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New-York tribune. [volume] (New York [N.Y.]) 1866-1924, August 28, 1920, Image 5

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Delay Naming
Shipping Board
Checks Marine
Uncertainty as to Policies
Likely to Affect Sale of
the Government Fleet to
Private U. S? Interests
Can't Sell Ships Abroad
Two-Man Body Is Without
Power; Competitive Op?
eration by State Likely
Prolonged delay in the appointment
of the new Shipping Board, according
to ihipping men here, is causing in?
creasing unsettlement in marine con?
ditions. Not only is the development
of the merchant marine being held up,,
it is declared, but little is being done
toward putting into effect the policies
provided for by legislation passed at
the last session of Congress.
President Wilson on June 5 signed
the merchant marine act. Section 3
of this measure directed him to make
the appointments of the Shipping
Board commissioners "as soon as
practicable." Although nearly three
months have passed since then, how?
ever, not one of the seven commission?
ers who will compose the board has
been named. As a result, control of
the millions of tons of vessels owned
by the government is in the hands of
the two surviving members of the old
board, Admiral Benson, serving as
chairman, and John A. Donald. Ac?
cording to the terms of the shipping
bill, the commissioners in office at
the time of the enactment are to re?
main until a!l the commissioners are
appointed an?.: qualify.
One of the most important powers
placed in the board's hands bv the
act is the sale, "as soon as practica?
ble, consistent with good business
methods," of the government tonnage
"at such prices and on such terms
and conditions as the board may pre?
scribe."'
Personnel of New Board
Under the provisions of the bill the
seven members of the board are to
represent the various sections of the
country, so that a decision by them
will reflect the general sentiment in
regard to the policies to be followed
in the development of the merchant
marine. Two of the members are to
be from states on the Atlantic Coast,
'two from the Pacific Coast, one each
from the Great Lakes and the Gulf
district, and one from an interior
state.
Speaking at a luncheon in New
York on July 14, Admiral Benson
stated that the sales policy to govern
the Shipping Board in disposing of
its vessels to private interests would
not be made known until President
Wilson had appointed the full board.
About a month subsequent to this
statement, however, Admiral Benson,
apparently expecting no action soon in
the matter of appointments, an?
nounced the terms of sale and fixed
the price? at minimums ranging from
$160 to $185 per deadweight ton. Bids
have been called for to be submitted
September 1.
Both shipowners and shipbuilders
have expressed dissatisfaction with
the scale of prices. The former hold :
that the cost is too high to enable
them to operate the ships profitably in ?
competition with those of other na?
tions. The shipbuilders regard the
figures as below the cost of replace- j
aient and view them as setting a false :
INSTRUCTION
Berkeley-Irving
SCHOOL for BOYS
311 West Eighty-third Street
A School inhere the highest educa?
tional ideals have been success?
fully practiced for 40 years
"From Primary to College."
Small ekisses and individual in?
struction.
Swimming Pool!, Gymnasium and
Roof Playground, al ?on the prem?
ises, permit properly supervised
sport and athleftcs that develop
mentally and pysically.
Special preparation for West Point,
Annapolis, and all Colelges. Super?
vision from 8:30 A. M. to 5 P. M.,
if desired. Afternoon Outing Closses.
'.'ilustrale.d Catalog on request
LOUIS D RAY. Ph. D. Headmaster
TELEPHONE SCHU?LER 4S36
New York Tribune's
School Department
will gladly assist you in the
selection of a suitable school
for your girl or boy.
Address:
New York Tribune,
G. C. Delmonico,
154 Nassau Street
DAT AND EVTNtNO DBPT8
NawYorfc?7aParfcAv?-b^.a?-398ts.
Brooklyn? Corrar Fr?nklln ?t>- J?ffet?o_ A?
KLVlC.ll I^Examinationsi
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8?tv3 for?ntnto? ?cd -?a??*- ?o B/weoto Ri-tw/'
FALL TERM BEGINS ?EPT. 43
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Fall Tern? Beri-i
Afondar, Sept 27t
**" Send ror C_Ui?ga.
ONE MINUTE from both Brooklyn
and Manhattan Borough
Hall Subway Stations '
DWIGHT SCHOOLJ, I,',; f.
??f<si? A K-f-nu. West Point A Ann.po??. <l?t Tf.
ii-kei ? ttuiy of the individual student
FALL TERM BEGINS SBPT. -0.
DANCING INSTRUCTION
LOVELI/S
637 MADISON AVE.
LKXSONSI lUt
IT? guaranlfe to teach you t?
dance alt th? litest modem
diners ?iir.rH- ?ml correctly.
9 LESSONS $5
PRIVATE LEWSOXS
10 A. M. TO 11 P. St
WITHOUT APPO-NTIUENX.
1
standard of vain? for American ton?
nage.
Sale of Paw Ship? Expected
While it is expected that there may
be a .little bidding for the most de?
sirable tonnage, shipping men do not
anticipate that any offers will be
made for tho great bulk of the gov?
ernment fleet and that the board will
have hundreds of vessels remaining
on its hands.
A large percentage *of the board's
steel vessels are small steamers, which
shipping men regard as uneconomical
for use in the transocean trade. The
chief markets for1?vessels of under 6,
000 tons deadweight are regarded as
the Baltic and Mediterranean trades
and the Continental coasting trade.
The sale of these ships abroad is im?
possible under present conditions,
however.
By the merchant marine act the
Shipping Board is authorized to sell
to aliens vessels fer which no Ameri?
can purchasers can be secured, but the
sales can be made only upon an af?
firmative vote of ai least five members
of the board. In view of the large
amount of ships being built abroad,
delay in the offering of the less de?
sirable tonnage to foreign buyers ia
likely to lead to the loss of foreign
j markets through oversupply abroad.
^According to the records Trf the Ship?
ping Board, it had at the beginning o?
this year about 600 vessels of undei
6,000 tons deadweight, aggregating
over 2,000,000 tons, and this numbei
has been materially increased since
then. Vf ith only two votes in the board
as it is at present constituted, nothing
can be done, however, toward dispos?
ing of tonnage abroad. ?
Board May Be Competitor
One point in which American ship?
ping interests are particularly in
tcrested is as to the policy of th<
Shipping Board in regard to operating
its unsold tonnage: Private interest:
are desirous of knowing, before thej
buy ships of the government, whethei
the unsold remainder of the Shipping
Board tonnage will be worked by th?
government in competition with th?
purchasers of the board's vessels.
No, assurance has been given tha
the board will not pursue this course
and that condition is one of the chie
factors in disposing private interest
to withhold bids until some d?finit
policy has been decided on. The board
it is argued, is not bound by economi*
rules and has the purse of the Ameri
can public to draw on in case of con
tinued loss of operation.
Still another factor adding to th
unsettlemcnt of the situation is th
feeling that with a two-man board n
permanent policies can be expecte
and that the full board, when it i
finally appointed, may adopt Completel
reverse courses to those taken by Ad
mirai Benson and Commissioner Don
aid. Under these circumstances th
purchase of tonnage is regarded b
shipping men as a highly speculativ
proposition.
Less Than $15,000
To Meet Ponzi's
$10,000,000 Deb
Search of Strong Boxes i
Six Banks Disappointing
Eight Names Used by th
"Wizard" in Operation
Special Dispatch to The Tribune
BOSTON, Aug. 27.?The receivers ?
Charles Ponzi's Security Exchanj
Company received a setback in the
hunt for assets to-day upon the cor
pletion of their examination of doc
ments and papers found in half a doz<
strong boxes in as many banks abo
the city. Hope had been held out <
the strength of Ponzi's declaration th
he thought he had "at least $300,000
Liberty bonds in one of the vaults
Less than 515,000 was found.
Against this slow progress the liab
ities are rising steadily, and it is nc
conceded that the previous estim?t
of $7,000,000 were too small, and th
they may even reach $10,000,000. T
total at the office of the Attorney Ge
eral to-night is well above $5,000,01
and this amount includes none of t
New Hampshire investments and pn
tically none from Lawrence, where t
total is said to reoresent another $
000,000.
At least eight names were used
Ponzi in his operations, the receive
announced to-day. These, in additi
to the firm name, are Lucy Marte!
Joseph Daniels, Mary C. Mosse
imelda Ponzi, Pio Conti, Rose N. Po
?and John S. Dondero. The receiv?
to-day officially seized the estate
Lexington which Ponzi purchased ah'
three months ago, and his three f
automobiles were also takirn. 1
wife has ordered her car sold.
The young wife to-day protes
that she was "deserted by her pr?te
ing friends and practically penniies
"It makes my blood boil when I th
of the money people got out of my h
band," she declared. "A month i
these people were swarming to see
Where are they now?"
A suit in equity was filed to-?
against Joseph Daniels in a move
recover $40,000 alleged to have b
paid him in'settlement of the $1,000,
suit in which he alleged that he wa
partner in Ponzi's business. A tern
rarv injunction was issued by Ju
Sicks staying Daniels from dispos
of his stock" in the Daniels & Wil
Company, a furniture firm in which
has bought an interest.
-???-????
Crown Princess Goes to Doc
WIERINGEN, Holland, Aug. 2
The former German Crown Princ
who has been visiting her'husband h
departed yesterday to visit the for
German Emperor and Empress
Doom. She-was accompanied by tw?
her sons, the other two remaining 1
with their father. '_
Schwab Announces
New Oil Engine for
Merchant Marine
U. S. Entry Into Field, Hith?
erto Under Domination
of Europeans, Expected to
Aid Shipping's Advance
Invention and successful operation
of a type of marine Diesel engine
which is aaid to represent a far greater
advance over the oil-burning steam?
ship than the latter is over the
coal-fired steamship is announced by
Charles M. Schwab as chairman of
the Bethlehem Steel Corporation. The
new engine is described as a triumph
for American engineering skill in a
field hitherto dominated by Europeans.
While the engine is adapted to land
use as well as in cargo vessels of any
size,, it is in the latter direction that
its utilization is expected to be more
largely employed, and its economical
features are expected to make it an
important factor in the development
of the merchant marine. In addition to
producing as great horsepower as other
engines twice its size, it is claimed
that it can effect a saving of two
thirds in fuel, compared with steam
driven, oil-fired vessels. The new en?
gine has been developed by the Bethle?
hem Steel Corporation and the Bethle
hem Shipbuilding Corporation.
In a statement issued yesterday by
Mr. Schwab he says:
"At a time When the American peo
pie have expressed through Congress
their desire that the American mer?
chant marine, built up during the wni
at a cost of $??000,000,000 shall remair
on the seas, and shall expand to tak<
care of the commerce of the nation, il
is particularly gratifying to be abl(
to say that American inventive skil
has found the means of solving on?
of the biggest problems that to-da:
faces the owner and operator o
American ships?the problem of re
ducing operating costs.
"The development of the new Beth
lehem fuel-saving Diesel engine repre
sents two distinctive phases of ad
vanee in marine engineering.
"I. For the first time an internal
combustion heavy oil engine for
either marine or land uses has been
perfected, which is not only de?
signed and built by Americnns, but is
built especially for Americans, and
is adapted to American operating
conditions.
"2. For the first time a two-cycle
internal combustion heavy oil engine
has been perfected which produces
the same horsepower as a four-cycle
engine practically twice its size, and
is at the same time adapted to large
cargo ships, while saving two-thirds
in fuel cost alon?, as compared with
steam-driven, oil-fired vessels.
"Neither of these developments
theoretically a new idea. For yeai
Europeans have successfully operate
large ships with Diesel engines. Tr
achievement of Arthur West, the Betl
lehem designer, who is at the her
of our power department, is in tr
adaptation of the two-cycle engine t
American operation and in tho perfe
tion for practical use in cargo vesse
of any size.
"The success of this engine hi
already been demonstrated in tv
ways. It was installed and operat?
for ten months as part of the pow>
plant of the Bethlehem Steel Corpor
tion at Bethlehem, Pa. It was th<
installed in our new ore-carrying ve
eel, the Cubore, which to-day cor
pleted on regular schedule time i
first voyage to Cuba and return.
"The operation of the engine at t'
Bethlehem plant was so successful fh
we are building another one to ta
its place as part of the auxiliary pow
plant for the steej mills. Its oper
tion on the Cubrr:- not only demo
strated its practicability, but its i
markable economy. The Cubore ma
the voyage from Sparrows Point, M
to Cuba and back without stoppi
her engines, except to come into po
and consumed one-third of the amou
of fuel oil ordinarily used by h
sister vessels fitted with oil-burnt
steam machinery of the usual ty
when running on this same voyage a
at a much greater rate of econoi
than has been achieved by any otl
Diesel engine operated shin of whi
we have any record.
"We also have in service betwe
here and Cuba duplicate ships, exc?
that some are fitted with turbine
duction gears and some with recip
eating engines, so that we have
direct comparison between the oil
gine installation and the most mod?
steam installation."
-?-,
Dr. Altendorf, Barred by U. ?
At Mexican Line, Not a Citiz
WASHINGTON, Aug. 27.?Dr. P
Altendorf, denied ' admission to
United States from Mexico at Juai
is not an American citizen and has b?
classed as an undesirable alien,
was learned to-day at the State Dep?
ment. His claims of citizenship h
been investigated, it was said, disci
ing the fact that he has not been nat
alized.
Dr. Altendorf, it was said, at
time held credentials as an agent
the Department of Justice, but th
were later revoked.
-#~
Unpreparedness Is Charged
Against the Adminislrati
SOUTH GARDNER, Me., Aug. 2
Unpreparedness both in war and
peace was charged against the Fed?
Administration in a Republican c
paign speech by Elon H. Hooker,
New York, here to-night.
"We have been in the maze of
sound thinking, finely drawn phn
and involved deductions which s<
for the exercise of parlor wit ral
than the basis for the strong reali
of life in these cataclysmic years,'
said.
3^ant Ad Rates of the
First to last?the Truth; News, Editorials, Advertisements
? Per Agate Line
13 times 7 time
time, a week ron.
Board and Hoarders Wanted. 35? $1.00 $2.00
Business Cards . 35c 1.00 2.00
156 times. 28c.
Business Opportunities . 36c 1.00 2.00
Buyers' Wants . 35c 1.00 2.00
Country Board . 35c 1.00 2.CKL
Deaths. Births, Marriages, Engagements_ 40c ? ?
Employment Agencies . 40c ' ? ?
2 times. Sunday, 30?; 156 times, 28c.
For Sale . 35e 1.00 2.00
Help Wanted Instruction. 35e ? ??
30 times. 30c: 156 times, 28c.
Help Wanted . 35? 1.00 2.00
Information Wanted . 40e 1.10 2.25
Lost and Found. 40e 1.10 2.25
Rooms to Rent or Wanted. 35? 1.00 2.00
Situations Wanted.2 line*, 25e each insertion.
Each additional line, 20c each insertion.
Regulations
No advertIswment accepted for )_a- than price of two linea
?io display other than white ?t-H.ce?agate caps and 10
point light face type permltt*6.
&ix average words to a line 1n tg-.-rt. type.
Four average words to a line If all agate caps.
No order accepted for longer than one year.
REAL ESTATE?
Apartment? and Flats, Apartment
Hotels, Auction Sales, Dwellings,
Farms. Mortgag? Loans. 40? Yt.rH ?corstinv
3 times a week. 35? [EACH INSERTION
104 timcj in a year. 30c
5,000 lines in a year. 30c
Telephone your Want Ads to Beekman 3000, or leave
with any of The Tribune's Want Ad. Agents?over 500
in Greater New York.
Plans for 16 Ships Passed
???___?
Board Acts on Applications Un?
der Merchant Marine Act
WASHINGTON, Aug. 27.?Applica?
tions were approved to-day by the
Shipping Board for construction of
sixteen vessels, aggregating 295,740
deadweight tons, under the provisions
of the merchant marine act. These
permit ship owners and operators to
avoid payment of excess profits taxes
for ten years, provided a sum equiva?
lent to the tax is set aside yearly tow?
ard the building of new ships.
Fourteen of the vessels are tankers
ordered by the Standard Oil Company
of New Jersey. Three of these, total?
ing 45,300 tons, are to be built at
Kearny, N. J.; three, totaling 30,300
tons, at Oakland, Calif.; three, totaling
2O.S00 tons, at Newport News, Va,;
three, totaling 35,960 tons, at Van?
couver, Wash., and one of 11,900 tons
at Oakland. The Pacific Mail Steam?
ship Company applied for one 9,800
ton tanker, to be built at New York,
and the Sun Company of Philadelphia
for a 12,800-ton oil steamer for con?
struction at Chester, Pa.
Hylan Suspends
Policeman in
^hisky Inquiry
(Continued from pas? on?)
Police Commissioner Enright to forth?
with suspend Sergeant John F. Smith,
who for the past two or three months
has been assigned to the office of Dis?
trict Attorney James Maloy, Rich
mond County.
"Police Commissioner Enright has
advised me that he assigned additional
detectives from Police Headquarters
to Staten Island to work on and clear
up the case of Eckert, who is said
to have been murdered by the alleged
'whisky ring' operating in Richmond
County.
"Yesterday I requested the acting
chief magistrate to assign a magis- j
trate to sit in the police court in Staten !
Island in place of County Judge J. i
Harry Tiernan, who was sitting as a j
police magistrate'in the absence of the
local magistrate, who had reported ill. j
The acting chief magistrate complied |
with my request and to-day assigned
Magistrate Simpson to sit in the police
court, Staten Island, until such time as
the present investigation of this case
has been completed."
Police Sergeant Smith is a brother
in-law of Judfie Tiernan's stenographer,
persons at the Richmond County court?
house said yesterday. His alleged con?
nection with the bootlegging ring was
not cited by the Mayor.
District Attorney Maloy refused to
disclose any of the questions put to
Agents McGuire and Weldon, or any j
of their answers.
Not Interested in Bootlegging
He said he was not interested in!
bootlegging, and that information with ;
regard to the bootlegging situation
was all that resulted from his examina?
tion of the agents.
IDs attention was called to the Fed?
eral' statute, which says state officials !
"shall be coactive with Federal agents
in inforcing the law," and he replied: j
"The policy of the police is not to \
inforce the law."
"Does that situation obtain on Staten
Island alone?"
"No; everywhere," he said.
Cooperation with Federal authorities
is not compulsory, Mr. Maloy said, add- '
ing that he did not intend to aid in the j
investigation into alleged wholesale
traffic in liquor in Richmond County, j
lie did say, however, that he would fur?
nish the P'ederal departments inter- |
ested with a report on the six-hour ex
amination of the agents.
Mr. Maloy will furnish Governor ?
Smith with the evidence he has of i
illicit traffic in liquor, and a special
grand jury may be called within two
weeks to investigate the whole affair.
"There is absolutely nothing to show
that William J. McGuire and James
Weldon, the prohibition agents on my
staff, who were summoned before Dis
trict Attorney Maloy on Staten Island
this? afternoon, are in any way con-!
nected with the Eckert murder," said '
Mr. Shevlin upon the return of the ;
agents to his office.
"I have been informed that District j
Attorney Maloy has finished with
them," he continued. "McGuire and
Weldon were actually implicated in
bootlegging operations on Staten Isl?
and to the extent that they had infor?
mation that liquor was stored on
Staten Island. They were working on
the case at the time of the murder, but
had no positive information that |
would enable them to complete the ',
case and make seizures and arrests. I
I make every effort to locate and seize i
stocks of liquor."
Detectives questioned Max Katz, who I
j is held on a short affidavit charging I
| homicide. Katz is a chauffeur, who is I
alleged to have transported a load of ;
liquor in a motor truck for Eckert ;
? about two weeks ago.
Kat^Still Held
His attorney asked for his release
in the Stapleton police court, in the ;
I absence of any specific evidence against
| him. Magistrate Simpson extended
I the short affidavit forty-eight hours ;
? to give the District Attorney that time
I to present any evidence in his pos- !
session.
As he was leaving the courthouse re
: porters asked Judge Tiernan if he had
I been in touch with his brother.
"I do not believe my brother has
been engaged in bootlegging," he said.
"These stories are entirely without
foundation. I have been in close touch
with my brother, and I know these
stories are without foundation."
William Moloney and Charles Kain,
the two other men charged with par?
ticipating in t lie murder, continue to be
held on a complaint made by Mrs. Flor
ence Eckert, the widow.
Henry Hugot, proprietor of the res?
taurant in which three barrels of
whisky bearing Tiernan's label were ?
said to have been found by a prohibition
officer, refused to discuss Tiernan yes- ;
terday more than to say that the lat- ]
ter rented a house from him and paid
his rent promptly. He denied his place !
had ever ben raided. He said the men
tion of his name in connection with the ;
Eckert case was an attempt of Staten
Island politicians to "put him out of
business."
Mr. Ross announced he would call
Agents McGuire and Weldon before
him Monday and will make a thorough
investigation of all evidence furnished t
by the District Attorney.
-?
U. S. to Restrict Ship Sale |
WASHINGTON, Aug. 27? Sale of the j
government owned fleet of steel vessels j
for which bids will be opened Septem- |
ber 1 will be confined to craft not in i
service on established steamship lines, !
it was said to-night by officials of the
Shipping Board.
Vessels now operating in berth ser- ;
vices will not be sold except to pur- i
chasers who agree to keep them in j
their established routes, officials said,
nor will ships at sea for which commit- :
ments have been made be disposed of;
unless substitutes can be provided for !
thr-ir operators. 'Jf
Offer of the entire government own?=jjr;
steel fleet for sale, however, compites
with the terms of the Jones merchant
marine act, which makes ample adver?
tising necessary and enables the board
to proceed with its program for eventu?
ally turning over its ships to private
control.
Arrangements are now being com?
pleted by which a group of a hundred
steel vessels, aggregati;^ about 60,000
deadweight ton* will be offered for
sale for immediate delivery.
Chief of Reds
In Mexico Is
Held as Rebel
Augustin Prewe, Would-Be
Trotzky of Republic, Tak?
en at Campeche; Faces
Trial by Special Court
U. S. Recognition Sought
Action by United Stetes Will
Be Followed by Europe,
Say Government Chiefs
By George E. Hyde
Special Cabla to Th? Tribuns
Copyright, 1920, New York Tribune Inc.
MEXICO CITY, Aug. 27.?Augustin
Prev?, who would be Mexico's Trotzky,
has been capturd afc Campeche and is
being brought to this city for trial by
a special court on charges of rebellion.
General Eduardo Garcia, chif of staff
in the War Department, said that after
personal investigation h was convinced
the Bolshevik propaganda in the Mexi?
can army was the work of political
opponents of President de la Huerta.
They were trying to create "dissension'
in the army and in this way to develop
opposition to the Huerta regime, Gen?
eral Garcia declared.
He said that thhe conduct of the
Huerta administration had been such
that it could not logically be attacked
by any of the Presiden't opponents and
that knowing this, his enemies sought
to attain their ends by opening a
breach in the army and injecting
politics nto the military. Proof General
Garcia asserted, probably would be ob- |
tained in a few days when the govern?
ment would take drastic steps to end |
all seditious opposition. It is known
that the War Department has been
receiving complaints daily of high offi?
cers mixng in politics. No sooner are
these complaints received than investi
rations are ordered and charges pre
erred.
Rebel Officer Executed
Reports received to-day by the War
Department announced the capture and
execution of an army officer in the
State of Vera Cruz who revolted a week
ago in company with a smull force of I
soldiers.
Reports current here that Zamora i
has surrendered are generally credited,
but the War Department has not c?5ri
firmed them. The department says i
merely that contact has been establish
ed with the rebels and that there has j
been some skirmishing with small !:
detachments. General Calles is at Gua- I
dalajara directing the campaign against
Zamora and reports.. satisfactory
progress.
With the petroleum control contro
versy temporarily disposed of, the ques
tion of the possibility of recognition of j
the present goernment again is being
seriously discussed. The Belgian King's
official reception to the Mexican minis- j
ter, Felix Palavicini, has bred a spirit
of optimism among admistration offi?
cial.
While little is being said publicly,
it is a matter of common knowledge
that de La Huerta is anxious to have
his government recognized in order to
enable him to carry out the more
serious work of the national rehabili?
tation.
Miguel Govarrubias, retiring Foreign
Minister, before leaing for London as
the newly appointed minister to Eng?
land, stated that he felt certain recog?
nition would not be forthcoming until
[ the United States acted. Both Euro?
pean and American nations he said
were waiting for Washington to take
the lead.
Walt for United States to Act
He said that the efforts of Pala
vicini and other emissaries to negoti?
ate recoignition had unfortunately been
unproductive. Ho was being sent to
England, he asserted, because he had
numerous connections there, but did
not believe that he would be able to
secure British recognition of Mexico
until the United States had acted.
One of the leading independent
newspapers this morning published a
lengthy analysis of the Mexican planks
in the Republican and Democratic plat?
form, pointing out that there is vir?
tually no difference in the fundamental
principles expressed by the two great
parties in the United States regarding
Mexico. The newspaper article as?
sumes that both planks constitute a
repudiation of "the Wilson policy of
regeneration" and confine themselves
to a clear-cut demand for fulfillment
of rights under existing international
agreements and international law.
The Foreign Office has sent out a
circular* to all consuls announcing that
all political refugees now out of
Mexico be allowed to return without
fear of judicial action for political
offenses. While it was not so set forth,
the circular is interpreted to mean
that thse guaranties do not consti?
tute a pardon for criminal offenses
committeed by the refugees. The con?
suls also were informed that the coun?
try is now peaceful throughout and
that foreigners should be urged to re?
turn and resume operation of their
properties which they were compelled
to abandon several years ago.
Others seeking to come to Mexico
for purposes of investment should like?
wise be encouraged, the consuls wj;re
advised.
Americans Returning
Many Americans who have been
absent from Mexico for the iast sev?
eral years are ' returning, and the
hotels of this city are full of visitors
who are looking over the situation
with a view to investing.
Travelers recently returning frorr
various parts of the country reporl
that geological experts of many na?
tionalities are investigating possibili?
ties of investment in the west coasl
southern states. This .is consid?r?e
an indication of a prospective boom
While it is generally recognized tha'
projected luid labor legislation and ?
ruling of the Supreme Court on petro
leum laws constitute a check on in
vestments, many persons are inclin?e
to accept the situation at its face valu?
and go ahead. Business experts re
port imports and exports constant!;
increasing and volume of productioi
within the country growing by leap:
and bounds. Mexico, they believe, i
likely to become one of the great.es
rations in the world as soon as ade
quate banking facilities aret provide?
und a more flexible currency assured
This question, in fact, is already near
ing; agreement between all concerned
and a bill is being prepared for pr?s
e"ntation to the next Congress whic'
provides for a single bank issue simi
lar to that of the Federal Reserv
banks of the United States.
Other legislation affecting busines
is considered unlikely during De 1
Huerta's incumbency because of th
large amount of business pending noi
in Congress and the probability tha
considerable politics will be injecte
into the discussions.
Mexico to Settle All
Just Damage Claim,
Embassy in Washington Say
All Guaranties Will B
Afforded to Foreigner
From The Tribune's Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON, Aug. 27.?Equitabl
settlement of all claims against tfc
Mexican government, with assurance
that in the future protection will be
afforded all foreigners who enter Mex?
ico are promised in an official state?
ment issued to-day by the Mexican Em?
bassy.
In denning the policy of the new
government, the statement said:
"The standard or policy of the Mex?
ican government shall always be to
endeavor to afford all guaranties to
foreigners entering Mexican soil. With
that end in view, the government has
not failed to consider the great and
serious responsibilities faced by former
administrations, especially during the
period of revolution which has dis?
turbed Mexico for the last ten years.
Therefore, it has been necessary to
study the responsibilities for damages
sustained in life and property by for?
eigners residing in Mexico; for losses
caused by the disposal of funds not
belonging to the national treasury, and
for the non-payment of credits due and
interest in arrears thereon.
"It is the government's earnest de?
sire that by means of friendly rela?
tions with other countries interested
problems relating to Mexico's interna?
tional life shall bo solved to the best of
our ability and resources at hand, and
in the spirit of honesty which animates
all the acts of the government.
? '
Boy Bandits Admit Plot
To Assassinate Comisky
Confess Thev Intended to Hold
Up Box Office at Ball Park
When 'Babe' Drew Crowd
CHICAGO. Aug. 27.?Confession of a
plot to shoot Charles A. Comiskey,
baseball magnate, and the office force
and police guard at the White Sox
baseball park box office September 16
was made to police to-day by the three
boys who were arrested yesterday in
an attempted robbery*of a $40.000 pay?
roll of Wilson & Co., stock yards pack?
ers.
According to the police, the three
said that they intended to rob the gate
receipts of the White Sox-Yankee game
September 16, when they figured Babe
Ruth would draw a record-breaking at?
tendance. They said they also planned
to shoot the witnesses. They said
they knew that Comiskey was not per?
mitted by his physicians to watch the
games and that he was in the box of?
fice every afternoon.
James Ryan, one of the trio, was
identified as a member of the gang
that shot and killed Detective Sergeant
Frank McGurk recently while the de?
tective was defending a vinegar com?
pany's plant against a robbers' raid.
-?
Thief Posed as Tailor ;
Seeks to Mend His Ways
Court Gives Plausible Burglar
Ten Years in Prison to
Reform
Edward Koch, whose profitable pas?
time it was to call upon women with
the information that he was a tailor
their husbands had sent to measure
them for new gowns and then to rob
the house while they were preparing
for the measuring, pleaded for clemen?
cy yesterday when arraigned for sen?
tence in the County Court, Brooklyn.
"It is high time I was mending my
ways," he said earnestly. "I should
be bringing a little sunshine into the
lives of my poor old parents. I mean
every word I say, judge?-honest I do.
Give me a chance, judge! I am twen?
ty-three years old, but my mind is
only that of a ten-year-old boy."
Judge Haskell remarked that the ex?
cellence of this address had served
merely to convince him that the pris?
oner was a plausible swindler and sen?
tenced Koch to serve ten years in Sing
Sing.
EVERYTHING IN
Photographic
Supplies
AT THE
RIGHT
PRICES
WMLOUGHBV
W Cameras?Supplies I
110 West ISA St. Opp. Cimbel?
Rockefeller Finds Fun
In $10 Motorboat Ride
Stepts Jauntily From Craft Af?
ter Two-Hour Spin and Gives
Pilot S2 Tip
Special Dispatch to The Tribuns
S ARAN AC LAKE, N. Y., Aug. 27.??
"That is the most fun I have had for
$10 in twenty years," said John D.
Rockefeller, as he stepped jauntily
from a motor boat at the Paul Smith
Hotel landing this afternoon. The
aged but comparatively active oil mag?
nate made the remark to Leo Kelly,
who had piloted Mr. Rockefeller and
his party on a two-hour trip through
: the Upper and Lower St. Regis lakes.
The $10 bill was not all for Kelly.
Eight dr'lars was for be;.t hire and $2
was Kellys' tip.
Mr. Rockefeller has been visiting his
brother, William, at the latter's camp
near the hotel. He manifested great
interest in the sights around the lakes,
and Kelly notieed that he could locate
distant objects without glasses more
easily than any one else in the party.
Stops were made at the camps of Mrs.
Whitelaw Reid and Dr. James. A mo?
tor boat owner who has been grumbling
at paying 37 cents a gallon for gasoline
in the Adirondacks ventured to inquire
from Mr. Rockefeller if gas was ever
going to be any lower.
"Never, so long as the public con?
tinues to consume more than the wells
in the country can produce or are pro?
ducing," replied Mr. Rockefeller, with
a smile.
Note From Lost Girl Found
Message Also Delivered at Home
to Reassure Mother
Mrs. James P. Dickinson, of Cliffside,
N. J., whose fifteen-year-old daughter,
Edith, departed, dressed in her best
frock, Monday, found a book under the
mattress of the girl's bed yesterday.
The title of the book is "Come and
Get Me." In it was this note in Edith's
writing
"Dear Mother:
"I am going to visit a sick friend.
Don't worrv; everything will be all
right. EDITH."
Another message, saying ''Edith is
alive and safe and you will f.nd her in
New York," was delivered at the house
yesterday. It was scrawled on a post?
card and was not written by Edith, ac?
cording to her parents. The police are
trying to trace the card.
-?
R-34 Carries U. S. Crew Over
London on Instruction Trip
LONDON, Aug. 27.?The British di?
rigible airship R-H2 to-day flew over
London in the commencement of a
twenty-four hours' instructional flight.
The airship carried the American crew
which is training in England to pilot
over the dirigir? R-38. which has been
purchased by the United States navy
and is tinder construction at Bedford.
Where to Go to Church T?-morrow
AMERICAN ORTHODOX CATHOLIC
CHURCH OF THF. Til \NSFIGI RATION
(HOI.V EASTERN CONFESSION)
233 fast 17th Street.
Services and Sermon in EnRlish.
Lltursry (Mass) 10:43 a. m. Vespers 5 p. m.
..H.APTIST
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
llrondway and "9th Street.
PASTOR I. M. HALDEMAN, D. D.
Preaching 11 A. M. and 8 P. M. by
REV. HARRY C. LEACH.
Hucketisucli, X. A.
?Madison Avenue Baptist Church
MADISON AVE. AT 31ST ST.
George Caleb Moor, D. D.,
Minlnter
Every Sunday, 11 and 8ft All Summer.
CENTRAL BAPTIST CHURCH
S E. Cor. 32D ST. <fc AMSTERDAM AVE.
FRANK M. GOODCHILD, D. D., PASTOR.
11.1 >r. Franklin Pierce Lynch,
of Muklmvlka, Africa. No evening service.
CHRISTIAN SCIENCE
Services are held in the following
CHRISTIAN SCIENCE CHURCHES,
Branches of the Mother Church,
Sundays, 11 A. M. and 8 P. M.
Wednesday?, 8 P. M.
First Church?Central Park West & 06th St.
Sunday Evening Services omitted during
August.
Second Church?Central Park West and
68th St.
Third Church?5Sth St., just east of Park
Av. Sundays, 11 A. M. and 4:30 P. M.
Fourth Church?ITSth St. & Ft. Wash. Av.
Fifth Church?Aeolian Hall. 34 W. 43d 9t.
Sixth Church?1D35 Anthony Av., Bronx.
Sevnth Church?112th St., east of Broad- !
way, Sunday, u A. M.
Eighth Church?103 East 77th St.-, 11 A.M.
Ninth Church?Park Avenue Hotel, 4tfc
Av. at 33d St.
Tenth Church?57th St . east of Broadway.
Eleventh Church?.562 Briggs Av., 11 A. M.
Twelfth Church?Anderson Galleries, Park
Av. and 59th St.
Christian Science Society?547 W. 146th
St. Sun., 11 A. M., and Wed., S P. M.
FREE READING ROOM. 33 W. 42d St.
CONGREGATIONAL
BROADWAY TABERNACLE
BROADWAY AND 5?3TH STREET
Rev. WM. A. KIRKWOOD will preach
at 11 A. M. ami 8 P. M.
Wednesday. 8 P. M.. Midweek Service.
DISCIPLES OF CHRIST??CHRISTIAN
CH^ffiAN 142 West 81st St
HVRCH
Prof. JOHN CLARK ARCHER.
of Tale University, preaches at 11 A. M.
JEWISH
CARNEGIE HALL
2 I TO-DAY, 7 &. 9 P. M.
ont Y I TO-MORROW, 3,749P.M.
PALESTINE LIBERATED
.1 Mming Picture Shouinp
Entire Hotyland. OUI d .\ew
Special Overture Musical ?Popular ?
Program Arranged by I. Zuro. | Price?.
LUTHERAN
ADVENT ??
Stelmle. T>. D..
Ptstor. B'w.j * S3d St.
Morntn* 8errlce. 11 o'clock.
CHURCH OF THE HOLY TRINITY
65th St. and Central Park West
Rev. William Freas preaches at 11 A. M.
METHODIST EPISCOPAL
METROPOLITAN TEMPLE. 1. St. & 7 At.
11 A. M.?Dr. William Farrell.
I?Rev. K. H. McElman. 'The Kingdom
of God."
MECCA FOR SUMMER VISITORS.
METHODIST EPISCOPAL
UNION CHURCH
233 West 4Sth St.
"99 steps from Broadway."
JOHN' G. TIENSON', PASTOR.
11 A. M.?Dr. W. ?'. Coleman
8 P. M.? Rev. John M. Pearson
The Travelers' Church.
Madison Avenue Church, 60th St.
Dr. RALPH W. SOCKMAN, Pastor.
REV. LELAND P. CARY?11 ami $.
PRESBYTERIAN
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
OLD FIRST. UNIVERSITY PLACE AND
MADISON SQUARE FOUNDATION.
?Rtv. Geor?e Alexander, D. D.
Ministers i Rev. Harry Emerson Koedlck. P. D.
I. Rev. Thomas ?"Juthrle ?Srw?.
Services, TJnlterslty* I'laco Church, cor. leth. St
11 A. M.?Mr. Speers will preach.
8 r. M? Lawn Service. Fifth Av., 11th St.
Mr. Cutzor will preach
Fifth Ave. Presbyterian Church
Fifth Avenne ?ind Fifty-fifth Street.
Ministers J n?-v-JOHN KELMAN. D. D.
s / Rev. Ja:,?K.S PALMER. Ph. D.
Rev. F. W. GINSAIH S, D. D.,
will preach at 11 A. M. and- 130 P. M.
At 4, Organ Recital by Archibald S.oS'.on.
BRICK CHURCH
fifth Avenu? and Thirty-seventh Street.
.,,.. ?? ,! WILLIAM PIERDEN MERRILL.
Ministers: ? THEODORE AIMSWORTH GREENE.
Dr. JOHN' ALEXANDER HUTTON,
of ths Delhaven Church of Glasgow,
will preach at 11.
PRESBYTERIAN CHl'RCH
525 West 155th St.
L.L.D., I'astor.
11 a m.?Kev. C. N. V?u Houten ,
7 30 P M?UDtu A.r Service, Rive???de. Jjrive and j
155th -St.
BROADWAY
PRESBYTERIAN CIH'RCH.
Broadway and 114th Street
Rev. Walter Duncan Buchanan, D. D.,
Minister. Rev. William C. Hogg. D. D
will preach at 1 1 A. M.
WEST-PARK PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH,
Amsterdam Avenue and Hflth Street.
Rev. ANTHONY H. EVANS. ?. D., Pastor.
Rev. GEORGE JOHNSON, Ph. D..
of Lincoln University, Penn ,
will preach at 11 A. M.
FT. WASHINGTON BR0?MA?r.AT
Rev. JAMES Ml RSELL preaches
at 11 A. M. and s P. M.
PROTESTANT EPISCOPAL
Cathedral of St. John the Divine
Amsterdam Avenue and 112th Street.
8 A. M.?Holy Communion.
9:30 A. M. ?Holy Communion (Spanish).
11 A. M.?Preacher. Rev. Wm. H. Garth.
4 P. M.-^-Proacher, Rev. Wm. ({. Garth.
Daily Service 7:30 A. M.
ST. JAMES' CHURCH
Madison Avenue and 71st Street,
Rev. FRANK SVARFIELD CROWDER, D D . Rector
g a. m. Hoiy Communion; 1? a. m.
Morning Prayer an 1 Sermon.
FIRST REFORMED EPISCOPAL CHURCH
Preaching Servie-, H A. >[.. Y. \V. C. A.
Auditorium, Lexington Ave. and 53d St.
For clergy appointments throughout sim?
mer, telephone Plaza 2~;~.
Church of Zion and St. Timothy
334 West 57th Street.
Rev. Frederick B?rge*?., Jr., D. D., Reetor.
8 and 11 (Rev. JAMES V. CHALMERS).
ST, THOMAS'S CHURCH. 5th Av. L 53d St.
Re>-. ERNEST M. STIRES. D. J)., Ruetor.
S. 11 (Rev. FLOVD S, LEACH, Ph. D. )
C&
RCH OE THE HOLY COMMUNION
?Oth Street and Sixth Avenue.
SERVICES 8 and 11 A. M. and N?X>N.
PROTESTANT EPISCOPAL
St. Bartholomew's Church
Park Avenue nntl Cist St.
The Rev. LEIGHTON PARKS, D. D.,
Rector.
Special Sumiller Services
8:30 A. M.. Holy Communion.
11 A. M? Morning Prayer and Sermon ;
Preacher, Rev. Z. T. PHILLIPS
Full Choir. All Seats Free.
C i) u r c i) _?. 3 n carnation
Madison At?, und 85th St.
The Re?. HORACE "PEBCY SILVER. Rector.
8 A. M.?Holv Communion.
10:40 A. M.?Organ Recital by
Frederick Kinsley.
1. Meditation ("Thais").Massenet'
2. Scherzo .Glgout .
3. Marche F?nebre & Chant Seraphlque
Guilmant.
11 A. M., Morning Prayer, Sermon by
Rev. D. WI LMOT GATESON.
Cfjapel of t fie incarnat ton ;
240 East 31st St.
Rev. E. V. COLLINS.
Services, 8, 9:30 and 11 A. M.
GRACE CHURCH,
Broadway and 10th Street.
Rev. Charles I wls Slattery, D. D., Rector. '
Holy Communier.S A. M. i
Service & Sermon (Dr. L?beck).11 A. M. !
Later Evensoiii! (Rev Charlo* G. Baird).. 8 P. M.
?errice 12:S0. Tries.. Wed., Thura., Fri.
CALVARY CHURCH ??2u?thBtYe
Rev. Theodore Sedgwtck, n. D., Re'ctor.
Services 8 & 11 A. M. (Mr. Cutler).
8 P. M., Special Musical Service !
Gauls "Holy City" and other favorites. ?
(T-?jurcij of tfje iErangfi?ruration |
1 East 29th St.?DR. HOUGHTON, Rector. I
SERVICES: 7, 8, 10:30 (Sermon) and 4. :
Urgun Rfiliat 4:30 p. m. Dr. Richardson. ?
REFORMED t
Collegiate Church of New York
THE MIDDLE CHURCH, ?
2d Ave. and 7th St.
Re?. Edgar Franklin Romig. Minister.
Rev Melbourne S. Appiegate.
will preach at 11 A. M. and S P. M
THE MARBLE CHURCH,
5th Ave. and 29th St.
Rev. David James Burrell, D. D., Minister '?
Rev. David De Forest Burrell, D. D,
of Dubutrue. Iowa, will preach
11 A. M.?"The Alabaeter Cruse." .
4 P. M.?"Hedged In."
THE CHURCH OF ST. NICHOLAS,
5th Ave. and 4Sth St,
Rev. Malcolm James MacLeod, D. D , Minister
Rev. Charles K. Brown, D. D.,
of New Haven, Conn., will preach
11 A. M.?"The Modern Use of the. Bible."
8 P. M.?"The Prophet Who Fought a
Wicked King."
THE WEST END CHURCH.
We?; En ! Ave. _nd 77th Street.
Rev. Henry Evertson Cotb. D. D., Minister
Rev. A. L. Warnihuls, D. D., of China
will preach at 11 A. M.
THE FORT WASHINGTON CHURCH,
Fort Washington Ave. and 181st St.
Ail Seats Free.
Rev Irving H. Iierg. D. D., Minister.
Rev. James S. Klttell, D. D.. of Albany, N. T.
wlil preach ar. Il A. M.
SOCIETY OF Mil END?
iUD.ii.ioc? ?ocnrrr or frie.-.t)?? ltetfcui
for ?.>-?hlp. 11 ?. ?., tt 2.1 Ksat 15th St.. M__
katua- and 11* ScOermerhorn St.. Brootiia.
SPIRITUALIST
LOTUS FLOWER SPIRITUALIST CHURCH
Carnegie Hall ?Chapter Room'. Sunday?,
8 P. M.?Spiritual Healing and Messages.
Tuesdays. 8 P. M.. Genealogical Hall,
226 West CSth.
Speaker and Medium, Margaret Campbell.
FIRST SPIRITUALIST CHURCH
LIS Eaat 5*th St., near Sd Av.
EVERY SUNDAY AT ? P. M.
I NITARIAN
:rth aventh
?oth street.
un . i 1819
Dr. WILLIAM S?TL-LIVAN. Minister
11 a. m.?The Rev. RICHARD BOYNTON,
of Buffalo. X Y. will preac;h. Su ????.:
"THE TROUBLING OF THE WA :
Union Services ?f the Unitarian C <
of New York <?r- held at ALI. SOULS'
every SunJav niornintr throughout th?i
Summer.
A CORDIAL WELCOME TO ALL
UNITARIAN PREACHING,
Church of the Saviour, llrooklyn,
JUNE 6. 1 1 A. M.
REV. JOHN' H. LATHROP.
Pierropont i;t. and Monroe Pi.
Four minutes Borough Hail subway.
OTHER SERVICES
The most certain sign of
the second coming of Our
Lord in the present genera?
tion, a sign foretold in the
Bible and now being remark?
ably fulfilled.
A Bible Address 'by
CARLYLE B. HAYNES
_
k
in the Big Tent
at 95th St. and
Broadway
Sanday Night,
August 29,
At 8 o'clock
Meetings every night except
Monday and Saturday.
All seats free?Questions and Answers.
TENT EVANGEL ??? ?
REV. T. T. SHIELDS, I). D.
Noted Canadian Preacher
Sunday, Monday, Tuesday.
Sunduy, AujruFt 29, t P. M
"Is Jesus Christ God?**
.Sunday, August ?D, g y. m.
"*Is the Atonement in Con?
flict With Science?"
Monday, August :10, 8 I*. M.
?"Uncle Sam and John Bull
in War and Peace.**
Dr. Shield?'?? moot "^oted lectnre.
Special Lecture To-Night 8 P. M.
"Hie Present Religious OuiJook"
By OR. SHIELDS. f
Noted Speakers to Sept. 15.
CARRI E. S. MARKWELL
will coruluct terrier?
EVERY SINDAY MORNING
at 11 o'clock, also Thursday Ev? a'. ?
tn tue
COLONIAL ROOM. ?IOTEL M'ALPIN,
Broadway and 34th St.
Audible treatments
at the close of "ach ?ervlc?.
CHINATOWN?- g^SST*
Wide awake Gospel Service, Nightly 10 I*.it.
Thorn?? J. Kooaan, ?upcrtnt?Dd?nt.
APOSTOLIC CAMP MEETING *
DIVINE HEALING-,
E**!?...91'* $*' * (h?"?> Ave.. Brooklyn.
Through August and Septwnb.iv.

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