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New-York tribune. [volume] (New York [N.Y.]) 1866-1924, January 03, 1921, Image 8

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jCoates Makes
Farewell Bow
As a Conductor
?New York Symphony Or
I chestra Under His Superb
? Leadership Attains High
I, est Peak of Efficiency
So Will Sail To-morrow
?rahms"s Symphony in C
Minor ami Scriabine's
Poeme Feature Program
Albert Coates ?nade his last appear?
ance as guest conductor of the New
York Symphony Orchestra yesterday
Afternoon at Aeolian Hall, his last ap?
pearance, at least, of, this season, for
it is to be hoped that this able and
Virile conductor will ?onn visit us
again. This time Mr. Coates gave an
American audience the opportunity to
hear his reading of Brahms's Symphony
in C minor. No. 1, and of Scriabin's
"Poemc de l'Extase."
His Brahms was not of a stereo?
typed variety. It was a modern read?
ing, suffused with the vigor of the con?
ductor's personality, Brahma with a
difference. Because he approached the
_ musk* from a less academic angle than
" Ss customary and because he treated it
with les-; servile reverence than is
habitual, this reading might be calcu?
lated to provoke discussion among the
sticklers l'or musical conventionality.
But whatever the differences of opinion
as to its merits, there was nothing
trite about Mr. Coates's interpreta?
tion. It was an interesting per?
formance.
During his stay in Russia. Mr. Coates
Bummered and wintered with Scriabin.
The composer told hira his secret-, re?
vealed his personality, disclosed his
aima and ambitions. In an interesting
note in the program, the conductor
says of the Russian composer:
"His great aim in life, both in his
jmisic as in everything else that he I
"* did, was to give people a wider, a ;
higher vision, or, as he himself put it, j
?to carry people with him up to the ;
heights'' the said it entirely without
"conceit). He believed that the human i
race having become degenerate, it was j
- the duty of each generation so to live |
and, above all, so to work that the nest j
ac-eneration should be a better and a i
higher one. He believed profoundly
. that aome day a wonderful new genera?
tion of human beings would be born
- into the world, that a great regenera
?. tion of mankind would come to pass.
He considered it the bounden duty of
?very one, each in his own way and ac?
cording to his gifts, to work toward
this goal of a regeneration of mankind,
and he believed in ali sincerity and in
all humility that it was his own duty
as a musician and a composer not only
to influence the minds of his listeners,
hut so to uplift them and carry thorn
away that they should forget for the !
time the small everyday things of life,*
and, like his human being in the 'Poem
of Ecstasy,' stand for a space on the
mountain tops bathed in the shining
splendor of things eternal.
"To those who know Russia well
Scriabin was a true son of his country,
that land of extraordinary contrasts,]
of twilight and vivid color, of Eastern
mysticism and Western cleverness,
luxurious cu;ture, of fervent religious
feeling and intense love of beauty."
Mr. Coates's reading of the "Poeme"
far outranked that of other conductors.
In fact, by its clarity ar.d force, he
came near to persuading the hearers
that this extraordinary blending of
tenderness, pas.ion and orchestral
- cacophony, thig. intense expression of
things earthly ar.d things mystical is
- r.bsolute music. And in spite of the
tempestuous nature of the music, the
conductor refrained from riding the
orchestral whirlwind with exaggerated
fury.
His climaxes were thoughtfully pre?
pared, especially that of the closing
pages? of the work, and when the musi?
cal conflict was at us height, Mr.
Coates remained master of himself
and of his men. The orchestra has
i,ever played more eloquently, never
with greatej elasticity and brilliance.
Sergei Rachmaninoff gave a superb
performance of Tschaikowsky's Con?
certo in B flat minor and shared in
the expressions of enthusiasm for the
< onductor, who received an ovation at
the close of the concert.
Mr. Coates '? 11 sail for England to?
morrow on the Rochambi au in order
to be in London for the next concert
of the London Symphony Orchestra on
nuary 17.
On the Screen
By Harriette Underhill
Maurice T< ir1 i ? ; taken J, Feni
? ,ore Cooper's masterpiece, 'The Last
?if, the Mohicans,'* aret put it on the
screen, which prdv? - that he is a brave
nan. Little as we know of the real
-tory, we can realize that the produc
? .:, of ? thing is a colos -al under?
taking, And there is to bi tradition to
be reckone I witl and < ?? ry man who
eei the pi< tun i goii to have his
own idea- as to how il should have
been produced, The reason we know so
ittle of ??' tory a because it was
k'iven to u.-? to read when we v.< n little
.' 1 we pect< d that it v as hi? tory.
.'oat settled it for us. and wo never
ave rend it since. However, if we liad
read the book, perhaps we should not
have enjoye,- the p el ire .. much as we
?lid, for i'. is a perfectly thrilling pic
' are, with bea il
and massacres ar.d Indians all acting
h thou;*', t v.<- ?? \.-v.- year's Eve. As
? ?<? watel d tor; i ?Id we could
only think tl I t was a pity prohibl
? ion ha ln'1 . i 775, in
tcad of 1925. Did you know that the
??eawori th< Indiana burned houses and
Bcalped peoi kc wild Ind?
ians genera::-. ?.,. because they were
fall of firewater? Well, such, it seems
"as tl Unions were a
? w- lown 1 enjoyed killing p"o
ple with hatchel - and knive . and the
?elawari . rath? r peaceful and
didn'l i a? h a m ut ';.- ir liquor;
Mohicans were noble and hand
omc. When our story opens there was
only or.e of th< e left, lincas, the last
of the Mohican.'.
Aibei .1 ':.. a -, and it would
be difficult I find nj ? ?? -.-, ho looks
'p?s like an Indian than Mr. RoKcoe.
'?ever for a moment did he socm like
:'ncas, but somehow that didn't ,-;eem
'o detract front the interest of the
tory. Perhaps it was because we. had
to ideal linca?,
Wallaee Beery was the villainous
-ndian Magua, and I ~.. o was an un
;ke an Indian as it is possible to be.
I'nless, Indeed, our conception of an
Indian is all wrong. .Sir. Beery leered
-?rid winked ar.d looked ardonic, and
???? expected eery moment to hear
?:rn my, "I'll get you yel ' Indians,
?': think, are j_ t crue . : a non is
crtwl. They do not gloat and revel in
/."ir own wickednc
There are ?.ai* perfectly hair-rais
'?'/. fights, where Indian-',, the good and
bad, grapple with each other and throw
? ?rh o'.he, over precipices and hurl
iiattle a/es and tomahawks. The only
?rouble ii, in a battle of that '--ort, it
s difficult to toll who in getting the
vont of it. Indians all look alike in
* fight.
Barbara Bedford Is perfectly eharrn
ng ar Cora Munro, the martyred
?rofne of the tale The sweet little
blonde Lilian Hall ig the other ist?)
who hasn't mueh to do bot look pretty
and faint. The death of Barbara ?nd
tjneaa i? (>tm ut ti,?-, moat convincing
things we ever ear/ done, and we shall
not soon forget it. How can a director
have his players crash hundreds of
feet over precipices onto the rocks
and live to make another picture?
With the exception of the un-lndlan
like Indians, the cast, is excellent. It
has Henry Woodward, James Gordon,
George Ilacka thorne and other well- ;
known players.
The overture is "Notoma." There is j
a Prizma called "Indian Summer" and '
a vocal prologue by Joseph Martell and !
the Strand male quartet. Kitty Mc?
Laughlin sings "The Bird Song" from
"Pagliacci." The comedy is "Number,
Please," featuring Harold Lloyd.
Another Maurice Tourneur production |
is at the Rialto. This is called "The I
Bait," and is taken from Sidney Toler's !
play, "The Tigax. Lady," and, for once,
we consider the screen title much better
than the original one. Hopo Hampton
is the star. It is principally because of
Miss Hampton that we liked the picture.
Her work is fresh and light and natural.
She made the rather preposterous hero?
ine a real girl and not a wronged and
weeping maiden with good resolutions.
We do not think that "The Bait" is the
sort of story that Mr. Tourneur is the |
most successful with. He seems tu re- j
quire vast numbers of people and mnuti- !
tainous backgrounds to be quite at ease, ;
or big things like the Drury Lane melo- :
dramas, calling for quick action and I
hairbreadth escapes every minute. He ;
seems to be better at showing you how
people ride or shoot or swim or fight
or make love than what they think.
You never feel that you would care to
invite any of his men to tea or to dis?
cuss the latest styles with any of the
women.
In the present picture, this is true of
all the characters with the exception of
Miss Hampton and Rao Ebberly, who
plays a small part convincingly. Miss
Hampton believes implicitly tn Joan
Granger, the bait; so much so, in fact,
that you begin to believe in her your?
self.
Just how difficult this was you will
understand when wo teil you that Joan
was a good girl working in a ?try goods
emporium when some one put a stolen j
parse in her drawer and she was con-1
victed of the crime. Then she was i
stolen by the man who planted the !
purse and taken to Paris to be used as !
a liait to catch rich men'.; sons. She ;
met the hero when she was being
nearly eaten by a lion which escaped i
trom a music hall act, and was dragged
into all sorts of traps which included
being accused of murder. Xow do you
think it is an easy matter to be sincere
and natural under such harrowing cir?
cumstances ?
We fancy that Misa Hampton could
do marvelous things with a polite i
comedy. She has undoubted talent and|
charm and, best of all, sincerity. Some-:
how we fancy that she would need very!
little directing.
Harry Woodward is John Warren,]
"the fish," who snatched so eagerly
at "the bait." Hie is the sort of hero
who says: "You are my dream girlJ
Somewhere in tine world I always
knew"- etc. Jack Gilbert made the ]
scenario. The titles are well done, but
a bit grandiloquent, at times.
The comedy is a Christie, "Going
Thru the Rye." Mary Fahiar. sings an i
aria from "Joan of Arc." Joseph Al?sai j
plays "Iruflammatus" from "Stabat Ma- ?
ter" as a trumpet solo. The overture!
is "Rienzi."
At the Rivoli the feature picture, is j
"The Passionate Pilgrim."
"Bunty Pulla the Strings" is at the j
Capital." These will be reviewed to- j
morrow.
Theater Prices Reduced
In All Harris Houses
Sam II. Harris announced yesterday
that a lower scale of prices for tickets
to the attractions which he controls in
New York will be put in effect begin?
ning to-night. A $2.50 .-cale of prices
will be fixed for Mr. Harris's produc?
tions heretofore commanding $3. This
reduction, it itf announced, will extend'
down the line tx> the lower priced bal?
cony seats. In the case of an attrac?
tion playing to capacity audiences at
the %'i scale. Mr. Harris estimates that
the reduction will cut $3,000 from the
weekly receipts.
Mr. Harris said that instead of rais?
ing prices for opening performances
he will keep the roduced price scale
established. When. .Mrs. Fiske comes to
New York shortly in "Wake Up, Jona?
than!" the new price will be effective
at the opening and thereafter, and the
same will hold true of the production
of "The Champion," in which Cirant
Mitchell is to appear at the Longacre
Theater to-night.
Th*? productions now running which
will be, affected by Mr. Harris's order
are "Welcome Stranger." a! the Cohan
* Harris Theater, and "Little Obi New
York," at the Plymouth.
The new scaJe is not the result, of any
lowering in ti? cost of production, ac?
cording to Mr. Harris. lie sa s sal?
aries, royalties, costuming, lack-stage
costs and overhead charges are greater
than ever, but he believes that by start?
ing at the selling end of the business
an early reduction in production cost
will be hastened. He expresses the
hope that other New York managers
will enlist with him in the. price re?
duction movement.
Verdi and Masculin Favored
The Sunday evening concert, at the
Metropolitan was devoted entirely to
I Verdi and Mascagni. Among the Verdi
numbers M. Mandones sar:,v the aria
i! ?acerato Spirito from "Simone
Borcanegra." The aria and Miserere
from "II Trovatore" were sung by Miss
Rosa Ponselle, .Morgan Kingston and
the chorus, and the trio from "I Lom
bardi alia Crociata" by Miss Ponselle
and MM. Gigli ami Mardones. Miss
Ponselle, M. Mardones ami the chorus
| sang the finale from the. second act (,t'
"La Forza del Destino."
Mascagni'.s "Cavalleria Rusticana"
1 was given by Mme. Destinn as San
. tuzza, Flora Perini as Lola, Marion
' Telva as Lucia. M. Gigli as Turridu
and Ciuseppe Danise a- Alflo. This
I was dramatically performed, especially
by Mme. Destinn, whose voice, how?
ever, seemed occasionally to be forced.
The orchestra, under Giuseppe Bam
boschek, played the overture to "I
; Vespri Siciliani" and the prelude to
I "I Lombardi," with violin .solos by
Gino Nastrucci.
Spanish Violinist
is the Philharmonic j
Orchestra Soloist!
Joan Manen Displays Mas-!
tery and Artistic Matur?
ity in Playing of Sym?
phonie Espagnol of Lalo
,.? III! '
The music on the programme of the
Philharmonic Orchestra yesterday]
afternoon at Carnegie Hall was fa?
miliar, but of the kind that will bear
many rehearings. The noteworthy
feature of the concert was the appear?
ance as soloist of Joan Manen, the |
Spanish violinist., a newcomer this fall,
who at once impressed himself as a
musician of more than ordinary dis?
tinction. He stands outside the group
of talented striplings who appear an?
nually to exhibit their prowess nnd
reap the fruits of public adulation be?
fore they have attained artistic ma?
turity.
Mr. Manen is a Reasoned artist of
attainment and reputation, whose name
lias long been familiar to students of
the violin. He played yesterday Lalo's
Symphonie Espagnol. It was to be ex?
pected that he would play the music
of his compatriot with authority, but
he did far more than that. He played
it with a beauty of tone and a dignity
that lifted it completely out of the
sentimentality in which it is in some
of its many rehearings immersed. He
is not a player of outstanding brill?
iance. There is no flourish, but. his
mastery of his instrument and line re?
pose of style soon win their way with
his hearers. He was received with
much enthusiasm.
Dvorak's "New World" Symphony,
Strauss'.s "Till Eulenspiegcl" and the
Hungarian March o\ Beriioz comprised
ho. orchestral numbers. The audience
was large.
In the evening at the Hippodrome
Mishel Piastro replaced A-^n Kubelik,
who had been announced to appear, but
was prevented by illness, in a joint
recital will? Alfred Mirovitch, pianist.
Mr. Piastro is another of the season's
newcomers whose attainments place
him above the average. He played lust
night with great warmth of tone and
abundant temperament Sindings's Suite
in A minor, the "Serenade M?lanco?
lique" of Tchaikovsky, a Hungarian
Dance of Brahms, a Paganini Caprice,
"The Lonely Wanderer" of Greig and
Wieniawski's "Russian Carneval."
Mr. Mirovitch displayed considerable
proficiency, but, due undoubtedly to
the difficulty of the task of adapting
his instrument to the demands of so
large an auditorium, a style in which
there was more of vigor than of clarity.
His numbers included n transcription
of an organ concerto of Handel, Cho?
pin's B flat minor Sonata and a Liszt
group. A good-sized audience heard
the program with every evidence of
enjoyment.
The Stage Door
Francis Wilson and De Wolf Hop?
per make their New York appearance
in the revival of "Erminie" at the
Park Theater to-night. The curtain
will rise promptly at 8:10 because of
the length of the performance and
because of the ceremonies in connec?
tion with the presentation of a loving
cup to Francis Wilson by the Actor.-,'
Equity Association. Other openings
to-night are "The Champion" at the
Longacre Theater and "Transplanting
Jean" at the Court Theater.
"Hobby in Distress," by Charles
Mann, will be presented out of town on
; .January 1C by Julian l'ollak. ,
Roland Young, instead of being
: featured in (Jare Kummc?'i "Hollo's
'? Wild Oat," now at the Punch and
? Judy, will be starred hereafter.
A new third act for "Miss Lulu
i Bett," now playing at the Belrpont, has
| been substituted for the act which
'closed the play originally, the artistic
! ending which left Lulu free to decide
I her own future giving way to the more
popular dramatic form calling for the
: marriage of Lulu. The change was
! made by Brock Pemborton, the pro
; (?ucer, and Zona Gale, the author, and
was incorporated last Saturday night.
Dinner is a
Revelation
?cores of New York business
men look forward with pleasure
to the delightful dinners at Kew
Garden? Inn.
Choice food in endless va?
riety, excellent cook.ing, dainty
service ? everything to tempt
und satisfy.
.And the invigorating country air
develop? heiihhlii! appetites. It's
simply preat out there this winter.
Everyone is having a wonderful
time. And, just think, ii's but lr>
minutes from New Yotk.
KEw Gardens
?__,._ r^KSw Gardarus"
IN m__/ LonSLlsland
J to 4 Hooin Apts.?Knott Management
?eorpe II. Wartman. Mor
Phone, Rich, mil 383
January Dis?
counts Prevail !
China and table
crystal at 10% to
50% discount.
CONFORMING to the old Ovingtorr custom,
all the charming china and table crystal is,
for the month of January, offered at. discounts
from 10% to 50%.
Nothing is exempt. Whatever we have tn china
and table crystal, you may have at very attrac?
tive prices.
OVINGTON'S
" The Gift Shop of Fifth Avenue"
312-314 Fifth Avenue Near 32nd Street
It was made in response to letters j
and expressions of opinion from those
who had read the book and then seen j
the play.
Max Marcin is negotiating for ai
London theater and will make hi.-1 own
production of "Three Live Ghosts,"
which is now running at the Nora |
Bayes Theater.
Margaret Anglin announces that
Maurice Browne will assist her in the
production of the "Iphigenia" and
other special performances to be given
in the course of the season for matinee
production. Last year .Mr. Browne pro?
duced ''Medea" at the Garrick Theater.
"Enter Madame" at the Fulton Tiie^
ater broke theatrical records last week
in the twentieth week of its run by
playing to n gross of $23,342.60. This
was mad?) possible by the daily mati-?
noes given in addition to the evening'
performances. The figure sets a new
high mark for box office receipts for
a dramatic attraction.
Miss Farrar iu New Role
General Manager Giulio Gatti-Ca
sazza announced yesterday that Char
pentier's "Louise" will have its first
performance by the Metropolitan Opera
Company on Saturday afternoon, Janu?
ary 15. Miss G?raldine Farrar will be
the heroine; Mme. Louise Berat, the
mother; Orville Harrold. Julien, and
Clarence Whitehall, the father. Others
in the cast will be Mme?. Delaunois,
Dalossy, Perini, Roselle, Miriam, Tif?
fany, Mellish, Kellogg, Axman, Ingrain,
Ellis, Egener, Farnam, Arden, Telva
and Sundelius, and Messrs. Dua, Bada,
Ananian, D'Angelo, Laurenti, Leonhard,
Audisio, Resehiglian, Malatesta, Pal
trinieri and Piceo; solo danseuse, Miss
Florence Rudolph.
The opera lias been rehearsed and
will be directed by Albert Wolff. Giulio
Setti trained the chorus. The stage
management is in charge of Samuel
Thewman. Miss Rosina Galli arranged
the ballet. The interior scenes were
painted by James Fox and the ex?
teriors by the Triangle Studios,
__^_^_^_^__^__B?rT;'o>> ?f H"00 RieaettfeltB.
RIVOLI
Broadway at 49th St.
Cosmopolitan Production
ANNIVERSARY WEEK
5*
The Passionate Pilgrim
A PARAMOUNT PICTURE
.?-'? ene from Lakmp?Grace Hoffman, ?soprano.
''horua o? 20, Entire Rivoli Hallet.
ICdoardo Alba no. Baritone, ami Choni!?.
__ RIVOLI CONCERT ORCHESTRA
Tim
RIALTO
MAURICE TOURNEUR'S
"THE BAIT"
With Hope Hampton
A PARAMOUNT PICTURE
FAMOUS RIALTO ORCHESTRA.
CRITERION
Broadway
At 44th .St.
''Midsummer Madness"
A PARAMOUNT PICTURE
with JACK HOLT, CONRAD NAGEL. LOIS
WILSON, LILA LEE,
From Cosmo Hamilton's
"iliB Friend and His Wife.''
National Symphony Orchestra |
ONCERTS Ml
OELBERG SERIES
MENGELBERG
CONDUCTING.
CARNEGIE} Tues. Aft., Jan. 11?Frl. V.r., Jan. 14,
i HALL 5 Thurs. Aft.. Jan. 13?Sat. Nr.. Jan. 13
Jar.. 13 l.-.-PCHMULLER. Soloiat
Tickets (it Hoi (mice $_.8<j to 00 Cent.*.
1'IIK KNABE IS Till* OFFICIAL PIANO.
I CARNEGIE HALL. Thi? Afternoo? at 3. j
AEOLIAN HALL, THIS AFTERNOON, at 3.
Yolanda MERO
PIANO RECITAL
(*i:?lnway Piano.)
AEOLIAN HALL, TO-NIGHT, 0:15.
JOSEPH FUCHS
2d VIOLIN RECITAL, (SMnwty Htn?.)
AEOLIAN HALL, Friday Art., at 9, Jan. -9
Planofort? Recital by IQNA2 /
Joseph Schwarz FRIEDMAN
RUSSIAN BARITON!
I'rcnenud by Alex L. Flacher.
'Met. Antonia Sawyer. Inc. Stclnway Plar.o.
AMFIITCAN DFBT'T.
Seats Now at Box Offlc?, Too to V:.
Met. Metro. Musical Bureau.?Stelnway n?no.
ea^^^E"ELWESIPH,LADELPH|A ORCHESTRA
VJL_-1V V /-\kJl__ I__l__, W J~__-J ; LEOPOLD STOKOWSKI, Conductor
ENGLISH TENOR
Mgt. Antonia Sawyer, Inc. Ht "In way Piano
LEOPOLD STOKOW8KI, Conductor
/?ARNEGH3 ! TO-MORROW ??_ A at
V IIALL ' EVKNINO, J??. *t | ; j -
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OH!
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Chicken Waffle Dinner?
Tuesday?, Thursdu & _iurday_. Luneh
ft.ii. Attcrn___^__^__H East S?tb Ht.
"THE AHM CHAIR AT 15? KAtVf
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Artlfllc ?iilt- to l?i for all Vlnfls ef
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?HE PIROUETTE t, ~ r?i?.i.?
l.uncbeon. Te?. KDe<>lal |)?nn?r, il.00.
TUF r?i^PV ' r" K?om, It) E. 83 ?t.
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Chicken waffle, home cooking, f>': W. 40 8*.
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I.nncheon, ? Oo. Dinner, $1 00 and $1.25.
CHICKEN DINNER Mon., Wed. and Hat.
SCOTCH
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^^^^^^^^^^ Murray Hill 5664.
Breakfast. luncheon. te_. dinner. Scotch
pastry, ?cone?, ?hurt brea<!, mutton plea.
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f? W. 3<th Ht. Open 10:30 A. V? 7:30 P. M.
Mt> and Woman Served.
The Ann Fulton Cafeteria
ni runo? ?TaatT ? v AN? ir?ru
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TWA ROOM Luncheon, 46o to sic.
12 W. 47th Ht. Dinner, 7?o to ?I.
The eut-eMlte-errflitary else?? ef New Yore,
whara unlqu* atmaisharea and food ???ullar
t? varias taitas Invite the dlitrlmlttatlas.
RS. COPELAND 8 WE?T 50?h st
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AMERICA'S FOREMOST THEATRES AND HITS. DIRECTION OF LEE ? ,1. J. SIICRERT
WINTER GARDEN
_S_?'?IE?I LAUGHING
STAOEO AT THE WlNTtn u?nUt?
The PASSING SHOW,
Matinee
To-morro
?rSotl'-l? ?AUGHING HIT EVER
STAOEO^AJ THE WINTER GARDEN!
"~" OF
^^^^^^^^^^^^ 11921
!?-*_., WILLIE & EUGENE HOWARD
MARIE DRESSLER-HARRY WATSON
AND 200 OTHERS
CENTRAL THEATRE;;;^ 8:30 M?t?.
Ufc.il I nHi. 4,th _ By Wed. i Sit,, 2:30.
NEXT MAT. WEDNESDAY. 50o t? $2.00.
?iy P"0*"?* * -H.rri, <;,,-. Prient
-??ls-V___:'_i a"d Parta Sensation
DELYSIA -A f car
"Ha? t-^er^Nf-jr^kj- s)orra."-Telegram.
LONGACRE ESA!.1- ? S '
OPENING TO-NIGHT
Grant Mitchell
?5__gT *A'" THE CHAMPION "
by THOMAS LOUDKN and A K. THOMAS.
RftflTU 45th. w I E?enln?8 8:30. Matinees
DUU 1 11 ??: ivh-jj I Wednesday A Saturday
-?_. FAVERSHAM
f?tfft THE PRINCE M_ PAUPER
PRINCESS , / To-m'w Night
MGIBSC'SX ??ttM
chzs:/ e ? o r
THE BA_> MAM
]
Matinees Wednesday and Saturday at 2 ?il
?TV.? THEA. ,;?,'?. "r
T/7/-;
?s? y?ifi
ASTOR
*-. J>y A- 45th. Ers. S
_?Vi'.l..l'op. ) i ?
HENRY W. SAVACE offers
ant.-_.p-.~- | -!.-?_?
A SCKEA?HX? COMEDY"
-?Telegram j
CASINO
H|RSELF,^?^L:?06IM-^_&'.
*?X;aMATIC ?NS?fio'N'w'sEArToN
I'.?www?www
: 9lh and B'way. E\ ni es al 3 0
POP. MATINEE WEDNESDAY.
7.1 MBA LISTS PLAY WITH Nil Sir
T
JL
ft
HI VMniITU *5"> SX., West or Broad-aj
rLlmUUin Ma-.lnees Thursday and Sat.
LITTLE OLD NEW YORK_
LYBIC ??.'T!:AX"A...a.?'? : [WT?TT$S7
"BREEZIEST EVTV.rt m viikv ~ ????.-" 1-*???1? ?*?
Republic wk?; Daddy Dumplins
ELTINGE $g_4$
Street. Brei ': r? ? *5
ed. (Pop.) A >at . 2 3?.
UTTLt
THEAiKE. _
W. iV.U St i MATINEES WED. and SAT., __?.
FRAZEE S?.?*ST? " ; . ? ?
BI'E< 1 \I M M IM I. MAT I KID \\
AI m "THE WOMAN
_ $?S_iSS OF BRONZE"
GREENWICH VILLAGE THEATRE
THE BEGGAR'S OPERA
A gay and racy ofd musical
show with more charm, satire
and sweet tunes than teaih
Broadway in si\ seasons.
?KENNETH MA< ? ? i\V \\\
m i.ivr,MXM 1.1 THIS SEASONS'??'(
'II Kit KAMI I,Y TREE"
MAXINE ELLIOTT'S E
Eve?. 8:30. Mata. Wed. * Sat. 2::
200,000 PERSONS HAVE SEEN and LIKED I
SPANISH LOVE
IT "HOI.IIS THE AIDIKM B
BREATHLESS."? Eve. Su i
AMI IS "A I'EAY NO ONE SflOI'll)
MISS."?Alan ??ai' i,\ th>- American.
NOW IN ITS 6th BIG MONTH
CENTURY Ev "E LAST 3 WEEKS
Beautiful Product!
CCA
Evenings at S Sharp. Mali Wedne 'and .-'? ? ?idaj
f.asi Times ot the World's Largest and Most Beautiful Production
V RAY CO.MSTOCK and
MORIUS CKST I'resent
A Ml'SICAL EXTRAVAGANZA
OF TUE OKIE.N 1'
Most Sensational Success in World's History
Company of 400 People - - II Bio Scenes
POPULAR BARGAIN MATINEE WEDNESDAY, 50c to $2
LAST NIGHT POSITIVELY SATUHOAY EVENING. JANUARY 220
M0B0SC0
THEATRE West 45'h St
tvs.830MatsWedeSat230
um
\AI
\
\SE
\
APOLLO !'" '2|1 Sl' Evening? I! 20. ?- Jlr'ES SO '"'"'* W4
franc?s" ?V~
k WHITE i
? Will) BEN WELC
SELWYN ;;:?;' ?,;;?
w?intees ' ^immiE
Will) BEN WELCH and Star Cast.
n:
"J )FLORENCfc '\ ] THE
?WEED ,n iVl | R a G E
FRANK TIN NE Y ?-,
"TICKLE ME"
torn
TIMES SO THEA.?Special Mats.
"M?X'?D MARRIAGE"
Si i i' \::!.?: CAST. PRICES '? . to f_.<
Rltnrit PEMBERTON introduc
7, O N A <? A I. K ' S
?"Miss Lulu Bett"
Some opinions of the pre - :
"i 'ontains scenes as delightfully amus?
ing "ml as genuinely amusing as any- i
II, ij the ?-.too'' has seen or is likely '
see."?11 eywood Hroun. Tribune.
"Will undoubtedly take its ulace be?
side 'Fititrr Madame' as one of the suo- ,
Cfssfnl plays of the year."?Robert (J.
Hv ;?. Eve. Teleoram.
??The whole ton < i ? likely to fall in j
love and want to marry '.]... Lulu \
Bett.'"?Charles uarnton, Eve. World. :
"Hush to the Belmont <nul take your ;
place on the line ?/? front of the i/^: ?
Office."?Stephen Rathiun, Eve. Sun
??.I perfectly good galaxy ??? quite
adorable cliaracters "- Ala : Da'.e..
BELMONT ?S ?22:
BROCK PEMBERTON Presi-ntH
? HILDA VARESI ?NORMAN TREVORf
NTER MADAM t
FULTON vt<
,1.1V Y \ TIlEA.Tn J-? Biso '!'? u
si-Ki i, mats. io-aay -,-..,., & ?.
The Provincetown PlayersM,.
frith CHARLES * .11 I'l \" \ In
"The Emperor Jones'' ' '
^TJTiTarnTTTTTI
igP 3?f -v PLAYS CF SHAKCSPEARE!
l/f ?$& ''" V";JI " '?" HELI 0; i ? .-.'
Ill
I
. i TJ nrs v!, ? ?? ; pr\ , Merciia
d_TM ?T TMP?TRP matinee m?
Tim D. W. Griffith Masten ? SHUBERT
WAY DOWN EAST ?popular mat. ^Wednesday
j^?ftEEtWtCR VIPAGB
Vil f?UJEfoglSTZO'
On liwtral nul Vocal A
S .- ? ? It? - ? ti r in Adra
GARRSCK ?5 w' ?5, Fitzrov l522, Evl-S:l?
: Sal a: "-I-:
HEARTBREAK
HOUSE
./ ,,??/; j, BERNARD SHAW
3flthST,i,""\r. .'..v'r?Vv' ?
West 48th
Matinees \
THEA
VL48.?
SAMSON AND DELILAH
PAULINE LORD
3H0?DHURST 4,ih ?_._?: &&>?
Er OVER THE HILL
playhouse;;
MARY MASH
"Thy Name Is Woman"
;V".* 48tb St. 5?
"THE BROKEN WINS"
SEE THE CRASHING AEROPLANf
BIJOU '"?'?"? ??' ' ? ?. !" ?*?
THE SKIN GAME
I! Y JOHN OAliSW'ORTHY
METROPOLITAN 8 po l S ?
TONIGHTatS. DON CARLOS. Vonscllc Matzoi
mer. llalli, Mart? - 111, I'.i l.n i. IM liir I'apl.
WED. at S, CARMEN. I'nr-ar s -
Galll; Martlnelll, Amato, Botiller?Wolff.
THURS. al - OBERON. I'onsclle. (loi
Smi lellus; Kjixaton, Ola/,, Uua -lie clai ?.! !
FRI., ; M.-i, TRISTAN. Ma:/.- ?< ici (i nl
Semliach, \V)iil hill, Oustafs. i, BaCa?Bcdanzky.
SAT. m .. BUTTERFLY. Parrar, Foi la
Cr ? !. s ittl, Dua Moral - til.
SAT. al 3, Spec'! I'erl'Ve MEFISTOFELE.
Alia, Peralta, llowan!, I'erinl; (!:,,' . Mai lunes,
Baila, I'altrtnleri Moianzonl.
' NEXT MON. MAT. at i ($1 to $4) Dou
Hi!'.- L'ORAC?LO. Peralta ; Chainlee, Scnttl,
1'iliir. I'-oll'd by PAGLIACCI. SunJellus; !
I Crlml, l)o I.ui-.-i NIorajizonl. s-at-? to-day.
""MON. at s. BLUE BIRO. Bast?n, Gordon. Kills!
Delauuols, r.-'ni: Rothler. (.?ha'n'ers?Wolff.
51AKDMAN riA.NO L SED.
NEW YORK SYMPHONY
i IRCIIESTRA
WALTER DAMROSCH.Conductor
Historical Cycle at CARNE?TE HALE
Tburs. Aft., Jan. 6?Fri. Kvi; , Jan. V.
HA RO LI>"L HA D ? R, PI ano
I'IKTRO Vt)N, ( Irgan
RENE POLLA1N, Viola,
Berlioz- Liszt - - F ram l< ?Hall I Sacna
AEOLIAN HALL, SAT., JAN. ? a< 11
SYMPHONY CONCERT for CHILDREN
AEOLIAN HALL, Sun. Aft,, Jan. !? at 3
Sololat S P A I DING
A LIIERT OrrtLUIlVU
Tickets at ll?i Offices. (?EOROE ENCLEP-. Mrr.
Philharmonic
Carnegie Hall, Sat. Eve.. Jan. 8 at S:30.
under the direction of JOSEF STRAN8KY
Beethoren?Wajnirr -Lltzt
MATZENAUER
linmulatlon Sceilo,
Fells F. Lolfels, Manager.
Aeolian Hall, To-m'w (Tues.) Ev*. at. 8:15
BEETHOVEN
ASSOCIATION
With thn followlnc A vt !;<;.??
OAVTH1EK I HCTCHESON
ZI MBA LIST KORTSCHAK
SVECENSKI WILLFUL
Tickets Bo* Office ??.?'! of Miss Helen Lot*. 1 \\ 34
FIFTH BILTMORE
FRIDAY MORNING MUSICALE
Qrand B-liroon? Hotel Biltr.icre, J?u. '. at ' '..
^2H?^ LAZZARl
?22??5 NOVAES
'?^^ HACKETT ?
Tickets a'. Bntmoro nor Office ?Balrorv Floor).
M?t. It. K. Johnston. (Knabe I'lano.)
PHILADELPHIA
r ORCHESTRA
LEOPOLD STOKOWSKI, Conductor
pARNBGIB I TUESDAY I?_ A at
"*- 1IA1.I. EVENING Jrtn. *t g:1r
CARNEGIE HALL. T^-.,,-.-,. ? i
wed. evo., at 8:15. January 3
ONLY N. Y. RECITAL?FRIEDA
HEMPEL
Seats at Box Office. Stolnwaj Piano.
Aeolian Hull, To-morrow (Tue*.) Aft. at 3, '
REC?TAX P\' A 1
Marguerite JJ AlVa^Z
"THE MATCHLESS D'ALVAREZ''?The Olobe. I
Management Daniel Mayer. Steinway Piano
To-nioht.
RESERVED SEATS ALL PARTS OF HOUSE.
Jacx)b's Opera Ticket Office
NORMANDIE HOTEL. BROADWAY and 38TH ST.
PHONES FITZROY 4lflS-4l!)l).
MOTOK js/*^??g-?u*i'w
eu* mm a * _-. -_- ?rcn?sbor toll?n
TRUCK show
T
V E VT 'YORK'S LEADING THE A T R E S A N 1) 8 C C < E 9 ? B S f
EEVPIR? ' v'v * 40th "' Ev" ;i' NEW AVVrF,,0AM iHEA
ii'way A 40th St. Evs al '
Mai ? . \Y, I.
'One of the plays ?ill lovers of t'i- theatr
?houtil see and see ?Main - T
"EARRIE HT ft O
11 r-c
Ruth
Chatterton
.WARY M?BILYN HILiEk'
T. M. BARRIE'S Mu 11.W
^ Z?CFELD M1DNIQKT FR0?C
BELASCO
Lione! Atwill ?debur?u?!l,berty : ;
?-lu.iui nun n ?tb?rt?? gmr -bent that mi su al comed?
l;y Pucha Guitry. Adapted by Granrllle Barker ' CAN PROVIDE." II
mm mw m
h ? -J9 m?
?a? /iS_sif. yJSB Kfl
'LADY BILLYS:,;;;--r
"leatre. W 151., ?jt ; r, , . 0
"THE GOLD ?'
DIGGERS" i"",,?-.
L'K.?.-'f?jr^r*."'*
in (t
LYCEUM
INA CLAfRE
BRAMHAU
MiXED MARRIAGE ?y-. :
PffC0kM3Wf?lTV,
7J?DSON si'-""?w-fiai
THE M??NIST MAN
IN THE WO KL?
MkCQHAH Jn the title >oie
TO- Ml.H
M \m. \i;i: i
', i: riu ;;
VRON
M. LVHeQN CVES*30IMTfW?Di.SaT
THE TAVERN
Wl?A'l'ri I'll i. -i.,,ui ... i >_? .'
?MM. COHAN?C?M?DiANS
AWRENCE
" TRANSPLANTING JEAN ?
SPECIAL MAT. IO-MORW
Mmiowi?CKif
T I t r|..lan. t. 7, II. 14, Ifl 21 ! V.
?3?r/S M? Oa? :
M?H HAT TAN ,? ;,
GERMAN (illlK OPERETTA -I ?*ON
TO-NIGHT, GIROLFE-GIROLFA.
! v.- ! v, . .V -. ... i ?e 1 . WO OH
! SINGT .
' Mat _; '? . . DER BETTtL STUOENI
PARK Tm'VI !:i:- ' ? ' '' ?'-''*? ~"
TO-NIGHT AT: 8:io SHAjRp CehaB & Harris
WILSON & HOPPER
"ERMINIE"
15
IN A NEW
ANO
WONDROUS
GAIETY, IV .' ; ? '
JOHN t.'M HIN f.
EntANKiiiur
HKNR-Y MILLER'S Till-; A'?'it!*, 124 West 43 at. !
Ev_ ..-<.: i. Matlni r irsda
Patricia :n?\? JUST _=
colime?! ?as? | suppose ??' [f ncTiff^jf ?"??_.,;
CL?KE KUMMER I. . ?.I,?? ,?,, ,, */ I H L U U I II il L TIP-1UH
MLLO'SWILDOAT? RoHo's M? O^t ?
EV,,. 8:30. Mat,. Frl. S. S.L, 2:30. Jl?th ^ : nV,,U * " ' **W V?U "
CHABLES DiLLINOHAM
"FOR
Tvl? MAN aWAR
tttCING SENSATION
ALL THE OTNED
HOLIDAY NOVELTIES
-CONTINUED- ,
W? & \
TV'x PA?;A:sT OF iOOO WONDERS'
IE DAILY I
WORLD'S BIGGEST
SHOW AT THE
LOWEST PRICES
?OOtiOOPe'f ;
O0Cl4->lkV* V i
SEA15 AT J[t!
ACTORS' FUND
ANNUAL BENEFIT
l'RI.. JAN. 21. MAT. CKXTl'RY THEA.
I'rellinlnary advnnce rcKcrvalioiiH t>% until t<>
li F. Keith's j
A L ? C E
It?:? ' i'..t '." S
LEO PARU LO.
> -.-'-. \ rTarf?
.\ ,
-. , .
HARRY CARROLL 4 CO.
THE LAS! 01 THI
eov
RA.
IIAMI I. I'KOIMI.W, I U 11 M Mil Mill, A M VKK cj_, "Till LA?!
BOX OFFICE. I'RH E $1.00 to Jttl.50. C V D A Ai il MOHICANS."
. A I II M il II HAKilLll t I O* L> l'OM
_PJt HIMHIJ n Pull? the String?'' U *ay I 4' S! STRAND 0RCHE8T
? JrS 521 8 fill n,x,>l(1 ,*k>y<1 *"' ""'lv- "Naw
LflTJilKj' ' J; ' I Loiw's New York Theatre and Roof
Orchiwtra
Mata SO 10, \ Ifhta ? So
,v , m ist iv, autiful 'nieatre.
\ Twl -,? n,: ?? i- | -. it
COLUMBIA
BOWERY BURLESQUERS'^Ar
? 11 A M to 1 ' l
IKinala? t alrtiank?, I ' .
Loew's Ann- ic^n Roof ? ", ." .' i v
i All StsU
Torn iLni? .v Co., <? otb in '<''<*-? I ?_._*,?_.
I UouRlaa lauVauW?, Tli? MaiL ot .'. ??.. I ??*"?-? '

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