROLINE
BcaU at rtox Offloo. Mgmenu It. E. I0EN8T0N
AEOLIAN II A L I? To-night at 8:10.
PIANO
UKCITA1,
MANFRED
MRt. Haensel & Jone?. Stelnway Piano.
WRITTFX AND RIIII VHM t> rX
I'K Aitov AND 1 1 MtDKM
CMr.r' Utu . Thaui
Th.- New v rk 1 ? ln ? -.-. i..
cess, "You Know Me, Al'i
Prloce 60c t<> s:. n.. War Tax.
Jtumeifle Ila(l, Mon.. >lar. 84. at B:3?
CAPT. AUN BOTT
lAuthor of "mvalrj
flouiln" on
AEOLIAN HALL, This Afternoon at 3.
ALLENEY
jjTi.k.-U j2 to U-- H.ii ytfin, m Mt??|tn.
(.aiucKie tl.ill, Tliur. .vtt.. fti jr. J., ut t
CAPT. H. G. 01LULAND
Three Years a Prisoner in t.ermanjr
"MY GERMAN" PRISONS"
Tl'-lirts |il tn r>0e at hot Oitlfr, .Asancta or
XU" J. B. Pond Lvr?iim Btl^^nn.
JANACOPULOS
Dlraotlon Catharlna A. Bamman. 6?ats SOs to 32.
OaMMffta Ilnll. THIS AFTKRNOON. at 8:30.
Boston Symphony Orchestra
II H N It I 11 MIA! ||
Conduotor
Tloknt? at Box Ofltca
RLS1K 1 KUC.t SON tn
The MiiniuKe vtum,m
* ? vl?l -M...11M1 l?.iv.>- s?l?ut?.
BVjy41"<'"t RIVOl I OKCHKNTH 1
lAI'M! "T1IK IIIHMl" by
?**???" CIIMtllK HIM'||?
TimMScuaralin "The r.?nU." Orch.
FRED STONE
"lohnny. Get Votir Ona.'*
60U)II?T8, ORCHMTKA,

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