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New-York tribune. [volume] (New York [N.Y.]) 1866-1924, August 15, 1920, Image 16

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Giants Beat Dodgers in Ninth Inning of Riotous Game?-Yankees Within a Point of Lead
Wild Heave fyy Krueger
Wins for McGraw Men
Long George Kelly and Ed Konetchy Pole Out
Home Runs Which Tie Score and Drive
Rooters from Rival Boroughs Into Frenzy
By W. O. McGeehan
The second skirmish of the Battle of the Boroughs ended in a ninth
?nning victory for tho Giants by the score of 7 to G, after some of the
wildcat scenes that have been enacted at the Polo Grounds since Brush
Stadium was tucked into the lee of Googan's Bluff. A bit of carelessness
that will go down into history with the celebrated lapse of Fred Merkel and
the equally celebrated world's scries eccentricity of Heinie the Zim, lost
the came for the Doderers after they had tied in the ninth.
Thero was one out, Beauty Bancroft
was ?urkink at third Frank Frisch was i
on first and Long George Kelly, own !
nephew to Big Bill Lange, was at bat.
AI Mamaux, because of his speed, had
been called in to relievo Clarence Mit?
chell. Ho made a heave to Krueger
with a moist and clammy pill. A post?
mortem verdict is that Kruogrr should
have wiped the pill on his trousers.
But he did not. lie heaved the ball
carelessly and it hit tho ground before
-Mamaux and skidded. Bancroft dashed
across the plate with the winning run.
A Stirring Melodrama
This made something of an xinti-cli
rflftx to one of the most stirring melo?
dramas ever staged on the lot that is
devoted to the great national outdoor
drama. The game was a tense one and
the emotions of the inmates of the
rival boroughs were constantly run?
ning amuck. Judging from what hap?
pened there yesterday the scientist
who said that the baseball fan was
just a nut. uttered a morocco-bound
encyclopedia.
When Long George Kelly tied the
score for the Giants in the sixth with
a home run to the left-field bleacher;-,
tho Giant rooters unanimously, tossed
their straw kell;, s into the field. When
Big Ed Konetchy. tho bouncing Bohe?
mian, tied it in the ninth with a home
run into the same place all of the hats
of Flatbush went hurtling into tin
field. Henry Fabian and his corps of
harvesters were somewhat handicapped
by the lack of modern machinery to
bring in the crop. They used wheel?
barrows. Henry has applied for a
tractor harvester.
During the truculent afternoon
Johnny Evcrs, acting field marshal foi
the Giants, was thrown out of the game
twice, tiie second time being when he
was found lurking in a corner of the
dugout after being once banished bj
Bill Klem. Boss Young was banishoc
fcVr hurling his bat into the air am
then in a fit of peevishness shakinj
Old Rill Klem by the shoulders. Beautj
Bancroft was chased from the coach
ing line for squawking sympathetically
The game started like a pitchers
duel between Art Xehf, the ex-Brave
and Reuben Marquard, late champioi
deck swabber of the U. S. X., but botl
of the left-handers started to crack
Nbhf started to go first, and the Rub<
went badly after Umpire Bill Klen
made him change t\\? glove under sus
picion '.hat he liad a little piece o
emery or other contraband in the orig
inal glove.
Kilduff Starts Trouble
The Flatbush Fusiiliers started thei
first drive in the cixth. Little Peterki;
Kilduff, the pride of the Omaha sloe.
yards, started it with a two-base hi
that knocked Frisch lose from his pin
and rolled into left field. Kruege
poled a double to loft, and Peterki]
scored. Marquard laid clown a sacri
lice bunt to Frisch. Olson slashed ;
single to center and Krueger score.'
Johnston lifted a fly to center, and OI
son went to second. Bernie Neis drov
a double along th? left field line, an.
Mr. Ivan Ivory Olson scored.
This brought a flock of Flatbus'
Kellys info the field, and even befor
lier.ry i abian's farm hands could stac
tin- crop tho Giants started a come
back. Burns got a base on balls an
was forced by Bancroft. Spencer, wh
went in at center after 1'ep Young'
peevishness, beat a hit to Johnstoi
Frisch lifted one to center.
That brought up Long George Kell;
who had queered the Kelly.; and tl;
Langes, to whom the Kellys are relate*
by being caught o'.f first in the fi.'t
inr.ii!).:. Long George at that time \v?
sleeping when Rube Marquard made
quick pass to Konetchy. Long Geort
started to fall back to the bag, but w?
delayed by his altitude i:i getting bai
to safety. The physics profes tor v. i
doped the yacht race handicaps <.
explain how it would take a long playi
like Kelly longer to reach the grout
than an ordinary player.
Long George was out to redeem tl
Kellys a:?.I the Langes and he did. 1
poled a home run into the left fie
bleachers into the midst of part of i!
population of the other suie of tl
Bridge and tho score was ted.
Shuiilin' 1'h. i ! Douglas was sent
for the seventh inning to stay t!
Flatbu.-h hordes and he ein) for tl
tune being, ?n the Giant ?.all" of t
seventh inning Abie Seaman Marquai
priif- of the mosquito lleet, was sho
<?: ... ?nagic glove and began to g
his. Snyder led off with a single
i ; .'i :. : Shuiilin' Phil 1'ogulas ex
cuttd a very neat .sacrifice.
Snyder Shows Amazing Speed
Burns drove a single to left wi
sirva pronounced vehemence that Sr
dor, puffing like a locomotive on t
i.?.'.' from Truckoe to Summit, seor
ail the way from second, while Bui
v, ?at to second on the return. Boat
Bancroft punched out a neat sini
and Bums scored. By this time 1
plaintive bleats of the anguished :
goras imported from Flatbush lil
the humid air.
There was a hasty coroner's jt
summoned by the Dodgers' infield ;
Reuben Marquard was pronounced n
and void lor the remainder of
afternoon. Clarence Mitchell relic
him and passed Herbert Spencer,
Giant philosopher. Frisch b.ouncec
single i" center and Bancroft scoi
?Kelly ended the drive by slapping i
into a double play. ?
After that the .Manhattan it es pi
up straw hats with prodical recklc
ness while the fans of Flatbush
moodily groundling in the gather
gloom. Henry Fabian dripped as
went on with the harvesting, Rip
Dodders were not yet entirely defu
- not by a jugful of the prohibit
bevi rage.
Bad Bill Lamar, the ex-Yank, slap
a hit between third and short. Fri
took it, but too late to make the thr
Wheat forced Lamar. Myers shot a
past Long George Kelly. Then
stopped Big Ed Konetchy, the o
Bohemian in the great American y
time. Big Ed pasted one for Robe
and it went into the left field sia
for a home run and the favorite ml
dramatic situation -tied in the nin
The few remaining hats of the
mates of Flatbush were east uv.o
stacks that Henry Fabian was pi1
up. It looked i hen as though the :
ond skirmish of the Rattle of the !
ou^-hs would eventually be halted
darkness in tho gathering thun<
storm.
Wnh Burns out, Beauty Ranci
cracked one down to Johnston, \
stopped the ball with a bare lu
hook, but he made a wild peg to i
and Bancroft scooted to second. Sp
ccr hit to short left field, but Bant:
pulled up at third.
Again the gamo was halted ;
Benny Kauff To Be
Recalled by Giants
From Toronto Club
fkUTFIELDER BENNY KAUFF,
who was traded to the Toronto
club, of the International League,
for Vernon Spencer several weeks
ago, will report to the Giants at the
end of the International League sea?
son. It was announced yesterday
that the New York club had exer?
cised its right to recall Kauff. Bill
Ryan, th? former Holy Cross pitcher,
who is also with the Toronto club,
will return to the Giants with
Kauff.
Kauff is playing great ball for the
Toronto aggregation ami McGraw
has decided to give him another
trial. Benny's batting average to
date is .308. He has slammed out
six home runs and has stolen ten
bases.
Ryan has developed into one of
the International League's leading
pitchers. He has won fourteen
games and lost six this season and
he has been credited with three
shut-outs.
Mitchell was removed for Al Mam aux,
the speed boy. Mamaux passed Frisch
i?nd was operating on Long George
Kelly when Krueger made the careless
toss that broke all the hearts of Flat
bush with one crack. The ball slipped
between Mamaux's legs, and Bancroft,
waiting for any turn of chance, shot in
with the winning run.
Your Uncle Wilbert Robinson lost
a trifle of weight during the engage?
ment- a mere hundred pounds or so.
Flatbush went home with its heads
bared to the storm, while the Manhat
tanites remained with their beans
bared to the pattering rain that fell
upon them with a hollow but triumph?
ant sound.
Some sneaking assassin concealed in
the right field bleachers threw a bottle
at Bernard Neis, the Brooklyn right
fielder, while the player was trying to
? field a fly. The missile just missed
him. The sooner a few of the "fans"
of this breed are in Sing Sing, the
sooner will the game bo cleaned.
The score:
BROOKLYN" (N. L.) I NEW YOItK (N. L.)
a?) r li po ?i e ab r h po a e
Olson, ss ..-ill 1 2 (i Rums, If ..4 1 1 2 0 ft
Johns'n. 3b. 4 0 o o 4 2 Bancroft ss.5 3 2 2 2 0
Veis, if ....301 4 0 t- Yiiuiip-, if...-J? 0 3 ?i ?i
L?mar, rL.ltil i) 0 OIRpciiccr, if..11 1 2 00
Wheat, If...4 10 2 0 0 I'rlsc-li, 3b. ..4 0 1 1 3 0
Myers, cf .411 3 0 0 !<?!'. 1?, ..-II 2 10 (1 d
li - v. II.. 4 11 S H n Iviliff, cf ... I ?1 1 2 0 n
KIldufT. 2b.4 1 3 4 2 OiDoyle, 2b ,.4 0 2 2 5 0
ICrilccer, ,.411 30 llSnvilcr. C...3 I 3 3 n 0
Mr,-, u'nl i- 1 0 0 (I 2 0 Nchf 1) . ..- 0 ?? 0 1 n
i>. i ii i) o n " Douglas, i... 1 o 0 ?J 1 i?
Mamaux, p.O 0 0 0 0 0
Tola!; ..31 0 0 '25 10 ill Tunis ..34 7 13 27 12 ?)
?One out when winning vim was scored.
Brooklyn.... 00000300 3?r>
New Vor!;. . . 0 0 0 fi 0 3 3 0 1 7
Two-base hits?Snyder, Doyle, Kllduft,
Krueger, Ncls, Myers. Home runs -Kelly,
Konetchy. Racrltlces?Marqunrrt, Douglas.
Double plays -Bancroft, Doyle and Kelly;
Olson, Kilduff and Konetchy (2). Left on
bases?Brooklyn, 2; New York. S. Basca
on balls -Off Marquard, 3; off Mitchell. 1;
off Mamaux, 1. Hits Off Nehf, 5 In 6 In?
nings; off Douglas, ?", In 3; off Marquard,
8 in 6 1-3; off Mitchell, fi in 2: off Ma?
maux, none (pitched to one batter). Struck
out By Nchf. 1; by Marqunrd, 1; by
Douglas, 1. Winning pitcher-?Douglas.
I...sing pitcher?Mamaux. Umpire'! -Klem
and Einsiie. Time of game?2:20.
Alexander Shuts Out
Champion Reds, 5 to 0
CHICAGO, Aug. 14.? Alexander
pitched magnificent ball to-day and
shut out Cincinnati, 5 to 0. Ruether's
wildness accounted for all of the locals'
runs in the first inning, while four con?
secutive hits, combined with an error,
brought over the other three.
Herzog was hit on the head in the
first inning by a pitched ball and re?
tired at the end of the inning.
The score:
CINCINNATI IN I, 1 ' CniCAGO (N. L.I
lib r K po ., e at. i li po ;> c
Oroli. 3b . 10 i1 0 i 0 ?' ack rf ,.410100
Haubert, 11-.4 0 0 11 I) 0 lb rzog, 2b. . 0 ! 0 n ! C
lion ill, cf . A ? 1 0 n (i Itobertson, If 3 12 1 0 0
nil man. if .4 n 1 0 0 1 T.-r ...-.,. 1110 4 0
Hopf, ss ...SOI 1 ?ii Mcrl-,1 -. ;:- 3 1 1 12 0 ?
Nealo. if ...4 0 1 1 0 Oll'askert, cf ..4 0 1 1 0 0
Nii-M-..-. 2b..3 ') 1 1 -1 : [?i-al 3b I n ?I 3 1 i
WliiE ? i: . .3 0 0 1 1 0 I-Viu'k K 2b 4 0 2 4 C i
Iturtlii r, li 0 'i ?) ?i 1 I? ?I'l'a-ri-ll. c-,.4 0 1 '. 0 1
Sillico, p . ..2.A i-xai der, p.4 0 1 0 (I 'j
Hresulcr, r>- ? ?? 0 ?' 0 n ??
*Seo .10 0 0 0 0
Totals . ..32 o ;, ii io : Totals ...32 5 0 27 12 0
?Batted for Sallee Irf eighth Inning.
Cincinnati... 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0?n
? .'hi- ago. 2 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 X?-5
Two-base hits?Robertson, Merkle, Bas?
ken. Sacrifice- Terry, Left on bases?
Cincinnati, r, ; Chicago, 8. Hases on bails
Off Alexander, 1; off Ituether, 3 Hits
?iff Ho.'.In r, 4 in i : :; Innings; off Sallee
3 In r. 1-3; off Brcssler, 2 In 1, Hit by
pitcher By Ruothi i- i Hi rzog i Stru ?;.
out By Rueth? r, i . by Alexander, ?. Los?
ing pitcher- Rueth. r i ? ipires?Harrison
and Hart. '1 Imo of garni 1 ;20.
Greb Defeats Moha
SANDUSKY. Ohio, Aug. 14.?Harry
Greb, Pittsburgh light heavyweight, won
the newspaper decision over Hob Moha,
of Milwaukee, in a fast ten ound
bout at Cedar Point this afternoon.
Greb won eight rounds decisively and
two were even.
Ruth Drives Out
His 42d Homer
In 3-2 Victory
Babe Gives Teamniates a
Good Start Against Sena?
tors in the First Inning
From <i Special Correspondent
WASHINGTON, Aug. 14.?Tho Yan?
kees are playing like a team inspired,
and this afternoon they continued their
march toward the peak in the American
League pennant by defeating tho Sen?
ators in a closely contested game.
The score was 3 to 2, and victory was
achieved with the nid of Babe Ruth's
forty-second home run of the season.
Tho five consecutive triumphs of the
Iluggins flag hunters, coming on the
day when the Indians were beaten and
the White Sox broke even, put the
New Yorkers less than a point and a
half within first place. It is all a mat?
ter of percentage points now, for the
Yankees have won three more games
and lost two more than the leaders.
The Bambino is showing other quali?
ties besides hitting ability. He is
showing himself to be the gamest play?
er the game has ever produced. De?
spite wrenched tendons, dislocated
knees and bruised shins, the Babe is
in there every day, giving the club of
his best.
Ruth gave "Rip" Collins an encour?
aging start by mauling the ball out of
the lot after two were out,in the first
inning. The little white pellet sailed
over the right-field wall. It was a cov?
eted homer for the Babe for, besides
stretching his record, it was the first
four-bagger he had made in Washing?
ton this season, giving one or moro
circuit clouts in every park in the cir?
cuit.
Also Fgurcs in Rally
The Babe also figured in the two
runs that the Yankees produced in the
sixth inning, and which was just
enough to give them the victory, as the
Senators came back in their half and
bagged their second and lust run of
the day.
Peck opened the "lucky sixth" with
a base on balls. Jim Shaw, in the box
for the Senators, tempted Fate by pitch?
ing to Ruth, and the Babe lashed out
a single into the right field. Pratt,
who has developed into a real clean-up
batter, bounced a double off the left
field bulwark, and Peck and Ruth
scored. Pratt negotiated third on the
throw to the plate, but overran the
bag and was trapped olf on Gharrity's
throw to Ellerbe.
The ruthless Babe was in a measure
responsible for the first Washington
run, which came in the second inning.
With two out Ellerbe placed a single
in left. O'Neill followed with a drive
to Ruth's pasture, and the Babe, in an
eifort, to cut down the batter at sec?
ond, threw wild to Pratt, permitting
Kllerbo to score. Collins, however,
took a hitch in his trousers and struck
out Gharrity on three pitched balls.
Saved by Double Play
The famous double play combination
of Pratt, Peck and Pipp averted im?
pending disaster in the sixth after the
GrifFmen had crowded a run across the
plate. Milan opened this round with a
double and Rice, fouled to Ruel.
Frank Brower, the "Babe Ruth of
the minors," who was plaving his first
game for the Senators, singled Milan
home, the newcomer taking second on
the throw to the p?ate. Shanffs was
fnven a pass and then Ellerbe hit into
a double play, Pratt tosshhg to Peck,
who threw to Pipp in time to turn back
the batter.
Collins and Shaw went the route,
with the former Texas Jlanger having
slightly the better of the argument.
The whilom two-gun man has hit nearly
as hard as his opponent, but aside
from the second and sixth, kept the
home forces at bay.
Another deed of Babe Ruth in this
came remains to be enumerated. It
was he who cut oil' the tying run in
the fifth inning with a mighty throw
to the plate. Gharrity had singled
with one down and Shaw had sacrificed
his battery inatc to second. Judge
dropped a single into right, and the
Rabe, making a flashy pickup, threw
the ball into Ruel's big glove in time
to nail Gharrity at home.
Peculiar Play in Fourth
A peculiar play occurred in the
fourth inning. Pratt started with a
double, but was picked off second on
Gharrity's throw to O'Neill. Lewis
slammed tlie ball through the box and
it looked like a certain hit. However,
the ball hit second liase and bounced
to O'Neill, who threw to Judge just in
timo for the out.
"Truck" Hannah was sent from the
field oi' battle in the seventh inning,
when he disputed a play at first base.
Ruel had pried off the lid with a single
and Collins sacrificed, Shaw to Judge.
It appeared as if the pitcher had the '
throw beaten, but Umpire Moriarty
ruled the contrary. Hannah, coaching
at first base, raised such a howl that
he was banished.
The score;
NEW YOJtK (A T..i | WASHINGTON (A. 1.1 !
al> r h i>'. .i c nh r )i po ?t. o \
Ward, 3b . 4 0 u I 2 o .Iticlcc, lb .10 1 10 0 0
I'cck'Eh, ss. :. ! ii -i 2 0 Milan. If ..-ill 3 1 0 I
III.III. if .. .4 2 2 ;: 11 ItJcr cf . . .. I 0 '1 4 0 0 ?
i' fin, 2b . .4 .i 2 3 S o ?rower, rf. ..102 2 ii 0
Lewis, If ..4 0 2 1 0 0 Shank . !li...3O0 o'l '".
I'lnp, U.i o 1 !l 0 0 Ellerbe, 3b ..4 11 2 ??? 1
';..! !. cf . . .4 0 n ii 0 (1 >' ss 3 .'I 1 4 0
linel. o -4 0 1 .; 1 0,'ttharrlty. c...:. 0 1 ." 2 ?
Collins, ii ..301 o 3 0 '-;. iw, v ? '?? ? 1 0 2 0
' 11 .ii: .1 il,l i.
Totals ...34 3 9 27 12 l| Totals ...322927131
?Batted for Shaw In ninth Inning:.
Now York... 10000200 0?3
Washington.. 0 10 0 0 1 0 0 0?2 i
Two-bane hits?Pratt, Milan, Roth. Home
run Ituth. S;ii iiiu-.s - Shaw, Collins,
Gharrity. Double play?Pratt, Poekin
paligh iin.l l'ipp. J.iMt on bases New
Vork, 6; Washington, 8. J3ases on balls ?
< Iff Shaw, l ; off Collins, 2. Hit by pitcher
?By Collins (.fudge}. Struck out? By
Shaw, 5; by Collins, 4. Umpires Hlldo
brand jihI Moriarty. Timo of garni?2:14.
Laiigf ord Wins Decision
In Bout With McVey
CHICAGO, Aug. 11.- Sam Langford
won a newspaper decision over Sam
McVey to-day at East Chicago, Ind., in
a slow and uninteresting ten-round
fight. The crowd of 7,000 spectators
booed McVey repeatedly because of-his
stalling tactics. '
Langford forced the fighting through?
out and was credited with winning
seven rounds.
Record of Ma|or League Clubs
NATIONAL LEAGUE AMERICAN LEAGUE
GAMPS TO-DAY GAMES TO-DAY
Boston at New York (two). \cw York at Washington.
Philadelphia at Brooklyn. St. Loui.-i at Cleveland.
Pittsburgh at St. Louis (two). Chicago at De?roit.
Cincinnati at Chicago. Other teams not scheduled.
YESTERDAY 'S RESULTS
New York. 7; Brooklyn, 0. YESTERDAY'S LESUI.TS
Chicago, 5; Cincinnati, 0. New York 3: Washington, 2.
Philadelphia, -1; Boston, 3 (1st). St. Louis, 5; Cleveland, 3.
Boston, 4: Philadelphia, 3 (10 ins,, 2d). Boston, 6: Philadelphia. 3.
St. Louis, 1; Pittsburgh, 1 (8 Chicago, 5; Detroit, 2 (1st).
St. Louis, 1; Pittsburgh, 1 (7 Detroit, 6;? Chicago, 1 (2d),
in*., called to catch train, 2d). I
ST \N!> NG OF TEAMS STANDING OF TEAMS
W.L.Pct.l * W. L. Pet. W.L,PctJ W.L.Pct.
Cin'nati, 5945 .067 Chicago. 55 57 .491 ? Clevel'd. 69 40 .633'Boston.. 4458.458
B'ktyn. . 62 48 .564 Sft. Louis 50 57 .46^ N. York. 72 42 .632|Wash... 46 59 .438
N.York 58 48 .547 ?feton.. 46 56 .451 i Chicago. 71 42.62S? Detroit.. 4166.383
Pittsb'g. 53 51.510 Phllo.... 43 64.402 St. Louis 53 53 .500jPhila.... 3576.315
The Days of Real Sport.ByBRiccs
Cardinals Blank
Pirates in Opener,
Then Play 1-1 Tie
PITTSBURGH, Aug. 14.?St. Louis
defeated Pittsburgh to-day in the first
game of a double-header, 1 to C, due
to the effective pitching of Doak. The
second game was called at the end of
the eighth with the scoro a 1-to-l
tie, to enable the players to catch a
train for St. Fouis.
Stock's double and Hornsby's single
scored the run in the first contest.
The scores:
FIRST GAME
ST. LOUIS IV I..) I PITTSBURGH (N, I.)
ab r h po a e ab r li po a o
I Smith, cf ...2 0 1 1 0 0 RlRhce, If . .-tnu 0 00
MMIm'y, cf ! ? I 1 0 0 Carey, cf ...3 0 1 2 0 0
Fourni?, lb.40011! 1 0 Nicholson, rf.4 0 1 2 00
.lanvriii, lb..100 1 no Whlttrd, Sb..4 0 1 3 20
Stool;, 3b ..111 1 2 0 Cutshaw. 2b..2 0 2 3 7,0
Uornsby, 2b,3 0 2 1 5 0 Grimm, lb ..4 on 10 10
Shotton, If. ..401 o 0 0 Caton, S3 ?...400 230
Lavan, ss ...4 0 1 2 4 0 llaofrner, c ..300 5 21
lleatb'te rf. 1 ?? 1 3 0 0 Fonder, l> ..2 0 0 0 2 0
CU-nions. C...3 0 1 1 2 0 ?Soi,H,.until uoo 0 0 0
Doak, p _300 0 6 1 Hamilton, p. 0 0 0 0 00
T i| da . : 1.1 : 3 27 20 li Totals ..30 0 5 27 15 1
?Battb'.l for Ponder In eighth Inning.
: St. Louis. ... 0 0 i u 0 0 0 0 0?1
Pittsburgh.. 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0?0
Two-base hit ?Stock, Stolen bases?
Lavan, Ileatlicotr-, Carey. Sacrifice?Cut
shaw, Double play?Cutshaw, Caton and
Grimm. Left on bases -St. Louis. 10;
I Pittsburgh, 7. Uases on balls?Off Doak,
; 3; oft Fonder, 3. Hits?Off Fonder, 8 in 8
| innings; off Hamilton, 1 In 1, Struck out
?By Ponder, 3; by Hamilton, 2. j.o.sIiik
pitcher -Fonder. Umpires?u'Day and
| Quigley. Time of game?1:41.
.SECOND GAME
ST. LOUIS (N. L) I PITTSBURGH (N, L.)
at) r li pu a o. ab r li po a ?
Sliotton, If.4 0 0 2 il n lilKbee, lf ...4 0 1 30 0
l'Viuraler, i.,.4 1 2 8 0 0| Carey, ,-f _401 3 0 0
Stock, 3b ..301 0 1 0jNicholson, rf .101 200
llornsby, 2b.2 0 U :. 1 0| WhllU-d, 3b...4 1 2 30 0
V.'lliu'y, er.3 0 1 :i 0 OiCv.Lshaw. 2b...3 0 1 220
La\ -? ss ..2 0 0 2 s ?? Ilarbaro, ss... 3 o 0 :, 1 o
III at?i'ti , rf.3 0 0 1 o OlHaen?, c.1 0 0 3 " o
i'!.;- 'fer, c.,3 0 1 3 0 ? Ui-iuim, Ib . .. J o 1 5 0 0
Sherdel, p 300 0 2 0 Carlson, p ..Ho 2 olo
Totals . 27 1 'i 24 12 o| Totals ....20 1 0 21 0 0
St. Louis. o n n 0 0 l 0 0 ? I
PII taburgh. 0 0 0 0 0 1 o 0?1
Two-base hit?Cutshaw. Thro,--baso lilis
?Fournier, Nicholson. Stolen bases?
Poiirnier, Stock, Bigbee. Sacrifices?Cut?
shaw, Itaoffner. Double plays?Lavan and
Po urn 1er; Lavan, ilornaby and Pournler.
Loll .,-i bases?St. l.'-iii.-, 4; Pittsburgh, 7.
Bases on balls- Off Shordel, 1; off Carlson,
2. Struck oui By Shordel, -7. by Carlson,
2. Umpires?Quigley uiol O'Day. Timo of
Braves Again Divide
Double Bill With Phils
BOST01?, Any;. 14- The Braves and
Phillies again divided a double-header
to-day, the visitors winning the firsi.
game, -1 t:> ii, and the home team cap?
turing the second by the same score in
ten innings. In the second game the
winning run was scored on Sullivan's
single. Fletcher objected to a d?cision
in the tenth and was ejected from the
game. j
'.! he scores:
FIRST GAME
I'ilil.A (N I.) i HUSTON (N. L)
ab r h IK) a ? :ii> r ii i;o a o
Paillette, lb.4 1 2 1? 0 0?.Powell, cf ..4 13 B 0"
I/Hom-'u, lf.3 0 0 2 0 l'Chris'.cn'y. 2b.4 0 0 o 3 0
lia' ? -y 2b o I ! 3 0 l-lavrx. If . . .4 0 1 2 0 0
v. - : is. cf.4 1 1 0 0 ? Cruise if . ..", 0 0 1 0 C
Mi'U I. rf. 4 11 n 0 0 II,)ll:e. !.. 3 0 1 11 0 0
Fii-rdier, ss.4 0 2 1 3 Ol Uoei loi. 3b..4 0 1 0 0 0
\\ i-i'l me 3b.4 0 '? 2 :-; tl Knrd. W ...4 0 0 4 S 1
\\ i eat, c . .4 o 0 .-. 1 ; o'N .; .- ..40131 0
Meadows, p.3 1 2 o 5 0 Watson, 1) .2 0 0 o 4 0
, ? riullivan . .0 l ? .
svi.it. ii . . .0 o 0 o 1 0
, M.o.-i ... 010000
Totals 33 4 0 27 15 ' Totals 34 3 ? 27 14 1
?Batted for Watson In seventh Inning.
tBatted for Scott In ninth Inning
pi i -:. iphia. 01010002 0- 4
Boston. 'i 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 I ? 3
Two-b? ?? hits M u ici, Powell. Three
base im ? U'Noil, Si? ?rlllco Pa ? lings.
Double plays?Meadows, Bawling? and
Paulette; Chrlstenbury, Ford and i I >l .--.
Li ft -m bas - P lib Inhl ,. I Boston, 10.
Bases oi balls i iff Mea lows, 6 off A\ at
son, 1. Hits?Off Watson, ?? in : Innings;
oft Scott, 3 it: 2. Struck out -By Meadows,
; . l y \\..; ?on, j. by Scott, 1. Wild pit h
itt. Losin piti her Scot t, I 'mplres
- -Kigler and Moran Tlmi of gam??2:05.
SECOND GAME
rilll.APKU'lUA (X. L.)| UOSTOX (X I.)
nil r h pu .i ? ab - !i i? . a e
Pauli tie, lb.4 0 1 S I ?Powell, cf. . . t 0 ? 1 n 0
J... Hinir'11. If.4 0 2 -' 0 ii Pli jfl 'y, 2b 4 12 2 11
Itawii.igs, 2b.4 2 2 1 2 0 Kayra, If.3 12 2 00
W . ..on-., cf.5 1 1 '. 0 0[ Cl 1 ??-. ?f.. 4 .? 1 :
h'...- rf 40 12 00 llolke, lh. ...40 1 10 10
fiel '.?? u ? :;???' i: ? el 1 3b 4 1 ! 12 0
Il 51 . .i i ? n i' -i |.'i -1. as . :; 'i 0 - Il U
V\'r.g ? 3 0 0 2 1 OiGowd 3 0 0 7 2 0
I .? ; ,. .i ?_ . (i, . 10 0 0 0 i)
Us N ;'. .'.ni o '. .i leadieger, p 311 0 10
P..0 0 'i 'i I ?? Su llvail . . I .' 1 0 H 'i
Total J ? ??: : ' 0| T tal 33 4 8 30 13 1
?One oui when winning run waa score.1.
I It m for i ; .<"? :.'?? In ' ? - : h inning.
{Batted tin ? ??-.-,- 11 - t ? s ' in ?-nth Inning.
Iphia.000200 1. 00 n?3
!'? in. 10 10 0 0 0 0 11?4
Two-base hits?Fletcher, Eayrs, Oeseh
ger, Christenbury. Three-basi Uli w'ill
Homo run?Rawllngs. Stolen base
Cruise. Sacrifices ? I.e Bourveau, Ford.
Double play- t-'ord and Holke. Left on
bases?-Philadelphia, 7; Boston, 4. Bases
on balls?Off Belts, 1; oft Hubboll, 1; off
Oeschger, 3. Hits?Off Bi-tts, 7 in 8 1-3 ln
nli gs; oiC Hubbell, ?. In 1. ?truck out?By
Betts, -, by Oeschgor, 5. Passed ball?
Tragesser. Losing pitcher?Hubbell. Um?
pire??Morau and Kigler. Tlrna of garnie
??1:16.
NQg/ \aJf<ty Gran fland Rice
(Copyright, 1920, New York Tribune Inc.)
One of the World's Greatest Sports
/ refer to solitude,
A day off every now and then
Apart from all the human brood,
In the heart of some deep glen
Where only ivinds and shades intrude,
Beyond the thought of worldly gain
Or streets where pallid faces liaient,
Beyond the reach of greed and pain,
Of trickery and fear and want?
Where one can sit and dream a bit
Unravelling some mental twist,
IVhere no white flame of fame is lit
That lures to disappointment's tryst,
Close to the Mother of the Clan,
The earth, that madmen still defile
With blood and tears through life's brief span,
Where each one has so short a while
To dream- of something better than
The endless strife of man and man.
The smaller man is supposed to have as much chance
in many branches of sport as the larger entry, but after
inspecting- "Babe" Ruth, Ted Ray, Jack Dempsey and
Walter Hagen and observing the height and range of
Tilden we recall an old saying of Hughey Keough's, viz.: |
"The battle is not to the strong, but that is where to
look."
The Jazz Finish
The red-eyed scrap in the two major leagues for a
shot at the world series kale that awaits the winning
teams may be almost as dizzy as the jazz finish of 1903.
That year still holds the record for all such per- !
formances, with no rival in sight. In the National !
League the Giants and Cubs had to take over an extra ;
day beyond the schedule to settle their argument, which
Tinker's triple won. And Pittsburgh was only a game j
behind.
In the American League, Detroit, Chicago, Cleveland j
and St. Louis all had a chance with ten days to go.
Cleveland was still in the running with four games to
play, and the issue finally went to a decisive conflict
between Detroit and Chicago.
Here we had seven clubs in the two leagues with a '
chance to win up to the rim of the final week.
Nineteen twenty might not offer any such closing;
scenes, but there are chances left that the National !
League will have three or four clubs fighting it out
through September. Brooklyn, New York, Cincinnati
and Pittsburgh are not likely to fade out before the
last two weeks?that is, no one of these four clubs is
likely to do so.
Cleveland's eai'ly show of power from training camp
days has been well maintained, but even Speaker's
corking club is not yet rated any sure winner against
Chicago and New York, two clubs that may develop
an abnormal winning fit at any given moment.
An Opinion
Dear Sir: I have mude a fairly close study of
both Dernpsey and Wills and while my dope may be all
wrong, I don't believe you will find it very far off.
The only type of man who has a chance to beat
Dernpsey is a good defensive fighter. Wills is that
type. He is a hard hitter, but his main point of
strength is upon de'fens?. I don't mean by this to say
that Wills can beat i npsey, for I don't believe he
can. But I do believe he has a chance?and a pretty
good chance if he can only stay away five or six rounds.
I know it is no easy matter to stay away five or six
rounds with Dernpsey rushing, but it can be done. And
the man who does it and who in turn packs a punch
of his own may very well be the next champion. Wills
at least is the, only contender left. Miske hasn't an
outside chance and no one knows this better than Miske
himself. If there is to be any real championship battle
it must be between Dernpsey and Wills. F. S. R.
The coming tennis carnival at Forest Hills may not
be a world championship, but if it isn't where are
the other champions who might have an outside chance
to win? Yon know what the answer is without further
comment.
"Olympic team refuse to come back in the same
transport which carried them over." If they felt about
it like the A. E. F. did after the armistice was :-'prcii
they will be extremely thankful to start back in a row
boat without any paddles attached.
Many a doughboy, when he reads the above line,
will recall what the sight of a honieoound transport
meant to him, even with his habitat cast two fathoms
below the steerage. But that was war and this is
peace, a condition which hardly justifies the transporta?
tion facilities offered the greatest collection of athletes
in the world.
Following a championship golf clash is one of the
softest assignments ever fthown if you don't mind
sprinting twenty-seven miles a day to keep ahead of a
pop-eyed multitude bent upon getting there first.
Pen Widders Outseore
Thespians on Diamond
In a battle of wit and baseball,
played yesterday between nine:-, of
actors captained by De Wolf Hopper
and artists captained by Tad Dorgan
on the village green at Bayside, the i
pen wieldcrs won by a score of 4 to 1
in four innings.
Dorgan had a cort?ge of infantry?
men lined up at third base who, too,
used physical power to prevent any
of 'the thespians from going- beyond
that peg, The one run scored by the
actors was made by Leo Carrillo, who
jumped over the heads of the guaros
at third base and stole home before!
anybody except the umpire, who, it '
was declared, was bribed by the actors,
saw him.
Tesreau's Bears to Meet
Philadelphia Giants
Jeff Tesreau's Hears will p'.r.y their
usual double header > t Dyckman Oval ;
this afternoon. In the first pame the
Bears will oppose the Philadelphia
Ginr.ts.
The second contest will bring the
Guaranty Trust Company nine into
action against the Bears. Big Jeff
will appear on the mound in the open?
ing battle.
Baneball To-day, Ebb?? Field. Brooklyn
vs. Phlla., 3 p. m. B'way Brighton Sub. 30 I
minutes Times 8q. to Prospect P?rlt Station.
Five Leading Batters
In Two Big Leagues
NATIONAL LEAGUE
Player, ( In). <.. AH. K. II. PC.
HoniHby, St Louis..107 415 ?7 15(5 .376
Knusli. Cincinnati. 101 38S 56 127 .332
.1. Siiltli, St. Louis. 75 257 1!i H.-> .331
tVilllam*, Phila.in.-> 120 <)."> 130 .32?
Konetchy, Brooklyn. 0(i 368 41 118 .321
AMERICAN LEAGUE
Player, Club. <;. AH. it. Ii. PC.
Sister, St. Louis .107 430 02 17H .402
Speaker, Cleveland. !00 400 00 I0:i .101
Ku'li. Nr?- York .108 I'll 1?.", r;.: .387
Jackson, CWcajro.,108 110 71 ir.i .:l?4
K. Collins, Chicaeo.?13 438 8(5 154 .353
W. Babcock and F. Main
Victors at Dunwoodie
DUNWOODIE, Aug. 14. \V. \v.
Babcock and Floyd I. Main were the
winners of the weekly 0 1 I i .:
handicap tournament over the links
of the Dunwoodie Golf Club here to?
day. The tournament was contested
in two classi i, Babcock winning in
Clasi A and -;iain being the victor in :
Class B.
The Class A winner turned in a card
of 79?7-72, while Floyd I. Main's!
card in Class B was 87?18- -69. The
18-Btroke handicap wa? a deciding fac- !
tor in Main's victory.
Giant? vs. Hoatou To-day, 2 game??First
lame 2 p. m. Pola Ground*
iSew York Y. C. Keeeives
Challenge lor Kaces
Rear Commodore Francis R. .Mayer,
Atlantic Yacht Club, scn1 to the New
York Yachl ?'i.1? y sterday challenges
for the < ape May and the Brenton
Reef cups. Next to the America's Cup
these are the most important trophies
in the yachting world.
Commodore Mayer has nominated
the three-masted schooner Undaunted,
one of the few large yachts in com?
mission this summer. Undaunted was
built in 1911 f< r Robert E, Tod, an- .
other former flag ofii;e-r of the Sea
Gate Club. Whoa Bhe .va.. own? -. .
Commodore Tod, Undaunted was
called Karina, i-Vae is a steel sch
almost 200 feef long, and has shown
a good turn of speed in i
? - suggested that the races be h"ld
in September.
The Brenton Reef Cup originally was
offered - - ' The j achts rac<
for boat, without time allowance, Ther*
is no restrictions as to size or the rig
of the craft.
Eastern League
Waterb lry, I; Hartfi rd, l.
.\. -..- ? i.,-> en, - Pltti leid, l.
Br! Igep irt, 3; .1.
Worci si--:. t A Ibany 3. (1st)
Worcester, 13; Albany, 3 (2d)
American Association
Indianapolis, 4; Minneapolis, 1.
St. Paul, 71'l-ouinviil-, 0.
Toledo, 5; Kansas City, 1.
Milwaukee, 3] Columbus, ??
Indians Drop
Fifth Straight;
Browns Victors
Speaker's Men Hold League
Lead hy One Point
After 5 to 3 Defeat
CLEVELAND, Aug. 14.?Tri? Speak
er's league-leading Indians suffered
their fifth successive setback this af.
ternoon, when they were beaten by it?.
Browns by a score of 5 to 3. The lo.
cals are now only 1 point ahead of the
Yankees, who are in second piare,
Guy Morton, who was on the mound
for the home playrs, had one bad in
ning, the third, whe? two passe? were
coupled with two singles and a dotib'o
by Williams. Uhle replaced the bat?
tered Morton and was very effective in
the pinches.
The Browns filled the? bases with
none out, but they were unable to
.score, as Bisler fouled to O'Neill, jj,
cobson fouled to Johnston and Will?
iams struck out.
Urban Shocker, who performed fo?
the visitors, was well ni^h invincible
after the third inning, except in the
fifth, when poor coaching cost the In?
dians at least one run. He allowed
only five hits.
The score:
ST. LOUIS i A. L.) I CLEVELAND (A. t)
ah r h r<n * ? - " ?? po ao
Gerber, ss ..SOI 1 1? r?mi?wn. If. ?12 o 00
Gedeon, 2b..~> 1 1 2 2 0 fliar-man. ".HOI 2 <0
Blaler. lb ...4 1110 3 0: Speaker, cf. 300 | do
.! 801 rf.r, 1 2 5 f r> Smi rf . 4 " 0 0 ?o
Williams. lf..4fll 3 0 0'Gardner, 8b 411 0 49
Smith, 3b ..2 10 1 3 UWam'naa. 2b,2 0 0 4 :o
Til.in. rf ..300 1 001 m : 10 013 1?
r.iuiiiKs, C...4 0 1 s fi ; o'N-i'.i. o ..soi t io
Shocker. p..3 12 1 0 (' u ' p 0 0 0 (II
?L'hle. p ....3 10 1 81
Totals ...335927112! Totala ...303527150
St Louis.... 00400001 0?5
Cleveland... 0 3 2 0 0 0 0 0 0?J
Two-base hit?Williams. Three-ba?bit
Cardner Sacrifices?Tobin, Wa m bagante,
Double plays?O'Neill an^l Wambaganae]
VVi n bsganss, Chapman and Johnson Left
on bases?St. Louis, 8; i ? Basaa
on balls?Oft Shocker, S; off Morton. :;
off Uhle. 2. Hits?Off Morton, i In 2 2-3
Innings; off Uhle, 5 in 8 1-3. Hit by
pitcher?By Uhle (K. Si 1th)
?By Morton, 1; by Uhle, 2. Wild pitch?
Morton. Losing nltcher?Morton. I s
?Connolly and Nallin. Time of gurr.???
2:03.
White Sox Bealen
After Taking First
Game From Tigers
DETROIT, Aug. 14.?Detroit and Chi?
cago divided a double-header to-day,
the visitors winning the first, 5 to 2,
and the Tigers taking the second,
6 to 1.
Kerr's pitching brought victory to
Chicago in the first contest while De?
troit took the second by hard and op?
portune hitting.
The scores:
FIRST GAME
chioJigo (a .. norr .. lj
- . ,: a'., r h po ? ?
Leiert. rf.50 1 2 1 V'oune. ? U
E. C ..'-. 2b.5 0 0 0 'J 0 Bush ss ,..4 02 0 21
VVi aver, ; b ; 0 : j ! ' ?
:., i, If.3 2 1 2 0 O'Colih I
FelSCh, Cf..4 1 2 Ii 0 '< V ?:: il, If 2 6 'I
.1 i ...'.-. lb.4 1 3 13 0 114 1 I
Klsberg, ts.il 2 1 31 rf.4 0 1 3- il
F ! alk, c ..3 0 l 2 0 o Plnelli.
Kerr. y ...400030 Maul
Stallage c 20 1 4 I
D i
\. . ? l ?0
Aye ? '
' -11 , .. 10*1
0 0 00
T tais .. 5 5 11 27 14 1 Totals ?" l';1
?Batted for OI
???!?: m for Stanage In -? ven
Chicago. 0 1 0 0 0 2 0 2 0?S
Di tri It. 0 0 0 1 : 0 0 0 0?1
Two-base hits?F. Isch f.eib ' I Sacrl
'. ? ?;. h. !'? uble ; : i" : ?' l
?. In " ?th. Left on b
l .???? .ii '. Bases on ' ? Off < Itfara,
? ' Kerr, 2. Hits i ?I " '?'?'? r
innings; off Avers, 4 in 2. Struck out?By
Kerr, 2; by Oldham, I. Losi - ; >r?1
i ildham. Umpires - i-vdas,
'40.
SECOND G 1ME
CHICAGO (A L) DETKOIT 'A. L>
ab ? !?. ? ?? 'i po?f
. ?'. ..300 2 <: 0 roung, 2b...3 1 1 I 51
l' Collins 2b 10 0 4 ? Ilu i....3 1 2 S SI
? , ? r. 3b 4 0 1 0 3 Olrohl cf ' 0 3 0 0
lack ti. If.4 0 0 2 00 Veach, If 4 13 2 0?
Vf..: cf. . t il 2 3 0 n Hollinan, Il : ?' l 9 1?
I. Collins, lb.4 0 rf 11 ICI
Itlsuerg, s, 3 'i 1 2 1 O rones, > il i 0 :)
2 1 1 1 0 Al Surnage, 4 0 0 ? 11
J ???? i. c. ...0 0 0 I ( 0 klwiko, p....3 1 S 0 11
i ? p 0 10
. . p.l 0 0 .
Totals ...31152410 Totals 31 CU*?*"
?Faber out; hit by batted ball.
Chi ago. 0 0 l f o 0 0 o o?I
'? roit. 1 0 I " i :; 0 0 x?o
Two-base hits?Felsen, S hallt Ehn?te>
Veai h. Three-bas ? hit Bush - i '
? Faber, 1.??lb >] ;. Voung. Il iWi
;?' ly E. C .Ulns, Risb ;-g md C Hi?*
!. : ' . ? : bases -Do t l'oit, 4 Chi
Bases on balls Off Faber, I; ofl l.hmke.
1 Hits?< iff Fabi r. 10 In G Injrs oS
.. ? m, 1 In 2 St ru -
:'. Loi Ing pit ii- r Eaber. I mplret-^
Evans and Dlnneen. T me t game?y.?k
Boston Wins Deciding
Game From Athletic?
PHILADELPHIA, Aug. 14.?Bosto*
won tho deciding-game of the s?riel
from tho Athletics to-day by a battis!"
rally ip the seventh inning, score 6 to
3. Keefo held 1 Jo s ton scoreless til t';a
seventh, when ;: wild throw and several
bits got him into trouble and Rummel
was rushed to his rescue, six succes?
sive hits gave Boston the lead.
The score :
BOSTON AT,) ' riill.A. i A I.)
a:i r I. po a <? a!, r 1: [-' ?*
Vllt. 3b -.112 4*0IWel i. rf ..41 2 0 <"?
Bra ly. !? 5 110 4 0 Dykes, 2b. 103 S J!
M I v. |f.5 0 l I oo" Wal'r lf.4 0 0 2 'J
II loper. rf :.' 0 1 100 \\\ itt. el ...4
M'lnnls, lb.4 1 1 13 0 OlDuga
? : cf.3 1 1 5 0 ii Shu ' ??: I '
20 1 2 0 l'l'i ?00 5 1?
'.-,?.. . ? ? i ?',.,? .:! 1?
0 0 I 0 O.Keefe. p
?Karr ... .1 l l o on i:>, m p (
Wain ra, c.OO 0 1 1 0 *Burrus : o 0 0 Of
:. 4 1 .i 0 2 , _?
Tota! "
'"? ? .:???,? in ?. ?? nth U
tBal I for Rommel i ninth inning.
B . 0 0 0 0 0 15 1 O'-f
phia. 0 0 2 0 1 0 0 '
Tiv . :.- - ? hits v. el h f "
nosky. Dykes. Sacril
. i lugan Keel ?. i. rt on base?-"
B ? Philadelphia B i *?
? ??? ??: ???--. 3. ii
?i innings (none out in -?? ? l ft Ro'?"
. ? i. 7 in 3. St r-. . ,.. Bush, 6: *>'
1 Wild pitch K< '? Balfc>-"
R ?' ime.l. I. .sing ; Itcher- Itn nmel l'n'
; i;a:;>??'
1 :4T.
Ross Baj?rs Polo Yiotorv
For the Rumsen 'Whites
RUMSEN, X. J . Aug. l I.?In a polo
pi ? oil to-day a- the B
C( untrj Clu ?, tl >. " . Iefe?tw
;' ?? "Bluer," l v a scon of 11 goals to'?
The W : on the I
6 to 3 ai -1 Leland H. Ross whi
tall ed ?'. ur in succeMi**
in the T;!'!h n?riod.
Gymkana games were played bef?
the polo match. Arthur B?rden. 3cn
of Colonel Howard S. Borden, won ???
events, which incl? led ? Pcl*
ball race, sticking ami ball ?ace, *Bi
a pig sticking.
Southern Association
"' ; \' f."hv le, . i is- i.
Nashville -,. \<:, ? ?.. i (2d). .
Little Rock, .'?. Hlrmingham, S (??? '
BirmlnKham. S; Lit?l. aock. ? ^-aM
Chaitanoosa. 2; Mobile. 1. .^
ilemphia-.Ncw otitum (?*??

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