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New-York tribune. [volume] (New York [N.Y.]) 1866-1924, July 13, 1919, Image 35

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NEWS AND NOTESOf1EaYS=AND FLAYERS
Hall Caine's "Woman"
. No Martyred Saint
By Virginia Tracy
"The Woman Thou Gavest Me" has
exactly one idea. This is inferred in
the title, and every inflection of every
scene, sub-title and close-up reaffirms
and brands it in. This idea is that
Mary McNeill is a saint, martyred in
marriage.
Would any one like to know how the
picture proves this? Just what hap?
pens to Mary 7 And how does the saint
endure her martyrdom?
Well, in the first place, Mary does
have a highly disagreeable father.
This father forces her to marry the
villain while the man she loves is ex?
ploring the North Pole. Just the luck
of so clinging a girl as Mary to love an
explorer! The villain is, as Mary says,
a "libertine," eager to spend her money
on an adventuress. But if you ask
how, after all, Mary's father could pos?
sibly force her to marry him, we must
answer that we don't know. She never
attempts to defy the tyrant with a job
as a typist or a telephone girl, nor does
it ever occur to her that, even in her
Ophelia-like helplessness, at least she
herself might her quietus make by just
falling into the river. No, when it
comes down to being made outragsously
uncomfortable at home or marrying the
libertine, Mary chooses the libertine
And we all pity her. For, to this day,
Ophelia comes welcome and privileged
?into our sympathies, being limp but
lovely. The whole village pities her,
and she certainly looks most beautiful
in her wedding dress, and the exquisite
acting of her during the ceremony and
the expression on the lower lip of
Theodore Roberts, as the father, goes
a long way toward justifying anything
she does. Then the libertine bears her
off. And the audience thrills and
shivers and thinks, "Now for it!" And
martyrdom is in the air.
And there it stays.
For by the mere ceremony of mar?
riage Mary is changed from Ophelia
into a character beside whom Lady
Macbeth would have been a shrinking
and procrastinating person. When her
husband comes to her room and starts
1 to kiss her, Mary, feeling instinctively
that he is apt to attempt such a lib?
erty, and wrapping herself in her flow
? ing draperies to her very throat, is
ready to repulse him. Whereupon the
husband says: "Well, if you feel like
this about it we will be wed in name
only." And Mary wraps herself in her
draperies to the tip of her nose and
locks her door. We hope nobody sup?
poses that Mary brightens up at all
over this capitulation of the husband
or shows any weak relaxing in disdain.
She knows her business as a martyred
saint too well for that.
Mary and her husband in name only
go to Cairo, where she accompanies him
to the races with the expression of a
stained glass window on a cloudy day.
There the husband meets his advent?
uress and Mary meets her explorer, the
husband wickedly becoming more cheer?
ful and Mary saintily becoming more
martyred. That night-Mary and the
explorer sit out in the moonlight, and
he holds her hand and leans his head
with the holiest tenderness upon her
hair. In this attitude they look up and
behold the husband leaning his head
with the utmost villany toward his
adventuress and kissing her. And
Mary and the explorer leap to their
feet and stand glaring at each other,
awestruck with what Mary has suf?
fered and with the wickedness of the
world.
The husband, seeing himself discov?
ered, leaves for India next morning,
taking his adventuress with him.
Whereupon Mary decides to live her.
own life, draws off her wedding ring,
throws It out of the window and takes
a holier vow in the arms of her true
love; thus another lap in her saintly
martyrdom is passed.
But the explorer must return imme?
diately to the North Pole, and as the
English divorce law requires the vil?
lain to add blows to infidelity, Mary,
with great force of character, retires
to the south of France, where she can
get a divorce for mere infidelity, and
bear the explorer's child in peace.
Here, after the baby is born, Mary's
wicked father bursts in upon her, try?
ing to insult and bully her into giving
up her child and going back to her hus?
band, and Mary, quite properly, puts
him straight out of the house, lower lip
and all. Her disposition has, indeed,
been growing more and more precipi?
tate, and when she reads in the morn?
ing paper that a piece of the explorer's
ihip has been picked up and that all on
board are probably lost she does not
wait for so much as the evening edi?
tion, but instantly buys her mourning,
and, taking her child in her arms,
plunge? at one desperate step from
Fra?ee to England and the depths of
poverty.
What became of the money upon
which, up to the moment of that
plunge, Mary had _een living in such
charming style in France? Perhaps
"he spent it all on the mourning.
Otherwise, since she must have made
-
at least something at the various jobs
she lost after she reached England, !
we do not understand how, in the
space of two montha^she is brought to
such a pass that she cannot get medi?
cine for her sick child. Mary, how-1
ever, knows her business as a martyr i
better than we do. To that pass she j
does come, and seeing out of her win- i
dow at night women stopping men on ?
the street she realizes at once that
there lies the final step for a saintly
martyr and out she goes. By a fortu?
nate, if remarkable, chance the first
man she speaks to is the explorer, who
at first looks a little jarred, but who
has enough dramatic instinct to realize
that this is what Mary is to be
brought to by the wickedness of the
villain and the marriage laws, before
tho picture "can end. Happily, he h-s
loads of money?none of which it had
occurred to him to settle on Mary be?
fore he went to the North Pole, no?
toriously a risky trip?and as Mary
has her divorce ready tfey are mar?
ried and live happily and in the midst
of luxury ever after, although we
can't help thinking the explorer must
feel a little nervous every time he
has to leave home. If the first time
he, went away he returned to find
Mary driven to marrying a libertine,
and the second time, he returned to
find her driven' to streetwalking, it
seems as if he might well wonder what
his next absence might drive her to.
But, of course, in marrying a profes?
sional saint and martyr he must have
been prepared to take some risks.
Only, we should be glad to have any
one show us what martyrdom Mary
suffered through anything but not hav?
ing enough money. And we fail to see
how this lack was the fault either of
the marriage laws or of the villain.
As a firm, strong-minded modern
woman who knew what she wanted and
went after it and got it, we are ready
enough to applaud the picture's Scotch
Mary McNeill, but as the sympathy
catcher for which she is designed she
somehow proves not a circumstance tc
the book's unpretentious little Irisr
Mary O'Neill, who, as readers of the
foregoing synopsis may be interestec
to hear, never threw ther wedding rinf,
out of the window, never denied tha
she stood in mortal sin, never got <
divorce and never married the ex
plorer.
Hall Caine, his book being a life-and
death attack upon indissoluble mar
riage, first makes his heroine a Romai
Catholic and then doubly binds he
with the marriage laws of England
The picture, eager for the publicity be
longing to a-book which is a life-and
death attack upon anything, is equall
eager not to attack anybody; it neatl
i cuts out any sense in Mary's martyi
?dorn by cutting out her religion an
I then by taking only one faint slap s
the English marriage laws, rightl
judging these to be of rather remot
interest to a public which has ri
joiced all winter in Cecil De Mille
picture-scries of blythe adventures i
divorce. But, though it is a thing mai
agers nover will believe, you canni
eat your cake and keep it; you canni
make your heroine a sympathy catche
through the miseries of indissolub
marriage and yet hand her her divon
on, so to speak, her wedding night.
Hugh Ford has had this nonsen
beautifully produced and photographei
Beulah Dix's scenario contrives a tec
nical triumph of mere progresan
which urges' on your otherwise u
founded interest and the staggerii
varieties of place?Scotland and Ind
and the North Pole and the Londi
slums?instead of jarring and haltii
the illusion, as they too often do, a
so managed as to encourage, quick.
and sustain it?this, of course, beii
really an essential beauty of movi:
picture movement. As for the actir
we used to think that Theodore Re
erts had made such admirable crutch
of his mannerisms that he would nev
I be able to take another step withe
?them, but observe the magnificence
his stride now he has thrown Ihi
all away! Poor Jack Holt has
ways to play villains because he or
played a German. But certainly
plays them exceedingly well, and w
should we pity him when we see M
ton Sills weighted down with the de
corpse of a hero and doing as well
?possible with nothing whatever to rj
! Katherine Macdonald puzzles U3 as
I how she escapes registering joy eve
I time she looks in the mirror, but i
I imposes Mary's martyrdom upon
with a mournful loveliness which gi
some arrestive hints of better thin
__.- #? .
IVew Manager for Strand
Moe Mark, president of the M;
Strand Theatre Company, has appoi
ed Jack Eaton managing director
the Strand Theatre, to succeed Jost
L. Plunkett, who has the Famous PI
ers-Lasky.
Mr. Eaton is leaving Town and Co
try Films to take up his duties at
Strand. He also produced the Jai
Montgomery Flagg Comedies. He <
enter upon his new duties July 21.
New Plays This Week
MONDAY?At the Broadhurst Theatre George Broadhurst will present "The
Crimson Alibi," a new dramatic version of a novel of the same title by
Octavus Roy Cohen. The cast will include Harrison Hunter, William H.
Thompson, George Graham, Robert Kelly, Robert_Barrat, John Ellis, Robert
La Run, Jack Kane, Paul Kay, Bertha Mann, Inda Palmer, Edna James,
Mary Foy und Catherine Cozzcns.
At th* Cort Theatre Leotlda Mosquera will present "?reams of Three," n
?pectacular musical comedy revue by Manuel Pcnclia and M. Caballero.
There ar? three acts the first laid in Venice, the second in Paris and the
| third, in Seville. The cast will Include two prima donnas, Adelina Velio
and Consuelo Balllo, Carmen Lopez, Adela Vivero, Dora Iris, Lola Bravo,
M?qti.l Santaeana, Manuel Mor?egu, Miquol Pro?, Leandro Dinz, Carlos
ViJlarl??* and Arturo Vasque?.
-, ?"-^????--??????.--.-??.^_
A GROUP O! VOBLE DAMES
The-Motor Car . "The Better "Ole"
The Changing "Follies"
There have been numerous changes,
in the casts of the various "Ziegfeld
Follies" for the last thirteen years.
Some of the players who have appeared
in the different editions of the revue
are as follows:
1907
Emma Carus, Nora Bayes, Lillian
Lee, Bickel & Watson, Baker &
Mauley, Mile. Dazie, Grace La- Rue,
Frank Mayne, Charles J. Ross, William
Powers, Florence Tempest, Annabelle
Whitford, Grace Leigh, Mae Murray
and May Leslie.
1908
Bickel & Watson, Nora Bayes, Jack
Norworth, Lucy Weston, Mile. Dazie,
Arthur Deagon, ' Billy Reeves, Barney
Bernard, Grace La Rue, Lillian Lee,
Annabelle Whitford, Lee Harrison,
Grace Leigh, William Schrode, Elphye
Snowden, Mae Mackenzie, Mae Murray,
William Powers, May Leslie, Eva Fran?
cis, Seymour Brown, Albert Fromme,
Gertrude Vanderbilt, Rosie Green and
La Richi.
1909
Nora Bayes, Eva Tanguay, Jack Nor?
worth, Arthur Deagon, Billie Reeves,
William Schrode, David Abrams, Gertie
Meyer, William Bonelli, Welsh, Mealy
& Montrose, Bessie Clayton, Sophie
Tucker, Lillian Lorraine, Gertrude Van- I
derbilt, Rosie Green, Arthur Hill, Anna-1
belle Whitford, William Powers, Mac
Murray, M. Hegeman, John Schrode, R. ,
Woodward, Albert Fromme, Josephine
Whittell, Joe Schrode, Harry Kelly,
Will Philbrick, Harry Pilcer and
! Charles Scribner.
1910
Bickel & Watson, Bert Williams,
j Bobby North, Lillian Lorraine, Fanny
' Brice, Billie Reeves, S. Wania, Will?
iam Schrode, Shirley Kellogg, Harry
; Pilcer and Jacques Kruger.
1911
Bert Williams, Harry Watson, Leon
! Errol, Walter Percival, William J.
Kelly, Tom Dingle, Brown & Blyler,
; Dave Abrams, Charles A. Mason, Bes?
sie McCoy, Ethel Clayton, Clara Pal
Kmer, Fanny Brice, the Dolly Sisters,
? Gorman Sisters, Arline Boley, Ve?a
! Maxwell, Ann Meredith, George White,
i and Lillian Lorraine.
1912
Lillian Lorraine, Ida Adams, Josie
| Sadler, Rae Samuels, Rose De Bois?,
: Arline Boley, Elizabeth Brice, Ethel
! Amorita Kelley, Bert Williams, Harry
Watson, Leon Errol, Bernard Granville,
, Charles Judels.
1913
Jose Collins, Frank Tinncy, Nat M.
Wills, Leon Errol, Elizabeth Brice,
Martin Brown, the Marvelous Millers,
i the Dolly Sisters, Ethel Amorita
: Kelly, Florence Jerome, William Le
Brun, Murray Queen, Ann Pennington,
Evelyn Carlton, Peter Swift, Ernest
Wood, Stella Chatelaine, Ian McLaren,
i J. Bernard Dyllyn, May Day and Flor
i ence Gardner.
1914
Leon Errol, Stella Chatelaine, Bert
Williams, Arthur Deagon, George Mc
I Kay, C. M. Home, Johnny Dove, Wal
'? ter Percival, Ed. Wynn, Herbert Clif?
ton, J. Bernard Dyllyn, Vera Miche
lena. Gertrude Vanderbilt, Louise
Meyers, Ann Pennington, Kay Laurell,
Rita Gould, Cecelia Wright, Cora
Tracy, Whiting & Burt, Hodgkins
& Hammond and the Gorman Sisters.
1915
Leon Errol, Bert Williams, Ed Wynn,
Bernard Granville, W. C. Fields, George
White, Will C. West, Carl Randall, Phil
Dwyer, Melville Stewart, Herbert Wilke,
Malcolm Hicks, Charles Purcell, Ina
Claire, Mae Murray, Ann Pennington,
Lucille Cavanagh,. Justine Johnstone,
Emma Haig, Helen Rook, Kay Laurell,
! Olive Thomas, the Oakland Sisters and
Mao Hennessey.
1916
Will Rogers, Don Barclay, Norman
Blume, W. C. Field-;, Bernard Gran?
ville, Sam B. Hardy, Carl Randall,
Peter Swift, Bert Williams, Allyn
King, Fanny Brice, Ina Claire, Helen
'Barnes, Idah Gibson, Emma Haig, Jus?
tine Johnstone, Bird Millman, Ann Pen
I nington, Tot Quakers, Rock & White
and The Hawaiian Troupe.
1917
Fanny Brice, Allyn King, Dorothy
?Dickson, Tho Fairbanks Twins, Edith
i Hnllor, Cnrl Hyson, Helen Barnes, Mil?
dred Richardson, Dolores, Will Rogers,
W. C. Fields. Walter CMlett, Eddie
Cantor, Don Barclay, Irving Fisher,
Jack MacGowan, Fred Haider, Officer
Russell Vokes and Don, Joseph Kilgour,
Gus Minton, Hans Wilson, Thomas
Richards, Frederick Burton and Ray
Raymond.
1918
Marilyn Miller, Ann Pennington,
Allyn King, Mildred Richardson, The
Fairbanks Twins, Will Rogers, Eddie
Cantor, W. C. Fields, Frank Carter,
Savoy & Brennan, Billie Ritchie, Gus
Minton, Lillian Lorraine, Kay Laurell,
Bee Palmer, Dolores, Dorothy Leeds,
Martha Mansfield, Gladys Feldman,"
Harry Kelley, Frisco and Emily
Drange.
1919
Marilyn Miller, Eddie Cantor,
Johnny Dooley, Ray Dooley, Van &
Schenck, George LeMaire, John Steel,
Eddie Dowling, Delyle Alda, The Fair?
banks Twins, Phil Dwyer, Bert Will?
iams, Addison Young, Florence Ware,
Jessie Reed, Mauresette, Lucille Le?
vant, Kathryn Perry, Hazel Washburn,
Mary Hays and Mary Washburn.
Successful Playwright,
Relative of Stevenson,
Now a Manager
The author of "Three-Wise Fools,"
the Winchell Smith and John L. Golden
production which has had a run of
nearly a year in New York, is Austin
Strong, a relative of Robert Louis Ste?
venson and a playwright with several
Broadway successes to his credit. He
is also foreign manager for the Smith
and Golden interests, and is at present
superintending the London production
of "Three Wise Fools," which opened
last night.
Born in San Francisco, Mr. Strong
was taken to Honolulu, Australia,
Samoa and New Zealand, where his ed?
ucation progressed in widely diversi?
fied places, ending with his graduation
from the English College, New Zealand,
and including several years at Vailima
in charge of his famous relative, who
addressed to him several of the "R. L.
S." letters.
From his boyhood days Austin Strong
was always conscious of the attraction
the stage held for him, but he followed
the advice of his family and studied
landscape architecture, laying out the
largest park in New Zealand and jour?
neying to France and Italy for post?
graduate work. In hi3 leisure moments
he worked on plays. One of these,
"Exile," written in collaboration with
his uncle, Lloyd Oshourne, he took to
London and induced Martin Harvey to
produce it. It failed, and the ambition
of Mr. Strong was only made the
stronger thereby.
Coming to New York, he finished
"Little Father of the Wilderness" and
interested Charles Frohman in its pro?
duction. Francis Wilson was engaged
and played in it for a season. To this
actor Mr. Strong gave the manuscript
of "Drums of Oude," a one-act play.
Wilson liked it, and turned it over to
Frohman, who took it to London with
him on a t?ip. There he read it, and
when he learned that Barrio was look?
ing for a short piece to put on a pro?
gramme with two of his own playlets
he suggested "Drums of Oude." It
had a success, and since then has
brought in a satisfactory revenue from
high class vaudeville presentations.
Strong's next play was "The Toy
maker of Nuremberg," done at the Gar
rick Theatre in 1907 by Frohman, and
one of the first plays by an American
nutkor this manager ever produced.
Cyril Maude saw it and thought, it an
excellent medium for his type of work.
The following year he presented him?
self in it in London.
In the mean time Strong had written
another play, this time for Mansfield.
Plans were completed for its produc?
tion when Mansfield died. By some
AMUSEMENTS
B'WAY _ 47TH HT.
COLUMBI A
THE ARISTOCRAT OF BURLESQUE
TIip Hnmr of RurlriHiue An Luxe."?Time*.
1rt\ linilTUT "Equal in all esaantlal
Ulli mUBI In. particulars to any pres
entatlon "f musical commly now on vlow
In tha $2 lioUBO?."?Eve. Sun.
Peek-a-boo
-?II? MiUnm, ISo, Mr. Mr.. Nlghta. 25c to 11.01..
?atI* Two YVtoks Ui Aii-_nce, BuuokLng i'onalllt?!.
chance De Wolf Hopper saw the manu?
script and persuaded Strong to turn his
play into a comic opera. It became
"The Pied Piper" forthwith and en?
joyed a large popularity during its run
on Broadway. By a coincidence, Helen
Menken, leading woman of "Three Wise
Fools," was one of the youngsters in
"The Pied Piper," and she renewed her
acquaintance with Mr. Strong during
the rehearsals of his latest play.
When David Belasco decided to
Americanize "The Good Little Devil,"
a play by the Rostands, he gave the j
I adaptation to Austin Strong. With
Mary Pickford in the principal r?le
the play had a success in New York, in
which the Rostands, Strong, Belasco
and little Mary had an equal share of
glory. "Bunny" was Strong's next
Broadway play, and then he went to
work on "Three Wise Fools," known
first as "Three Wise Men."
Cohen Is Harassed
Octavius Roy Cohen has just signed
a five-year contract with the Goldwyn
Company whereby they are to have his
stories for the film. These are hectic
days for Mr. Cohen. Monday night at
the Broadhurst Theatre will be pro?
duced "The Crimson Alibi," made from
his novel of that name, and, in addition,
he has sold two other plays, not yet
announced, which are to have produc?
tion this season.
"39 East" to Move
After passing the 125th performance
mark at the Broadhurst Theatre, "39
East," Rachel Crothers's comedy, will
move to the Maxine Elliott Theatre to?
morrow night, where it will play
throughout the remainder of the sum?
mer.
Behind the Scenes at
The "Shubert Gaieties"
By Katharine Wright
Comedians oft" duty are proverbially
morose, so when we went to interview
Ed Wynn, now a shining light in Ahe
"Shubert Gaieties of 1919," we knew
about what to expect. Mr. Wynn was j
not only true to tvpe, but he was elu- j
sive. After searching every nook and ;
corner of the world behind the scenes I
af the Forty-fourth Street Theatre,
someone said, "Mr. Wynn is on the |
street."
This seemed to us bad taste on the
comedian's part, considering the num- |
ber and variety of Junoesque young |
women who were strolling about in
gorgeous costumes waiting for their
entrances. However, Mr. Wynn was
reluctantly persuaded to return to the
fold. *
"Saddest comic ever lived," he mut?
tered, with his peculiar brand of
chuckle, thus fulfilling our expecta?
tions. Now knowing that Mr. Wynn
would undoubtedly be sad, we felt he
might choose a subject to talk about
like "The Psychology of Humor," or
"How to Make an Audience Laugh," or
something equally solemn. Instead, we
learned that, although apparently the
most mild-mannered of men, he is not
without force in the home.
"I fired all the servants yesterday,"
he said next. J.
This was a most unexpected confes?
sion. It seems that the comedian had
requested a lordly butler to perform
some trifling service not immediately
connected with the dignity of his of
! fice. As trifles irritate.Mr. Wynn more
j than real troubles, rebellion was
! promptly followed by dismissal of the
! entire household staff. Fortunately, the
?comedian's wife looked upon the mat
: ter with the eyes of a philosopher.
Fortunately, too, the Wynns live near
| the club.
"It's the little things that ruffle me,'
?went on Wynn. "I don't mind honesf
j criticism. For instance, my wife has
; picked on me after every first night
I except after the 'Gaieties,' and I've
j almost grown to look forward to it
But it's friction that gets on my nerves
That's why I hate this business?hati
it and love it. I wouldn't give it up
for the world."
Another comedian, George Hassel],
came along just then, attired in filmy
female pajamas and a boudoir cap, with
lavender ribbons. He used to play good
uncles and philanthropic physicians
and British butlers at the Castle
Square, iti Boston.
"And IVe never acted since," he
groaned. "I'm on my last lap of a
three years' contract, and then no more
musical shows for me. If they must
have comedy they will have to take
it straight."
Mr. Hassell is not a small man. His
lingerie and the forbidding angle of
his pipe and his dejected expression
combined to make a pathetic study in
contrasts.
Meanwhile stately feminine figures
floating by made way for Miss Gilda
Grey, the "shimmie" dancer. Miss Grey
owns up to twenty-two, but J>.ioks
eighteen. She is Polish and proud of
it, but all of her stage experience was
gained as a cabaret singer in Chicago.
Later on, as we watched the show from
the front, we remembered that Mr.
Wynn had said that he found it hard
to compete with so much youth and
beauty. Certainly, Miss Grey heads
the procession of fascinating rivals.
Another Merging of Stars
A merger of motion picture filra
stars was announced yesterday. The
latest quartet of prominent playera
who have affiliated comprises Mitchell
Lewis, Anna Q. Nillson, recently seen
in "Auction of Souls"; Seena Owen,
one of D. W. Griffith's finds, and Nilcs
Welch, prominent as a juvenile.
"The four concerns were incorpor?
ated in Delaware on Thursday," said
Mark \V. Wilson, a Philadelphia mo?
tion picture magnate, who was seen
at the Waldorf-Astoria hotel yesterday.
"The Mitchell Lewis, Anna Nillson,
Seena Owen and Nilcs Welch Produc?
tions Company, Inc., will be the gen?
eral title of the quartet, and each of
the stars will head his or her own
company, with individual directors."
AMUSEMENTS
AMUSEMENTS
AMUSEMENBB
AMUSEMENTS
AMERICA'S FOREMOST THEATRES AND HITS UNDER THE DIRECTION OF LEE AND J. J. SHU?ERT ~*
44th ST
THE ilGGEST THING SINCE THE ARMISTICE!
THEATRE. Just West o? Broadway. Phone Bryant 7292.
fe^a? $1.50. MATINEE WEDNESDAY
"Attractive. Exquisitely
Tuneful and Original."
?Eve. Sun.
Colored,
"Offers Variety and Klaborate En?
tertainment."
?Ere. World.
B'mi and
WINTER GARDEN.
Matinees Tues., Thura. & SaC at ?.
A Diamond Mine of Entertainment
?^NF^iT+Hrn
"WIIX SATISFY
THE GREAT
l'l'BUCWHiril
IS EAGER FOR
THIS SORT OF
SHOW." ?(Jlobc.
with
ED WYNN
GEORGE HASSEL.., WII.I.IAN KENT I CLASS
AND 120 OTHERS. i SELF.'
STAGED BY J. C. HUFFMAN'.
" M AY BE
PLACED IN A
BY IT
-Posf.
Staged ny j. C. Huffman.
Book and Lyric? by Harold AU-iidsre.
T0.NIGHTrso^iPVTT0.NIGHT
ALWAYS THE BEST SUNDAY EV
TERTAINMENT IN NEW YORK.
F. RAY COMSTOCK. and
MORRIS GEST Present
THE FIRST BIG
COMEDY HIT OF
THE SEASON
39 EAST
Rachel Oothors' Captivating Comedy
MOVES
TO-MORROW NIGHT
Maxine Elliott's
THKATRE, 39TII, NEAR BltOADWAT
l'hone Bryant 147ti. Eves. 8:30.
Mata. \V?J & Sat. 2:30.
^-'^^??'-????"""???wwg***??- "??__-E*ii n ??mm
i-a. 44th. W. of Bway.
Imiin llrvniit r,4.
IIDIRCE BROADin RST, Director
RROADHURST V
GEORGE BROi
Opening Tomorrow Night 8:30
GEORGE BROAOHURST l'rcscn x
Hin Own Dramatic Version of
ti nsi ULI
A Novel by Octavu* Roy Cohen
Special Cast Include?:
Harrison Huntgr Bertha Mann
Wm. H. Tliofflpeon inda Palmer
Gocirce Oaliam K<liia Jamos
Robert Kelly Mary I ,
Robert Barratt Catherine Cozzens
?lohn Ellis Ja-k Km.?
Roy La Rue I'atit Kay
.Sta?e<l by Mrs. Lillian Trim!.!,- Brndiey
BY GUY ROLTON AND FR:VNK MANDEL
STAGED BY ROBERT MILTON
GREATEST ACHIEVEMENT IN THE AIR?MORE
THAN DUPLICATED BY THE GREATEST COM?
EDY ACHIEVEMENT OF THE YEAR AT THE
THEATRE
B'way & 4_<J St.
Mats. Wed. & Sat.
PACKED TO THE
DOORS AT EVERY
PERFORMANCE
"Combine? Thrills nnrl Chuckles."?-Laurence Reamer, Sun.
"Keep? the- auditor on Hie eilire of his scut."?/.'. ',. Welch, Eve. T"'
"Corklnir Good?A mystery 'sets' us."?S. Jay Kaufman, Globe.
"Full of suspense?ingenious und effective."?Louis V. De Foe, World.
"Received with enthusiasm?:i genuine thrill."?Eve. Post.
"Must inevitably (lud a considerable audience."?ripies.
"Ingenious detective play."?Heyxoood Broun, Tribune.
"Thrills and mystery enough to satisfy the most' exacting."
??Journal of Commerce.
SAY THE PAPERS OF
I Owen Davis' new melodrama
?TW?' JL?
mystery, ranrriage and murder
' 'SsT $$L, J'S?^ft
Ltd., at (he
?\ est
Bryant
HAS A PUNCH L.KE DEMPSEY'S!
"Where are you going to, my pretty maid?"
"To see LEW FIELDS, kind sir," she said.
"May I go with you, my pretty maid?1'
"If you're "A Lonely Romeo,' sir," she said.
So they smiled together, and with hands clasped tight,
Went to the SHUBERT that very saa^ night.
Rironlncps 8:16. Matin*?? ? ?-.".?".
?????? iiia?n??
TH\VANDEe6ILT|
\ PHON_ _V>.VAf?r :3?V
f knur 141 f-v: 6?0 ?j Wr??*"" 230
j*lUNln/_,?_ RftcneL
CftOTHt?S'
, _ . 4R?FRE5H.N6
THE GilEAT PLAY
JOnN FERGUSON
AT THE FULTON THEATRE
CENTRAL THEATRE s
BEWARE!
Let not the lurid lights of li?
cense blind your vision and
plunge your family into vision's
depths.
OPEN
YOUR
SES? SHOW IN TOWN
? JFZ&*\ !n ! 39TH I
yp ?jfc The! v/eekJ
%& Bett?rOle
Dwiit watin_es wea*$AT.i.3ol
? ' .!? n . i ? i i m in i .??*
SEE THIS GREATEST OF
FILM S ESS. I TI ONS
Children Inder 1? >n? Admitted.
Continu ii fine i-.:, i il A M to
11 P. M. Pr?4ei> -11 ir 7, 2Sc & 5le;
7 lo 11. 25c to ;: '??;..;. .: under
n-pet-i ?!,? r. S. Publie
Health Service. Educational winning
against social evil
Fadetcs Ladies Orchestra
20?SOLOISTS?20
SENSATION
Nr'A yowx
?OP?N AIR.
hk???x
ONLV
ROOF
EXCLUSIVE.
UUl?k
DlN/v?
Wfil
EXCLUSIVE AFTEf_ OlNiNf?. I
AT 93Q - PER-POR_)y\'AN)CE
REVULII.
phone
11:30 RM

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