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New-York tribune. [volume] (New York [N.Y.]) 1866-1924, January 03, 1920, Image 16

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LOST, FOUND AND REWARDS_
A LIBERAL REWARD
WILL BE PAID for the return of a
woman's platinum ring, cup shaped set?
ting, diamond about 1% carats; lost prob?
ably December 22d. between 4 and S P. M.,
in the shopping district on Fifth ave. to
49? West End ave. Communicate with
a. B. Hopwood, 55 John st.. New York
City. Telephone Beekntan 8987.
--?IL?
LIBERAL REWARD
for return of circular pin. lost at BUtmcre
?upper dance, New Year's Eve: threo rows
of diamonds: bluish stone (star sapphire)
in centre. Communicate with Mrs. A. R.
Watson. 1 West 64?.h at. Telephone Co?
lumbus 8500.
$200 REWARD
return diamond bar pin. containing about
ten diamonds, lost December 29th at or
between Rttz-Carlton and Forty-fourth
street Theatre or in taxlcab. Black, Starr
A Frost, Fifth ave. and 48th at.
$150 REWARD
return wrist watch, containing eight sap
ohfre- and thirty diamonds, lost December
17th at or between Rtts-Carlton Hotel and
Woat 82d st. I. H. & B. H. Weinberg. 665
F"?th ave.
?250 REWARD
return platlnun* flexible diamond bracelet,
lost December 21st at or between? Hotel
Astor and Winter Garden. I. H. A B. H.
Weinberg, 665 Fifth ave.
LOST.?Gold wrist watch, with gold band;
vicinity Grand Central station. Phone
Vanderbilt 479.
LOST BANKBOOKS
LOST.?Bankbook No. 127.849 of the Bx
? cslslor Savings Bank, 79 West 23d St.
Payment stopped. Please return to bank.
LOST.?Bankbook No. 79.845 of the United
States Savings Bank of New York. Pay?
ment stopped. Please return book to bank.
LOST.?Bankbook No. 76.298 of the United
States Savings Bank of New York. Pay?
ment stopped. Please return book to bank.
LOST.?Passbook No. 147.479, issued by
the Union Square Savings Bank. Finder
will please return It to the bank.
r. ,- - . ? ? j
FURNISHED ROOMS TO LET
145TH. 334 BAST.?One large aunny room,
heated; $6; gentlemen.
FURNISHED APARTMENTS TO LET
?7TH ST.. 205 WEST. THE OSBORNB.
ccmer 7th ave., handsomely furnished
housekeeping apartment of 9 rooms and
a bathe, adldtlonal maid's rooms; excep?
tionally large rooms .with high oeUlngs;
Immediate possession; 1660 per month
until October 1. Boo Superintendent or
telephone Circle 6420.
? i ? . . , -a
_HELP WANTED MALE
~~ INSTRUCTION
MDARN TO BB A CHAUFFEUR.?Pleasant
and profitable work; day and evening
classea Send for free booklet and visitor's
rasa. West Side Y. M. C. A.. 306 West
7th sL_
OPPORTUNITY, advancement, prestige await
the accountancy-trained man; Investigate
the advantages of this training for yourself;
ter ai page bulletin giving details of evening
claases In accountancy and business admin?
istration (Pace Courses) and for admission
cards to opening lectures address F. P.
Lamphear. 216 W. 23d Bt., N. Y. ; A. I.
Hardy., 55 Hanson Place. Brooklyn.
HELP WANTED MALE
BOY, Christian, 16 years or over, In office
? of lithographic shop; (15 weekly; good
opportunity for advancement. Le Huray &
Co., 160 Lafayette st.
BOY. strong: good pay. Rapid Servios
Linotyping Company, 141 West? 36th st.
FEEDER in stationer's job plant. J. P.
Paret St Co.. 71 Broad st.
\
JAMES McCREERY
REQUIRES THB SERVICES OF
EXPERIENCED
SHOE SALESMEN
for their
Men's Shoe Department
EXCELLENT SALARIES AND
COMMISSIONS, WITH GOOD OP?
PORTUNITIES FOR ADVANCE?
MENT. APPLY. ALL DAY, SU?
PERINTENDENT'S OFFICE, 8TH
FLOOR.
JAMES McCREERY & CO.,
a?TH 8T. EMPLOYEES' ENTRANCE
OFFICE ASSISTANT, who lias had some
experience in printing or lithographing
?hop; permanent position, with good pros?
pecta Le Huray & Co., 150 Lafayette at.
OFFICE BOY in printer's office; one who
Is familiar with filing. J. P. Paret A
Co.. 71 Broad st.
TRAVBLINO REPRESENTATIVE wanted
by well known Christian firm; must have
!;ood education In marketing and advert?s
ng work or good selling experience; age
{3 to 35. Apply, Saturday, 9 to 11 or 2 to
t, SOth floor. 315 Fourth ave.
WANTED?Secretary, young
man, expert stenographer,
with best of references; oblig?
ing and willing to travel. Ap?
ply in own handwriting, stat?
ing age, experience and salary
desired, to Box 443, Tribune.
WANTED?Office boy. 1?-17, for mail and
errand?; good opening for bright boy; $10
per week.. A.. Bot ?6?, Tribune Office.
HELP WANTED FEMALE
PERMANENT POSITIONS
FOR
YOUNG WOMEN
$900 to $1,400 a year.
Working conditions and
opportunities for promotion
are excellent.
Call at 1158 Broadway,
N. Y. O, and see Miss F. G.
Carncrose, who will give you
full particulars,' or
Fill in and mail the blank
below:
Please communicate with
?me about the position which
'you advertised.
Name.
Address.
Telephone No.
Age.
f/AW Omen need? competent stenogra?
pher; at least two years' l?s*al eipari?
ese? ; sao? oftlc? bas </p*ntng for ?te
??'?graplter without legal training; state
?**. e?p?r!en<? and salary dealred. B.,
Box 444, Tribun?? OfBc?.
?TENOGKAPHER. ?n#-glrl office; ?xpert
?Tf.'A Remington; steady position; 120
12* we*)?, ?/ >:vr?i)/ig to e*p*ri?nee. Apply,
?J? p?rsort. The .laine* A. Blanchard ?*orri
paoy. Room hit, 30 Church ?t , New York
ctir_
ttVTMUCS. jrraduats and undargradttat?. for
day dtftv; hospital position; good saiary.
t'mtron* Central Registry, 038 Eagls av?.,
-ocx Heir*.-*? l#*4.
advertising
HELP WANTED FEMALE
AN OPPORTUNITY
FOR
YOUNG WOMEN
AND GIRLS
OVER 16
Permanent employment
for young women with
or without previous tele?
phone experience.
Good pay from the start
with regular and fre?
quent increases.
Annual vacations with
full pay and liberal sick
benefits, medical advice
and pensions without
cost to employes.
Operating and recrea?
tion rooms are large,
well ventilated and com?
fortably furnished. .
Lunch rooms are pro?
vided in principal offices
in which hot meals are
provided at less than
cost.
Positions are also open
for all night work at ex?
tra pay for those who
prefer this work.
MAIN EMPLOYMENT
OFFICE: 27th St. &
Broadway, Manhattan.
BRANCH EMPLOY?
MENT OFFICES: 58
W. Houston St., Man?
hattan; 453 E. Tremont
Ave., Bronx (12 M. to
9 P. M.), and in Brook?
lyn, 81 Willoughby St.
and 1336 Broadway.
If unable to come to an
Employment office, tele?
phone Miss Bremer,
"Madison Square 12000"
(tree call) for further
information.
NEW YORK
TELEPHONE
COMPANY.
FILINO CLERK, required by Insurance
company, 17 to 19 years old; state salary
desired and references; splendid oppor?
tunity for advancement. B., Box 442,
Tribune Office.
JAMES McCREERY
requires the services of experienced
SHOE SALESWOMEN
for their
Ladies Shoe Department
EXCELLENT SALARIES AND
COMMISSIONS WITH GOOD OP?
PORTUNITIES FOR ADVANCE?
MENT. APPLY ALL DAY SUPER?
INTENDENT'S OFFICE, EIGHTH
PLOOR.
JAMES McCREERY & CO.,
S6TH ST., EMPLOYES ENTRANCE.
WANTED.
A stenographer; college education preferred;
refinement and good appearance essential ;
excellent chance to become an Important
factor In the business. Call at 392 Fifth
ave., 9th floor, Saturday morning.
YOUNG WOMEN,
17 to 25 Years.
WHERE
?
WILL you start your
business career?
WHY NOT START IT
WHERE surroundings
are of the best?
WHERE your asso?
ciates are all young
women of the best
character?? ?
WHERE dainty lunches
are served below cost?
WHERE vacations are
given with pay?
WHERE the work is
clean and pleasant?
WHERE can you find a
better place?
T
WHERE '
SEE OUR MANAGER
AXT TIME BETWEEN 9 AND I
AT ROOM 630.
24 LISPENARD ST.
IT'S JUST BELOW CANAL 8T.
. THE AMERICAN
TELEPHONE &
TELEGRAPH
COMPANY.
SITUATIONS WANTED MALE
CHAUFFEUR, 10 years' experience In truck?
ing and long distance ; can do all repair?.
C. Whlttemore, 311 E. 80th st. Lenox 9470.
COUPLE (Finnish-English), cook and
chauffeur, cook and butler; references.
Lehtl's Agency. 77 East 125th st. Har?
lem 6616.
NEW DREG PATENTS, specialty?. Intro?
duced who^eale, retail; no conHignments,
H. L. Hemme, 167 Ashford ?t., Brooklyn.
lirrTr?TioNs wanted female
COOK and waitress and houseworkers
(Finnish-English), girls, good references.
Lehtr? Asjency, 77 EaHt 126th et. Har?
lem 6616.
WABHING taken In; colored woman. Ad?
dress Mrs. Hopper, 308 Lenox ave._
BUSINESS CARDS
Carpet Cleaning
CARBFT7L CARPET CLEANING COM
I PANT?Cleans by compres?e?l air, steam,
I hand or on floor. 419 East 4?th ?t. COM A
BRANDT. Telephone 132 Murray Hill.
<* mu ?. '"i ' .? ? " " ' .
Diamonds
DIAMONDS AND JEWELRY BOUGHT
POR CA8H, estates ?ppral??d, purchased.
BENNETT, 175 Broadway, upstairs.
Men'a Clothing
? . .
A,?We buy aeiitlernen's rtl?earded cloth
Inr, business suit?, overcoats, fur lined
1 ?coat?, full dress, Tuxedos, pants, ?hoes of
?very tl?e< rlpUon; positively pay moro tli?n
I others. Oaf), weite or phone, MEYBR
I HOROWiffi *4? ft* *ve. Oreeley 1st*.
German Liners
Put on Block
By Ship Board
Thirty-four Vessels, Includ?
ing the Leviathan and
George. Washington, To
Be Sold on January 20
Only Americans May Buy
Cost of Refitting the Craft
for Passenger Service Es?
timated at $50,000,000
WASHINGTON, Jan. 2.?Thirty for?
mer German passenger ships seized
when the United States entered the
war, including the Leviathan, the
largest vessel afloat; the George Wash?
ington, which carried President Wil?
son back and forth from Europe; the
Agamemnon and others which were the
pride of the German merchant marine,
were offered for sale to-day by the
Shipping Board.
Proposals for the purchase of the
vessels, which may be filed up to
January 20. will be received only from
American buyers and must include a
pledge to use the shins on lines desig?
nated by the Shipping Board.
Decision of the board to otfer the
former German liners for sale was de?
termined principally by the cost of
reconditioning them for passenger
service, Chairman Payne said in an?
nouncing that the vessels were for
sale. Many of the vessels were used
by the War Department as transports,
both before and after the armistice,
and the cost of refitting them for pas?
senger service has been estimated by
Shipping Board officials at approxi?
mately $50,000,000.
By restricting the sale of the ships
to American interests and to perma?
nent service on designated lines the
board expects to accomplish the estab?
lishment of its proposed passenger
service program to all parts of the
world along the same lines that would
have been followed had the board it?
self put^ the liners into service.
The vessels of the first class type
offered for sale are; Leviathan, Ag?
amemnon, Mt. Vernon, Von Steuper,
George Washington, Martha Washing?
ton (Austrian), America, De Kalb,
Aeolus, Huron, Princess Matoika, Po
cahontas, Callao, Mocccasin, Black Ar?
row and Otsego. Fourteen others of
the intermediate type adapted for
steerage and cargo, including the
President Grant, Antigone, Mercury
and Amphion, are also offered to buy?
ers.
The ships are to be turned over to
the successful bidders upon payment
of 25 per cent of the purchase price
and satisfactory fulfillment of other
ferms of sale. Such of the vessels as
are not sold at this time will be used
by the board in passenger service un?
til the whole of the government fleet
has passed into private hands.
Three Held in Death Mystery
Autoist's Body Found Hidden
in Ditch at Yonkers
William Rohbeck, Thomas Mallon
and Michael Ritz, of Hastings, N. Y.,
were held yesterday in Yonkers pend?
ing an inquest into the death of Will?
iam J. De Vail, of Hastings, whose
body, loosely covered with earth, was
found in a roadside ditch near'the
home of Samuel Untermyer in Yonkers
earlier in the day.
According to the story the police say
the prisoners told, all four were in an
automobile which unset at that point
and De Vail was killed. Mallon is said
to have declared that he wanted to call
a doctor, but that over his protests the
body was pulled into the ditch and the
death concealed from the patrolman
to whom the accident was reported.
Coroner George Engle declared that
five wounds in De Vall's back looked
like stab wounds.
I Britain Plans Trade
; Invasion of America
"Friendly Commercial
War" in I/. S. Proposed
as Feature of Drive
LONDON, Jan. 2.?The British gov?
ernment is planning; 'a great overseas
trade offensive, declared Sir Hamar
Greenwood, head of the Department of
Overseas Trade, in the course of an
i interview to-day,in which he outlined
the scheme. It includes sending of
touring trade exhibitions to South
Africa, Australia, New Zealand and
Canada.
Sanction for the plan already has
been received from the Treasury De?
partment, Sir Hamar said, and it was
proposed also to send sjmilar exhibi?
tions to South America tfnd the United
States.
He considered that 1920 promised to
be the greatest year in the history of
British trade, barring strikes. ?He
added: "We desire to strike a'blow at
the fetish of German cheapness, fos?
tered by the Leipzig fair."
Regarding America, Sir Hamar de?
clared: "I am for friendly commercial
invasion of the great American Re?
public. Some of our products now are
in greater demand by the United States
than they ever have been, and the
limitations of our productive capacity
form the only limit of our export
trade to the United StateB."
Lockwood to Ask
Grand Jury Action
Against "Ice Trust"
All Facts in Legislative
Inquiry Will Be Given
to the District Attorney;
Expects an Indictment
Senator Charles C. Lockwood, chair?
man of the Joint Legislative Commit?
tee investigating ice and housing con?
ditions, said after a session of his
committee yesterday that he would
place evidence obtained in the inquiry
before the District Attorney. He said
he was convinced that th? ice business
of this city was controlled by a single
group of men in violation of the law.
"I will hand over the minutes of our
sessions to the^District Attorney," Mr.
Lockwood said," "for him to bring the
matter before the grand jury. I think
we have brought out enough to warrant
action by the grand jury."
Brewer Testifies
Norman S. Goldberg, president of the
? Fidelio Brewing Company, of First Ave?
nue and Twenty-ninth Street, told the
committee that his plant, which had an
ice manufacturing capacity of sixty
seven tons a day, wouldn't do much
manufacturing until 1921. He said he
was tied up by contract to sell all the
ice he could manufacture to the
Kuickerbocker Ice Company at $2 a
ton. He was prevented by contracts
from selling his ice to any other firm.
Goldberg also testified that he didn't
make ice from January 1, 1917, to May
1, 1918, but was paid $500 a month by
I the Knickerbocker Ice Company during
that time. Goldberg said he wasn't
! paid for part of April. The Knicker
| bocker people told him. he said, that
the Ice Controller had closed many
plants then and he wouldn't have been
able to do business if he had been
operating independently.
The witness said that Governor Odell
had promised to try to get the Fidelio
Company $3 a ton.
Five-Year Contract
"Did you try to get that from the
Knickerbocker Company?" Mr. Lock
wood asked.
"I did, and Mr. Oler wrote me that
Governor Odell had nothing -to say
about the price of ice," Mr. Goldberg
replied. "All Governor Odell'a author?
ity was limited to the production of
eadi plant, I was told."
Mr, Goldberg said that he would pro?
duce this letter at a later hearing. The
contract between Goldberg and the
Knickerbocker Ice Company called for
the delivery of 450 tons or ice a week
in cakes of 300 pounds, at a price of
24% cents a cake. The contract was
entered into in 1916 and was to run
five years.
RELIGIOUS NOTICES
START THE YEAI
k T\ WHAT IS IT?
**? "? l. A. D. 1920. An
TlM'/^lll'YY other anniversary of
ITlV/lflA A the birth of that
Prophet of Galilee
who internationalized Mt>ses; Whose
disciples have printed the Old Testa?
ment in every language of the world ;
Whose life created the New, the
World's best-seller, bound with the Old,
among all books; and who, sceptreless,
founded the Kingdom of Affection,
Homage, and Obedience whose frontier
is including the whole human race.
Civilization has derived its rules of
equity from the spiritual statutes of a
King whose crown was of thorns. The
centuries have not revised Him; the
world's highest spiritual and social phi?
losophy, endowed by Him, yet borrows
from Him; and all realms recognize His
right to rule by dating their records
from the advent of the Race's First Citi?
zen?its Saviour, its King.
2. The Three Hundredth Anniversary
of the Landing of the Pilgrims, bearing
in their hearts Christ's ideals of liberty,
and duty, and in their hands the Book
from which more light was yet to break.
3. The One Hundred and Thirtieth
Anniversary of the first census of the
American Republic, the first census in
the race's history to be built on belief in
the worth of the individual, and of his
right to personal participation by pro?
portional representation in the law
making of the land.
4. The One Hundredth Anniversary
of the statute which compe|s the inspec?
tion and registration of every new im?
migrant into the domain of the Republic.
RELIGIOUS NOTICES
* RIGHT SUNDAY
In 1910, the foreign-born in New York
City were over half of the whole popu?
lation of the United States at the time
of its first census. The law was passed
not only to protect the Republic, but to
secure the immigrants' safe transporta?
tion in the sailships of the time?an?
other application of the protection of
Christianized law to personality.
5. The One Hundredth Anniversary
of the commencement of Ne<w York's up?
ward climb to primacy among the cities
of the world. From 1810 to 1820 New
York City did not grow as rapidly as
the nation at large, but from 1820 on- j
ward it increased until in 1910 5.18 per
cent of the whole nation's population ?
were lodged within its borders.
6. The Seventieth Anniversary of the first I
census enumeration of the foreign-born in |
the United States. Sixty-five an?! three- |
tenths per cent of them were then within the I
area of the Thirteen States that formed the I
Republic; in 1900. 48.6 per cent; in 1910,
G1.7 per cent; In N. Y. City,. 14.4 per cent.
7. The Fortieth Anniversary of the first
enumeration of the imrentapc of the foreign
born in the United States.
8. The Tenth Anniversary of the first
enumeration of the mother-tongue of the for
clgn-bom.
9. The ?irar of the Fourteenth Census,
which will show New York a city nearly two
million larger than the whole .population it
the American Republic In 1790.
10. The year when liberty and duty, und' ;
allegiance to Christ, the luring ami drlvh.g
principles of the Pilgrims, will win or lose
In the formation or defeat of a League of
Nations for the Neutralization of the World,
over all Its area, against external aggres?
sion.
11. The year when Conquest, the Prussian
principle, and Service, the Potentate of
Time's principle, will be contrasted to the
eyes of humanity by th? trial of the Kaiser
and the survey and sacrifice operations of
the Interchurch World Movement.
12. The year when your own heart cannot
halt In decision between Caesar and Christ
without enduring detriment, not only to your?
self, but to the human race.
IS. The year when, In addition to worship
In church, you should have worship In your
home.
14. The year when you should anchor your
decision for Christ In efforts to win others
to Ills allegiance.
Issued by Flecrultlng Campaign.
FOR MORE AND BETTER CHRISTIANS
The New York Federation of Churches
Room 2SS, 200 Fifth Avenue
Tel. Qramercy 2298
BUSINESS CARDS
Furniture
HIOHBHT PRICES paid for furniture, an
tiques, pianos? bric-a-brac, book?, art,
?to. UAHAY, KX Unlvtrulty Place. 'Phono
Hluyveaii.nl 2377.
Machinery
MAi'HWIST? ?utnd. Apply. Nasiareth
Foundry * Mn-.hltn- <'o., 32 Broadway.
BUSINE8S CARDS
Printing
Hintlnnrr-Prlninr for the Critical Bayer.
LEWIS (, A N IJ H u r n O ,
162 Greenwich St. Cortland 406?.
Trunk?
BIO BARGAIN?New and uieit ward rob?
trunk?. BO? ?tb ave., bet. 30th-31?t at*.
Food Costs Underwent
Big Decline in 1919
Fifteen Grocery Items and All
on Meat List Registered a
/ Drop, Report Shows
Federal Food Administrator Arthur
Williams made public yesterday price
lifts comparing the cost of staple food?
stuffs on December 31, 1918, and De?
cember 31, 1919. The figures virtually
are the same as those published in The
Tribune on Wednesday and show thai
fifteen jrrocery items declined in price,
three advanced and one was unchanged.
All eighteen articles on the meat list
registered a decline.
The total cost of the nineteen gro?
cery items on Mr. Williams' list was
$4.49 on December 31, 1918, and $4.21
on December 31, 1919. The total cost
of the eighteen meat items was $7.12
on the last day of 1918 and $6.15 on
the last day of 1919.
Deputy Markets Commissioner Mrs.
Louise Reed Welzmiller announced yes?
terday that she would attempt to carry
on a campaign to educate school chil?
dren to purchase food properly. She
plans to cooperate with the Department
of Education, she said. Children do
most of the purchasing in poorer fam?
ilies because the mother is too busily
occupied with household duties to ven?
ture out, she explained. She also will
try to get sugar into circulation in re?
tail channels, she said.
Pennsylvania Investor
Buys Bronx Apartments
The Manning-Bernhard Realty and
Construction Company has sold to
Louis Berger, of Reading, Pa., the
three four sgtory apartments. at 1705
to 1709 Fulton Avenue. Nicholas
Hodes and Isaac Propp were the
brokers. ^
Max Cohen and Jacob 'Siria have
bought the southeast corner of Fox
Street and Avenue St. John, on plot
75x100, a five story apartment with
nine stores. Mr. Conen bought 850
East 180th Street, at the southwest
corner Mohegan Avenue, a. five story
apartment with five stores.
Besides, Mr. Cohen has bought 49
East 167th Street, on plot 42x92, a six
story apartment'and stores; 735 East
160th Street, at the northwest corner
Forest Avenue, a six story house and
stores, on plot 49x96; 678 Dawson
Street, on plot 26x105, a six story
house, and has sold 595 Tinton Ave?
nue, on plot 37.6x100, a live story
apartment.
Eugene J. Busher has sold for the
Lenox Hill Hospital the two four story
flats at 1468 and 1470 Webster Avenue,
on plot 20x100 each, to Jacob Bass.
The Henry Morgenthau Company 1 aj
sold to John J. Heitler the plot, lOOx
140x irregular, on the south side of
Home Street, 150 West of Westchester
Avenue, which will De improved with
a garage and stores.
The five story building with stores
at the southwest corner of Fordham
Road and Tiebout Street, originally
owned by Henry Linsnau, was sold to
a client by H. A. K?iher.
Adolph Lang has sold the two fam
ij? dwelling at 855 East 169th Street
aW a three-family dwelling for E.
Goldaker to Mayer Brurcberg.
Recorded Lesees
Manhattan
EIGHTH AV, 797, str & b; John C Bremer
to John C F?rster, 724 Eighth av; 6 yrs
from May 1, 1920; attys, Harris, C M &
S, 165 Bway.....?3,500
23D ST, 9 E; all; Clara W Tlllman to
Julia A Paddell. 371 W 23d; 15 yr? from
May 1, 1919; atty; E M Burghard, 111
Bway.'..$3,600
TENTH AV, 153-65, n w c 19th st: all;
R Louise Flaacke et al to Jos M Preg
enzer. 862 W 23d st; 10 yrs from Oct 1,
1919; atty, O W Flaacke, 15 Exchange
-pi, Jersey City, N J ..?2,500
49THST. 11 E; parlor floor; Charles
Brown to Hatti?* Arnold and ano, 11 E
5 yr? from Sept 1, 1916; atty,
D Rosengarten, 3? Park Row; $2,800 to
?3.000
49TH ST, 11 E; ground floor and b; same
to same; 5 2-12th years from Aug 1.
1918; $4.000 and.$4.400
21ST, 42 E. b str and 1st fi; John A Had
don jr. and ano to Samuel Abramowitz,
42 East 21st st; et al; 3 yr? from Feb 1,
1918; atty, M J Junger. 51 Chambers
st .,.$2,260
BROADWAY, 832-4, 1st loft; Klasko
Finance Corpn to Marrua t\ Fried, Inc.
29 East Bway; 3 yrs from Feb t. 1920;
atty?, Fried & K. 299 Bway.$4,000
HESTER ST. 60-62. c Ludlow st. b and b;
?.?X. Joseph and ano, exrs, to Max Ask
ktnaze, 52 Hester st, and ano; 5 yrs from
May 1, 1919.$2.460
COLUMBUS AV, 828-38. 1st and 2d lofts;
Rachel Markowitz to Alex Helfand, 267
West 261st st, and ano; 2 yrs from Feb
1, 1919; 1 yr renew at ?6.600 and s _
at ?7.000. na %??*
67TH ST, 16 W. all; Jno S Br?"wni??.i"!
to Eliz Kllgannon. 16 West 67th\?. ..'
II wraT?tMay *? 19l9: *tty> C ?
LBXINGTON AV. 413. '?'tr'and'-ii?i'"*
First Conatr Co. of Brooklyn, to ????.cj
Tannenbaum. 960 Ave 8t John7a?i???!*
10 yrs from Sept 1. 1919; address ?fti
Lexington av; ?6,000 to ...., .^jf, ??
MADTSON AV, 77. s e cor ?8th st'sir ?i?.
. and b and office on 2d A; H H Cam?^L
and ano. turstees. to Thos R RoseSS?
IS Claremont av; 3 yrs from Feb a iSr
attys. Bppstein A R. 175 6th av se eu
8TH AV. 267. s and b: United Cigar Sto?!?
Co to Jas Kat? and ano, 60 West 28th 2*
from Oct 1. 1918. to April 30, Hjn- i??i:
Harry Stacke?, 200 Bway.'*2.%ti
Lis Penden?
112TH ST, 132-136 B; Berliner * Grsw,
berg, Inc. agt Meyer Vesell et al (?S*
counting, Ac): atty.. R> E. Jackson
33I> ST. 205 E: American Mortgage ?v
agt Mary K Letterer et al (amena.*
foreclosure of mortgage) ; attys. MiddW
brook & Borland. ^ """*
EAST HOUSTON ST. 150; William Osam?.
art John Ossman et al (Partition?
atty, S. Berg. "'?
EAST HOUSTON ST. 196 and 1st st -tl
William Ossman agt John Ossman et ?i
(partition); atty, S Berg. "
11TH AV, 842; Benjamin Qoldenberg aat
Katherine P Reynard <n al (forecloaur*
of mortgage); atty, H. Swain.
5TH AV, 141-147; Bernard A Kantrowitx
agt Shank Realty A Conatructlon Co ?
al (specific performance); atty, g.
Greeoberg.
Bronx
JEFFERSON PL. n s, 193 e Franklin av
25x100: Catherine C. Delaney as extrx'
agt Ellen Brady et al (action to de?
clare deed a mortgage); attys, Arn
steln & Levy.
FOREST AV. w a, 118.9 s 156th st, l?.jx
87.6; Mamie Cohn agt Mary Zebrowskt
et al (foreclosure of mortgage); atty
S Bltterman.
????????????????^
Where 1
BAPTIST
FIRST BAPT??T CHURCH
B'way and 70th Street.
PASTOR 1. M. HALDEMAN, D. D.
11 A. M.?"HE AND ME, THE KEY TO
THE DEATH OF CHRIST."
8 P. M.?"CAN THE DEAD COMMUNI?
CATE WITH THE LIVING? DO WAN?
DERING SPIRITS SPEAK THROUGH
MEDIUMS? IS DEMON POSSESSION A
DEMONSTRABLE FACT? IS THE UN?
SEEN WORLD TO BE FULLY OPENED
JUST BEFORE THE COMING OF
CHRIST?"
ALL WHO SEEK INFORMATION FROM
THE WORLD OF THE DEAD INVITED.
In this address Dr. Haldeman will refer
to Sir Conan Doyle's attack on Christlan
nty, and the pathetic folly of Sir 'Oliver
ledge's "Raymond."
Friday Night, January 9, 8 o'clock, "The
Wonderful Story of Ruth."
CENTRAL BAPTIST CHURCH
S. E. Cor. 92D 8T. & AMSTERDAM AVE.
Frank M. Goodchild, D. D., Patter.
11?"The Consecration of Life."
8?"The Unknown Future."
Fifth Avenue Baptist Church
4 to 8 West 46th Street.
Dr. Cornelius Woelfkln at 11 and 4:30.
Sunday School 9:30 A. M. Men's Class 9:40,
Leader, Mr. J. H. Ardrey. Women's
Class 9:46. Loader, Miss Bertha Conde.
Afternoon Service, 4:30. Young People's, f.
CALVARY BAPTIST CHURCH,
West 57th St., bet. Oth and 7th Aves.
REV. JOHN STRATON, D. D.
10:30?"Will 1920 Brin? Us Nearer a New
Heaven and a New Earth, Wherein
Dwelleth Righteousness ?"
,7:46?"A New Heart for New York."
Discussion of the City's New Year
Celebration.
MADISON AVENUE BAPTIST CHURCH,
MADISON AVENUE. COR. 31ST ST.
Rev. George Caleb Moor, D. D., Pastor.
11 A. M.?"The GeniiiH of Progress."
8 P. M.-TIIE MILAN CATHEDRAL,
"The Alps of Architecture."
10 A. M? Men's Clans, Rev. A. T. Brooks.
Mount Morris Baptist Church
Fifth Ave., between 126th and 127th Sts.
11 A. M.?"In Remembrance of Me."
8 P. M.?"The Wholo Man."
CHRISTIAN SCIENCE
Service? are held in tho following
CHRISTIAN SCIENCt CHURCHES
Sundays, 11 A. M. and 8 P. M.
Wednesdays. 8 P. M.
First Church. Central Park West and 96th St.
Second Church, Central Park West and ?8th St.
Third Church. 125th St. and Madison Aye.
Fourth Church, 178th St. and Kort Washington At?.
Fifth Church. Aeolian Concert Hall. 34 West 43d St
Sixth Church. 1935 Anthony Ave.. Bronx.
Seventh Church. 112th St. east of Broadway,
! Sunday 11 a. m. and 4:30 p. m.
Eighth Church, 103 East 77th St.
Ninth Church. Holland House, Fifth At?, and 30th.
Tenth Church, 217 West 57th St.
Eleventh Church, 2562 Briggs Avenue. 11 A. M.
FREE READING ROOM. 33 West 42d St.
CHRISTIAN SCIENCE LECTURES
will be delivered as follows:
First Church, Central Park West & 96th St.
by Judge S. W. Greene, C. S. January
8th, 8:00 P. M.
Ninth Chnrch, Cooper-Union, by Mr. Vir?
gil O. Strlckler. C. S. B? January 8th,
8:00 P. M.
CONGREGATIONAL
BROADWAY TABERNACLE
BROADWAY AND 56TH STREET.
Pastor. Dr. Jefferson, preaches 11 and 8.
DISCIPLES OF CHRIST
CENTRAL 142 West 8lst Street,
IIRISTIAN Dr. Finis Idleman. Pastor.
HURCH 11 A. M., DR. A. E. CORY.
8 P. M., Stereoptlcon Lecture: "Panama."
DIVINE SCIENCE
First Church of Divine Science
Grand Ball Room. Waldorf-Astoria.
Services Sunday at 11 A. M.
Rev. W. John Murray, Pastor.
"Is Disease Real or Apparent?"
Bible Class at 9:45 A. M. promptly.
Sjjnday School at 11 A. M.
INTERDENOMINATIONAL
THE METROPOLITAN TABERNACLE,
N. E. Cor. 104th St. and Broadway.
RBV. WILLIAM ALLAN. Pastor, at 11 and 8.
SPECIAL MUSIC BY FAMOUS NEW YORK
MALE QUARTET.
(Jreat Missionary Convention Monday to Thursday,
3:30 and 8 P. M. each ?lay. Celebrated missionaries
from South America. China. Africa, India, Ceylon.
ALL WELCOME.
JEWISH
TEMPLE BETH-EL,
6th Ave. at 76th St.
Service on Saturdays at 10:15 A. M.
Sermon by Rev. S. Schulman at 11 A. M.
SUNDAY SERVICE
January 4th, 1920. 11 A. M.
Discourse by Rev. S. Schulman.
"RELIGION and HAPPINESS."
Special Musical Service by Boys'
Choir trained in traditional Synagogue
Music. Congregational Singing.
ALL ARE WELCOME.
FREE SYNAGOGUE
CARNEGIE HALL, SUNDAY MORNING. 10:45.
DR. WISE:
"THE NATION'S TREATMENT OF ITS
PRESIDENT."
AND "THE LEAGUE OF NATIONS."
ALL ARE WELCOME.
LUTHERAN
CHURCH GF THE HOLY TRIN1T?
85th 8t and Central Park West
Re?. CHARLES J. SMITH. D. ?., Pastor.
Services 11 A M. and 8 P. M.
METHODIST EPISCOPAL
CALVARY METHODIST CHURCH
129th St. and 7th At?.
MinlaUr in Charge, Ruv. H. INGHAM, B D
11 A. M.?Bishop Luther 1?. Wilson, D. D, LL ??
? P. m.?ROYAL WELSH SINGERS.
GRACl^iOT^ia?f H ST.
Frederick Brown Harris. Minister.
11 A M.?"Heralds of tho Passion."
7:45 P. M.?"Old Well? for New Yea?." Also
Motion Picture._*""
8T. ANDREW? METHODIST CHTJRC?
78th Street and Columbus Avenue.
11? ALLAN MAO ROBBIE will preach.
8?"Father Knickerbocker's Health Problem?,"
Dr. Royal Oopsland, Health Commissioner.
METROPOUTAN^EMPLE. 14th 8?. ?4 m Av.
REV. JOSEPH *W. CHABBY. B. D., Mini????.
11 A. M,?"The Obligation of the Church. ??
.8 P. M.?"The Greatest of All Invitations."
to Go to C
METHODIST EPISCOPAL
Madison Avenue Church, 60th St.
Dr. RALPH W. SOCKMAN. Pastsr.
11 A. M.?"A New Year's Sermon."
8 P. M.?"Tho Cost of a Clean Conscience. "
10 A. M.?Men's Class?Mr. Paul Sturtevant.
6 P. M.?Social Hour?Halford E. Lucra*. ?
ST. PAUL'S M. E. CHURCH
86th St. and West End Ave.
Rev. Raymond L. Forman, D. D., Pastor
11?"The Man Without Means"
8?"The Church and American Ideals"
NEW THOUGHT
Miss Villa Faulkner Page.
Fellowship of the Life More Abundant.
Every Sunday, 11 A. M.
Brooklyn Masonic Temple,
cor. Clermont and Lafayette Aves.,
Brooklyn, N. Y. Subject January 4th,
"Scientific Optimism."
MUSIC. ALL WELCOME.
lV?RSrMARY^HAPl?;
Commodore Ballroom, 11 o'clock: "New
Thought and New Life." All Welcome.
PRESBYTERIAN
BRICK CHURCH
Fifth Avenue and Thirty-seventh Street.
?.?...^../WILLIAM PIER80N MERRILL.
Ministers. 1 THEODORE AIN8W0RTH GREEN.
DR. MERRILL preaches at 11 and 4.
The Sacrament of the Lord's Sapper
will be observed at 11:00 A. M.
Bible School at 9:40 A. M.
FRIDAY NOON HOUR OF MUSIC AT
12:10.
Lecture Organ Recital on "THE MUSIC
OF BELGIUM." Clarence Dickinson, Or?
ganist; Marie Stapelton Murray, Soprano;
Herbert Dlttler, VIolinlBt; Double Quar?
tette of Women's Voices.
NOODAY SERVICE DAILY AT 12:30.
Fifth Avenue Presbyterian Churcn
Fifth Avenue and Fifty-fifth Street.
?, , . S Rev. JOHN KELMAN, D. D.
Ministers: jRev. JAMES PALMER, Ph. D.
Services at 11 A. M. and 4:30 P. M.
DR. KELMAN will preach.
Organ Recital at 4, by Lynwood Farnam.
Bible School at 9:30. Men's Class at 10.
Wednesday at 8:15 P. M.,
the Mid-week Service In the Chapel
conducted by DR. KELMAN.
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
Old First. University PI?
Madltsn Square Feund
a I Nov. tieorge Alexan
Ministers -j Ho?. Harry Emerson
[ Hut. Thomas Guthr
Old First, University Pia?? and
Mad lean Square Feundathtn.
Alexander, D. D.
Fosdlck. D. 0.
Guthrie Speers.
Services in University P.ace Church, Cor.
10th St., on2 block east of Fifth Ave.
11 A. M.?Dr. Fosdlck will preach.
8 P. M. Mr. SpeerB.
PFNTPAI PRESBYTERIAN CHUPCH,
^L11 * f%?Irf Madlsen Ave. and 87th 8t
Rer. Wilton Merle-Smith, D. D., Pastor
Preaching; at 11 A. M. by the Pastor.
4:80 P. M.?Communion Service.
Sunday School, 9:45 A. M.
Young Piwple'a Meeting. 8 P. M.
Wednesday, 8 P. M? Devotional Meeting.
BROADWAY
PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH.
Broadway and 114th Street.
Rev. WALTER DUNCAN BUCHANAN. D. D.,
Minister, will preach at 11 A. M. and 8 P. M.
WEST-PARK PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH.
Amsterdam Avenu? and 86th Street.
Rev. ANTHONY H. EVANS, D, D., Paster.
Dr. Evans will preach at 11 A. M. and 8 P. M.
At 8 P. M.. A NEW YEAR'S COMMUNION
AND CONSECRATION SERVICE.
NORTH
PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH.
525 West 155th St.
Be?. John B. Mackay, I). J>.,
LL. D., Pastor.
11 A.M. and 8 P.M.? Rev. A. H. McKinney, Ph. P.
mi ID TU PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
rUUI\in west End Ave.. 91st St.
EDGAR WH1TAKER WORK. D.D., Pastor
11 A. M. Rev. Robert C. Richardson.
8 P. M. Rev Maurice S. White.
UfiTCT sTIim Presbyterian,
Wtdl fcWU Amsterdam, Cor 108th.
Rev. A. EU win Keigwln. D. D., Pastor.
Dr. Robert W. Rogers preaches 11 and 8.
8?"How Old Art Thou?" Gloria Trumpeters.
FT. WASHINGTON "$S?w??t
DANIEL HOFFMAN MARTIN.D.D..Pastor.
Rev. GEORGE B. 8TEWART, D. 0?
will preach at 11 A. M. and 8 P. M.
St. Nicholas Ave^Ac8^,.
Minister. Rev. ELLIOTT W. BROWN, D. D.
Services 11 A. M. and 8 P. M
DirrrCDC presbyterian church,
t\\J 1 IjE.K.3 Breadway and 73d tt
The Pastor, Rev. Daniel Russell, D. D?
will preach at 11 A. M. and 8 P. M.
PROTESTANT EPISCOPAL
FIFTH AVENUE AND 03D ST.
Rev. ERNEST M. STIRES. D. D.. Rector.
8 A. M.?Holy Communion.
11 A. M.?Morning Service and Sermon (Rector).
4 P. M.?Evensong and Address (Rector).
8 I'. M.?Hour of Organ Music.
ASCENSION ?,??S?K?
Rev. Dr. PERCY STICKNEY GRANT, Rector.
11?"Opportunity" (Rector). ,
4?Music: Bach'? "Christmas Oratorio."
8?Forum: ABRAHAM CAHAN. Edlor of "The
Forward," "Impressions of Europe."
CHURCH OF THE HOLY COMMUNION
Sixth Avenue and 20th Street.
8 A. M.-?Holy Communion.
11 A. M.?Preacher, Rev. Dr. Mottet
12 M.?Holy Communion.
8 P. M.?Preacher, Rev. George W. Dav?
enport.
GRACE CHURCH
Broadway and 10th St.
Rev. Charles Lewis Slattery, D. D., Rector.
Holy Communion.8 A. M.
Service & Sermon (The Rector)..11 A. M.
Evensong (Rev. Wm. Austin Smith), 8 P. M.
Dally Noonday Service at 12
ST. JAMES? CHURCH,
Madison Avenue & 71st Street,
Rev. Frank Warfleid Crowder, Rector,
8 A.M.; 11 A.M. (HECTOR) 14 P.M. (Re-r.
GEORGE V. DICKEY).
Church o? Zion and St. Timothy
334 West 57th Street.
Rer. PRBD13RICK BURGESS. Jr.. B. D., Recto*.
8, 11 (Rector) ?"d ? <???? Win. J. White).
ST. JOHN THE EVANGELIST
11th St. W. of 7th Ave.
Rev. .lohn A. Wade, Rector
CHIEF MAN1TOWOO, SI wash tribe,
speaks, in Indian costume, at a P. M.
CALVARY CHURCH ffifiS;
Rev. THEODORE HKDGW1CK. D. D.. Rector.
Services: 8, 11 (Reotor) and 8.
8T. MATTHEW'S CHURCH. 88 W. 84tn BL
Rev. ARTHUR H. JUDGE, P. I)., Rector.
Services, 8, It and 8.
ST. STEPHENS <9V/.. ?WS"?'
Or. Cyrus Transen* Brady at 4.
hurch To-morrow
UNIVERSALIST 1 UNIVKBSAJUST
Church of the Divine Paternity.
Central Park West and 76th St
SUNDAY MORNING SERVICE AT 11 O'CLOCK
JOSEPH FORT NEWTON, D. D.
MINISTER
Late of The City Temple, London, England, will preach
QUARTETTE AND CHORUS VISITORS WELCOME
UNITARIAN ? UNITARIAN
Unity Congregational Society
Earl Hall, Columbia Univ. Broadway at 117th St
x Charles Francis Potter
Minister, will preach tomorrow at 11 o'clock A. M., on
CONFORMITY AND ORIGINALITY
PROTESTANT EPISCOPAL
St. George's Church
Stnyvesant Square
Hth Street, East of Third Avenue.
Rev. KARL RBILAND. D. D? Rector.
All Seats Free
A general Invitation to ?trangers and
all persons Interested in St. George's and
its work.
SERVICES
8 A. M.?Communion.
11 A. M.?Communion?Address.
4 P. M.
Special Vesper Service
Special Music.
Mr?. EDITH CHAPMAN GOOLD,
Soprano.
Mr. DAVID BISPHAM
will read the Scripture Lesson.
Dr. REILAND
will preach at 11 A. M. and 4 P. M. Vespers.
8 P. M.?'Evening Prayer and Sermon.
Preacher, Rev. WILLIAM H. GIBBONS.
Q/4N THE iL/LBOUWERIK
Tenth Street West ?^Second Avenvj
WILUAA NOilMAN GUTHRIE, Acfi?
11 A. M.?Sermon by the Rector. Subject:
"Why nuit we agree to disagree In religion!"
4 P. M.?Jeanne d'Arc and Marshal Joffro. A
celebration. Col. Bunau-Varllla and W. N. GuUi
rle. French folk songs, etc.. by Mis? Yvonne
Schauffler and Miss Vera Curtis.
8 P., M.?Symbolic service and community singing.
Church of the Heavenly Rest
FIFTH AVE.. ABOVE 4?th ST.
Rev. Herbert Shipman, Rector
will preach at 11 A. M. Service.
"Common Sense and Immortality"
8 P. M. Special Musical Service.
SACRED CANTATA
'The Story of Bethlehem."
CWAPEL OF THE INTERCESSION (Trin?
ity Parish), Broadway and 155th Street.?
Rev. M. H. Gates, D. D., Vicar. 8 and
8:46 a. m., Holy Communion. 9:45, Sunday
School. 11 a. m., Holy Communion and
Sermon, 4 p. m. Popular Vespers. Ital?
ian Music. Mr. Vincent Esposito, tenor.
Mr. Leo Riggs, recital organist. 8 p. m.,
Musical Service. Choir of fifty, assisted
by Mr. Max Olanoff, violinist; Mr. Hans
Kronold, cellist, and Miss Mary Seller,
harpist.
Cathedral of St. John the Divine
Amsterdam Avenue and. 111th Street.
8 A. M.?The Holy Communion.
10 A. M.?Morning Prayer.
11 A. M-?Preaoher, Dean Robblns.
4 P. M.?Preacher, Rev John R. Atkinson.
Daily Services, 7:30 A M.; 6 P. M. (choral
except Monday and Saturday).
Epiphany, Jan. 6th?7:30 A. M. ; 11 A. M.
(choral); 5 P. M. (choral).
Church th? incarnation
M ad I ?on Ave. and 85th St.
The. Bet. HORACE PERCY SILVER. Bactet.
8 A. M. Hijly Communion.
9:30 A. M. Sunday School.
10 A. M. Holy Cummunlon.
11 A. M. Holy Communion. Sermon (Rector)
4 P. M. Special Christmas Musical Service,
selected from the work of H. A. and J. S.
Mathews. John Doe, Organist and Director.
ALL ANGELS' CHURCH
CST END AVE. AND BIST STREBT.
8. De Lancey Townaend, D. D? Rector
H5"ly Communion.8 A. M.
Holy Communion and Sermon
(Rector) .11 A. M.
Choral Evensong (Rev. W. J. D.
Thomas) . 4 P. M.
STRANGERS WELCOME
CHURCH OF THE TRANSFIGURATION
1 East 29th 81? Dr. HOUOHTON, Rector.
COMMUNIONS at 7, 8, and 9 A. M.
11?SERMON and SCHUBERT'S MASS
4?EVENSONG: Garrett's "Magnificat.."
HANDEL'S "There Were Shepherds,"
ELVEY'S "Arise, Shine."
8?SERMON AND COMPLINE.
SOCIETY OF FRIENDS
RELIGIOUS SOCIETY OP FRIENDS. Meetings
for worahtrj, 11 a. ra., at 331 East lMh St. Man
batttan. and 110 Schermerhorn St. Brooklyn.
OTHER SERVICES
nAvTDC ?*-'? RESCUE SOCIETY.
UUIClW Old Chinese Theatre.
_m??!_????? Wide awake Gospel Service,
STREET Mgi.tiy. io v m.
*"' **"->*- * T. J. NOONAN, Supt.
The Universal Church of Jesu? Christ
The Cosmologlst. 600 West 18let St., Hall
No. 19.?Every Thursday night at 8. Sub
Jeot, "The Second Coming of Christ," bjr
Dr. Rlvero. Divine Healing after service.
Classical music. All welcome.
THE UOT9N~TW?OLOOICAI. SEMINARY
Service in the Chapel, Claremont Avenue,
between ISOth and 12ad Streets/ at eleven
o'cloek. Preacher?the Reverend Proteneor
ALBERT PARKER FITCH. D. D,. of
Amherst College.
REFORMED
COLLEGIATE CHURCH OF NEW YORK
THE MIDDLE CHURCH.
2il Ave. and 7th St.
Rev. Edgar Franklin Romig. Minister,
will preach at 11 A. M. and 8 P. M.
THE MARBLE CHURCH.
5th Ave. and 29th St.
Rer. David James Burrnll, D. D.. Minister,
will preach at 11 A. M.
Subject: "Can We Do It?"
Dr. Daniel A. Poling- at 8 P. M.
Subject: "Extremity and Opportunity."
THE CHURCH OF ST. NICHOLAS,
Mb Ave. and 48th St.
Malcolm James MacLeod. Minister.
Dr. MacLeod preaches at 11 and 8.
Evening Subject: "How to Catch the
Blue Bird for 1920."
THE WEST END CHURCH,
Wont End Ave. and 77th St.
Rev. Henry Evertson Cobb. D. D., Minister,
will preach at 11 A. M. and 4:30 P. M.
At 4:30 P. M., Special Music Anthems
for the New Year."
THE FORT WASHINGTON f HCRCH.
Fort Washing-ton Ave. and 181st St.
Rev. Irving H. Berg, D. D., Minister,
will preach at 11 A. M. and 8 P. M.
All Seats Free.
Sunday, January 4th.
DR. BURRELLatll A. M.
DR. POLING at 8:00 P.M.
Marble Collegiate Church
5th Ave. ?c 29th Street
Free Pews
Everybody Welcome
REFORMED CHURCH OF HARLEM
Lenox Avenue and 123d .Street.
Her. KIXJAR TILTON, Jr., D. ?.. Miniate*.
will preach at 11 A. 11. and H P. M.
UNITARIAN
THE COMMUNITY CHURCH
11 A. M.?New Amsterdam Theatre,
Service of Reception to
John Herman Randail
Address?DR. HARRY A. OVERSTREET,
"THE NEW RELIGION IN THE
MAKING."
Address of Welcome.
JOHN HAYNES HOLMES,
HARVEY DEE BROWN
Address of Response?MR. RANDAL!?
. 8:16 P. M.?Forum. P. S. 27.
42d Street and 3d Avenue,
J. A. H. Hopkins, Algernon Lee,
William Kohn. on
"A THIRD PARTY IN 192??
WHAT SHAM. IT BE?"
' 10 A. M.? New Amsterdam Theatre,
HARVEY DEE BROWN,
"Psychoanalytic Studies: The Literary
Creation of Christ."
au g?oui? sas.#
Dr. WILLIAM L. SULLIVAN. Minister.
Service at 11 A. M. ?
"THE REBEL SPIRIT IN RELIGION"
Jt will be DR. SULLIVAN'S subject.
A CORDIAL WELCOME TO ALL
This Church Is dedicated to Religion, not
to dogma. It fosters love to God and m?n-_
? UNITARIAN PREACHINO.
Church of the Saviour, Brooklyn,
Sept. 28, 11 A. M.
REV. JOHN H. LATHROP.
Plerrepont St. and Monroe PI.
?"?or minutes. Borough Hall subsra^__
CH. MESSIAH. GREENE AND CLBRj
mont aies?.?Rev. Floyd Appletoa. ??
Harrisburg. preach??. 11 a. as. _
___. Y. M. C. A.
Two Eminent Speakers:
GIPSY SMITH
The World Renowned Evangelist
DR. S. PARKES CADMAN
msuJSnSi vsoi: c? ?TA "? -*
Mauro* 8t. Brooklyn. t
Or?test Men's Mtetln? to Unmter N?w_xoPfc^
DR. C. WALIjACE PETTY
"Looking the New Year In the Face
SUNDAY. 8:80
Bronx Y. M. C A.. 470 E- I SI?? "^,
' j. W. C. A^
Central Branch. Lexington A-?*, (<*** "T
?P. M.-VBSPKR (WIV1?I.,
? P. M ?'THE OOD OP TO-PAT.
REV. FBRCY ?DROP. ?? I>. ,,?._
Jan. 6.^k?S MAROARB? SLATTBRT.

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