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New-York tribune. [volume] (New York [N.Y.]) 1866-1924, July 15, 1920, Image 8

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Help Put Flag
In Every Port,
Benson Urges
Private Ownership and Op?
eration of Merchant Ma?
rine Policy Outlined by
Shipping Board Head
To Extend Trade Routes
! Vessels To Re Sold Soon
Will Be Placed on the
Market at a Fixed Price
The whole problem of the American
Merchant Marine and the policies of
the United States Shipping Board with
regard to its development were discussed
yesterday by Rear Admiral William S.
Benson at a luncheon at the Waldorf
Astoria, under the auspices of the Ad?
vertising Agencies' Corporation.
More than 250 newspaper and peri
? odical publishers and advertising and
shipping men were present and neard
Admiral Benson's appeal for publicity
to help the Shipping Board carry out
its plans of putting the American flag
in every port of the world.
After giving a detailed summary of
the condition of the Ameucan Merchant
Marine. Admiral Benson laid down the
following cardinal principles of the
board:
Th? board will insist emphatically
upon a policy of private ownership and
operation of the merchant marine.
In devising and executing measures
for the extension of trade routes and
the development of ports the board
will afm to develop the ports through?
out the country, and especially those
along the Gulf of Mexico, for the South
American trade. It will oppose vigor?
ously any concentration of labor on
ingle ports like New York, Boston or
Philadelphia.
Fixed Prices Mast Be Paid
The ships to be sold soon by the
; oard will be put on the market at a
ixed price. Purchasers will have to
i>sy the fixed price for all ships. In
-oiling the government's ships and lay
i>ig down rules and regulations, as well
r.s in indicating new trade routes, the
?.-?overnment at all times will protect
) f_Uy the interests of the shipowners
::?id shipyards.
The Admiral said he total seagoing
merchant marine of the United States
??n June 30 consisted of 3,404 vessels of
: 1,278,741 gross tons, or approximately
:;.918,212 deadweight tons. Of this
total the Shipping Board now owns
1,502 vessels of 0,238,948 gross tons,
equivalent to 9,358,421 deadweight tons.
Of this total owned by the Shipping
Board 673 vessels of 2,621,712 dead?
weight ton? are vessels of less than &00
deadweight tons each. Vessels between
600 and 6,000 deadweight tons number
146, ?r r6*,853 deadweight tons.
? Admiral B-enson urged his audience
to fight vigorously -what he called the
widespread idea that the government
-should own and operate the merchant
marine.
, , He assured those present that there
would be no ridiculously low prices
placed on ships by the government, as
this would discourage shipbuilding and
destroy the facilities for filling gaps
in th? merchant fleet.
He spoke of th* Jonas bill?the ship?
ping act of .1920, giving the Shipping
Board wide powers arid authorizing the
building -of .a great commercial fleet for
the United States?as one of the great?
est constructive acts ever passed by
I Congress, arid predicted that it would
mark, an historic milestone in the com?
mercial and industrial development of
tho country.
"In the attitude that I take in push?
ing the American merchant marine,"
said Admiral Benson, "there is no oc?
casion tor international irritation. I
would beg of you to put this question
simply on the basis of our national
necessity and of oUr absolute right as
a great people to national defense. It is
our inalienable right to strive for suc?
cess. But we should keep in mind that
in any competition our competitors
will try to dominate. We should strive
to treat the matter in a spirit of
friendly competition. Under no condi?
tions, however, should we allow any?
body to diotate to us what our policy
should be. No one can tell us how,
wHen or where we shall operate our
ships. I know it is going to be a keen
fight and a severe one, but we cannot
succeed unless we have the united sup?
port of the people of this country.
Would Help Railroads
"Neither can we succeed with our
ships owned by the United States gov?
ernment. Government ownership of
ships will stifle the efficiency and in?
itiative pf our merchant marine. Our
railroads are already congested beyond
consideration, and something must be
done to relieve the situation. Our
plan, however, is not intended to In?
terfere with the railroads, but to help
them. I can assure you that the board
will exercise its great powers intelli?
gently and with due consideration to
the business interests of the country
and our foreign competitors. Our
powers will not be utilized as a club
against our foreign competitors, but
only as a club to make them play the
game squarely. And we propose to
make them do -so."
In discussing the plans made by the
board for the sale of its ships Admiral
Benson said that "the principle on
which we acted is to allow those really
interested in shipping to buy our ships
on terms enabling them to pay for
them on easy payments."
"We also must guard the interests
of the government," he added, "and
' see to it that those who buy our ships
can meet their obligations and ?fake
care of the vessels."
Would Not Disturb Trade Routes
Admiral Benson said that in selling
its ships the board would be careful
not to disturb any well established
trade routes. He explained that the
primary function of the board now is
to establish the necessary commercial
routes on a scientific basis in order to
eliminate useless effort as well as
deadening? waste and competition of the
kind which hampers rather than, pro?
motes the growth of a merchant
marine.
"We are engagisdiitv? business enter?
prise," said Admiral 'Benson.- "It
would hamper the development of Our
shipping interests if all of our ship?
ping were concentrated in New York
City, for example. Wo must not yield
to the fascination of' the precedent
of the past, when all things were con?
centrated in New York City. New
York has been indifferent in the mat?
ter of the development of our national
shipping interests. This is a national
task w? are facing and our attention
should be devoted to the development
of all our ports."
The Admiral expressed deep satis?
faction with the performance of the
ships in charge of the Shipping Board
thus far.
Praises Hog Island Enterprise
He repeated his ??cent praise of the
ships put out at Ho?r Island and termed
the Hog Island enterprise "the great?
est example of American industrial
enterprise and ingenuity wo ever saw."
In reply to a question regarding the
deal between W. A. Harriman & Co.
and the Hamburg American Line,
whereby certain ships ready for ser?
vice were transferred to the American
firm, Admiral Benson said that. the
deal was "a thoroughly American
proposition." He said that complete
details of the deal would be made pub?
lic by the Shipping Board within a
few days.
Regarding the proposed sale of the
Leviathan, he said that the board first
had endeavored to provide for the
refitting of this ship for the regular
transatlantic passenger trade. The
lowest bid received for the ship was
$8,705,000 and the board felt this was
too great a sum to be devoted to the
purpose. The ship was then again ad?
vertised for sale but the offer re?
ceived has not been accepted. He was
inclined to believe it should be. It
provides for a payment of $3,000,000
nnd 25 per cent of the ship's earnings
for ten years. He thought this would
I be a tidy sum. The matter will be
? presented to the entire board for con
I sideration before a decision is reached.
Cats Kill Flightless Parrots
When first discovered by the seal
ei's in 1810 Macquarie island possessed
a flightless parrot, peculiar to the
island, but akin to the ground-parrot
of Auckland Island. This has been
etxfrminated by the cats which were
[ introduced nnd permitted to run wild
on the island.
tf.
? ?
ALL OVERSIZE
Ma
? -> v,
? ^*?_T^Made in "DAISY" and
_^ ^^K "SKIDLOCK"Treads
Portage Tires Are Safe Guides to Big Mileage7
!N
ONE hundred and fifty years ago,
the scanty population of Amer?
ica was clustered along the Atlantic
?seaboard. The land of golden
promise?the west, ?and north?constantly lured intrepid pioneers to
venture into those unknown wildernesses at the peril of their lives. The
?surest and safest method of travelling was by canoe. But when the end
of the lake or river was reached, ?canoes and trappings had to be carried
[ upon the backs and shoulders. Then the hardships and perils of the
traveller, began. /Those primitive paths between the waterways were
.called the Portage. Upon those trails the grit and stamina of our foro
(lathers?were, tested to the utmost. Only th? strongest survived.
In iourrttyiag from New York to Canada, their way led through a chain of
rivers and lakes linked together by small Portages. Many of these latter are
unknown in history but their importance can be measured by the fame of the
forts that were bnilt upon them. How much history have the names of Fort
Crown Point, Fort Ticonderoga, Fort William Henry, Fort Schuyler and Fort
Nicholson wrapped within them! From Albany to Montreal these Portages?a\M
. and great, were the key positions for which hostile forces of Indians, French,
English araf ?Colonial troop? fought and battle? The history of the early years
of ?our country cannot be ?told without mention being nudo of these Portages.
H
*"ritoftfem~a&o~v9t built the first
jL Portage Tires. They were so
,named because we designed them
rugged, ?strohg-muscled and
carriers." They were built
to give generous mileage and posi?
tive servi??!. And they lived up to
their historic name.
jToday Portage Tires are better than
?tver. Every advance in the art of
lire building has been utilized by
Portage engineers and chemists.
Time and money have not been
considered when their expendi?
ture meant increasing the mileage
and endurance qualities of the
?tires.'?The 1920 Portage Tire proves
the soundness of the investment.
The motoring public has shown its
appreciation without stint. As a con?
sequence the demand for Portage
Fabric Tires and Portage Cord
Tires has grown almost faster than
our capacity for building them.
?)?a??44' ?pz&f?0?i
*&Z?*
NEW YORK BRANCH
1924 Broadway
>*S>rO*^
mm?
iKJRTAGB XCRE^xRUBBER CO.
AKRON
The Stage Door
The Theater Guild announces the
Inst week of "Jane Clegg" at the Gar
rick. The play, now in the Bixth month
of its success, will close for the sum?
mer Saturday, July 24.
When the Baroness de Wardener
Hollub makes her metropolitan d?but
nt the Royal Theater next Monday
records for stage magnificence in the
two-a-day will be broken. The baron?
ess is to the music hall what Gaby
Deslys was to the revue. She will ap?
pear in "Fifty Loves," a sketch by
Tommy. Gray.. Her jester, whom she
made famous in the smart European
pleasure resorts, will take a part in
her support.
On Monday evening, July 26, at the
Central Theater, Lew Fields will pre?
sent Charles Purcell in a new musical
novelty, entitled "Poor Little Ititz
Girl." The featured players are An?
drew Tombes and Gertrude Vanderbilt.
Others in the cast are: Lulu McCon
nell, Alma Adftire, Florence Webber,
Eleanor Griffith, Eugenie Blair and
Elsie Bonwit.
The, Wagenhals & Kempor Company
announce that the opening of "Spanish
Love," the new play by Avery Hop
wood and Mary Roberts Rinehart,
adapted from the Continental success,
"Aux Jardins de Murcie," has been
definitely set for the Maxine Elliott
Thoator for Tuesday night, August 17
This arrangement is made to avoid
conflict with several openings sched?
uled for the preceding night.
Margaret Wycherly and Dudley
Digges, now appearing in "Jane Clegg"
nt the Garriclc Theater, are arranging
matinee performances of the Irish
classics next season, irrespective of
their other engagements.
Brock Pemberton has made arrange?
ments with the Theater Guild for the
use of Garrick Theater from the mid?
dle ?ff August until October, when the
regular season of the guild will begin.
He will present "Enter Madame" on
August 16. Gilda Varesi will appear
in the principal r?le. The guild be?
gins its new season with Shaw's
"Heartbreak House" early in October.
A stage traffic director has been en?
gaged for the Century Promenade,
whose business it will be to direct the
movements of players, stage hands and
carpenters during performances of
"The Century Revue," "The Midnight
-T
Rounders" and "Florodora." Several j
hundred persons use the two stages
every night. ,
Abraham Levy is retiring from .the
theatrical producing business to be?
come general manager for Sam H.
Harris.
Manager Joseph L. Pluiikett, of the
Strand Theater, . has made arrange?
ments to receive airplane wireless com?
munications each day during the in?
ternational yacht'races. The progress
of the contestants will be announced
from the stage o? the Strand.
At the Strand Theater, Brooklyn, the
photo-dramatic feature to be presented
next week will be H. B. Warner in
"One Hour Before Dawn," instead of
Mildred HarriB Chaplin in "The In?
ferior Sex" as previously announced.
Roy Atwell has been engaged as
comedian in Ansslm Goetzl's new |
musical comedy, "The Rose Girl."
F. Ziegfeld jr, has called rehearsals
for the new edition; of the "Midnight
Frolic" on th? -iegreld Roof for next
Tuesday morning. The present frolic
has been running- for forty weeks and
the new edition will be the most
elaborate that Mr. Ziegfeld has ever
attempted. He will begin selecting the
new Ziegfeld beauties on that date and
promises a new panorama of pulchri?
tude, j
Furniture of Manhattan
Hotel To Be Sold To-day
??..-?
The entire contents of the Hotel
Manhattan, Forty-second Street and
Madison Avenue, will go on sale this
morning at 10 o'clock. More than 9,000
separate lots are ?Bted, some of these
comprising many pieces. The furnish?
ings and decorations of 700 bedrooms,
the china, silver, ?lass, linen, electric
fixtures and bathroom equipment are
included in the sale, which ?3 one of
the largest of its kind ever held in
BROADWAY; I
?uSWrSls "Man & His Woman"
(3(1 Week) CHARLIE CHAPLIN in "CARMEN" |
MARK ft JIUXDBEI) HARRIS
CHAPLIN In
"The Inferior Sex"
STRAND ORCUESTKA
S MARK ?%
T R A Nil
B'way. 47th St, l#
mm
H. B. WARNER In "One
Hour Before Dawn."
Harold Lloyd lu ??Jllgh
and Dlszy"; Gems from.
"Faust." Capitol Orch.
the city. Nearly 60.000 yards of car
pot will be auctioned.
Amrog the bedroom furnishings is
the mahogany set known as the "Presi?
dential suite." The only fixtures which
aro not expected to bring much bid?
ding ate the Manhattan bar and its
appurtenances, but these will be sold
with th?) other furnishings.
James P. Silo & Son, of 40 Ekst
Forty-fifth Street, will conduct the
auction. James P. Silo jr. has directed
the listing of the various lots which
are named in three large catalogues.
? ,
Hamnierstem to Produce
Five-Musical Comedies
Farce on Matrimony and Irish
Play Also in Plans for *
Next Season
Five musical comedies, a comedy
based on matrimony, and a play on the
Irish question will be produced by Ar?
thur Hammerstein next season, ac?
cording to an announcement from his
office yesterday. "Tickle Me," starring
Prank Tinney, will be revealed first,
opening at'tho Selwyn Theater August
16. Otto Harbach, Prank Mandel and
Oscar Hammerstein 2d wrote the book
and lyrics, and Herbert Stothart the
music. William Collier is now direct?
ing the reheijrsals.
Frances Write in "Jimmie," a musi?
cal comedy by the authors of "Tjckle
Me," will comp to New York September
20. l?en Welch and Roger Imhoff,
formerly burlesque actors, will be
featured. "I'm, Cured," adapted by Otto
Harbach for musical comedy produc?
tion from "N^ever Say Die," will be
tried in Hartford on October 11. "The
Love Apple," vith book and lyrrcs by
Bide Dudley, will be seen around the
holidays. "Blossom Time," another
musical play, with Otto Harbach as
the author, and featuring Louise Allen,
will be brought to Broadway late in
February.
"The Marriage Not," by Ada Patter?
son, in the nairte of the comedy which
Mr. Hammerstein will produce.'Eugene
Walter is writing "Sinn F?in," which,
as the title implies, deals with the
Irish question. *
Irene Franklin will tour in "AlwayB
You," opening in Allcntown on August
31, and companies of "Some Time,"
"Somebody's Sweetheart" and "Tumble
In" will also be seen on the road.
-? .
British Enter-tain Brandeis
U. S. 'Justice Tendered Lunch?
eon by Distinguished Jurists
LONDON, July 14.?Louis S. Bran?
d?is, Associate Justice of the United
States Supreme Court, was entertained
nt luncheon to-day by ? group of dis?
tinguished British jurists. Among the
guests were the Earl of Reading, Baron
Sterndale, Viscount Finley, Viscount
Haldane, Baron Buckmaater, Sir Hew
art Gordon, the British Attorney Gen?
era), and Sir Charles Darling.
John W. Davis, the American Am?
bassador, also was present.
-?-.
Silencer Is Invented
For Airplane Engines
GENEVA, July 14.?A silencer for
airplane engines, more highly devel?
oped than an automobile muffler, is an?
nounced by a Swiss airplane firm as the
invention of its chief engineer. The
first pubuic demonstration of the de?
vice is to be made on the Geneva-Paris
air service.
It is asserted the noise of the motor
is completely silenced and that the in
? vention is of great importance from a
military point of view.
.'TUfAftt* UNDER DIRBCTIOH'OF HUGO ni-ECEHFECCm
SDOA.DW-Y/ ?Sir V4Q tFx STDEET,
Today, Tomorrow and Saturday
PRODUCTION
mamDeMule's
m
Meigban
CHAI
RIVOLI
?n ?ddition charuc ckapu? mwat^ immwww?*]
OBCH&ST&/wt
T?rrv
ALLTi
MAC??. SSNN6TT CGr*e.UV7/?G(UKJf.D0CKtr.
RIA.LXO ORCHESTRA
. .??ainnsnunl^
CRITERION SBK?R
?_UM<H_S0?_
EMANUEt UST-wd ?3^CH&?Wt>?EU.EU?'
SENNETTC?MEPY-^l_)Me?*.?foEI-fa?6o^.
m_i?_?? u_u_iii?ui?__?i_?????? u_?__[iiimTmiini:?iri?ir_jjj_iiJjiii;j_Mi_ui?3irr
Get one of
You can take it anywhere. It fur?
nishes just the music and entertainment
that is needed at your bungalow, when
you go camping, on your boat, or? on a
short pleasure trip of any kind.
Extremely convenient it* the home,
too. Readily moved from room to
room, to the porch, or out on the lawn.
In some homes, the children have one
of these portable Victrolas for their
very own.
Hear these Victrolas today at any
Victor dealer's. Any of the four styles
will play any of the more than 5000
records in the Victor Record catalog.
ROLA
.KG. U. 8. PAT. OFF.
-*i
IIS MAISTEKS VOICE
RgCU&MCOFF
This trademark and the trademarked word
"Victrola" identify all our products. Look
voder the lid ! Look on the label !
VICTOR TALKING MACHINE CO.
Camdea, N. J?
Victrola IV, $25
o_
Victrola VI, $35
Mahogany or oak
Victrola VIH, $50
Oak
Victrola IX, $?3
?Mshofaoy ?r oak
Victor Talking Machine Company
Camden, New Jersey
_lTZXXLrx.i_t??_rt!fi^!i/r?jr?^TVr ?r
-?~?>--^- ??rr^r^rrrm^,M?n\ats\%^m?Un?,UM.HL.MW
. - ::i'.?a.TZ.,nsj-'limn Mira_'a_im'.?j_?' ?_u.vrrr:;jz
NKW YORK'S jLKAOIXO THBATlL I
?s*s.Wal.ii. Sat.. ?Oet?$?50. ????-Jl
?IN_JMJ.|.ffl|
AT 10:30- ON THE COa Of?*
ART HICKMAN OCCHESnf ??
ZiEGFELONKH?iii?nitt
-x/lth EDDIE CANTORardoB?1''
I UNEXCELLED RESTAURANT,
OEO
_. COHAN vr^RsAr&
??Sr TO-NIGHT",V
WILLIAM ROCK'S S?*
"SILKS AND SATINS"
Knickerbocker ??S???^
1^^ THERE'S A NEW KU_
_f^F OF GIRL IN TOW?
Victor Herbert^
1 GIRL ?_ SP0HI6K
"// ^??ry /(?y// Musical Come?i
another Herbert Triumph."
LYCEUM S?^?^Ts??
MATINEE TO-I>AY AT T?-*? "*
DAVID BKL.Vs? O present?
II? CUIRE ^cS^fe.
Cohan & Harris K^y?
fc*- ! HONEY GIRL
fvenaallon
t
%Tohr> Dn'nhvs&ter's
ABRAHAM LINCOLN
HENRY MiLLEPSl?il^
?_V_S.820-ri.AT5 THU6? c. SAT 2?
HENRY MILLER ?2
BLECHE B?TESE
B^ ?JAME6 FOSSES
TME SEA5QIN/S TOl?MPH
Liberty- f "a
'*r 'The Night Boat'!1*
Mat?. Wad. & Sal. !?
"Wfj
?lorliyr
CLOSE $2.50'
?OWE WH?TfS
SCANDALS oP 3920
te wi ft ANN PENNINGTOr
AQTHR THEATRE. :Mat.r,ff? 2!t la(l Ik
MO I Un I?Vayet4-> S- Eres. 'Oc. rSe 11?
CONTTNXOIS DAILY. I TO il p. V
"SHIPWRECKED
AMONG CANNIBALS',
America's Foremost Theatres aud Hht
Direction of LEE & J. J. SHCBEM
WINTER GARDEN 5?,."K&
MATINEE TO-DAY AT 2
CINDERELLA ON BROADWAY
DAZZLING PRODUCTION.?.?ii?i-H?i-aM
SUNDAY NIGHT?C8UAL STAK CONCEET
CENTURY PROMENADE
A?op Ont. TV?.
B3d. C. P. W. I'haa
CoL 8800.
Dl?i?g "?"Dancing**!:, fhe ('ir*. 6:? till desist.
Perfect an 1 vAvWialed Cutalni
! Musical Ecv.!. in ROOF THEATRl
V THE CENTURY REVUE
??5, THE MIDNIGHT ROUNDERS
One ?fay Dine on the Promanad*
Without Witnessin? Either Sheu
ADMISSION TO PROMENADE $1.10.
dROADHURS Tphona Bryan? M
BEGINNING MONDAY, JULY 19
OEORCE DROADHIRST
Presents the Comedy of Color
COME SEVEN
By OCTAVCS KOT COHEN
Founded on Mr. Cohen's Storie?
of ?pro Life Published in the
SATURDAY EVENING POST.
Sta.f???d by
Mrs. Lillian Trimble Bradly
SEATS NOW
CASINO -3-9th 8t- * Broa<1w&-'- K,fs- ?*?
Mala. To-day _ Saturday, ?at
WILL
M0RRIS8EV8
Conii<?ui>3 in
A Revucsque with ELIZABETH BRICE.
Buzzm Around
BOOTH ^"a- 4""h w "? ?'T- -KT!- !?!
Malin?? Vte?. & Saturday, !*.
The CharraUii!
Comedy
Triumph I
NOT SO LONG A68
PCUTIIBV ?2<L o*1?- Pfc Wt-t Ein- ??}*?
UC III Un I Mau. Wei A- Sat m ?:H
FLORODORA
Ets. 600 Good 8_<a at $2; 550 at 11.80; TM ??
$1.00; 600 at 50c; others at $2 50 and IS*
Nora Bayes w^r?v ri_R00F$
CDolost Thc?lre In Town. Mats. Wed. t Sat..!*
??l
SSIE^
"?ESTl /1U5/CAL Hlf^
.5EAS0A"5 Blff?EST. MU5/CAL HI
LAST 2 THEATRE GUILD'S
WBEKH Oreateet Sucass
"JANE CLEGG"
Iiy BT. JOHN KltVIVE.
Matlneu To-day. liest Ktata $2 00.
HHnnlblX Greeley 1522.! 2:30. Evga, M?
Little Theatre ?ivinSji
R?Qffif "FOOT-LOOSE"
By ZOE AKINS. Author of ?'DEC_SS_*
A O TU CT Thoa.. nr. B'wa? Ers. ? 3?r $3?
40 1 M die Mau. T??:..v ? s?l, 2 3C.;TU*.
a? STORM S?SSS
PLAYHOUSE &l?a-?I
? SEEING THiN^S^r
3?r LAPS IM 2.'/* HOUR-S I-*
?>CI UfVfcl Bleat?. W. 42d St. E't* |JJ
aCLjIffln MAT. SAT. Beit Sea!? t*-"?
-EdWyhn?rnivai
with KD. VTYNV. "The Perfeot Fool.
OPEtf i??R CONCERTS
NATIONAL SYMPHONY ORCHE6TR*
VALTKB J1KNKV JtOTHV.'LlX. CcniaflM
Kvcry Crrntng at S S?, lnclu.lin? Ku??!??
To-niglit?EDGAR ?SCHOFIELl?.
STADIUM lMS_* A 'Stif
Soa?i> 2.'? ?
PH.F. Keith'?
ALACE
?'way _ 47th St.
Wau. D???/ 25-11.
PAT rtOONEY.
MARIO"
BENT 4 CO.. Mil?. !"??*
1?_ BanKofT * i''-?. 3a%
Lucas a Co.. n?1?"^- ,m
HIJila Car!!:?* * '-*'-1- _,
RB.F.KeHh'? | BILLY B. VAN *? >Kb,L
JVErrSIDE -SSSSffi- g!?**?*
B'way ?.?id 96 ?t. j Clsuuu ?'.?Icmao. *^*__.
EEPUCHAg
THE FCNNY PI_CE VjFuA?
SURF 4 POOL BATHINIi
LUNA
FREE CIRCUS
.^-^r ? ??- -T, Children Free Week??*'
CO?CV (?JlAAft? Aft-. ,v?ih P*"*

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