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New-York tribune. [volume] (New York [N.Y.]) 1866-1924, June 11, 1920, Image 16

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Ruth's 16th Homer Wins for Yankees?Giants Lose in Eleventh -^Schupp Beats Dodger?
Clear?-Up Triple by Mays
Factor in 7 to S Triumph
Pitcher Clears Bases in Second Inning, While Babe's
Clout Scores Meusel Ahead in Third; Five New
York Runs in Ninth Inning Nullified by Rain
By W. O. McGeehan
DETROIT^ June 10.?The Yankees took the toothless Tigers again
to-day, and MBabe" Ruth got his sixteenth home run for the current
season. The "Babe" dropped the ball into the right field bleachers with
' Meusel on. Officially, the* score was 7 to 5 for the Yanks, but they made
five more runs in the ninth and left the bases filled with two out, when
the game finally was called by the skeptical Mr. Brick Owens.
It rained copiously from the third*
inning on, but Brick was not convinced
that the grounds were wet until a small
dog ventured beyond his depth in right
field in the ninth and was drowned be?
fore the eyes of the moist spectators.
Finally the clouds dumped most of
Lake Erie into the lot and washed
the customers and the athletes right
f^.out of the place. Owens was treading
^water nea* the home plate when last
seen.
Pitather Aids Own Cause
The Babe drew a base on ball3 from
"Chicken" Okrie in his first appear?
ance, which came in the second inning.
Pratt sacrificed Ruth to second. Ping
Bodie, the Wonderful Wop, also got
a base on balls and so did Truck
Hannah. This brought up Mays, who
gave himself a nice lead by punching
a tripl?* to right, scoring the three
runs. .
But the Tigers bit a big chunk out of
the lead in their half of the same inn
. ing. With languid .Harry Heilman out
Ellison drove a double to center. Pi?
nelli, the young Ping Bodie of Detroit,
hit a triple to right, scoring Ellison.
Ainsmith punched a singlo to left and
Pinelli scored.
Ruth knocked out his first home run
in eight days in the third inning.
Meusel had singled to left, as Is his
wont. Then the Babe got one where he
wanted it and drove it on a line into the
corner of the right field bleachers
scoring Lanky Bob ahead of him. This
makes the sixteenth for the Babe this
season. He now has thirteen to go to
e<*[ual the record of last year, and the
current season is still a mere infant
The Tigers got another run in their
half of the fourth, when Ainsmith
walked, went to second on Okrie's
sacrifice and scored on Young's single,
Walter Pipp opened the fifth with a
triple to center field and scored when
Babe Ruth was thrown out by Young,
With one out in Detroit's fifth, Veach
doubled and scored on Heilman'.
single.
Detroit scored again in the sixth,
Okrie forced Ainsmith, who singled
When Young singled to center Bodie
hit the runner on the throw-in, the
ball rolling into the Tiger dugout, se
"-T '?'? M-9.'
Rain Washe? Out Five Runs
Chicken Okrie filled the bases foi
Mays again in the eighth. Bodia go1
S a base on balls and went to third on i
double by Duffy ? Lewis. Hannal
"walked, but Mays this time popped out
Peck scratched a hit past Pinelli ant
-f-'?
Rogers Hornshy Will
Join Giants Within
Few Days, He Admits
ROGERS HOR?SBY will soon he
sporting the livery of the
Giants, according to a statement
made by himself at Ebbets Field
yesterday afternoon. The Car?
dinals' star infieldcr declared that
a deal had been practically closed
whereby he will be sold to the New
York club for $150.000, and that he
expected to join McGraw's aggre?
gation within the next few days.
Bodie scored. Meusel lifted a fly to ?
left, but Lewis stayed on third. Pipp ?
was thrown out by Young and the rain
got very loose.
The rain pelted down in the ninth
and Brick Owen called a halt after the
Yankees had put two runs across. Ruth
got a base on balls after trying to
bunt. Pratt sacrificed and was safe
when Okrie heaved the ball over first. !
Bodie hit to center and Ruth scored.
Lewis beat a perfect bunt and filled
again. Okrie passed Hannah and
forced Pratt across. Mays was tossed
out by Young and Peckinpaugh popped
to Bush.
Then Owens ordered 'them in out of j
the wet. It was still raining when the I
game was resumed a*ml Meusel walked,
forcing in another run. Pipp walked
and in came another. And Ruth walked
and forced in another. Doc Ayres came
in to the rescue of Okrie and Owens
called another halt.
This ended the incident.
The score:
NEW YORK (A. L.) I DETHOIT (A. TV
uli r li po a el ? ab r h po a o ?
rsrk'p'h. ss.7, 0 7 2 3 0 Young, Hh. ..4 0 2 2 30!
Meusel. 3b. .5 0 1 1 0 0 Bush, ss_4 0 0 J 10!
Pipp, lb-5 1 ? 10 1 0|Shorten, cf..4 0 2 fl 00 ;
Ituth. rf.3 2 1 100 Veach If...4 1 2 2 00 !
Pratt. 2b....20 0 2 2 01 Holl?n n, rf.40 1 1 00,
Bodie. rf_12 0 7 0 ll Ellison, lb..41 1 S 20
Lewis, If-4 0 2 1 0 0 Pinelli, 3b..4 1 1 2-10'
Hannah, c. ..2 2 1 S 0 0 Ainsmith, 0.8 1 2 S 10 !
Mays, P...A4 0 1 0 3 0 Okrie, p.2 1 0 0 40?
Totals ...3171024911 Totals ...335 11 24 12 0 j
New York. 0 3 2 0 10 0 1?7 I
Detroit. 0 2 0 1110 0?5 I
Two-base hits?Ellison, Veach (2), Lewis.
Three-base hits?Mays, Pipp, Pinelli. Homo
run?Ruth. Stolen bases?Shorten, Ruth,
Borlle, Ainsmith. Sacrifices?Pratt (2),
Okrie. Double play?Peckinpaugh and
Meusel. Left on bases?Now York, 8; De?
troit, B. liases' on balls?Off Okrie, 6; off
Mays, 1. Struck out?By, Okrie, 2; by
Mays, 3. I'm pires?Owens and Chill. Timo
of ?ame?2:15.
Police Escort Umpire Rigler
Off Field After Leaders Lose
Fans Resent Decision at?
Plate ; Cardinals Bat |
Grimes Hard ; Score, 9-3
By R. J. Kelly
It was a wild afternoon at Squire
Ebbett'g ball park yesterday. The
Dodgers lost the game to the St. Louis
Cardinals by the score of 9 to 3 and
Umpire Rigler almost lost his life. The
Flatbush aggregation and the as?
sembled multitude took violent excep?
tion to a decision at the plate in the
seventh inning and, when the day's
proceedings had been brought to a
close, the veteran, arbiter had to be
escorted off the field by a squad of
police.
The contest was resolving itself into
a pitching duel between Ferdie Schupp,
the former Giant, and Burleigh
Grimes, who was bent on gaining his j
sixth straight victory, when Horasby
opened the riotous seventh by beatinir
out a hit to Grimes. Fournier and
Schultz walked, filling the bases.
Lavan then shot a single to right,
scoring Hornsby.
Jacques Fournier also tried to score
from second on the hit and Terry
Griffith made a fine throw to Miller.
The play was close, but Miller had
the plate blocked and Fournier ap?
peared to be out.
However, Rigler ruled otherwise and
he was soon surrounded by af howling
mob of Dodgers. Their prote.t.3
availed them not and, while the ex?
citement was at its height Schultz
calmly stole third and Lavan took
second. Miller was ejected from the
fray and "Rowdy" Elliott replaced him.
The crowd vented its wrath with a
torrent of hisses and catcalls which did I
not subside until Rigler had made a |
hasty exit at the end of the game.
This w*s the turning point of the !
battle and the Brooklyn players j
seemed to lose all interest in life in
general and the ball game in partic?
ular, demons then singled to center,
scoring Schultz and Lavan.
Three singles, it brace of infield hits
nrid a base on balls netted the Cards
four more runs in the eighth. Schupp
eased up in the ninth and the Dodgers
chased three runs across the plate.
The ?core. .
ST. I/IT'IB (N. 1,1 | BROOKLYN IN. L.)
ibrhMi? ab r h po a ?
hmlth. cf. 4? 1 4 OO'Olwii, as. #0 1 2 !> 0
>' _ioo_o. If.* 9 0 2 ??Johnston 3b'.. 8 . J ??
V .-?* 8b ..II 1 1 2 0Wh.at. ?...6? 0 6 0 0
RoRMby, 2b 4 I 2 1 lO'Mvcr?. d. ..8 0 1 1 11
V-im'r. lb 8 2 ill 1 ?'. HrVdt. lb.4 1 118 _ 0
! Imita, rf 3 2 2 1 OO'r.rlffflh. rf. 2 0 0 0 00
T.viin, ss 42 1 8 3 1'N.I.. rf.11 1 0 n 0
< '-mena. e. 4 0 2 4 1 .'Kllduff, 21?..4 0 0 1 . 0
_? :.'lt*>. P 30 0 0 JOlMiilM. ?-..10 0 4 no
?Kill. (t. e ...21 1 4 10
?Iririv*. p ? 3 0 1 0 4 1
M_h_rt, p. ..0 0 l> 0 10
?Knww ...H 0 0 0 0
IMllJu? _10 1 0 0 0
T..t*l? .33? 11 27 1? li Tot_l? ,. .37 . 1? 27 .9 2
>B*U?4*fof ?'rlftlth U> n-vcntl- inning.
1 '..??<?,i for Mohart In ninth Inning.
St. l>.ul__ 0 10 0 0 0 4 4 0?!>
Brooklyn. ... ??O00000 3-3
Thr.^-ba?e hit? Horneiby. Htol<*n I???.?
If. ?cheot-, Fourni-r. Schultz, Lavan, Olson,
B-h?n.ndt. Ha-rl??-.m- ? Hornaby, Bchugp
l?'/Obl?t> play? l,.v?n and fourni.r: GrimM,
.'!?_<n and H'lhtnaridt, Uy*n and Johnnton.
K.iiuff, Otara ?t?.| gcBman?t. I.'ft on
v,.-.?i*ii?Ht I..U.I-, 6; Brooklyn. 9. f. , . ? on
ball??Off Schupp, L'; off Oriro?*?. 4; <?fr
Mo hart, l mt_?-Ofl Grim??. 10 in 71 .t
Inning?; off Moh.il, 1 In 1 2-3, Kit by
plf.-h.r- By 'irlrn?*? (Smith). Htru'k out
By H.hupp, 4. by Crimea, f. ; by Motiart.
1. i'aa?*,'l ball- Mill'-r I,o?.lrig pUflhei
Grim**. Omplr**- Bigler und Moran i
Tim? ?_ ??r?.* ?55.
PIA- York Boy TradTLeaflrr !
PROVIDENCE, B. 1., ./_:?. 10, c. \\.
f.uddeback, former 8tuy.9g_.nf; llieh
...?.ool i.N'.iy- York) record ?holder in
the 220-yard da.h, to ?lay wa?. eiert, d
?t-aptaln of the Brown 1,'niv. rsity track I
t-.m.
.lanta t?, CiMttBtS?ti 'Vo-day?8:,',<) V W
??>>', i;r-,in?(, A4m, ... ?fe .1.10, ?i,?.i. lh'?
Five Leading Batters
In Two Big Leagues
AMERICAN UBA&UE
Player, Club. (?. AB. R. H. PC.
Staler, St. Louis... 45 181 86 70 .387
Speaker, Cleveland 47 177 46 68 .384
i .Jackson. Chicago. 43 176 35 65 .369
Johnston, Cleve... 45 164 16 .r>9 .360
Milan, Wosh'ton.. 45 105 33 70 .35!)
NATIONA1. LEAGlB
Player, Club. O. AB. *R. H. PC.
fornsby, St. Louts. 47 100 30 71 .389
>aubert, Cin'nati.. 43 168 30 59 .351
Robertson, Chicago 41 156 21 53 .340
Groh, Cincinnati.. 44 173 32 _58 .335'
Duncan, Cin'nati.. 45 171 23 55 .322
I-1
Maranville's Hit Wins
For Braves in Ninth
BOSTON, June 10.?An error by
Caton, an infield out and Maranville's
bounding single to center gave Boston
a run, with two out, in the last of
the ninth and a 2 to 1 victory over
Pittsburgh to-day. Scott had the bet?
ter of Cooper in a well-pitched game.
The score:
PITTSBURGH (N. T. ) | BOSTON (S. L)
ab r h po a e! ab r h po a ??
Blithe*. If...401 3 0 0? Powell, cf....300 3 10
Putshaw, 2b.4O0 ' 5 0 Pick, 2b.3 0 0 0 60
Carev. of_20 0 S 0 0' Siilllran, 1?..4 0 0 2 0 0
Hnutliw'h, rf 2 1 1 2 OOM'riilse. rf_4 10 2 0 0
Whined, 3b.2 0 0 2 ll.liolko, lb.4 0 2 12 10
Schmidt, C..4 0 1 ?: 1 01 Boeckel, 3b..4 11 0 00
Caton. sa....401 2 1 ll.Muranv'lo. ss.4 0 1 5 00
<**rimm. lb. ..3 0 1 7 2 0 O'Neil, c.30 3 2 2 0
Cooper, p. . . 2 0 I) 1 2 0| Sr-ott. p.3 0 0 1 3 0
Totals ...27 1 5*26 12 2I Totals ....322727130
?Two out when winning run ?cored.
Pittsburgh.. . 0 10 0 0 0.00 0?1
Boston. OOOOlOOO 1?2
Two-base hit?Boeckel. Stolon bases ?
Carey, Southworth. Sacrifices?Southworth,
Whltted, Cooper. Double plays?Cutshaw,
Caton and Grimm; Powell and Maranville.
Left on bases?Pittsbursh, 6; Boston, 6.
Bases on balls?Off Cooper, 1; off Scotts 8.
Hit by pitcher?By Cooper (Powell); by
Scott (Southworth). Struck out ? By
Cooper, 3; by Scott, 1. Umpires?Quigley
and O'Day. Time of game?1:30.
Phila. Golfers to Meet
for Women for Trophy
PHILADELPHIA, June 10. ? New
York will meet Philadelphia In the
finals to-morrow for the Griscom Cup,
which symbolizes the woman's golf
team Eastern championship. Philadel?
phia defeated Boston at the Philadel?
phia Cricket Club here to-day, ten
matches to five. New York beat the
Bostonians yesterday by the same
count. New York holds the champion?
ship at the present time.
Mrs. Ronald II. Barlow, again East?
ern champion, defeated Miss Marriott
S. Curtis, a former National champion,
and champion of the Bostoji district,
at the thirteenth flag, 7 and 5. Mrs.
Barlow was '.i up at the turn, sank a
par 5 at the long tenth for a awin and
reeled off the 8 "Devil's Kitchen" holes
in a row of wins, 4 -4?:.f.
#
A Handy Man Around the House - By briggs
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Red Sox Smother
League Champions
For Third Straight
CHICAGO, June 10.?The Boston Red
Sox found Cicotte and Kerr for eighteen
hits to-day and defeated the White Sox
for the third straight time, 8 to 1.
The only Chicago run was scored off
Harper, who was wabbly in the first
inning. After he had passed a batter
in the second inning he was sup?
planted by Russell.
The score:
BOSTON (A. L)
ah r h i)o a e
H.ioper, rf..6 1 1 2 0 0
Vltt, 2b_SI 2 3 3 0
Me'skey. lr.r. i l 4 0 1
Hindryx, cf.7, 14 0 0 0
Melnnis, lb.4 2 3 11 0 0
Poster, 3b...r> 0 12 0 0
Scott, as. . .5 0 1 2 4 0
Si'liang, C..3 2 2 8 10
Harper, p. .0 0 O o 0 0
Russell, p. .5 0 3 0 4 0
CHICAGO (A. !..)
ab r h po a e
Ixsibold. rf. ..3 1 0 1 0 0
E Collins. 2b.3 0 3 3 6 0
Weaver, ss...4 o o 4 HO
Jackson, If...4 0 1 4 o o
FMach, cf. ...4 0 2 1 0 0
.?. Collins 1K3 0 112 0 0
McMullln, 3b.4 0 0 100
Schalk, C....4 0 1 1 0 0
Cicotte, p. . .2 0 0 0 10
Kerr. p.100 0,0 0
?Murphy _10 1 0/00
Totals . .43 S 18 27 12 1! Totals . ...33 1 9 27 13 0
?Batted for Kerr In ninth inning.
Boston. 0 0 2 110 3 0 1?8
Chicago. 10 0 0 0 0 0 0 0?1
Two-bq-se hits?Vltt (2), Felsen, Murphy.
Three-base hit?E. Collins. Homo run?
Sehang. Sacrifices?E. Collins, "Mclnnis.
Double plays?Vltt and Mclnnis; Weaver,
E. Collins and J. Collins: ftohang and Vltt ;
E. Collins, Weaver and J. Collins. Left on
bases?Chicago, 9; Boston, 11. Bases on
balls?Off Harper, 2; off Cicotte, 2; off
Russell, 1. Hits?Off Harper, 2 in 1 In?
ning (none out'ln second); off Cicotte, ] .|
in 6 (none out ?n seventh). Struck out?
By Russell, 3. Wild pitch?Harper. Win?
ning pitcher?Russell. Umpires?Connolly
and Moriarty. Time of K?me?1 :5;7.
> -
Browns on Batting Spree,
Trounce Senators, 15-1
ST. LOUIS, June 10.?The Browns to?
day swamped Washington, 15 to 1, driv?
ing Shaw from the box and hitting
Schacht at will. Sisler led in the at?
tack with four hits, one being a home
run.
The score:
WASHINGTON (A. L.) I ST. LOT'IS (A. TV
ab rhpn? ?! ab r n po a e
?Shanks. lb...4O0 8 1 11 Tobin. rf...5 2 1 5 0 0
Milan, If.212 0 0 OlGixleon. 2b.5 114 40
Catvo, If.000 1 n 0 Sisler, lb..5 4 4 8 00
Itlco rf .4 00 5 0 Ol.Tacobs'n, cf.il 2 3 o oo
Both, rf.4 0 7 0 ?i ohVllll'ms. If.5 12 3 00
llnrrls. 2b_30 1 3 1 0 T'pson, 3b.3 2 2 121
Kllerbe, 3b...3 0l 0 7 0|(?erhcr. .ss.3 113 .r? 0
O'Neill, ss.,.,3 0 1 5 3 2 [Soveriod, c.4 12 3 10
Shannon, ?8...10 0 0 0 Ol Davis, p. >4 1 1 0 1 0
Gharrity, e. ..2 o o i o o
Torres, e.2 0 0 110
Shaw p.10 0 0 011
Schacht, p...2 0 0 oil
".Johnson _1 P 0 0 0 0
Totals _32 1 7 2494
Totals ..39 If. 17 27 14 1
?Batted for Schacht in ninth Inning.
Washington, o o 0 0 0 0 0 1 0? 1
St. LoulSw. 0 0 6 10 7 10 x?15
Two-base hits?Milan (2), Sisler, Sev
ereid. Three-base hit?Severeid. Home
run??Staler. Stolen bases?Sisler, Jacob
son, Williams, Thompson. Sacrifices?
Ellerbe, Tobin, Gerber. Double plays?
Shanks, O'Neill and Shanks; Gedeon, Ger?
ber and Sisler. Left on bases?Washing?
ton. 8; St. Louis, 7. Bases on balls?Off
Shuw, 2; oft Schacht, 3; off Davis, 2. Hits
?Off Shaw, 3 in 2 innings (none out in
third); off Schacht. 14 in ?. Hit by pitcher
?By Davis (Harris). Struck out?By
Schacht, 1; by Davis, 2. Losing pitcher?
Shaw. Umpires?Dinneen and Nallin.
Time of game?2 :0f?.
Donley Battles Simler
in Bayonne- To-night
The Bayonne A. A. will have the box?
ing field in Jersey to itself to-night,
and a fine card has been arranged,
featured by two twelve-rounders. In
the main event Hickey Donley, of New?
ark, will meet Chick Simler, of Scran
ton, while Walter Donovan, of Staten
Island, will oppose Dan Lynch, of
Bayonne, in a middleweight Contest.
Donley and Simler are ranked with
the best, lightweights in the game to?
day. Both have fought thar leading
contenders, for Benny Leonard's crown,
while Simler has the distinction of
having gone the route with the cham?
pion.
Record of Major League Clubs
NATIONAL LEAGUE
GAMES TO-DAY
Cincinatl at New York.
St. Louis at Brooklyn.
Chicago at Philadelphia.
Pitt.burgh at Boston.
YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
Cincinnati, 2; New York, 1 (11 1ns.).
St. Louis, 9; Brooklyn, ?3.
Phil?., 9; Chl.aRo, 8 (11 Ins.).
Boston, _; "Pittsburgh, I.
STANDING OF TEAMS
W.L.Ptt. W.I-.PH.
Bklvn, . 2717 .614 Plttsb'h. 20 21.4.H
?'ln'nati. 2? Ml .57? Bonton . 20 22.476
St. Lui? 'i- ? 28 JH IN. York 20 2? .488
Chicago* 24 24 ..'.OOJ'hila. 18 27.400
au?wm t ? ] .
AMERICAN LEAGUE
GAMES TO-?.AY
New York at Detroit.
Philadelphia at Cleveland.
Boston a I Chicago.
Washington A\ gt. Louis.
YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
New York, 7; Detroit, 5 (8th; rain).
Cleveland, 7; Philadelphia, 2.
St. Louis, 15; Washington, 1,
Boston, 8; Chicago, 1.
STANDING OF TEAMS
W.L.IVt.i W.L.Pcl.
Clovel'r, 8116.660Chicago, 23 22.532
N. York. 32 17.658 St. Louis 18 27 .400
Boston.. 25 18 .581? Phi la... . Hi .'12 .3.1.1
Wash..".'. 24 21 ,588 Detroit... H 32 .804
Concerning Grips
How many men, playing baseball or golf, grip a bat or a club a cer?
tain way because they were taught that way? Because they happened
to start that way? Because, after various tests, they found a certain way
best suited to their style?
And, after all, just how much difference does it make the way you
grip a baseball bat or a golf club? Does it make a big difference?or is
it a minor matter?
Many, Varieties
Perhaps you've never turned on a close-up of "Babe" Ruth's grip.
? The "Babe" first puts the end of the bat in the palm of his right hand.
He literally palms the end, his left hand being crowded upon his right.
I Both are naturally enough (under these circumstances) as close to the
gripping end as it is possible to get.
Only a batter with unusual physical power in his hands and arms
could swing a long, heavy bat with this grip, which permits the maximum
,of leverage.
Ruth's grip is entirely different from Ty Cobb's. Ty's right hand is
near the end of the bat, but his left is several inches higher up. There is j
a distinct space of at least five or six inches between the two hands. Both
Ruth and Cobb differ in every way from Willie Keeler, who adopted the |
fashion of gripping the bat near the middle. When the Wee One picked !
up a bat and faced the pitcher, there was as much ash furniture below !
his hands as there was above to hit the ball. Then, again, Ed Roush,
National League champion, has another way of gripping, as he holds
both hr.nds together, aboufc six inches from the end.
All Different
So here we have four notable batsmen who all hold their bats in dif?
ferent ways. Cobb, Ruth, Roush and Keeler for one reason or another
find it more effective to follow a certain system.
They may have begun that way?they may have been taught that way '
? ?or they may have worked out their systems from many experiments.
But the fact is they get result with varying grips.
The Same in Golf,
The golf grip is supposed to be quite important. Yet Walter Hagen,
i open champion, uses the overlapping* grip; Francis Ouimet, ex-open and
i ex-amateur champion, uses the interlocking grip, with the little finger of
his right hand and the forefinger of his left hand hooked; Jerome D.
Travis;' four times amateur champion, uses the V-grip, where his hands
are neither overlapped nor interlocked. "Chick" Evans uses a still dif
ferent grip, with both thumbs down the shaft.
Hei*e we have such golfers as Hagen, Ouimet, Travers and Evans all
gripping the club in various ways?and all good enough to win open or
amateur championships.
The main thing seems to be to get a grip that is comfortable, that
feels natural and that gives a feeling of some power. Hagen would likely ;
have played just as good golf with Ouimet's grip?and Ouimet would have
played just as good golf with the Evans or Travers grip.
It doesn't seem to make much difference as long as other necessary
ingredients are applied.
Yet in golf it might be stated that most of the leading "pros" use ?
\ the overlapping grip, so when in doubt follow the main average.
Extended Leverage
It might be noted in passing that two of the most remarkable hitters
of all time use the system of extended leverage.
I These two are "Babe" Ruth and Jack Dempsey. ;
By extended leverage we mean a leverage that begins at the waist in
the first pivot, and that extends through the shoulders, elbows, wrists, on
to the punch.
Ruth ,could never get the distance he. does by merely slashing away
? with his arms. The pivot from his waist line starts his big body back of
' the blow, with his arms and wrists merely contributing their share.
In the same way Dempsey has a pivoting motion from his right hip
j that gets in back of a short jab and adds a tremendous amount of power
i to the punch.
There is a sudden twist to the body just above the right hip that gets
in back of the wallop at the proper moment.
Through his abnormal knack at controlling his timing Dempsey has
been able to knock down 240 and 2^0 pounders with one rap.
In a game such as billiards, much more delicate timing is required,
but it is a simpler matter to control timing where the power of the body
isn't needed so often to deliver the smash. It is much simpler to merely
control the wrists and forearms than it is to control these in conjunction
with the shoulders and the body.
Heydler Suspends Rnu.li
Eddie Rouah, centerfleldor of the
Cincinnati Nationals, iwbb Indefinitely
SU.ponded yesterday by President
iicydlcv, nnd Cntchef Ivy Win,'? . of tii?
samo team was lined $60, Both play
I ctH were punlshod for threatening Um?
pire McCorniick at t.ho Pol? Grounds
I during Tuesday's game.
-,?_____
!
Y ??le Freshmen Defeated
(?ALKS FERRY. Conn., ?Tune 10.
Yale's second varsity eight defeated
the freshmen in a ten-minute work-out
mi the Thames River this forenoon,
The winning diatanco was three-fourths
| of a length. Tlu? lirrt varsity boat had
! ii n cany row. Lawrence and Love joy
I aro.atlH out.
Single by Pitcher
Wins for Phillies
In 11th Inning
PHILADELPHIA, June 10.?Pitcher
Gallia's single won an eleven-inning
battle for Philadelphia over Chicago
to-day, driving home Paulette with the
winning run. The score was 9 to 8.
Gallia also pitched sensationally in the
pinches.
Home runs by Meusel and Tragesser,
each with two on bases, gave Causey a
lead, but he could not hold it.
The score:
CHICAGO <N. I?) IPHILADELPHIA (N. L.)
ah r h r- _ e ?h r h po a e
Klaok, 1....8 2 2 3 1 0 UawIiiiKs. 2b. 5 0 1 0 20
Holl'her, s_.5 1 S 1 5 1 Williams, cf. 5 1 13 01
Torry- :b...5 0 3 4 0 0 Ktongel, rf....2 2 2 00
Kob'tinn, lf.fi 1 1 3 0 0 Meusel, If. ..5 1 3 2 10
Morid??. 11)..5 0 0 9 10!!,. Ilnu'u. lf.l 0 0 1 00
Deal. 3b...5 1 1 _ 31 -..teller, ss.BO 2 3 6 0
Harbor, cf..2 1 1 3 0 0 Paulotte, lb.6 2 2 12 0 0
tPaskert ...0 0 0 0 0 0|R. Mli'r. 3b.5 2 4 4 01
tKrliiBrR. <?/_! o o 5 0 0 Tragresser, C.5 1 1 6 10
O'FarreU, c.4 1 2 2 0 0 Causey, p...20 0 0 00
Hendrlx, p.O 1 0 0 0 0'Wnin.iift, p.0 0 0 0 0 0
Martin, p. ..0 0 0 0 0 0 Qallla, P-4 0 1 0 2 0
? Twombly ..10 0 0 0 0
Carter, p...3 0 0 0 2 0
Totals ..44 S 13-32 12 2! Totals . ..40 3 IT S3 12 2
?Two out when winning run scored.
tBatted for Barber in fifth inning.
tRan for Paskert In fifth inning.
?Batted for Martin in fourth Inning.
Chicago. 002-1110000 0?8
Philadelphia. 3030100 100 1?9
Two-base hits?Flack (2), Terry (2),
O'FarreU (2), Hollocher, Fletcher. Home
runs?Meusel, Tragesser. Stolen bases?
Flack, Williams. Sacrifices?R. Miller.
Terry. Left on bases?Chicago, I?; Phila?
delphia. 13. Hases on balls?Off Hendrlx,
2; off Martin, 1; off Carter, 1; off Causey,
3; off Welnert, 2, Hits?Ctft Hendrlx, 7 in
2 Innings (none out in third); off Martin,
1 in 1 ; off Carter, 9 in 8: off Causey, 6 in
3 2-3; off Welnert, 2 in 1 ; off Gallia, 5 in
?i 1-3. Struck out?By Carter, 1; by
Causey, 1 ; by Gallia, 4. Balk?Welnert.
Winning pitcher.?-Gallia. Losing pitcher??
Carter. Umpires?Klein and Emslie. Time
of game?2:35.
Coveleskie Scores Over
Mack's Recruit Pitcher
CLEVELAND, June 10.?Hasty, a re?
cruit pitcher, had a bad inning to-day,
the fifth, and Cleveland beat Philadel?
phia, 7 to 2. Smith hit for a home run
with two on. Coveleskie was a mys?
tery except in two innings.
The acore:
PHILADELPHIA (A L.M CLEVELAND (A. I?.)
ab r h o a o ab r h po a e
Dykes, 2b...4 12 3 3 1 .Tam!.?-on, If.3 1 1 1 00
Tilomas, 3I-I..4 0 0 3 1 0 Chapman, ss. 3 1 1 2 40
Strunk lf.,.4 0 2 ? 0 01 Speaker, ?'f..4 1 0 4 00
Iltirnis, 11?. .4 0 1 11 1 0 Smith, rf...3 2 2 3 00
Myatt. rf...4oni l 0 flardnar, 3I>4 0 2 1 20
Oallaway, ss.4 0 0 :?' 4 0 Wamb's, 2b..4 0 1 3 30
WVisli, cf...3 0 0 1 0 0 Johnston, Hi.4 1 1 9 00
Porklns, o...200 " 1 OlO'XeilI. c.,,4 1 2 4 10
Styles, <?_111 0 1 0 Covol'e. p...20 1 0 20
Hasty, p_2 0 0 i 10
K?mmcl. p. ..1 0 1 0 0 0
Totals ...33 2 7 24 13 11 Ti.tals ...3171127120
Philadelphia. 10 0 00001 0?2
Cleveland... 0 0 0 0 6 0 10 x?7
Two-baser?hits?Dykes, O'Neill, Jamie
son, Chapman. Three-base hit?Smith.
Hume run?Smith. Sacrifices?Chapman,
Coveleskie. Double plays ? Chapman,
W'ambsganss and Johnston'; Myatt and
Hurrus. Left on bases?Philadelphia, 5;
Cleveland, 4. Bases on balls?Off Hasty,
2; off Coveleskie, 1. Hits?Oft Hasty, 8 In
6 Innings; oft" Rommel, 3 in 3. Struck out
-By Hasty, 2; by Coveleskie, 4. Losing
pitcher ? Hasty. Umpires?-Evans and i
Hildebrand. Time of game?1:31.
Princeton Nine Defeats
Westerners by 9 to 5
PRINCETON, N. J., June ?0.?Cali- !
fornia's baseball nine lost a loosely
played contest to Princeton here this '
afternoon by the score of 9 to 5. The '
Westerners established a lead in the I
first two sessions, but succumbed in the
third and fourth, when eight hits and
some clever base running netted nine
Tiger tallies.
The score:
Princeton ....00072000 0?9 12' 2
California ...1 3 0 0 0 0 1 0 1?6 8 2
Batteries?St. John, Lyons and Fischer;
l?llison an?l Toomoy.
Cornell Team Going Abroad
ITHACA, N. Y., June 10.?Cornell's
cross-country team will meet a com- j
bined Cambridge and Oxford team in
England in December. The Cornell |
team of seven men will leave early in
December and return before January
... the race to be shortly after
Christmas.
Fordham's Captain
Refuses Giant Offer
THERE is one college baseball
player who is not enthused at
the chance to Join a major league
club?and the (liants at thaC AI
I.efevre. captain und shortstop of this
year's Ford ha in nine, ye. it* rdny re?
jected nn-offer from Manager Mc
Graw to join the Polo (?rounders
II in believed I hi:! Lefcvre's refusal
v us occasioned by the small sum
proffered. Hov. ever, the collegian i?
considering the proposition.
Rariden's Pinch
Single Defeats
His Old Team
Ex-New Yorker Scores Dau
bert With Decisive Run
i'or Champion Reds, 2-1
By Charles A. Taylor
"Dutch" Ruether,"Whoa Bill"Rariden,
George Burns. Dave Bancroft and Um
[ pire Barry McCormack were the cen?
tral figures in the eleven-inning game
which went to the credit of the Cin
I cinnati Reds at the Polo Grounds yes?
terday. The score was 2 to 1, in favor
? of the world champions.
Ruether shone by his magnificent
! pitching, allowing only four hits
' throughout the entire eleven-inning
I spasm. But "Dutch" spoiled it all by
j his senseless kicking at the decisions
I of McCormack on balls and strikes.
! When "Dutch" got peeved, as he often
; did, he tossed his glove into the dust
j on the mound and received the usual
| "razzes" from the stands. Ruether's
peevishness almost cost him the game.
"Whoa Bill" Rariden ranked second to
? the southpaw in importance. The ex
' Giant was inserted as a pinch hitter
' for Chad See in the fatal eleventh
and tapped such a wicked grounder to
Bancroft that little Dave got all caflum
maxed and Jake Daubert crossed the
plate with the winning run.
Giants Tie in Ninth
George1 Burns, the third man on the
list of notables, distinguished himself
by hitting a double in the ninth inning.
which led to the Giant's lone run and
sent the game into extra sessions. As
for Dave Bancroft, the new Giant, he
performed nobly until the crisis came
in the eleventh, and he conlr't be
blamed very much for his failure to
handle the ticklish roller that settled
the controversy.
Barry McCormick had no friends
j when the game ended. Shufflin' Ph?l
; Douglas, who started in the box for
1 the Giants, and Rube Benton, who suc
'. ceeded Phil so that Lew McCarthy
might have a swipe at the ball, were
: of the same opinion as Ruether as re
i garded McCormack's decisions. The
j fans, of course, voted unanimously
i that Barry was the most incompetent
j of incompetents behind the old plate.
For six innings the. two teams strug
! gled in vain to push the essential runs
! across the plate. The break came in
I the seventh, which Kopf opened with
a pass to first. Neale sacrificed, Sick?
ing to Kelly, and Wingo smashed the
ball to center for the hit that tallied
I Kopf. King, who was subbing for
I Benny Kauff, made a glorious try for
i a shoe-string catch, but the ball eluded
? him.
The McGraw men were mowed down
with regularity- by Ruether until the
! ninth frame, which was as full of
! thrills as the most ardent fan could
desire. McCarty, batting for Douglas,
wormed a walk out of Ruether and
Kauff was nominated to do the running
for Lew. G?orgie Burns hit smartly to
left for two bases and Benny ambled
to third.
Passed Ball Nets Run
Bancroft drew a pass, the fourth
ball being low and speeding through
Wingo's glow Kauff-tallied on the
miscue. Things looked most promis?
ing, but Ross Young blurred the
scenery with a line drive to Groh,
who steoped on third, extinguishing
Burns for a double killing.
The Reds won the game in the.
eleventh. Daubert singled to center
as a starter and went to third on
Groh's liner to right. Rariden, hitting
for See, drove the troublesome ground?
er referred to above, which Bancroft
messed up, and Daubert counted with
the decisive run.
The score:
CINCINNATI (N. TV ] NEW YORK (N. L.)
ab r li po a e a'i ?? li pu ? e
Rath. 2b_4 0(1 7 4 0 Rums. If_7,0 1 Xi 0 0
Daubert. lb.5 1 2 11 0 0! Bancroft, ?3S..4 0 1 ?> CO
<*roh, Sb_50 1 :i 1 01 Young, rf_3 00 3 0 0
See rf.400 2 0 01 Doyle, 2b_501 4 s I
Duncan, lf..5 0 2 3 or King, cf.40 1 4 0 0
Kopf, as.411 3 3 0 Ricking, 3b. ..4 0 0 2 2 1
Neale, cf....4 0(l 4 O 01 Kelly, lb-3 0 1A1 2 1
wingo. c_40 1 5 2 0Snyder, o ? 4 0 nw:i M o
Kuetlier. p. ..3 0 1 0 2 0 ?Douglas, p. .2 0 0 1 1?
-Rariden ...10 1 0 0 0i Vii-Carty ...00? 0 on
Crane, rf_00 0 O.OOiiKauff .010 0 0 0
I Benton. p-10 0 0 0 0
Totals ... 39 2 9 33 12 lj Totals .... 35 1 5 33 17 3
?Ratted for See in eleventh inning.
fBatteil for Douglas in ninth inning.
JRan for McCarty in ninth inning.
Cincinnati. 0000001000 1?2
New York. 0000000010 0?1
Two-base hit ? Burns. Stolen base ?
Daubert. Sacrifices?Neale, Ruether. Double
play?Groh (unassisted!. Left on basses?
New York, 6; Cincinnati, 8. Bases en
balls?Off Ruether, 4; off Douglas, 2. Hits
?Off Douglas, 6 In 9 Innings; off Benton,
3 in XI. Hit by pitcher?By Ruether
(Young). ^Struck out?By Ruether, 5; by
Douglas, ? Wild pitch?Ruether. Dosing
pitcher ? Benton, empires ? McCormick
and Harrison. Time of game?2:25.
Hagen and Barnes Beat
English Stars on Links
CROYDON, Eng., June 10.?Walter
Hagen and Jim Barnes, the American
professional golfers, defeated the
Englishmen, George Duncan and Abe
Mitchell, in a match on the Eddington
course of thirty-six holes for a stake
of $1,000 to-day by 3 up and 2 to play.
The feature of the Americans' play
was the steady, sound golf they dis?
played. TJ??re was nothing spectacular
about their work, but they missed no
reasonable putt, and although they
were three down at the turn their
steadiness served them sufficiently to
bring them to the front by one hole
at the eighteenth.
The carc|s:
MORNING ROUND
Hagen-Barnes?
Out- 4G355484 4?ST
Duncan-Mitchell?
Out- 34 3 44435 4?33
Hagen-Burnes?
In...... 4 8 4 3 4 4 4 8 5?34?71
Duncan-Mitchell?
I?. * 3 4 4 5 4 5 4 5?38?71
AFTERNOON ROUND
Hagen-Barnes?
Out- 3 5 344434 .4?34
Duncan-Mitchell?
Out.... 3 6 4 4 B 4 S 4 6?35
Hagen-Barnes? (S4 hol(f!l)
?. i. ? 4 3 5 4 4?26??0?131
^Duncan-MltoheU-I " " * 'Vholi??
In. * 3 6 R 4 4 4?27?62?133
-?-?
Skeeters Take Second
Straight From Syracuse
JERSEY CITY, June 10.?Jersey City
made it two straight from Syracuse by
winning to-day's game. 2 to 1. Three
hits bunche?! in the first inning brought
in the two runs, while Gill's pitching
held the visitors to four scattered hits
and a single tally.
Th? score:
R. H. E.
Syracuse .oooioooo o_i 4 3
Jeraey City ... .20000000 x?2 6 b
Batteries??Perryman, Tlp?le and Mad?
den; Gill und Freitag. *
Southern Association
New Orleans, 7; DUtle Rock. 1.
Birmingham, 4; Chattanooga, 1
Atlanta, 3; Nashville, 2.
Memphis. 17; Mobile, 8.
American Association
Columbus, 3; Milwaukee, 1
Toledo, 3 ; St. Paul 2.
Louisville, s; Ivansng City fi
Minneapolis, 8; Indianapolis, 7
Eastern League
PUt afield, 7; Springfield, 5.
Albany, 16 ? rVaterbury. ?7
New H?ven. t; Bridgeport. 1.
?tii?.!>all To-day?Kbbt-t* Field
Brooklyn YH. ?fc L,uula-^S:3? I'.M.?Advt.
18,000 pairs of men's
shoes less one day's brisk
selling equals what?
No chance to figure it
all we could do to take care
of the crowds.
The "mountains" of shoes
(all from our regular stock)
are again tidied up and our
selling force rested and
ready to go on with the fan!
It started yesterday as
follows :?
10,446 pairs.
All sizes.
Black. Tan. Low. High.
\ More low than high.
852 were $17.50
4535 were $20.00
2402 were $21.00
1156 were $21.50
1501 were $22.50
$12.50.
Other makes; odd lots;
high blacks and tans.
2,491 pairs.
152 were $13.00
167 were $14.00
224 were $14.50
497 were $15.00
1451 were $16.00
$10.
Still others!
3719 pairs; high blacks
and tans with a good
sprinkling of low.
161 were' $9.00
1179 were $10.00
1468 were $11.00
911 were $12.00
1 $6.50.
. Also 910 pairs of white
sport shoes; buckskin; rub?
ber soled ; leather soled.
Were $15.00 to $22.
$12.50.
Plenty men's suits at $50
and $60.
Rogers Peet Company
Broadway Broadway
at 13th St "Four at 34tb St
Convenient
Broadway Corners" Fifth Ave.
at Warren at 41? St
Notre Dame Picks Captain
NOTRE DAME, Ind. June 10.?Cyrf
Casper, of St. Clt'id, Minn, h? *>"*
elected captain of the Notre V~aV
track squad. Casper is a junior if jP
School of Commerce.
RACING
AT BEAlTlFl'l
BELMONT
PARK
TODAY
PLATTSDALE HANDICAP
2 MILE STEEPLECHASE
Q?0G?E HANDICAP
and 3 Other ThrilUn?; Co-it***
FIRST RACE AT 2:?0 P. St
SPECIAL RACK TKAINS .
lrav? lVnna. Station. 3Srt Pt MM ??*?"
Av , also KlRlbuMi Av.. Brooklyn.?
IS:S0 and al Intervals ur to ?'?*?.?
M. Special Cara K?->wrvrd for !**"*
Ctsurae ai*o reached h>* trolley. ?
Grand Stmul * ra<lil?k. M???.
Indio? i*l.fl.*v. InrlndlnitWarjn?

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