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New-York tribune. [volume] (New York [N.Y.]) 1866-1924, June 13, 1921, Image 6

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April Raiiway
Iii come Falls
Off $1,494,000
Exeeutives Report Revenues
in Month Amount to Re?
turn of 2.18 Per Cent on
Ratio-Making Valuation
Lists From 201 Carriers
Statements Show Tliat Cuts
Have Been Made in Cost
of Keeping Trains Moving
from The Tribune's Washinototi Bureau
WASHINGTON', Juno 18.?Railroads
of the country had a net operating in?
come of $29,201,000 during April,
$1,494,000 less than in March, accord?
ing to'reports transmitted to the In?
terstate Cpmmerco Commission by the
carriers, the Association of Raiiway
Exeeutives announced to-day.
On t'bc basis of the tentative valua?
tion rixed for rate-making purposes by
the commission under the transporta
tion act this would be at the annual
rate of return of 2.18 per cent, com?
pared with 2.30 per cent in March, The
carriers in April fell short $51,286,000,
or approximately 64 per cent of earn
ing the amount contemplated by the
act. The tabulations are based on re?
ports received from 201 railroads, rcp
resenting a total mileage of 235,160.
Comparison of the reports with those
for March show that the railroads dur?
ing April made still greater cuts in
their operating expenses, but that their
operating revenues also were less. The
ratio of operating expenses to reve?
nues in April was 86,74 per-cent, com?
pared with 87.19 per cent in March.
Reductions compared with April, 1920,
in operating expenses were reported in
all districts.
Operation Cost Drops
Reports show that the total operat?
ing revenues in April were $433,181,
000, or an increase of 7.7 per cent over
those for April last year. while operat?
ing expenses were $375,752,000, or a
decrease of 6.2 per cent under April,
1920. The net operating income of
$*29,201.000 compared with an operat?
ing deficit of $23,767,000 in April, 1920.
In considering comparisons with
April last year, however, consideration
must be given to the fact that railroad
operations were tied up that month
by a switchmen's strike.
'During the eight months since Sep?
tember 1, 1920, when the guaranty
period expired, the net operating in?
come of the carriers has totaled $279,
008,000, which would be at the ar.nual
rate of return of 2.41 per cent on the
tentative valuation of the railroads.
This sura, however, is $414,253,000
under the amount contemplated to be
earned from the rates established by
the commission.
On the basis of the net operating in?
come for April carriers in all dis?
tricts, as in previous months, fell far
short of earning a return of 5% or
ii per cent. In the Eastern district *:he
net operating income was at the
average annual rate of return of 2
per cent, in the Southern '3.11 per cent
and in the Western 2.01 per cent.
Revenues Up in West
Complete reports from the Eastern
district show that the total operating
revenues of the carriers there were
$196,768,000, or an increase of 15.5 per
cent%ver that for April, 1920, while
operating expenses were $170,785,000,
or a decrease of 6.8 per cent, compared
with the same previous month. The net
operating income waso$13,126,000, com?
pared with an operating deflcit of $24,
057,000 in April last year.
With all roads reporting, the onerat
ing revenues for the Southern district
were $72,161,000, or an increase cf 2.7
per cent over those for April, 1920,
while operating expenses were $62,419,
000, or a decrease of 2.8 per cent, com?
pared with one year ago. The net
operating income was $5,562,000, or an
mcreasc of 79.5 per cent, that for
April last year being only $3,099,000.
The Western district reported
operating revenues of $164,252,000, or
an increase of 1.6 per cent over April,
1920, and operating expenses as $142,
548,000, or a decrease of 6.8 per cent,
compared with April last year. The
net operating income was $10,513,000,
compared with a deficit of $2,809,000
during the same month in 1920.
Oberamniergau to Give
Passion Play Next Year
Anton Lang Again to Have Part
of'-Christus; 82 of Village
Died in War
OBERAMMERGAU, Germany, June
12 (By The Associated Press).?The
committee having in charge the ar
rangements for the renewal of the fa
mous Passion Play has decided to give
thirty jierformances in 1922. The first
performance will take place May 11
and the last -on September 24.
The east will not be selected until
next October. Anton Lang, who has
enacted the role of "Christus," prob?
abiy will have that part again. Ottilie
Zwink, who played "Mary" in 1910, has
married since that time, and, as no
married woman is permittcd to enact
that role, another must be selected.
Eighty-two men from Oberammergau
?were killed during the war. They were
m ?y,!?.,no,r actora and musicians.
Most of the leading actors in the Pas?
sion Flay were beyond military age
when the.war broke out.
Headquarters of Hylan
League in Duane Street
Will Circulate Petitions in Ef?
fort to Persuade Mayor to
Run for Ke-election
The recently incorporated Hylan
League of the City of New York has
opened headquarters at 46 Duane
Street for the present, according to an
announcement made yesterday. Dr.
William I. Sirovitch, superintendent of
the People's Hospital in lower Second
Aver.ue, is temporary chairman and
Thomas F. Ward jr., of 550 Putnau
Avenue, Brooklyn, is temporary secre?
tary.
Petitions are being circulated in all
obiect?o0fU?R *Vhe ,Caeuc with the
"bject of persuading Mayor Hylan by
a^chcdrtoS;r ,,Umber of "fcnlturV.
. ?M \ lhem t0 con^nt to become
a candidate for reelectfon. The officers
*ts to thf? V d70tin* flftJwE
, fucccS. a"d ar0 con?dent of
Branches of the league have been or
ganued ,n all the boroughs without re
gard to political boundarie*. ?$ the
thousands otmen and women who have
been enrolkd are said to be. atfiliated
with none of the political paries
Brooklyn has s.xteen branches Man?
hattan twelve, the Bronx ten, Queens
eight and Richmond two.
The Washington Hcights branch, of
which Charles Newmark, of 1042 St
Nicholas Avenue, is president, is to" l
jneet in the Jurael Building Wednes-1
Hot Dog Reserves Feed Coney
Multitude Despite Strikers
Veterans of Many a Gridiron Rush to Front When
300,000 Visitors Clamor; New Aeqnaintanee
Robs Two Girls of $1,000 in Jewels and Casli
Undaunted by the strike of the
frankforter stnffers, 300,000 persons
made their way to Ooney Island yester?
day by trolley. train, motor, afoot and
boat, and for the first timo this season
the tuthhouse establishment- were tak?
ing them ns they came. *
No one was drowned, or drunk, or
OtherwiSfl disorderly, and tho only un
toward event to come to the attention
of the poiice was a $1,000 iewel rob
bery, tho victlms being the Misses Mary
arul Rose Frimerman, who were spend
i":g the week-end at 2920 West Nine
teenth Stroet, Coney Island.
To be sure, there was the usual
number of children lost only to be
found by frantic mothers, but Coney
Island is one place where children
simply will get lost?and found.
The water was warm and unusually
free from banana and orange peels. So
as the good word went from one to an?
other, the beach by mid-afternoon be?
gan to rescmble a bathing beach rather
than a picnic ground.
Poiice Inspector Byron Sackett took
a walk along the water front to see
if there was anything oxciting in the
shape of a bathing suit. He found only
the utmost propriety, and presently
retreated to the shade of the poiice
station.
\ .hicular traffic was unusually
heavy, especially on Surf Avenue, and I
the only compiaint heard from the
gurage men was that they did not
have more room.
The hot dog bazars foolcd every |
ono and went about selling their wares j
as if there was never such a thing |
pending as a scarcity of woofers due |
to the strike of the aroused frank- !
furter makers. At one booth alone it ]
was estimated that 35,000 pounds of
frankfurters were sold during the day. >
Mauretania Makes Her i
Slowest Trip in 8 Days
Forced to Use Poor Quality of
German Coal on Account
of British Strike
If ships had feelings and could ex
press them the Cunard liner Maure?
tania might, have said she wa. hu
miliated yesterday on her arrival from
Southampton.
She is to-day the fastest merchant
vessel afloat and yet on the run across j
the Atiantic which ended yesterday
she was loafing along for eight days, i
the slowest passage in her history.
She is still a coal burner and" that;
is the reason for her tardy arrival.]
With the strike on in Britain she was j
able to get only 5.000 tons of good
Welsh coal in England and had to go
to Brest for 6,000 tons of an exceed- '
ingly poor quality of German coal to j
fill her bunkers. " Back in 1908 when!
she was making history in fast ocean
travel the Mauretania used to burn be- j
tween 900 and 1,100 tons of coal r. day. I
In those days she rarely made the
trip in more than five days. On one \
occasion she made the run from j
Daunt's Rock Lightship to Sandy Hook j
in 4 days 10 hours and 41 minutes, her !
average speed being 20.06 knots and
her best day's run 676 miles.
Captain Rostron said yesterday that
he was proud of the courage of th?
Cunard Line in sending the Maure?
tania across under such adverse condi?
tions merely to maintain its schedule.
She carried only ??_ty-seven _alon
passengers.
?
Father and Twin Sons Drowned
BALTIMORE, June 12.?When the
small boat in which they were attempt
ing to cross Bear Creek and the
Patapsco to Numsen's Point sank in
Bear Creek Channel this afternoon,
Ignatius Ellert, fifty-four years old,
Send us yourfilms!
for
Developing
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and notice the difference by tbe
Herbert & Huesgen Process.
Send today.
Our informati've booklet,
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HERBERT^ HUESGEN CO.
18 East 42gg^3^NewYorkCtty_
Fifth Avenue am Crand Central
The Proofis the Print.
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The kcen-sighted vendcrs had laid in
an extra large supply to carry them
over any cmcrgoncy. Whether they
will have anything in that line to sell
next Sunday is something to be wor
ried about next Sunday.
So if it had not been that a dupper
young man, introducing himself by
the odd yot serviceable name of John
Smith made off with Miss Mary
Frinierman's engagement ring and
other jewelry and money amounting
to $1,000, the day as it fell upon Coney
Island would have been perfect.
It was Miss Rose Frlmerman who
met Mr, Smith yesterday in a restau
rant. She had never seen him before,
it is said, but his manner whilo ofifer
ing to pay her check was so irre
pioachable that. she took him around
to the house and introduced him to
Mary and Joseph Yacker, Mary's fiance.
Mr. Smith, unfortunately, did not
have a bathing suit, so when the others
decided to saunter over to the beach
for a dip, he departeri.
Befor. starting for the water Rose
and Mary put their rings and money in
a beaded bag and hid the receptacle in
one of the rooms. Seventy-four dollars
belonging to Yacker also was put in tho
bag. Then they went out.
What prompted Rose to worry about
the safety of the bag is not known. But
she did,-and returned to find Mr. Smith
in the room.
'!Oh, hcllo," she said. "What are you
doinf. here ?"
Mr. Smith blushed modestly while he
expiained that he had a few pounds of
unnecessary sand in his shoe3 and had
come in to get rid of it.
That was all there was to that. Mr.
Smith left once more, and when Rose
looked for the bag it was gone. She
was able, however, to give a good de
scription of him to the poiice.
and his twin sons, Joseph and Stanis
laus Ellert, six years old, were
drowned. Mrs. Ellert was saved by a
friend.
On the Scrcen
"A Private Scandal" at Rivoli
Trite; "The ,$10 Raiwe" at
Capilol AtiiUHi'iig
By Harriette Underhill /
May McAvoy is at the Rivoli in her
first stnrring vehicle, "A Private
Scandal." It would seem lo us, if
all wo hear of the needs of "tlie in
terior" '.ie true, that it ought to be a
great attraction on tho road. A pro
ducer said to us one day last week:
"lt is n problem whether to make a
picture that ,the. New York public and
tho cities will like or to make one that
will go great on the road." It seems
that th;s is taking a very superiol* at?
titude t:ward the people who live in
lowa, ns Ileywood Broun says, but
everywhere we hear the same tale. Mr.
Griffith told us that "Brokcn Blos
soms" was a financial failure in Arner?
ica; that in the smaller places no one
wunted it. And James Montgomery
Flagg, whose "Perfeclly Fiendish
Flanagan" was a screen classic never
to be forgotten, showed us letters from
exhibitors around the country who said
that if he called that a comedy either
he was crazy or they wero. Mr. Flagg
was so disgusted that he stopped mak
ing comedies. thcreby taking the joy
out of life for US,
Now, do producers really try to pro?
duce something which will please peo?
ple who wish to be spared the trouble
of thinking and ask only to be allowed
to see the same old material, grown
gray in the service, rlished up to them?
Or do they have faith in their own
pictures? Do they enjoy primer-like
titles and hackneyed situations them?
selves? We wondered this as we
wateh ed the picture at the Rivoli yes?
terday, in which May McAvoy is nearly
wasted. With Miss McAvoj's beauty,
charm and talents what a chance for a
great picture ind how trite and com
monplace is "A Private Scandal"! Miss
McAvoy is east as Jeanne Millefte, a
French war orphan, who comes to Arner?
ica and is adopted by a family named
Lawton, which consists of one preoc
cupied husband, one discontented wife
**nd one young child (tiny tot) with
curls. Now, eouldn't any one just
reach out and pluok the plot from the
nearest pigeonhole? He could, and
that is the one that is used ln "A Pri
vato Scandal."
The picture is used to point a moral,
while Miss MncAvoy adorns the tale.
You know this bh soon as you read the
opening title, which says that Jeanne
is a simple soul, who bclievea ln the
v/ords "honor" nnd "home," wordi too
often, alas, forgotten by the majority
of people. The titles, somehow, rc
minded us of the announcements of the
man with the megaphone who rides in
front. of the big motor car nnd tells
the people in the car what's what.
After the first flashea of (he orphan
leaving stricken France, and of her ar- !
rivitl at the home of the Lawtons,
comes h title which says "Three years ;
have passed," and suggesU. that to be- |
come better acquainted wifh the famlly
one muy watch thein opening their ;
morning mail. There is a pict.ro of j
Mrs. Lawton receiving a letter from
villain Croshy, in which he makes tho :
usual protest against her remnining |
with her husband, and tells her that
she must "decide now." It was an in- :
discreet letter, and we feel sure that I
the villain will be eaught by Nemesia.
Ho is. Mr. Lawton's letter says that
people are talking about his wife nnd
Crosby, but the writer thinks the real ;
attraction is "that French girl." "The j
French girl" is seen taking breakfast
With baby Bet.ty (now grown to be a j
kiddleLand her letter says: "Of courso
I hhall sanction your marriage to the :
good Jerry if the Lawtons no lonr _r
need you. Your first duty is to them."
Jerry is the stable manager for Mr.
Lawton, whose sole. interest in life ia
thoroughbrod horses. When Lawton
questions his wife about Crosby she j
puts the blame on Jeanne and Jeanne
accepts the responsibility out. of love l
for Mrs. Lawton. In the end, of course, I
Jerry kills, or nearly kills, Crosby, be- !
heving him to be the lover of gentle
Jeanne.
Miss McAvoy is, in our opinion, as
elever an actress as there is on the
screen. She is always perfectly beauti- I
ful and we know what she can" do, hav- i
ing seen her do it in "Sentimental j
Tommy." The best part is _iven to !
Kathlyn Williams, as the erring wife, j
but then Kathlyn Williams ha* poise
and intelligence, tw0 things which are
apt to make any part which she nlays I
stand out. It seems that she and'Miss i
McAvoy eontributed all the imagina- j
tion which was used in the making of
the picture, if we except Bruce G- .don, I
who made Jerry, a likable sort of per- j
son.
The story is by Hector Turnbuli. __d
the direction by Chester Franklin. I
There is a Chester comedy, "Just in '
is today followed bjr t?e Linco
Hightfdiy <md Irans-Gontinental Aeropl
It is the direct route to California, the
Pacific Ndrthwest,the National Parks
and other scenic wonders of the West.
Its twin highways of heavy steel and
solid embankment, dustless, smooth
as a boulevard, and protected all the
way by automatic safety signals, con
stitute as fine a railroad as there is in
Arnerica.
To see the finest scenery on the conti
nent is profitable; to see it comfortably
is nothing less than a benediction.
Food of the best quality, deliciously cooked and appe
tizingly served in dining cars that are the pink of
neatness; club and observation cars ; barber and valet;
current magazines; comfortable Pullmans (standard
and tourist) and courteous employes.
6 daily trains?to the Pacific Coast
from Chicago and Omaha including
the renowned Overland Limited, Los
Angeles Limited and Oregon-Wash
ington Limited.
3 daily trains to Colorado,
For information call,' phone or write
J. B. De Friest, General Agent, 309-310
Stewart Bldg., 280 Broadway, New York.
Phone Worth 1757.
&? Firs? in 1569
5K?; First ?a 1921
10-FF
fotOt-tS
atsaa ajjasau^
BtNVER
WBwbm
Time," starring that clever monl.ey.
This timo he is seen as chauffeur for
Rob Nichols, a car conductor.
The overture is "Symphonic Pathe
tlque," by Peter Tachaikowak. ; Carlo
Enciso is heard in "Somewhere a
Voico is Cnlling"; Ruth Paige doea a
dance, "Tho Bee," to Schubert 's
music, which was Ktaged by Adolph
Holm. The light opera number ia
"iih, Oh, Delphine."
Thero is n stirring picture at the
Capltol called "Our Navy in Action."
The program snya that it is the first
public presentation of the government,
picture taken by a navy photographer
on board the U. S. S. Mayflower, dur?
ing the recent visit of the President to
New York. The picture is enormously
evciting, but we think half th<? credit
belongs to the Capitol orchestra and
the man who makes the cannon and
bomb effects. To ri^ht of you, to left
of you, and in front of you,'they volley
and thunder.
The feature picture la "Th. Ten
Dollar Raise" from Peter B. Kyne's
Saturday Evening Poat story. The
rcreen version is made by A. S. Le
Vino; it. is directed by Edw"ard Sioman
and presented by J. L. Frothingham.
Tho picture is well done, and it is
nniusing and, whocver selected the
east was careful to pick out types
which suited the parts perfoctly.
Helen Jerome Eddy ia excellent as the
old maid who, for flfteen years has
worked and dreamed of marrying Wil?
kins, a human worm, excellently done
by William Mong. Pat O'MaHey ia
fine as the young lover of Marguerite
I. _ la Motte, who playa the daughter
of the altruistic partner, Stryker.
Hal Cooley is pleasantly unscrupulous
ns the aon of the ugly partner, Batea.
These roles are filled by Charle. 1*111
Mailea and Lincoln Plumer.
One day the worm resolves to turn
nnd asks for a $10 raise. which ia re?
fused by Bates, When the unscrupu?
lous aon sells Wilkins some building
lots, which prove to be visible only at
low tide, the worm turns in earnest.
Every one who likes to see a bully get
come up with will enjey this picture.
The opening title says: "Man's inhu
manity to man makes countless.nations
mourn." We have always thought it
was "makes countless thousands weep,"
and tlie only other version we ever
heard was one which our firat come
dian used. It ended "makee countless
thousands rush the can."
The program opena with a Pmma
called "Japan." Following this are se
lections from "The Mikado," with the
Capitol ballet and the quartet.
Matilda Locua, a wonderful fourteen
year-old pianist, plays Baint-Saens'.i
Third Movement of G minor Concerto;
Gambarelli and Oumansky dance to
Kreialer _ Caprice. Viennoia, played by
Jacfjues Cordon.
At the Strand the feature picture
is D. W. Griffith'a "Dream Street."
Wanda Hawley ia at the Rialto in "A
Kiss in Time." These will be reviewed
to-morrow.
Harding's No Golf on Sunday
Attitude Approved bv Church
CHICAGO, June 12.--Pre_ident Har
ding's refusal to play golf on Sunday
was praiaod to-day by the Rev. C. S.
Stevens, of the Third Presbyterian
Church. The eongregation of 200 by
a riaing vote authorized the sending of
a telegram to the Presidf-nt expressing
approval. The telegram read:
"May God richly bless you in your
determination to serve Him and to
remember His day, thereby aetting a
good example to the American people
and to the people of the world."
The Stage Door
?'The Whlrl of New York" opene at the
i W inter Garden to-night. In iccorflmc
with the announcenu-nt prevlouely maiin
by the . huberts, the curtaln will ri_ ?
promptly at 8:80 and patrons arrtving late
will not be eeated until the end of the
first act.
This will be the last week of "Miss Luhi
Bett" at the Belmont Theater. In Sep?
tember the comedy will open ln Chicago
with the original east.
Dudley Diggea returns to-night to the
rast of "Llliom" to resume the part of ?*_?
Kparrow, whicb he created. anu .nich be
left to -v??-_r in the revival of "John
Ferguson."
Eilythe Baker, erstvvhile Midnight Frolic
prima donna, has been engagred by N> .
Wayburn for hia production of 'Town
Talk."
Ted I,orra!ne and Gladys Wa'.ton Will
introduce a new walt_ in their number in
'The Last Waltz" at the Century to-night.
Edith Taliaferro opens to-day in the V.
Proctor theaters in a new _l_etch by
America's Foromopt Theatres and Hits l
WTNTTR fo - NIGHT~
GARDEN AT 8:30 SHARP
XTlTTPF ? Tlie rurtaln will riso proniptl.
.>_____. H( 8.30 _ . no on_ w||| . seated
during t_ first act.
THE N. Y. WINTER GARDEN PRODUCTION,
T
H
E
Fi.e
With a Noteworihy Cast and
A Typical Wlpter Garden _> auty Knwmb. .
FSRST MATMEE TO-MORROW
MatlneM ttTD. and SAT, 2.30.
arce. JUST MARRIED
VIVIAN MARTIN ? LYNNE OVERMAN
The NEWLY
w <?5_ st, ev_ e._o
MAT. VfO _ CAT -_ : iO
THE DKAMATIC SMASH!'
LITTLE
THEATRE
_>?.t it st.
2Ji 1st Year
Mita. WED. ?nrl SAT, 2:30.
CEORC_rf?-L
Ifl _\'THE GREEN j
i_%g_l_f_$ GODDESS
BOOTH _V_ .830 MATS WGP.SAT. 2-301
BTCE DAJLY -All 5E__R_?_V?Q
B_A5-d IBAH.Z
6fTH.AP?C/_LYPS
a_-S-=---=-_______ TH KATKE GI'II
_. n_R_hl_ 35th. B.of B'way. Ew.8:a0.
? U___.l__ Mat8. Tburs. i Sat.. 2:80*
.IR.
PS
PASSES BY
B_L!___T !. im Rt- Br-T- ?? Evs. 8:80.
DCLfflUn I Mats. Thursday and Baturflay.
&__? MISS LULU BETT
THEA.
. ? W.46_
. EV. 8 _0-r->_Tf. weD ?.SAt
LAST o TIMES
___ THE MUSICAL COM.QY~ HIT
MASTER. l.C.
"fPeclal Scale Summer Prices:
Ah Mats. 50c & $1.00; All
Mghla 50c. $1.00, $1.50.
v_>_ f Hi.u !..,_ Daily. ^ ;(0 and _30
wnxiAM "& CONNECTIGUT
YANKEE Arlhnr's (?o.rt"
POP. PRICES.
FOX
Presents
Stage d by Kmmctt J. Klynn
THEATRE .(Twice DailT
B'way and 5!>th Stl 12:30?_ 30.
PARK
WII__A_
FOX
By Wili Carlcton. Direc_d by Harry Mlltarde.
nder the Dircction of Lee & 9, J. Shub^rt
V* VET3ITABIF SENSATION/'
EVG8. and SAT. MAT.50c t?> $3.M)
SATVRD.AY NIGHT.SI to S:'.<W?
I'OPIUK WEI). MAT.50c lo S?.00
G A 5 I N 0
Mats. Wednesday srvi 8at.
JOE WEBER offers
*"!&&??* HONEYDEW
SELWYN THEATRES ?4N:d^t
TllfCC Cfl Bv.8 SO.Mta I Richard Carle
I ll?iC-a dlU Tbui*. * Sat. Blanrhp Sii.?
BROADWA Y 5&EEXr
t .Tay Goufd
| b< -' Seats $2.'.n.
H I R L
SELWYH
THEATRE MATS. \V"ET>.
I'.IIT.V-T 17 | AND PAT,
"NEW REVUE BOASTS PLENTY
OF GOOD COMEDIANS."?Tribune
BN0RA f LEW IIDEWOLF
AYSSnELDSHOPPfS
!GEQ McKAY-UJLU McCOrWELL
. 42 *t. KT4.fi.Si). Mats.Wnri &Sat.
SENSATIONAL PLAYLETS by
CJ/V/IPA i?Ev\f?
-EMPF! BIHG! BANG!-*
D PBODl C"1'IONS
46th St.. W. of BY Ev. 8 30.
Mals. Wed. and Sat.. 2:30.
With Jos. SchOdkravt "I TI ?AM? =
and Eva Le GaUiennc. LilLilXJiJi =j
"?5QTW *?T Theatro. n'r B'way. ?~s s:'fl
?3ln Oh Matnees Wed. and Sat., 2:88'
ARTHUR I IN A |
BYRON IHiXAnious
CO.MKDY
the G H O S T
BETWEEN
B^.48thSt.
Thea . E ot B'y. KtCs. **.?*)
Thurs. A.- Sat. g-JW.
JE_.
ELTiNGE jEfe.TkJ".3:]?<
fs Wed. aoa Sat. &t 2:30.
WOJU.Ii'5*
GREATEST
MOTION
ricTrnB.
M08J SENSATIONAL AND
MOST THRILLiNG SCREEN
SPECTACLE EVER SHOWN
Directod l>y j. Uonlon Kdwards
SEE THE W0NDERFUL CHARI0T RACE
Pryor's Band
_______ ____o_
CO. K_ ISLAND *>ee Dnociitr. Fr<_ Ci___
fll I IMRIA B'way JTwlco Dai'.5'!B_rle_u?
V. _*_(_.Ql... & .J7th|_:!5 & 8:15 1 .p.Prtcea
Jean Bedini'? D____l, , D,.rt with Clark _
all new reeii-a-_oo Mcc.i_.u_h.
ENCHAKTINC
ESTAI
AND COFI
?
S li R V E S REAL FOOD
To-night Dinner.Virgr;
BRHAKFAST LUNCHEON
CENTRAL BRANCH CAFETER1A
_D ST. & LEXINGTON AVE. .UBWAT
GOOD FOOD?QCICK SERVICE
OPEN TO MEN AND WOM_3.
_?ura? 7.45 to 0:_. 1130 to 2:S0. 6 30 u> r_?
{The Ann Fulton Cafeteria
!D1____ SPECIALS MEN AND WOMKR
3
GARDEN Phone _ur. Iltn 8713
Luncheon 50c. Dinner $1.00. Afternoon T _
Served in th? Garden. Also a la Carte Service
SCOTCH TEA ROOM ^"U
d'Bote I.uivh. Dinner. Afternoon Tea. Humo mada
:ai_s. Scou'ii acoae*. shortbread. _ astry & tumtun plas.
THE PiROUETTE _ _-T5__ &?__?_
Luncheon. Chick^n 'ilnner Thursdaya. _.fe#
Y. W. C. A. Cafeteria
_ W. S6th Bt, Open 10:_> A. M.. 7:30 P. M.
Men nnrt Women Served,
THP \7f_Yf PT"Tea^RWroTHT^vrioth "st.
i lILv V H/L.L, 1 I__c__| 45 ft r>5c. Dinner. 80c.
SwedUh Home Cookiug. S_ r ial Bunday Supper. JI.
fUC PTVCC Y T_ii Room. 10 _. 33 "^7
int .UdE.1 Breakfa_t Luncheon:
65c: D ln ne r. $1. Strictly home cooklng
AI __U A TEA ROOM. a. W?lt 47th 8_
___\_ ____ Lunch 45c & 00c?11:43 to 2:30
Chickcn Dinner, 85c?5:80 to 8:30 P. M.
IThe o_-of-the-ordlnary placai of New York
wbe_ unlqua at__pt_r*9 and food peoullv
U vai .<l t_t_ iavlU l_ d!_ri_laa_a?.
I-,-,-,_J'
SMAKK B*?x D. W. GRIFFITHS
TRANU 'DREAM STREET5
B*Vi*AT, 47TH PT. Stnuid Symphonj Orchestra.
mi
Htutif *k & Stra** "?ur Nan' ?'? ?*?**?)
"The Ten Dollar Reise"
Matilda Loeus (Planlat)
"Our Navy tn Aotton."
Cap:tol Grand Orcli?*tra.
ETHEL BARRYMORE
Ruth Ro,ye. Jack Diinahof.
others & Harland Dbcon &
tlie 16 London I'alace Girl?
3 TElfiOOMS
JRANTS
?EE SHOPS
Nr% 8 WEST 50th St.
*** CIRCLE MtS
A T A F I X K D V R I C E
inia Ruked Ilam and Spoon Bread
AFTERNOON TEA LHN'XEB
RESTALRANTS
Washington Gardens
72 WASHINGTON 8QCARJB
Telephone?Spring 9474
Luncheon?7 ca?Dinner
Sunday?Breakfast. 10 to 12;
Bupper, 6 to 8.
Special C'urry Dinners
Arranged by Telephoue
THE ENGLISH TAVERN
41 West 39th St.
LUNCHEON. 50c. TEA. 35c. DINNER. ?5o.
SUMMER GARDEN*.
JL
The Pine Tree, 26 West 43d St
Luncheon?Afternoon Tea?Dlnner
A la Carte and Table d'Hote.
Open Sunday and Holidays.
SHIF'S I! "Come Aboard!" li W. SOth Bt.
INK. II Luncheon, 65c. Dlnner, $1.00.
Afternoon Tea. Alao a la carte service.
Attfll>ian'e Graenwleh Cor. 7th Av. * U<h S?.
AllUliCIl 5 Villaae Oi*u 7 a.m. to MidNtsbt.
Luivheon 50<*. Dlnner 75c. Southern Ilot Wafftea
i with AU IHnner*. Al?o a La Carte.
Manp FsiKer Rf'-taurunt, 13 East 361h St.
u*r, 6 to *. Waoleaoiae Home Coolted Food.
0__B_?_r_l1. ?***?. .??_*?/.Uw s.m,
Wl_n "John t-rgueon" op*n? nt ? ..
Belmont __?__? next week th. ,,,.,
.fxnmle I !!i be pltjred br [ ,',
Ker_M_, who cr--?ted tho roi<> ._ ?
dtfcectlon of St. John Krvin-' when _?_
_f_m? wa. pro.uce. at the _bb? v Th.
a'er. Dublin. y ln*
I>onnl . M0-_ h=_ b"en ?neaj_ fl bv .?_
K Marrln for "_U-Cylln4?r Lov(> "Jfi
William Anthony McOulr. "....:,.,, ? *
which Erneaj Traex >a ?
Former Corean [nslsti
Japanese Menace U. S.
Philip .Taisohn, former Co__d ?,
ernrafii' official and lifelong r_il}ent
of that country, aridressfd a jar
(jatberiM laat r.igfct at the Hadiaoa
Avenue M.tbo.i.t Eni?copa! f hurch
? h Streat and Maditon Aven.e'
on "The Japaneae in (_?_?. m-'
.Taisohn is now a Mfident of Phslade.J
phia.
Mr. Jaisohn _ ! <1^ .Inoanese
poli.i.. in the Far Saat constituted a
" to Amei ,:>_ ac_
tivitiea thero and tni
now if they wore to be defeatc I
speaker pointed out that if tim? were
permitted the Japan< ? _lid
ly to establish thei in China,
any future efforts to di
v.'.uld be at the cost of biood .?<_.
"Japanese and r.erman ideala are
identical," said Mr. Jaiaohn. 'Both
beiieve that micht is right. Since 1895
the. poiicy of the Japanese has been
one of expnnsion and they have _on
st:.ntly pursued that policy. The
course of Japanese diplomacy will
never be changed until that ch.r.pe is
forced. Nothing in the way of vo'.un
tary recession is to be .-? :pected from
he Japanese government. '
Referring to the situation in Coret,
Mr. Jaisohn said it could not be worse
The administration of the Japanese
he declared to be barbaro-.is fu the
extreme, and their attitude toward
American missionaries one of e.creme
brutality.
NKW YORK'S __?____( TH__TRE<.
'S _?
rlEWAMSTTEPDAM %*t *? S*cv_. _
MATS WED.SAT 50t,$2_6_S__I
_A_ay._fiiB
F. ZIEGFELD, JR.,
hereby wishes to re
quest the capacity
aud; .nces in attend
ance at the New
Amsterdam Theatre
n i g h t 1 y to see
"SALLY" that they
must leave the thea?
tre immediately after
the final curtain, as
the ushers and house
staff are unable to
get the enthralled
and satisfxed patrons
out of the theatre
until long after the
final curtain.
SEAT SALE
TKUR_*DAY JUNE 16
fflt
A NATIONAL INSTITUTION
OPEN. TUEf.JUN.2l,
__POP MAT WED JUNS ,2!
G E 0. fi ft y ? |] !'.??,_.>!- lal #A
?. <.U__N _-.,. B 15 JBERTKEATS ._
THE SMARTEST, L1VELIEST
SHOW IN TOWN!
_______ TWO LITTLE
GIRLS l_ BLUE
A jolly brew. a roilickinp orew,
With a punrh. a idek Vflii
And a laugli for I VIJ?
hum<m _.w^aT
P^eMOST TALK.D
OF P.DFOCMANC9'
COHAN
THE VAGABOND
THE TAVER!
5_t_ II .? TIMES.
Br
|_p__
"The 60LD 0I66ERS" -
THE SHow o." l.
PACi'.ING _.?y-a
'EM IN? iL'^J A
FANCHON _ _T? l'i
MARCO In
A Musiral
Extrava.anza
MOVES NEXT M0N_AY~T0 Tl
?5AM H. HARRIS THEATRE. W. _ 8T.
CAIETY. B'
l^MSHO__?NliS P10? u>^
63rd ST.^8'. .^:- _?S
SHU. FLE ALONG r__S.IS ?%.
SP'CL MIDNIGHT PERFORMANCE WE?.. H*>
OPEN'G TOMOR'W NIGHT
THE NEIGHBORHOOD PLAYHOUSE CO. IB
"THE HARLEQUINADE"
?;;;:;:-'.^,,n,r"A NIGHT atANlNN^
SUMMER PRICES?ORCH. $2. . .!?0 ???<! ?'?
R
R
IVOLI MAY MacAVOY
K'way PKCVATi I _MP_1?
at ?!._?. B__l I -"***" .
IALTT^aniOawley
IIMI.S A KISS I\ TIME"
sqiARE rami _ Ma] ?
CRfTERION THOS. ME1GHAN
SIXKS .VH1TE anrt fNMAR_H?-'
SQUARK A _?r_n unl 1- ;:'?? ..
Baxtnaliif Nert Su_d?y, "THt i.O-tm.
Loew . New York Theatre & Ro^
Coat II _,M. to 11 P _. Bigrttl A?;
I'AIUSE FREOEKKK _ "-JuuTAWy
oew s American "{.11 E,Crv t> ?t *:s
I ATTy" r__BBDC-XB tn '"rie I All Se*l?
Ti-wUng ,..s_r_n_i." M,xw*'! I _#_r-ed
QulDtetUb **B_iJi?_ U Btuion*."! w__^
GREENWICH __3__Sft? ?"
ADDREY MUNSON
THE QUEEN OF THE STUDIOST
_~v__, lirr j_t.m?!n wen-tj of . _ ? _
tt "H E E 0 L E S S M 0 T H Sw

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