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New-York tribune. [volume] (New York [N.Y.]) 1866-1924, August 15, 1921, Image 4

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")tate Conducts
67 Schools for
Inly 119 Pupils
iartliiig Conditions in the
Rural Educational Sys?
tem Disclosed by Survey
of Women Voters' League
Consolidation Is Urged
>ne Trustee Has Teacher
for 3 Children; Is Jani?
tor and Board's Instructor
Sixty-seven schools with a total of
iiy 119 pupils are maintained by New
. ork State, according to the following
*ble:
New York State maintains fifteen
choola each of which is attended by
nly one pupil.
New York State maintains fifty-two
schools each of which is attended by
.nly two pupils.
New York State maintains 167
choois each of which is attended by
nly three pupils.
New York State maintains 3,000
schools each of which is attended by
;nly ten pupils.
The above statistics are furnished
by the New York State League of
tVomen Voters as part of its child wel
r.re survey. The survey is being made
iy the league with the cooperation of
?vomen's clubs and organizations in
:nany counties. Returns so far have
been received from forty of the fifty
seven counties in the state.
The purpose of the survey is to
NOW A FOLLY
TO HAVE CORNS
Million? of People Know An Easy Way
to End Them?Quick and Sure
Folks all about you now treat
corns in this scientific way. That's
why corns are becoming so uncom?
mon. At the first corn pain they
apply Blue-jay ? the liquid or the
plaster?for sale at all druggists.
The pain stops instantly. Soon the
whole corn gently loosens and
comes out.
This is not like old ways, harsh
and crude. It is the modern method,
put out by a laboratory of world?
wide repute
For millions of people it has
solved the corn problem. It will
bring you freedom?and forever?
when you know it. For your own
sake, find this out tonight.
Liquid or Plaster l
Bl
ue=jay
Stops Pain Instantly
Ends Corns Quickly
How's the Cash?
You can teil at a glance,
when you use a National
Loose-Leaf Combined
Cash Book and Journal. .
Printed headings for
daily balances of Accounts
Payable and Receivable,
Purchases, Sales, Cash,
Bank Accounts, Expenses,
Interest and Discount.
Ask for National No.
7082-CL.
Look for This Trad? ?farJc
When You Buy
^NATSONA^
Loose Leaf and Bound Books
NATIONAL BLANK BOOK CO.
25 Riverside, Hoi yoke. Mass.
Lafayette
i
>
A saving of #775 is effected in
all LaFayette Open Cars at the
new price?
$4850 -
F. O. B. Indianapolis
Exciusiit tf Tax
porter -Lafayette, inc.
1763 Broadway, at 57th Street
Telephone Circle 8760
How
Fast
with Comfort
Learn what the
Marmon 34 can do
in comparison with
other cars. A dem?
onstration of the Mar?
mon 34 given gladly.
Mannen Automobile Co. of N.Y., Inc.,
1880 Broadway-62d St., N. Y. City.
Phone Columbus .5000.
MARMON 34
I arouse interest among women in con?
ditions affecting the health of children,
to uncover conditions ?actually existing
in the schools of the state and to draw
conclusions \from the evidence as to
what is necessary in the way of edu?
cational reform.
Consolidation in Rural Districts
?n a preliminary statement of the
accomplishments of the first part of
the survey, signed by Dr. S. Josephine
Baker and Dr. Dorothy C Kempf, they
say:
"One of the foremost needs is con?
solidation in rural districts. The
school district now is an area two
j miles square and the result is that
j there arc fifteen schools in the state.
; with only one pupil. It is obviously
j an inefficient system that permits the
i equipment and maintenance of a school
for only two or three pupils, when
j through consolidation of the districts,
i W|ith transportation provided for the
j children, a far better training could
j be given at less cost. Efforts to bring
| about consolidation often are met with
j stubborn resistance.
I "To particularize, a school in one
i'of our counties has been conducted for
j several years with only three pupils.
! The school trustee happens to be the
father of the three children. He is
abo employed as janitor of the school,
and, to clinch it, he boards the
teacher."
Calls Country School Archaic
Disadvantages of the country school
child in comparison with city trained
children were pointed out yesterday
by Professor Mabel Carney, of Colum?
bia University, after a conference with
country school superintendents from
all over the nation.
After referring to the fact that the
country school term averages 137 days
a year, as against 187 for city children,
; and that the country child suffers from
j inefficient teaching as well as poor
i administration in country schools,
i Professor Carney said:
j "That country children prosper as
j well as they do is due more largely
to the wholesome influence of the aver?
age country home than to any advan?
tage gained in the one-teacher school.
The latter is an archaic institution
j which should be abandoned. The wis
i est and most direct solution of our
| national country life problem is to be
| attained through proper attention to
I the rural schools of the country.
On the Screen
! "End of the World," at Rialto,
No Refuge for Cherry and
Her Three Admirers
"At the End of the World"?this lo?
cative title of the new picture at the
Rialto Theater identifies the spot where
Cherry O'Day's three admirers have
flown to drown black care. Of course,
Cherry flies there too?from Shanghai.
The end of the world is the one place
that most people would fly to. It has
the exclusiveness of the square meal.
The square meal will lure many a
person who would indignantly reject
one in the shape of the parallelopipe
don.
The writer of the subtitles has en?
dowed "The End of the World" with
plenty of lure. There is the "lure of
the East," which is strong, and the ;
"lure of the storm."?to mention just j
two of our best known lures. Miss !
Betty Compton endowed it with a very
handsome heroine in Cherry and a
wardrobe which is in itself a snare, j
Thi3 is a Lasky picture, adapted ;
from Ernest Klein's play, and is the
maiden effort in direction by Pen- j
rhyn Stanlaws, the painter. The pic
torial quality of its scenes has regis-1
tered the illustrator in a very effec?
tive manner.
Cherry is the daughter of a Shanghai
dive keeper, who uses her as an ac?
celerator of trade and wine agents.
He has armed her with this cynic
principle: "All men are evil. Play
with them to your heart's content, but
keep them at arm's length." Gesture.
So all in the course of business, Cherry
engages herself to Donald MacGregor,
a burly sailor; toys with Harvey Allen,
a young bank clerk, who steals the
bonds for her, and fall3 unscrupulously
in love with Gordon Dean, an American
yachtsman. Then the father is
plugged through the heart by a gam?
bler and Cherry marries the banker,
who is ready money.
But Shanghai's social set will not re?
ceive Cherry, which is bad for the
banking business, so a divorce is I
agreed to. Then Gordon Dean shows
up "by unexpected fate," the sub-title
says, which is all wrong, for it was de?
cidedly expected?the story clamors for
him with strong outcries. Gordon
squares up Harvey "Allen's theft and
takes him and the thick-thewed sailor
to the bleak and barren Dragon'3 Reef
Lighthouse, "at the end of the world,"
where the three can have peace and
| quiet.
Cherry discovers the retreat and fol
i lows, but before she ai-rivea the sailor
has gone mad brooding over her, and
the bank clerk, too, has become bewild?
ered with love. It is the lure of the
storm that takes Gordon Dean out to tho
rocks the night Cherry is wrecked and
washed ashore. The fight among the
three men provides an intensely dra?
matic situation. Of course, you know
Gordon Dean is going to survive, but
the fight is none the less thrilling.
Milton Sills invests the part of Dean
with likagle heroics.
A Clyde Cook comedy, "The Sailor,"
proved the comic relief in the program.
Also there are some unusually interest?
ing music numbers. The overture is
the temple scene from "Aida"?the
consecration nnd first finale. Susan Ida
Clough, mezzo-soprano; Carlo Enciso,
tenor, and James Woolf, basso, are as?
sisted by an excellent chorus. Lillian
Powell, Ivy Ladd and Anna Belel are
the dancers. Marcel Salesco sings an
aria from "The Masked Ball," by Verdi.
And other music numbers are featured.
At tho Strand Constance Talmadge
in "Wedding Bells" is the featured
picture. This will be reviewed to?
morrow.
"A Virgin Paradise," tho William
Fox picture, has been transferred from
the Park to tho Capitol Theater.
Under the title "Revue de L'Op?ra"
Alexander Rose sings the prologue
from "Pagliaeci," Miss Maria Samson
| Tho Letter Song from "Madam But
i terfly," the Capitol mixed quartet,
i the quartet from "Rigoletto" and
i the grand chorus, the "Tannhauser
! March." Chamir/ade's "Scarf Dance"
j is done by members of Alexander
j Oumansky's ballet. "Little Old New
| York" gives comparative views of
; early and modern landmarks.
"Experience" continues at the Rivoli
? and "The Golem" at the Criterion.
The title of "Perjury," in which Wil?
liam 1'arnum is presented at the Park
Theater this week, was selected, one
j would imagine, because the list of films
available for attractive movie titles has
been almost exhausted by the unnum?
bered films which recently have scored
by moral-coated appeals to the sup?
pressed desires of the semi-Puritan
mind. The picture is in reality a most
ingenious attempt to crowd into six
reels every form of human baseness,
and jealousy, anger, cowardice, gossip?
ing, treachery, robbery, money lust, sex |
lust, murder or hypocrisy might with '
equal justice have been assigned the
title r?le.
The captions are so thoroughly
moral that'it is a pity that the name of
their author was withheld. And the
censors must have rejoiced as one ;
after the other the idyllic home, the |
constant wife, the good girl, the son ?
fighting for the happiness of his moth- j
er and the faithful lover were brought ,
forward. One villain is shot with the
full approval of the district attorney,
and God's justice overtakes the other*
"Dulcy" at Frazee
A Merry Play
Of Deft Satire
Lynn Fontann'e Scores in
Comedy by G. S. Kaufman
and Marc Connelly Out of
F. P. A.'s Conning Tower
TUB CAST
William Pariser. Pulcy's brother,
Gregory KeUj
Henry.Harry Llllfonl
?.?onion Smith, Pulcy's husband,
John Westley
Tom Sterrett, advertising engineer,
Elliott Nugent
1'iulelnea.Lynn Fonts nno
Schuyler Van Pyck.Ollhert Douglas
C. Roger Forbes.Wallis Claris
Mrs. Forbes. .Constance Pellssler
Angela Forbes.Norma Lee
Vincent Leach.Howard Lindsay
Blair Patterson.George Alison
By Heywood Broun
Stout Cortcz was eilent when he eaw
the Pacific, but if he had lived long
enough to discover authentic satire in
a Broadway theater he might have
shouted with the rest. Dulcy, by
Gt'orge S. Kaufman and Marc Connelly,
; was produced at the Frazee on Satur?
day night. The new comedy is built
around the character of Dulcinea, cre?
ated by Franklin P. Adams in the Con?
ning Tower. It seems to us that the
authors, aiming at a certain ob?
ject, have hit something else on the
ricochet. This by-product of their
marksmanship happens to be,the more
valuable prize of the two.
The intent of the playwrights has
been to satirize the making of bro?
mides, with Dulcy as the. horrible ex?
ample. .This is- an amusing pastime,
but it does not begin to be as hilari?
ously funny as the incidental satire
directed against the makers of national
advertising and motion pictures.
Vincent Leach, scenarist, seems to us
by far the happiest characterization in
the play. It is Leach who obliges the
company at Dulcy's house party by de?
scribing the plot of his new film, a
super feature picture not released on
the regular program. His scenario is en?
titled "Sin," and, beginning with Noah's
Ark, it describes the progress of evil
through the ages. Long before Mr.
Leach has finished his outline of the
first reel the curtain descends to indi
in the form of heart failure as soon as
he has confessed the murder of which
he had convicted his best friend.
The parting of the, hero and his
faithful spouse at the prison door and
the scene where he pleads with the
warden not to drive him out into the
cold, hard world from the kindly shel?
ter of his cell just because his inno?
cence has been established twenty
years -too late are particularly touch?
ing. Ho finally returns to his home,
however, arriving just in time to save
his son from murder, his daughter
from a life of shame and his wife from
the brutalities of a second husband.
The appropriate happy ending follows.
The picture should make a big hit on
Fourteenth Street.
NEW YORK'S LEADING THEATRICS
Ji^MSTERDAM WesT^2Stl&i?8?S
A NATIONAL TRIUMPH
ZflCFILD HIT,
nmrn maw
LEONERftOL'?
A NATIONAL INSTITUTION
POP. MATS.
SEATS AT
WED. and SAT.
BOX OFFICE
EHA7EK WEST 42 ST. EVENINGS R:20.
rnH?EX MATINEES WED. & SAT, 2:20.
"The Gayest Comedy I Ever Saw."
?Booth Tarkington.
By Georee S.
Kaufman and
Mar..' Connolly,
with a How to
Franklin P, Adams
cowrE-s?
Me ST
<;kok<;i;: v.
liOBARTK
MELODY l'LAY
MUSIC BT
RAYMOND
HUBBELL
JiKAHK
SEATS
NOW
with
EMMA DUNN
ERNEST
GLENUINNING
MAUDE WITHKE
CAUL RANDALL
and others.
! St,|Mts.Wed.*Sat. $?
M.' COHAN Eve.. S:I5.|BEST SEATS
FULL OF BREEZE AND LAUGHTER
A. L. ERLANGER'S
MUSICAL COMEDY
CIRLS IN BLUE
TWO LITTLE
GAIETY, B'y ? 46 St. Mats. Wed. & Set.. 2:30.
KLAWTIiM., 45 St., W. of B'y. Bry. 67?7
>NKE PIQUES?
630 ST. MUSIC HALL. bet. B'uay & C. P. W.
SHUFFLE ALONG ?^n?.
SP'C'L MIDNIGHT PERFORM'CE WED. at 11:30
Itroadwav (with Richard Barthelmsss)
At 49th St. A Paramount Picture.
I ALTO Betty Compson in
TIMES "At the End of the World"
SOt ABE A Paramount Picture,_
Ve?.-eIi prologue-BMftt-srKedten
T R A N D at 47th St.
|?^?? "WEDDSNG BELLS"
CLYDE COOK ? FAMOUS STRAND j ERIC ZAUDO
COMEDY | MALE QUARTET' -?? ? '
PIANIST
QTADIUM j VICTOR HERBEBT
9 CONCERT .D?ci?'VirUT
TO-NIGHT SR?SH NIGHT
p, AT?,J TOM BURKE,
Pries?: 25c-50e-SI _.,?_
LAST 3 NIGHTS' lEM'K.
?THE IRISH MUSICAL SOCIETY."
Auspices
CAPITOL
William Pox Presents
?A VIRGIN PARADISE'
I'iipK"! Cirnnd Orgiin.
Chorus o"t 73 ?Voices.
VAI.ESKA MKATT
Mr. tiall.?her & Mr. Shcan,
fD.D.H. S Seren Bracks, oths.
tiludv? O llmrv
CL\KK W BERGMAN
(CSK&V THE FUNNY PLACE
SURF AND POOL BATH?N0
forest Rills Inn
The author of "Mala Street" saya It li
the one hotel that he regretted to lea?.
Fifteen minutes from I*ennsylTaiita S:a
tion; eighty-four electric trains dally.
American alas, Booklet ??atg WQ.U*?t
Forest Hills. L. 1. _
?Telephon? Uouievaxd 9Z^lmmmimm
cate the passing of half an hour, and
when it goes up Leach is saying. "Then
Fred rushes to the edge of the cliff and
looks over, but the WeoBol is dead."
Coming to tlie final reel we are in?
formed that Fred kisses Clara, and "to
| preserve tho symbolism Marc Antonv
is immediately shown kissing Cleopatra
and George Washington kissing Martha
Washington." The whole scene of
? Leach's recital and its effect upon the
; composite house party is the most suc?
cessful portion in the play and as deft
and happy a piece of satire, or possibly
burlesque, as the stage has known in
our time.
The young advertising man who has
made the country "Forbes-conscious"
is almost as good and the snatch of
the musical evening which we are per?
mitted to see is another gloriomt piece
of foolery. From our point of view
the richness of the new comedy is
found chiefly between the rib*. It tells
a story which is an ingenious and
workmanlike manipulation of moder?
ately familiar theatrical material. We
have, for instance, the big merger, the
mysterious millionaire who turns out
to be somebody else, and the pearl
necklace. In handling all this Mr.
Kaufman and Mr. Connelly have ob?
served the workings of the theater to
good effect. But they have done, bet?
ter than that in the rest periods be?
tween the rounds. The towels fly
faster than the more premeditated
punches and stir more breeze. And
on the breeze come currents from the
world outside the theater. This gives
Dulcy the air which makes it tingle.
It achieves in its best moments an
impromptu spirit which challenges the
moods of Clare Kummer and of Tark
ington. This is a gaiety so free that
it owes no allegience to plot or to
plan. It salts the tail of the diem and
catches it.
The first medal for shaking the
shaker belongs to Lynn Fontanne.
This is an exceedingly merry perform?
ance. The humor of n young woman
supposed to be a deadly bore might
actually become so in less skillful
hands, but Miss Fontanne preserves the
spirit of mockery and the authors have
been wise enough never to let the
bromides swirl into drifts. Howard
Lindsay, who staged the piece, is very
funny ns the motion picture writer
and Elliott Nugent does capital work
as tho young advertising man. Greg?
ory Kelly is funny, but a shade too
much aware of his opportunities. He
has a trick of hurling every line as if
it were a bombshell. Gilbert Douglas,
Wallis Clark, John Westley and George
? Alison are all effective. Dulcy is an
! ingenious trick play and the patter
! which introduces the legerdemain is
even better than the stunts.
j Rurplars Shoot Barber Twice
j As He Surprises Them in Shop
Joseph Denare, a barber, of 1476
j Williamsbridgc Road, suffered two bul
? let wounds early yesterday after he
' had been awakened by burglars.
Denare and his wife sleep in the. rear
| of the barber shop. When they were
| awakened they ran into the shop, where
they discovered three men, who opened
fire and then fled.
Detective Thompson and Patrolman
j Schein, of. the Westchester station,
j heard the shots and ran to the shop.
: Denare was lying on the floor, wounded.
j They called an ambulance and he was
. removed to Fordham Hospital, where it
? was said tho wounds were not serious.
White Denounces
Republican Tax
Revision Measure
Change in Bill, Democratic
Chairman Asserts, 'Has
Added Confusion to Gov?
ernment's Fiscal Situation'
WASHINGTON, Aug. 14.?The Ad?
ministration tax revision program was
attacked to-night by Chairman White
of the Democratic National Committee,
who declared in a formal statement
that business men would not be fooled
by the methods adopted by the Repub?
licans "in order to make a false show
of economy."
"The sudden change in the Republi?
can tax bill ^program decided upon at
the recent White House conference,"
said Mr. White, "has only added con?
fusion r.nd uncertainty to the govern?
ment's fiscal situation, nnd business
and financial circles generally are sur?
prised and disappointed at President
Harding's repudiation o? Secretary of
the Treasury Mellon as his fiscal ad?
viser and his recognition instead of
Chairman Fordney of the Ways and
Means Committee as the financial
guide of his Administration.
"Secretary Mellon told Congress
presumably with the knowledge and
approval of the President, that he will
need $4,1)54,000,000 to meet government
expenditures for the next fiscal year
He told Congress also, in view of thes?
expenditures, that taxes cannot b?
reduced.
"This meant, of course, that the Re.
publican campaign promise to reduce
Federal taxes would not and, in fact
! could not be kept.
"Chairman Fordney, who wrote th(
wonderful tariff bill of which the Sen
; ate is expected to leave only the en
! acting clause, came to the pol?tica
j rescue of the Administration and an
j nounced a plan to reduce taxes regard
less of the amount of money ncede<
to meet expenditures which would era
! ate a deficit to be taken care of by bor
| rowing the money, thus Increasing th<
I public debt; but, as the optimistic Mr
j Fordney saw it, his plan would maki
it appear that the party was keepini
| its campaign pledge to reduce taxe
? and was making a grand record o
. economy.
"Upon his return from his vacation
j President Harding was called upon t
' choose between the Mellon plan o
i providing for enough revenue to mee
expenditures and the Fordney plan fo
juggling the taxes by fictitious reduc
I tions and a false show of economy. H
I chose the Fordney plan, seeming!
! sacrificing an honest financial polic
to political expediency, which ought t
deceive nobody.
"The business world has waited Ion
for a sane and honest revenue act i
order to adjust its affairs and escap
the business stagnation caused by tw
years' delay under Republican rule i
i revising the internal taxes. It will nc
be satisfied with this sort of politicr
I jugglery. Speaking as a business ma
| myself, I warn the Republican Admir
j istration that business men will nc
be fooled by such methods in order t
make a false show of economy."
I The Ways and Means Committe
draft of the tax revision bill was m
America's ForemoKfc Th??tres and Hits I'jicler tho Direction of Leo & J. J. Shubert
i rTMTIlDV DDrMWICTVTAnr ,
ury Thea.
3S??Pe^^i?&S?ss
?2T\
MATINEE TO-MOKROW, 50c. TO $2.00.
Wiuyb?joiHi);?
* %WI6HTat830
*f a hew MvrreRy comed/
?/ euy bolton a. ma* marcin
^ff THEATRE ? FIR?r ttATINEE
OPEX?
TO-NH?HT at 8:30.
Wm. A. Brady's
48th ST. THEA.
Mais. Tliuri. ?: Not.
??Uli VIOLtr HEfitiftU and OTTO KRUCER.
PLAYHOUSE ?S? ?
THE TEASER
"HITS BULL'S EYE."? UN.
ToWED. NIGHT at 8:15
WAS A REGULAR TLAYHOrSE
With A New and Elaborate Revue
"THEMIMICWORLDx??!"
?^"?IIIICOTIO?lKIBIFIIir
(o overcome suggestion of midnight show
SEATS NOW ON SALE
Also OPKMNG of the
PROMENADE TERRACE
As a Restaurant Par Excellence.
Dining ami Dancing* on the Terrace from
ti o'clock till 1:30 A. M.
No couvert or admission charge 6 till S.
fPMTIinV 62,! st- Rm! Central Park West.
Ublliunl EVENINGS ONLY AT 8:15.
COOLED BY TONS OF ICE.
THE LAST WALTZ ?t^anob
DflATU <5th. Wost of B'<
DUU ! Il JUu Wednesday
THE GREEN
Bl I ft II Theatre. 45th St., W. of liwsy.
I J U U Brg8. ?.M. Mata. Wed. & Sat
"ENORMOUSLY AMUSING ? W E L L
CAST AND ACTED."
?Alexander Woollcotl, N. Y. Times,
AUG. 17
ii. Lawrence Weber (MTrrs You
?uADAnwe imiirw
With WALLACE EDDMGER
and A NOTABLE CAST OK EAVOKITES.
A? TU CT THEATRE, West of Broadway.
?*** lildli Continuous 11 A.M. to 11 P.M.
TEX RICHARD presents
DEMPSEV-CARPENTIER
OFFICIAL RINGSIDE_MOTION PICTURES.
I? %& MAT/ W?D i TAT. "i ! JO
419th TIME TO-NIGHT.'
StSEnvT' MAKIfll
"ONE OF THOSE PLAYS WHICH YOU
CAN HONESTLY ENJOY. WF. ADVISE
ANYONE WHO LIKES SMART NON?
SENSE TO SAMPLE IT."
?Louis V. De Foe, TV. Y. World.
OnUDCnl Matin?es Wed. and Sat, 2:3?
ESST? JUST MARRIED
with VIVIAN MARTIN and LYNNE OVERMAN
SELWVN, W, A2d St. RICHARD CARLE
BLANCHE RING
CHAS. WINNINfiER
WINONA WINTER
_ JAY GOULD
EVGS. AT t!:;tU.
Wrxt 12 St. Evss
Mats. Wed. ($1.50 roi\
and :?iiurduy at
? f? HDE?le>V S5th St.. E. of B'y. Etb. 8:30.
_UAIt?UUiV Maw. Tliurs. and Sat., 2:30.
?MR. p?M Passes By
? nEFRESHING COMEDY BY A. A. MILNE.
LITTLE
THEATRE
AVe.st 44 St.
Tt 1" YeaA
orrnn l;Iii)Al>\VAY AT ?5TH STllEET.
AOlUIl DAILY. 2:30 AND 8:30.
LAST (? DAYS?THE GOLDTVYN HIT,
CARLTdN PROOUCTlOh
t?iinJ
fiOHN E. HAZZARD WANK CRUtNT
mm?
WILLIAM FOX presents
PARK $^?&%*&1Lft&
WILLIAM F?RNUM '"
PERJURY
TIMES SQ.m^H^*
WILLIAM
COURTENAY
AND
LOLA FISHER
"IT'S A DARNED GOOD ?SHOW.
PRINCESSE m'^.AUG. 22"?
THE MASK OF HAMLET
t'lli TflM 4Cl!l Sf-.W. o.' By. Ers. S:26.
rUkl VII Matinees Weil, and .Sat.. -? .'?0_
SCHILDKRAUT and ?f? ?W H"fcT?/?J???
LE OALLIENNE In t-,ll_.iUIV| _,
FRANZ MOLNAR'S COMEDY OF LIFE.
DIRECTED
By HARRY
MILLA KDE
STAG UD Bj
l.'MMUTT
J. FLYNX
Q^L RESTAURANTS IttiK
?^jR^ AND COFFEE SHOPS *&?g?L
TEA ROOMS
{Tite AnnFwiton Cafeteria
n ruiTo? ."' *
'dUBIIK SPECIALS teEH AN P WOW?
ia?i
SHIP'S II "Come Aboard !" 52 W, 33th St,
INN. |l Luncheon, 66c. Dinner. ?1.00.
Afternoon Tea. Also u. la carts service.
Mr? rWkwirh 137 ""vvTverly Pisos.
?1rs. OCCKW1ID Luncheon 65c. L! to 2 Dlnnei
SI.CO. 6 to s T. 11. Dinner sened in ta? Qardtn.
Y. W. C A. Cafeteria
f8 W. S6th St. Open 10:23 A. M.. 7:30 P. ML
Men and Women Served.
pniMSPTTU TE* 47 WKST 30th ST.
rUI.t?CIHs GARDEN Phone Mur. Hill ?713
Luncheon GOO. Dinner 11.00. Afternoon Tea.
Served in the Garden. Also a la Carte .Service
i-~-~
I The out-eMhe-ordlnsry place, el New V.rlt
where unique atmwph.rej and ti.d s.euilar
Is varies tail? isvtt? ta. ?Iteriaiiaatias.
J)
TEA KOO.V13
5 WEST 28TH ST. |
14 WEST BIST ST.
LUNCHEON AND DINNER
Served !n Delightful (.arden*
SCOTCH TEA ROOM I^?JS
? 'Bete Lunch, Dinner. Afternoon T=* Home mad? .
lam?. .Scotch scones, ?noriure.d. Fasiry & tuuttoa still ?
RESTAURANTS
AnHi'ian'e Greenwich Cor. 7th A?. A 11th Si
Mnurten 5 Village Open 7 a.?, te MlrtriUhl
Luncheon 50r. Dinner .je. (southern bol w*:;.t,
Serted wilh Ail Ul.uers. Aiau a La Cart?.
1 Mnn? r.il.., Itrstaumnt. 13 East 30th St. I !
mane tstner luncheon a l? c?ns Dia? ;
?er, 6 te 8. Wholeaom? Horn? Cooked Foui, I
in form to-day for presentation to- ?
morrow to the conference of House
Republicans, which will decido upon
the procedure for House consideration
which is expected to begin on Wednes?
day and end with a vote late Satur?
day.
e ' '
Miss Starr Again To Be
Seen in 'The Easiest Way' ;
David Belasco will begin his season
by rcintroducing Miss Frances Starr
in "The Easiest Way" at the Lyceum
Theater on Tuesday, September 6.
Joseph Kilgour and Laura Nelson
Hull will appear in their original parts
of Willard Brockton and Elfie St. Clair
while the supporting company also is
to include Robert Kelly as John Madi
?on, John P. Brown as Jim Weston
and Marion Kerby as Annie. The voice
off stage, originally Miss Jane.Cowl's,
is to be Pauline Moore's this time.
The play is in four nets and four
scenes and concerns a peculiar phase
of American life.
Mr. Uclaaco will start rehearsals to?
day at tho Lyceum, where the engage?
ment is to b? limited to eijrht weeks,
after which Mis? Btarr will go on tour.
?t. ?
The Stage Door
"The Night Cap" will be presented at
the Thirty-ninth Street Theater lo-nicht.
The new production nt the Century
Promenade scheduled for to-night will not
open until Wednesday evening, an>l will
be known as "The Mimic World," inste,-,?!
>f ' M !nij;ht Rounders." The r,,* .
'? ' ? l '.O o'clock. * curt*lo wnj
A. K. Woods Will breaen? f ?
?hi- .venin?: ? The ',"?" '?" ??? Pl.y..
Main Stree? Theater. A^bur^ ? **
Ernkln
Kanford. r.f th*
Theat?
0?iM
?Mr
ins b?en appointed to the te?rL'I Ga!
f Bmsnuel Rslchsr". dramtlk^L*
P ? r.k Reicher _?.
pearanre as a recular memba,*!S *??
rnsldent company at in? '".arrlev *3l *?
m the leading role |D ?AnVbu?>,T>?t?r
which the Theater amid w?iona?C "?*(
son in October. p'n k? ae?.
Alan Pollock. KnEliah comsau, .
be starred by Charles WniiihS? *i>
- - Bill Uf DivorSnV^
season In "A
menee Par.
"Sonya" opens this evenln* ,t <??.
?iRhth Street Theater. l '*
Forty.
Can your eyes see behind wood
and steel and cardboard?
Were you to step into a Library Bureau showroom, you
would see the efficient, well-made L. B. steel or wood
cabinets. You could test the unusual strength of L. B.
Index cards and the quality of L. B. Guides and folders.
But still you wouldn't see more than a-tiny fraction of the
5,000 items that L. B. supplies. Here are just a few of the
main classifications. You will at once recognize their
efficiency. Each has been created by L. B., based on 45
years experience in over 125,000 offices. >? v .. ~ -,
L. B.* Wood and steel filing cabinets, including L. B. conater-bight
units, whereby filing cabinets serre the added purpose of a counter.
L. B.* Cards, vertical file folders and guides, including special forms
for individual businesses and individual departments.
L. B.* Sales records, which keep sales information at the sales manager's
finger-tips.
L. B* Automatic Index, which makes it harder for the file clerk to make
a mistake than to file correctly.
L. B.* Double unit card record desks, which bring 16,000 to 24,000 cards
within arms' reach of the seated clerks.
L. B. Equipment is the instrument of business efficiency.
And it is the expert advice of L. B. salesmen, who are pre?
pared to recommend systems and equipment for your par?
ticular needs, that will simplify your business problems.
*/u/? information on any of abete subjects will ht sent on reiuesU No oiliielion.
Library Bureau
Gard and filing
systems
Founded 1876
O. H. RICE, Manager
316 Broadway, New York
Fil?ng cabinets
wood and steel
Salesroom? in 49 leading cJtie? of the United States, Great Britain and France
era Dro
West 42nd St. (Between Fifth and Sixth Avenues)
West 43rd St
1
The AUGUST SALE NOW IN PROGRESS:
High-Grade ORIENTAL RUGS
at LOWEST PRICES we have quoted for several seasons
Presenting a most opportune occasion to fulfill every
need of the home in fine quality Rugs at a liberal saving.
PERSIAN and CHINESE RUGS
12.4x8.9.Now $215.00
11.9x9.0.Now $225.00
11.10x9.0 ....Now $245.00
12.0x9.4.Now $250.00
13.7x8.8.Now
13.8x9.6.Now
14.0x10.3 ....Now
18.2x12.0 ....Now
$255.00
$275.00
$350.00
$565.00
Extra large size Persian and Chinese Carpets; also
all our Persian Hall Runners at 33*/3 OFF
this season's regular prices
PERSIAN KAMERAGH RUGS in various scatter sizes:
$175.00 value_Now $85.00
$225.00 value....Now 105.00
$250.00 value.... Now 118.00
$325.00 value....Now 125.00
$350.00 value....Now 150.00
$375.00 value....Now 175.00
About 20 PERSIAN MOUSUL RUGS
Sizes 3 to 3.(> long x i to 5.10 long. Ex- $"29 50
cellent quality and effectively colored?now Vv?tuw

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