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New-York tribune. [volume] (New York [N.Y.]) 1866-1924, May 15, 1919, Image 13

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Forces Marshalled
For Salvationists9
$13,000,000 Drive
Ceneral Yanderbilt Names
CJiairmen in 5 Boroughs
Who Will Lead Campaign
for N. Y.'s $1,300,000
Contribuh'ons to the Salvation Army's
Home Service Fund of $13,000,000 are
already begir.r.ing to arrive, iu spite of
the fact that the collection of donations
does not bogin officially until Monday.
A steady sttream of te'.egrams and lettera
pours into the campaign headquarters.
680 Fifth Avenue, piedging the support
of proruineat people all over the coun
try. . . ,
Yesterday the organization of the
local drive was practically completed
when Brigadicr General Cornelius Van
derbilt. chairman of the city committee,
announced the names of the five men
who will serve as borough chairmen.
They are: Manhattan, .loseph P. Day,
ol Nassau Street; The Bronx, Supreme
Court Justice George V. Mullen; Brook?
lyn, Stanley E. Gunnison, 31 Nassau
Street: Richmond, Frederick A. John?
ston, 252 Sf. Mark's Place, Tompkins?
ville, Staten Island; Queens, Clarence
W. Lowes. 257 Broadway, Flushing,
Long Island.
To help put over New York City's
quota of $1,500^000,000, Edward Higgins
and .Morris K. Parker. of the Equitable
Trust Company, were appointed yes
terday on the industrial committee
which will help Joseph P. Day. Co
uperating with the eity committee will
bc the women's committee, of which
Mrs. F. Gray Griswold ia chairman.
A letter from Major General Robert
Alexander, commander of the 77th
Division. was received yesterday by
Brigadier General Cornelius Vandcr
bilt. Its opening sentence read:
"On behalf of the 77th Division I
want to thank you for the wonderful
work that the Salvation Army has
done for the men of this division."
Members of the women's committees
nnr! speakers and workers in the cam?
paign will meet on Friday afternoon at
4:30 o'clock at the home of Mrs. Vin
cent Vstor, 850 Fifth Avenue. Four
hundred invitation cards were sent out
"BL0SS0M FESTIVAL"
ONLY iCE SKATiNG
SHOW iN NEW YORK
Dinner Shaw at 1:30
Knpper Show ;?t 11:30
LyrlcH kikI Music by
Kt'BKY COWAN,
Staged ??
WIM.l.VM SHARf.
IN T1IK
nixixr?nAxmo
KN i'KBTAINMKNT
FORMAL OPENING TO-NIGHT 1
THE LITTLE CLUB%
^ 44th St. Theatre Building g?
EL1ZABETH BRICEI
WIU Entertani Nightly After Theatre. i
A Dancin; acd Snpper Club of
Elegance and Dittinctioa. *"
Superlitive Cnitiac jy
DirectJen jm
GAILLARD T. BOAG g
APATCH of Columbus Circle is being
smoothed over by a gang of a
dozen laborers. It is a very small
patch, but tho laborers are probably
tho busiest in New York City. They
are working between and just outside
of the car tracks?also outside of the
safety zone. Crosstown cars make
their day's work just one pause after
another, while automobile *buses,
trucks and pleasure cars play like an
ineessant barrage about their eara.
For three days they have been un
ravelling tho pavement, and in five
days, according to the foreman, will
have restored it to a smcothness con
sistent with the gtlmmcring asphalt
around it.
yesterday. At the meeting Com?
mander Evangeline Booth will explain
what the Salvation Army plans to do to
meet new conditions which have fol?
lowed the war.
In the evening, following this meet?
ing, former Governor Charles S. Whit?
man and Mrs. Whitman will-give a din?
ner at the St. Regis in honor of Com?
mander Booth.
Bryan Seeks Election
As Presbyterian Head
.
Wann Race Proniised at St.
Louis Assembly of Church;
Merger To Be Considered
ST. LOUIS, May 14.?Unity of all
denominations, relations between capi?
tal and labor and a score of other large
issues will be taken up at the 131st
General Assembly of the Presbyterian
Church in the United States, which be
gins here to-morrow.
For the first time in the history
of the Church, a layman is eligible.
under legislation enacted at the last
(reneral assembly, to hold high of?
fice. A number of prominent lay
raen, including William Jennings
Bryan, have announced their can
didacy for the otfice of moderator,
the supreme head of the 1,500,000
followers of the Church in this coun?
try.
Mcrging of the. assemblies of tho
Northern and Southern churches in?
to a federal general assembly. as the
nations will be considered simulta
neously at the sessions here and at
those of the Southern Presbyterian
Church in New Orleans.
Other issues which will be up for
probable definite action will include
| new measures with which to relieve
! unemployment among returning sol
\ diers, for which the church has ap
propriated $500,000, and Bolshevism
and its causes.
A service flag with nearly 4,000 gold
stars, representing the number of
members of the Presbyterian faith who
lost their lives in the war, will be
displayed at the meeting, which will
continue until May 23.
?
Mrs. Roosevelt Home
After Visit to France
She Arrives From Genoa on
Liner Giuseppe Verdi and
Goes to Oyster Bay
Mrs. Theodore Roosevelt, widow of
the former President, arrived here
yesterday from Genoa on the steam?
ship Giuseppe Verdi. She visited the
grave of her son Quentin in France,
then went for a short stay with her
sister in Italy. Members of the fam?
ily found difficulty in meeting Mrs.
Roosevelt. When the Verdi arrived in
Quarantine it was thought that she
would go to Pier B, Jersey City, her
customary docking place, but she was i
sent to Pier 95, North Riveif. Later
she was ordered to proceed to Pier 48,
North River.
Among those who came to greet Mrs. !
Roosevelt were Lieutenant Colonel and j
Mrs. Theodore Roosevelt, Captain and
Mra. Archie Roosevelt, Mrs. Nicholas
LongwoTth and Captain and Mrs. Ker
mit Roosevelt. They were not permit
ted to enter the pier, and waited out?
side until Mrs. Roosevelt and her maid
were ready to start for Oyster Bay.
Mrs. Roosevelt said she had a rest
ful and pleasant voyage.
?
Craig Urges School Veto
Tells Governor Teachers* Pay
Increase Would Be 'Oppressive'
Comptroller Charles L. Craig has
written to Governor Smith expressing
yiolent disapproval of the bill increas?
ing the pay of teachers. Not only
j doe3 Mr. Craig term the measure "op
j pressive, illrconsidered and improvi
| dent," but he adds that its approval
would constitute a death blow to home
rule and would inflict an added burden
of $17,293,475 on the city.
He has still another objection: The
budget for 1922, he says. will be made
public during tho political campaign
of 1921, and the increase that this bill
proposes to force upon the city will
be charged against the administration
by its political opponents.
.' ?-?~?
10 U. S. Sub Chasers Reach
Charleston From Europe
CRARLESTON, S. C, May 14. -
Forty American naval sub-chasers,
with their mother ship, and four ocean
going tugs arrived here to-day from
Ei-rope bv way of Bermuda. They were
given a noisy welcome.
DANC
to* PLEASUHE
?a?r?MBR?emaaa
Dance Palaee at Terrace Garden
5Rth Street, Near Lexington Av.
?s now. coaaected with it* FAHOUS SUMMER GARDEN
r\nr**T aw~ A*[olrd">* P?tron? an
OPEN AIRDANCING PAVILION
The Only Open A it Ga\a^n-Coolelt Place in New York
3 le*"0M wit}l !?? 9^r,
<*md*tl Inttrurtor, ^?--,*^
/ L
fnyai; Letionj, Any Hour, Any D?y,
by Appointaent 'Phona Plaza 75
?*/j? UuhhrUwJ CcttU H?u,r Imlruciort in charge
'- Akoholir. Drinki Sold
W>Mt *rith
?jeil?tr}?aj ln,
?Jrtlft<?,n fa/
I 9 ui "';'*' '?. I'? /,. ?
TO 11
As Daaciag bat become
? popoiar, these cohtnuta
wiU appear ererjr Taesday,
Tkarfday aid Stradaj.
1
Dr. Conley Urges
Placing Hospitals
Under One Head
Charities Official Advocates
Radical Changes to Con
ference; Present System
Wasies Money, He Says
Radical changes in the conduct of
the city's hospitals, involving tho con?
trol of all hospitals by tho Department
of Charities, were advocated by Dr.
Walter H. Conley, acting general medi
cal superintendent of Blackwell's Isl?
and, Department of Public Charities, at
the annual conference of Charities and
Correction in the Russell Sage Foun
dation Building yesterday afternoon.
At present the hospitals are under
three different departments; the Chari?
ties Department controiling ten, the
Health Department five and the trus
tees of Bellevuo and Allied Hospitals
five. This is a wastage of city money,
according to Dr. Condey, inasmuch as
the three departments purchase the
same kind of supplies at different times
and under separate contracts.
Hospital Department Urged
The ideal form of hospital control,
he said, would be a Department of Hos?
pitals, under the jurisdiction of a
commissioner of hospitals. Tho dis
advantage of putting the hospitals
into politics, however, with the pioba
bility of a change of commissioner af?
ter every election, made it necessary to
abolish all hope for this sort of con?
trol.
"The next best proposition is a hos?
pital division in the Department of
Public Charities, in charge of a medi
cal director appointed from a civil
service list by the Commissioner of
Public Charities," Dr. Conley con?
tinued.
"ln this way the director would be
permanent and would not chanpre with
the chansp of administration in the
city. The hospitals themselves could
be divided into three divisions ? viz,
the general hospitals of Manhattan and
Bronx. the general hospitals in Brook?
lyn, Queens and Richmond and the
contagious hospitals. A deputy di?
rector should be in charge of each d;
vision and they should also be civil
service appointees.
"-My reason for placing this hospital
division under the Department of Pub?
lic Charities is that the Commissioner
of Public Charities is the poor officer
of the city of New York and he is em
powcred to make investigations in re
lation to city patients in the subsi
dized private hospitals, thus bringing
all hospital patients under the control
of one department. All hospitals are
charitable institutions, some more so
than others, and, for this reason, if
no other, should be administored by
the Department of Public Charities.
"My reason for not placing this as
n division of the Department of Health
is that the Commissioner of Health is
the health officer of the city, and, in
addition to his many other duties, has
jurisdiction over the prevention of diar
eases, and there his jurisdiction should
end. By this I mean that all disease
of a contagious nature should be re?
ported to the Department of Health,
and when found by the Department of
Health to be of this nature should be
immediately sent to a hospital in the
hospital department.
Mrs. Biggs Presides
"The chief function of the Depart?
ment of Health is to prevent disease,
and next to detect disease. The care
of the sick does not belong to the
Department of Health any more than
does the care of prisoners after they
have been arrested. The police pre?
vent crime and arrest criminab, but
the Correction Department carcs for
them after they have been sentenced."
Mrs. Herman M. Biggs, vice-presl
dent of the conference committee, pre
sided over the afternoon session.' The
other speakers were Miss Mary Tin
ney, chairman of the committee on
Pubhc Charities; Charles H. Johnson,
secretary of the State Board of Chari?
ties, the Rev. Robert F. Keegan,
secretary for charities to Archbishop
Hayes, and Dr. George O'Hanlon. gen?
eral medical superintendent of Bellevue
Hospital.
The evening session at Brooklyn
Chamber of Commerce was devoted to
the subject of dclinquency, the speak?
ers being Alexander McKinncy, Will?
iam Dean Embrec, counsel of the volun
tary defenders' committee; Mayer C
Goldman, Arthur W. Towne and Charles
J. Dodd, City Magistrate, of Brooklyn.
?-?-?Hl
State Food Commission
Abolishecl by Gov. Smith
Also, He Signs 36 Bills, Brinj
ing the Total of New Laws
Up to 614
^ ALBANY, May 14.?The State Food
Commission was abolished to-day by
formal proclamation of Governor
Smith. The office was created at the
extraordinary session of the Legisla?
ture in the summer of 1917, and Gov?
ernor Whitman was defoated twice i
his attempt to have his appointment of
George W. Perkins as commissioner
ratified.
Tho bill providing $200 scholarships
for 450 war veterans, of whom not
more than three are to be appointed]
from any assembly district, was
signed. So were the Lockwood bill con
tinuing the 10 per cent war bonus for
state employes for the balance of the
year in which peace is.declared, and j
the Fearon bill, provinding pay in
creases for state employes reeeiving
less than $2,500 a year in recognition!
of the increased cost of nccessitics.
Governor Smith also signed the
Machoid bill, r.ppropriating $5,000,0001
for highway improvements. Ho signed
thirty-six measures in all, bringing the
number of new laws this year u'pto 614.
Hylan Said to Plan Tax
Suit Against Flagler Estate
JACKSONVILLE, Fla., May 14.?J
! Should the State of Florida fail in its
, suits to collect $5,000,000 of taxes from;
?tho estate of the late Henry M. Flaj:-'
, ler, oil and railroad mairnalf>, Chair
; man Corbett of the St. John's County
; commission^rs announced to-day, Mny
' or Hylan of New York has given as
surances that tho litigation will be car?
ried on in New York.
Grovcr Whalen, secretary to Mayor
Hylan, yesterday afternoon said l lint
: he knew nothing of any contonipfcitod
| action against the Flagler estate in
this city. Mayor Hylan could not bo
reached.
Little Club Rcopcns To-night
The Little Club is going to have nn
Other opening to-night under tho man
ngement of Gaillard Boag. As the open
l in<f of tho club and tho resumption
of rncing in theso parts occur on tho
namo day, Mr. Boag has extonded an
lnvltatlon to the utowardn of tho Motro
politnn Jockcy Club to be gueats of
tho club. Special numbers will include
Klizftbeth Brlce and Will Morrlaaoy, of
tho "Toot flwoet" company, Adrlenno
Doro, Martin Culhane, Veronica Mar
qul?n and Thelma Carlton.
l'lioto by Bachrach
Announcement was made recently
of the engagement of Miss Kath
arine E. Wales, daughter of Mr. and
Mrs. Charles M. Wales, of 410 liiver
side Drive, to Ensign Rowland
Bowne Haines, U. S. N., son of Mr.
ancl Mrs. Franklin Haines, of this
city and Brewster, N. Y. Miss
Wales is a member of the senior
class of Smith College. Ensign
Haines was a student at Columbia,
Class of 191.9, when he enlisted in
the navy.
Miss Etelka Riley to Wed
Becomes Bride of Lieutenant J.
L. Piland on Saturday
Miss Etelka Berrien Riley, daughter
of Mr. and Mrs. Lester H. Riley, will
be married to Lieutenant Julius Lynch
Piland on Saturday afternoon in St.
John's Church, Larchmont. The cere?
mony will be performed by thc Rev.
Richard Cobden. A reeeption will fol?
low at thc home of lhe bride's grand
parents, Mr. and Mrs. F. F. Proctor, at
Larchmont. The bridesmaids will be
Miss Flora Piland, sister of the bride
groom; Miss Margaret Bennett, Miss
Lyda Belle Bennett, Miss Helen Lee
and Miss Alice Brevoort Towle.
Lieutenant Robert Leonard Johnson,
of West Point, will serve as best man.
Miss Ballard Engaged
Mr. and Mrs John T. Ballard, of
Bloomfield, N. J,, announce thc engage?
ment of their youngest daughter, Miss
Margaret Eveland Ballard, to George
Bennett Hanford, jr., youngest son of
Mr. and Mrs. George Bennett Hanford,
also of Bloomfield, formerly of East
Orange. Miss Ballard took an active
part in the Bloomfield Red Cross
Motor Corps during the war,
Miss Rierden a Bride
Miss Marietta Elizabe.th Rierden,
daughter of Mrs. Anne Rierden, was
married at 5 o'clock yesterday after?
noon at her home, 11 East Eighty
seventh Street, to Lawrenee Frederick
Krantz, of this city. Thc bride, who
wore a travelling suit of blue, was at
tended by her sister, Miss Vernon
Rierden as maid of honor. Frederick
Bridwell Kraft served as Mr. Krantz's
best man.
Weds Daughter of General
Miss Susannc Belin, daughter of
General Emilc Eugene Belin, president
of the Interallied Suprene War Coun?
cil at Versailles, will be married to?
day in Paris to Lieutenant Robert \V.
Neeser, U. S. A., son of Mrs. John G
Neeser of this city. Lieutenant Neeser
received the Medaille de la Recon
naissance from thc French government
He and his bride will come to New
York in September.
Laing Made Supreme Justice
ALBANY, May 14. -County Judge
Phillips A. Laing fif Buffalo, was ap?
pointed justice of the Supreme Court
by Governor Smith to-day. He suc
jceeds the late Herbert P. Bissell. The
Governor also named Georgo B. Burd
of Buffalo, as county judge of Erie
County in succession to Judge Laing.
?-.
Last Horse-Drawn fire
Engine Out of Conimi3sion
Manhattan has seen the lasi of lhe
horse-drawn fire engine. Tho sole sur
vival of this type went out of exist
enco last night when the horses were
led from their stablcs in Engine Com?
pany No. S, Fifty-first Street, between
Third and Lexington Avenues, which
was organized in 1863. Captain Josoph
Donovan and the members of tho com?
pany stood about mournfully as agents
from the training station of the fire
department. took away Dalmuth, Ajallon
and Colonel, who had drawn the engine,
ond Sandborn and Boss, who ran be?
hind them wilh the fender.
oy lYiusic & Song
aml hear i h
The Salvation Army
"It Maa? Good ln i ho War."
Speakers: Vi<:e-Pre8ident Thomas
R. Marshall, Gov. Alfred E. Smitli,
Gen. Cornelius Vanderhilt, Hon. I
Charles S. Whitman, Commander I
F.vangeline Booth, Bishop Luther \
B. Wilson and the Rev. H. Pcreira
Mendes.
Madnme Marie Sundelius,
rtraniatlc aopr&no, 'i Metropolltan
npfrn. House ??nsatton, v.ili Hlnt;.
Mr. Cnmilien
will i-.-ui the
People's Liberty Chorus
IMtoS^ Garden
Puiuiuy. m:to v. M., Maj is. ioio,
No BJnt.rn.nfo Feo?No Coltaction,
TlekAtS en ui'iiItenHnn.
P. A. '''miipiiliiii Iti'.-i'l'iuiirlnrs, ?
?*0 Fifth Avunui, Now York.
Plays and Players
Because ole Bwimmin' holes are un?
known quantities, especially in New
York, the Rotary Club BUggested to
the Friars that a benefit be given to
raise a fund for underprivileged boys.
The Friars in their big hoarted way
immediately took hold, and the benefit
will be staged at the Lexington The?
atre Sunday night, May 18. Among
those who have volunteered to appear
are William Cillier, Sam Bernard,
Emmet Corrigan, the "Toot Sweet"
company, including Elizabeth Brice and
Will Morrisscy; Doyle and Dixon,
Sophie Tucker and her Six Kings of
Syncopation, Louise Dresser, Jack
Gardner, Blancho Ring, Charles Win
ninger, Jack Goldberg's "Juvenile Re
vue," Bert Levy, Eddie Cantor, Stan
Stanley, the Three Kitamuras, Ernesto
Caronna, "Chic" Sale and a minstrel
show composed of two hundred small
boys of the streets coached by George
M. Cohan and other Friars. Arrange
ments for the staping of the show are
in the haruls of William Morris. Fred
Block, S. Jay Kaufman and Jess Dandy.
Paul Nicholson, the "Sergeant Jim
Doolittle" in "Come Along," is doing
his best?or worst?to live up to the
name of his role. Ho enjoys full re
laxation, even to the extent of making
his wife, whose stage name is Angie
Xorton, act as chauffeur while he rides
^erenely in the rear seat of his car.
The chauffeur game is mighty trying
on Mrs. N. at times, but she can have
her job for life, and that thought con
soles her.
Winchell Smith and John L. Golden
announce the following east for "Sun
rise," by Pearl Franklin and Elia Peat
tie, which opens in Atlantic City Mon?
day. Alphonz Ethier, Wilson Day,
Chester Morris, Malcolni Bradley, Hor
aco James, Benjamin Kauser, Andre
Aubry, Joo Woodburn, Charles McDon
ald, Charles Althor'f. Sylvia Field, Mar
ion Kerby, Marie Day, Dorothy Gray,
Constance Beaumar and Liela Bennett.
After to-morrow evening's perform
ance, Sam Bernard will withdraw from
the east of "Friendly Enemies," Charles
Winninger, who piayed the role on the
road, will succeed him.
"Broken Blossoms," the initial offer?
ing of the l>. W. Griffith repertory sea?
son at the George M. Cohan Theatre,
will be continued for a second week
with daily matinees,
The 350th Field Artillery, "Black
Devil" Band of seventy pieces, led by
Lieutenant J. Tim Brymn, will give its
first New York concert at the Casino
Theatre Sunday night.
The Argonne Players will present,
"The Amex Revue of 1.919" at the Lex?
ington Theatre the week of May 19.
The Greenwich Village Players will
close their season at the Greenwich
Village Theatre Saturday night.
The Theatre Guild will continue
"John Ferguson," at the Garrick
Theatre next week.
Richard O'Brien. professionally
known as Richard Garrick, is going
oversees as n Knight of Columbus sec?
retary.
George White's "Scandals of 1919"
will open at the Liberty Theatre
June 2.
William A. Brady and Grace George
have arrived in England.
Oliver Railey will increase the dopth
of the Fulton Theatre stage tifteen
feet, so that it will aceonimodate a
A Soldier Says
<<nPHE league of nations is a step in
the right direction." says Me-'
chanic A. W. Woodall, who served in
France with the 114th Ammunition
Train and is now at Debarkation Hos?
pital No. 3. "As it now stands, of
course, the league cannot prevent war,
for it doesn't bind any nation not to
fight and it doesn't forbid large armies
and navies. ' But it makes it necessary
for each nation to give notice before
it declares war, and it therefore may
develop into a real peace league.
"I believe in universal military
training if it doesn't begin when the j
fellows are too young. No boy under I
eighteen should be trained. The army j
makes a man a machine and kills his !
power to think for himself. That I
means that if young boys aro turned [
into .soldiers before they know how to
think for themselves they'll never!
learn to use their brains."
musical comedy that will be produced
there this fall.
"Bnd" Marray is out of the army and
in "Monte Cristo jr."
Mrs. Charles G. Craig has been en
gaged for "A Regular Feller."
Helen Hoerle, formerly press agont,
has been appointed manager of "Our
Pleasant Sins," at the Belmont
Theatre, and is tho only woman
manager on Broadway.
On the Screen
"Auction of Souls" Gives Har
rowing GHnipse at Arme
nian Atroeities
Why must every tragedy become a
war of the sexes when it appcars on
the screen? Is it not just as brutal to
shoot, starve or stranglo a child of
three, or an old woman of seventy, as
it is to do the same thing to a bcau
tiful maiden of eighteen?
Then why could not "Ravished Ar
menia" remain "Ravished Armenia?"
Why "The Auction of Souls?" As far*
as we could see there was no auction '
of souls, and can souls be auctioned?
Auction of bodies there. was aplenty,
but all of the Armenian girls so auc?
tioned off died, vowing their allegiance
to their own church. Their souls
seenud to remain singularly un
touched.
If one's knowledge of war were
gleaned merely from the dramas which
aro shown on the screen one would
doubt if these vandal warriora have
time for anything save dragging beau
tiful maidens about by the hair.
"The Auction of Souls" tells the
story of Aurora Mardiganian. Sho her
self plays the leading role. lrving
j Cummings plays opposito her as the
j shepherd boy who linally saves her
| from the Kurds.
The picture tells of the atroeities.
I committed by the Turks in Armenia. It
j was directed by Oscar Apfel.
The photography is excellent and
> some of the scenes are beautiful and
J picturesque, but most of it vj, extremely
harrowing, and it runs for more than
an hour and a half. II. U.
Police Lunchroom Opened
Commissioners Customers for
Home-Made Apple Pies
With a dozen home-made apple pies
made by ,Mrs. Hylan as ttie chief ex
hihit, the Police Department lunch
rooni opened for business yesterday on
tho fourth floor of Police Headquar?
ters. Three hundred patrons ale their
noonday meal and paid ;S0 or 35 cents
for the food.
Among those who lunched there were
Police Commissioner Enright, Second
Deputy Commissioner Lahey, Third
Deputy Commissioner Porter and Miss I
Alma O'Hara, sister-in-law to Mayor
Hylan, who is employed1 as executive
secretary at Headquarters.
AMERICA'S rOKJCMOST T1IEATRES AND HITS UXDEK T11K DIRECTION OI
LEE & -5. J- SHUBERT
W5NTER GARDEN ^enMY*
MATINEE TO-DAV AT 2.
_2_
'ADiamond Mine of Eniertainmcnt'
-Stcphrn Rathbun, Bv
|| J U jY ^YBSTY IMILJfir.V.ltV.t
MOROSGOrT1^ To-night at3:30
<#<"?'? CWTL'Ry GROVE ftOQr'OFCEfflWr THfATW
-^l?MIDN!QHTWHIRB.
^^^a* AT IITJO.- A SEiNSATIOM-fHOnt COL. 6500
&J '1QTU QT Tli"n" '"'? B'w<w Eves'
% il3 I fi Ji I > Mats. Wed. qiuI Bat?
sssa* ,"39
ewesl Comedy ^^
llli Henry llull and Conatan
s
!?
A New Farce Comedy by Paul M. J.'ott<?r.
Nora Bayes Jftfc"- &* *g- *??&
EHiabeth Brics '"' 'Too, Sweet'
Musical inorael ti'.letl wltli girls and glnger.
aUnecs Wednesday and Sat.. 2:1,1
World: "it haa effervescence, eayet;
anil sparkle."
Wltli Adelo Rowland ami DJstlngulshed Oast.
Herald: "It raisoa tho buoyant aplrita
of Broadway. Rudlatea vltality."
Sun: "it movea unflasgingly; flow3
melodlousl v."
A BREEZY, BUOYANT, BUEBLiNG
MUSICAL OUTBURST
VANBERBILT ?& \&*???- !:&
1 KMA, A LITTLE JOURNEY
th t'.vril Keightlcy and Ethel Dane.
West 42d St. K?cs. nt S:30.
Matlnces Sat. & Wod , 2 30.
|g||PLAYHOUSE
With NORMAN TREVOR
KK.VZ. COMKIIS
nt the (OMKi)V THEATRE
?list St.. Near" R'wuy.
Hv.i. 8:30. Mats. To-day & Sat.
W, 4.?th. Kvgfl. ot 8 SO.
Mat.-. Wed. & Sat , 2:30.
S"J TX.?lf?C Wost. 42d St. Evr.nlnuf,
CLMPiUti Mata. Sat. & Wod, (i'm
,,,,.. ?_. Iltli St. Evonlnga nt 8:18
i'lUU&UPJ MaUneoa Sat. and Wed.
EOUIS
SAM BERNARD &
r>th, B. "f B'way. Gresley 1532
Ma
Oulld Preaonts Brvino's
BUOU
"Tho most Interesting nlgUt of tho
year In the theatre."
Charlea Darnton, Eve. World.
1 Run Extended Till May 24th.
IT HAPPENS
5 EVERYBODY
Thea.. 44, \V. of B'y. Ev 8:30. Last 4
Last ilatnieo Saturday, 3:30. [Times.
FOR DIANA
\vuh MARTHA HEDMAN
PLYMOUTH^^^'^,,^"--;,!
Kome"- barrymore "yEs?v
I ol B'l ly Kfss ' ? 1(1
To-day and Sal . .: 30
; 8:15, Mata.
I. & Sat,, 2:15.
i>? comedy
Wltli ARTHUR BVROM
Margaret r,AWRENCE
PRBDERIOK I'KIUSV
tina CTrnora st
MAXiNE ELLJ0TT5
"?>.'.: Wed a 3St at?30
|44TH ST. &ec^WedB'amisM8; 2:1:1. j / ARTHUF HAMMERSTSIN" HITS \
Qreezioat
Musleul Play
lafceJipomHe
?ft$T is WI5T
With FAY BAINT?ft
A5T0R IKTC&fSU.'fa
Mallnr-oa Wod. ainl Saturday,
8 LOVE YOU *.. l.
HARON.
'TIip Hoist Varrc of tho Yenr."?Herald.
rillTAil Wc?* 4?Ul St. F.V*1 at R:8I>.
rULI V/IM ' M?tj s.,tm,i?T ? \v?f)., 3:Io.
Olivor ttorOacoH WSIrrwIitd Paren
PLEASE GET MARRIED
with Ernejl Truex and rdith Tdliafono
6IG MUSICAL CCMlE/.SPiftVI
6ELV/yN TMEATRt
Cft5IN0 THtATRE
DREICER&CO
eatu
L
yj, SUPERB SPECIMENS-LOOSE, SET AND AS MECKUCiS
m PRECIOUS STONES OF UNUSUAL FORMS
i>^^agi^t=g^3=^^oiVSjg?'" ? ****??* ?iii Bsig^^.T-k'."-.^-~'.'s.-?XJv^^y' la^y:~
^SSSSBStBBBBBtB
Francis W. K. Crowninshield
Tells School of Dcsign Gradu
ates To Be Sales women
Francis W. K. Crowninshl'ld made
an address at the class day cxercises
of the New York School of Ap?
plied Dcsign for Women, yesterday
afternoon. He urged the graduating
class to aim at originality in their
work and to keep in mind the prac
tical side of their career. Mr. Crown
inshield said that far too many young
women sat complacently in their
studios, waiting for orders, instead of
undertaking a vigorous campaign,
while an hour's thought upon the re
quirement3 of a given newspaper or
magazino, followed by the intelligent
presentation of several ideas, might
result in acceptance, famc and fortune.
Among the pri/.e winners at the
opening of ihe current exhibition of
the work done by the school were June
Evans, Sophie Gollick, Thelma von
Boeckniann,, Elizabeth Kohn, Ava
Jordan, Helen Townsend. Ella Speer,
Florence Pomeroy, May Breman, Mii
drud Morton, and Ruth Poolman. Cer
tiflcates were presented to the grad
uates.
The exhibition, which will remain
open until Sunday afternoon, includes
examples of work in object drawing,
rlower drawing, flower painting, east
drawing, elementary design, advaneed
design, elementary historic design, the
applieation of design to the manu?
facture of wall paper, and textiles, the
application of elementary instruction
to the work of an arjehitect's drafts
man, to interior decoration and iJlus
tration, and. also work illustrative of
the advaneed coursea rn" poster de?
sign, commercial art and fashion il
lustration.
The first showing and sale of French
arl brought to New York by the
Camtessc de Fontenailles, will take
plate this afternoon at tho Kingore
Galleries, 24 East Forty-sixth Street.
This exhibition is for the benefit of
the Hospital Militaire Saint Nicolas
dTssy-lcs-Moulineau, of Paris, where
the comtesse has been a voluntary
nurse during the whole period cf the
war. Some of the pictures were made in
.prison camps. They are so recenl
that they represent the celebration of
the armistice. The proceeds of the
sale will go to the hospital and to tho
impoverished families of French artists
killed or wounded on the iiield of
battle.
The pictures covor a wide range
and are unusually interesting. Many
are pastels and chalk drawings. Among
the painters represented are Georges
Migot, Domergue, Jauas, Mignot,
Girard Cochet, Cahuet-Levieil (minia
tures), Mme. Desbordes-Jouas, Chris?
tian Froge and Maurice Comallier.
The bookbinding artists represented
include Kieffer, Heller and Rollir.ce.
Over thirty posters, including the first
mobilization posters of Paris and fa
colleetion of ten acquarelles of fiags
Sale Days TO-DAY (Tkursday), Fri?
day and Saturday, at 2 P. M.
Ia SILO'S
Fifth Ave.
Art Galleries
40East45*hSt.
S. W. Cor.
Vanderbilt Ave.
Jiiti\<>? I*. SUlo * Son, Auct}one#rs.
A MOST INTERESTING SALE OF
DECORATIVE AND USEFUL
Household Furnishtngs
Bv order of
M, fcX Kagel, M. H. StMnbaa-lt, \T.
Drake an-.i Mrs, Walter Mulliiirr, StaV
^m?ww ? ?iiiwi p iuMwa?a?a?mmmmmwmmm?
The I'AJNTIMiS wttl b<* bo!<1 on
l'?i;):.v Afteruoon, >lt?> 1*3, at 4.
taken from the Germans on the bsttle
field, are features of the cxhibit,
The total for the sale of English
literature from London, at the Ander?
son Galleries yesterday afternoon wa*
$18,640.50. G. D. Smith paid $550 for
a first edition of Ben Johnson's
"Poetaster"; $830 for a copy of the
Kelmscott Chaucer; $300 for Kneller's
"The Beauties"; and $50S for Luther's
sition of Salomon's Booke
Called Ecclesiastes of the Preacher."
Other sales were Persian illuminatod
manscript, J. F. London. $410; Horne's
"History of Napolcon," W. H. Wilkes,
i; Milton's "Paradise Lost>*? G.
Wells, $325.
The trustees of the Mctropolitan
Museum of Art gave a reception to
delegates and members of the Ameri?
can Federation of Arts and their
friends, ln tho Pierpont Morgan Hall
of the museum last evening. The first
session of the tenth annual convention
of tho federation will take pluce tht?
morning, when "War Mcmoriahs" will
be discussed by Charles Moore, chair?
man, general committee on war
memorials, Edwin H. Blasfield, N. A.,
and Frederick L. Olmsted, A. I. A.
[Army's Religious Policy
Attacked by Minisler
Southern Baptist ObjecLs to the
Y. M. C A. Taking Charge of
Things in Bi*j Camps
ATLANTA, Ga.. May 14.-~The atli,
i tude of the War Department toward
| denominational religious work in the
j army training camps was criticised by
? the Rev. J. B. Gambrell, of Texas, pres
I ident of the Southern Baptist Conven
; tion, in an address here to-clay.
i Dr. Gambrell declared "the religiour.
J war work policy of the povernment
| whs framed in a spirit of bitter disre
j gard for the religious rights of a vaBt
I majoi'ity of the civilian population of
; the country and the rights of a great
? majority of the soldiers in the army."
He conderniied especially tho atti
tude ef the department in turning over
to tho Y. M. C. A. the reUgious" work
of the various Protestant denomina
tions.
Dr. Gambrell was reelccted bv the
convention, which for tho first time in
the history of the Church admitted
women a.s delegates on an equality with
men.
WfUJAM
GJLLETTE
BE B'way and 40Ui SL Evrs. m 8:20.
?efe" Matinecs Sal i laj & Wod., 2:20.
N'KW YORK'8 LEADING THEATHES AND BUCCE8BBI
f NEW AMSTERDAM ??*??:?
The Musical Show of 1000 Lasigh*
TBE KL*W & KRI.AMJKIC'S GAI.IOF
OF IT N AM) JUHflDT**
UARRIK'S
BEST
COIIEDT
BLAK
BRUTUS
GLOBE. Ev.8:15 Mts Wed (Pop.)&Sat.
"Aiiutiicr Ch;iri.'.s Dlllingham Musi?
cal Co::;cdy Trlumph." -Etc. Sun.
"She's & GqocS FeJto"
BI0GE5T SUCCESS SINCE
1Lf>D|? '!r'i-?'??'''vi v-'-it'tP. St-^
1 Eve? 830 Mats Thurs & Sat 0.3O
1 # m MSS'KClLY^FHlOISXiAiiS
fjLQKGACRE ?&&<*
i U05T FA'CtNATlttO MTSTraY PV.'.V EV?R WRITTCN
j_ fpif. fs&CIS
L B lilEWiVJ Mata TO-DAY and Kat.. 2:
MATINEE TO-DAY AT 2:20.
DAVID BELASCO Prescr.ts
MCSIC BY VICTOK HKRBERT
9QMKIIEVK?
'niDlfldriT FRQJJC
COHAHTHEA.
B'way & 43rd Str?-ct
2:40?Twlcc Daily?8:40
NOW I'l.AYLNG
GEO.
M.
D. W.
SRIFFITH
RTOTORY
sfason *Broken Blossoms
"MOST BEACTIFCX 1IOTIOV riCT
i I RE \\ K EVEH HA\ E SEKX Ofct EVER
icxbei t xo m:k."?tribcxk.
LIGHTNIN
". 4??1 S* MAT. TO-MOR'W
nn al 8 10 'FRIDAY). 2:30.
SMITH-GCLDEN SUCCLSSES
st 44th Rl Ei ? ? '
ts. TO ;>A\ and Sat ,
MATS. TO-H \'i ."
TO-MORROW &
TIMES ? SEiAVath.
TONY SARG'S WONDERFUL. UN1QUE
?nHONETTES
-THE ROSE & THF. RINQ"
*PUNCH"& JUDY?H^?Vw&
hSRITERSQH Bvl
^r
GOOD ORCHESTRA SEATS AT $2.00
^Jgi^lSTOWN with MR.6V MRS. COaURN
..KNiGKEHBGCKER KJVM*
Mat aeei Bal avd Wed., :!.lj.
JOli.V luKt.s NEW Ml SICAE C'CUfEDY
i
ar
THEATRE,
Bi oadway
? Ual 8t.
DIRECTION 5'>- S. MOSS
'BAFFEES COMPARJSOX." Eve. M:i.U.
with 'BLANGNE SWEET
Pallv, Inol. Sunday, Noon to 13 P M
[ LOEW'S New York Theatre ft.M
? cont, II \ M to : I P. M. Roo? to 1 A. M.
PEGGY llYl.ANI), "Tlie Miss Adveaturc"
SYLTA
X BOYS
rXG cr over*
UOl.I.Y COXNQEEY.ota.
nml AI.A.N KifOOKS.
R8. F. KEITH'SI IRJBNE BQRDONI
I'/KRSIDF * MEl T. tilTZ-RICB.
B'wij & 'JCUi St i HUSMT, Mjer? & .Noon.
M8P?V R?F^? 9 NORMA TAI.M Mlt-K
HBEsSiB"a>'? I "? "THE NK? HtlOX"
? , ^ ," ICIYOI.l OlKHKSiTRA
tH1?. 5 iR'SV-fl* Al.!. ('(IMCllV H1LL
H?"*^T?"V f'??ir???? tluM>li-i. ??. ft
Mrn. istdnoy !>:?<??, orcli.
BEST flioro
Loew's Americaa Roof %?-?; ^ f&
Stun StfUtley, Xitt C'nrr | All Siilln
& 7 othor* ln tho Theatre: Reaorved
"AUCTION OF SOULS," 185,35.80
Hott'l Dta Artlsl
SVSBA
Simdny Evt>., May l?. 9:15,
V0TICHENK0
With ROSHANAKA. LYD1A rKlU.lSON
an<l OOROTIIY KOI US,
Soats $n.r?o tn %?>. l Weat siUi PUona <*<>l. ?ipo.
GREENWICH r'K^vV:^ ,
Ba-agar shakuntala
columbia Efiws? lar^a^
Mats. :!:S0.
li'way. rw . v !>aY.
!5-50o. Evf. ? ., ;>?-si.?o.
Last 3 Mstinee*
Ust 3 Wifrati
| 3f |.r'.?tl>sl Sljfntai
' fvrr Knc*n ln Th?
Tho?tr?.
6W9S ?,
"MARYPlCKFOfib

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