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New-York tribune. [volume] (New York [N.Y.]) 1866-1924, October 03, 1921, Image 8

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Memoria! for
Caruso Obtains
Quirk Support
Committee Overwhelmed by
Rush of Distinguished
Subscribers, Dr. Antonio
Stella. Chairman, Report?
Many Notable Are Listed
Scholarships -Vssured for
Musically Gifted by Pro?
posed $1,000,000 Fund
IX**, Antonio Si >lla, who was Enrico
>*, iruso's physician and is chairman of
th*,"* temporary commu?tes in -charge of
? tf pr ?ect for raising a memorial fund,
? ?' :\ ,000,000, the ii te >s1 of which is
'. v- devot? I to th? ed ical ion of prom
? . -, . meed yes?
terday that aci of membership
in the ..N ? e?eived in
no doubl
that terprise would tske perma?
nent form.
American students of '.oral music
are t> be ?".?' pr i neficiaries*.
Scholarships and other prizes will be
awarded :il>o to students i:i othei
bi'anches of ran Al awi rds will be
made by a board composed of recog?
nized authorftii s, to .- ed as soon
as tl ? ' Permanent
ficers art to 1 1 In two w ?? ks.
Tho makeup ;;' the national commit
t?:ti is as Follows;
Dr. Antonio Sb 11a, New York City,
iciaa to Caruso?
ary chain
inrd B. Alder.**!"' New York City,
pr? ,'don' Music I -: '-? ' ^h Chamber of
Coaimen-o of the "JnUed States.
John Aspogn n, *? City, presi?
dent New York Produoo Exchange
'?
Leopold Auer, New Torik City, emi?
nent ' ' ? cher*
Julius 1?. Barnes, Dul->:-. Minn*., for
r." r United Sta! Director.
... Battle. New York
City, lawyer.
Harold Bauer, New York Ciity, fa?
mous pian
Parke Bei ?an in jr., New York City,
brother ot Mrs. Enrico Car liso.
lutt? rv orth, Milling l\t.,
president Deere & Co.
Calvin G. Child, Nov.- York C**it\?. di
rector recording laboratories Vjctor
ine Company.
Pau! D. Cravath, Sfaw Yonk City,
member board of directors Mertropoli
and p.v. ?ident
Ame* ican So? iety.
Walter Damn sch, New Yor*k City,
tor New York Symphony Or
ci;- '..-;..
Mrs. Henrv P. Davison, Neil* York
City, wife tjf'H? nr* 1*. Davison, of J. P
? Morgan & Co.
Di -! hn '? . Erdmann, New Yoi?t City
eminent .- u v% eon.
John it. i- ton, ormer pxesi
? r C ?mmetce oc? tlu
?
Dr. Livings! ??? Parrand, Was h ra^ton
D. C., former chairman Central <>:??.
.uir-.. ?" American Red ?"veas.
John H. Finley, New York Citjt, ("or
m. r Commi'ssione.r of ??ducation of the
;i tte of N --.- York.
"!-..;-.- ; Plagler, New York
ity, ?residen Symphony ?"ociety of
N? ?v York.
Fletcher, Washington,
. . Uni I . ' S nator from
la.
Pi md, New York City
'-. anee of the
United States.
.-?,**. New York. City
- i '?>.
Mme. Lmeliti Gall ( iurci, High
mt. N. V., soprano.
rfield, Williamstown,
Mai Went Williams < ollege-.
K. M ity, jeivelor.
A. ;!. Glannini, New York City, pr?si?
dent Ka::?. Riv< ? Nati? nai Bank ctf New
. prcsi
- American Federation of Labor-,
! loy !?'.'.? torn, New York City
former Arab issi -a!/.
W liam Guggenheim, New Y&rk City,
capitalist and raining engineer.
U len F?a tl iy Jenkins, New
York ; fcv pi anti ropi st.
1-'. ii. La I rdia, Few Yorl ? ;-;-.
President New York City Board of
Dr. - bert, New Yoik
y, prominet
?: cl i -.-?- York City,
oe-president Printers' ink Publishing
. ' ;? icago, pres?
t? lizer Work;-'.
Osbourne McConathy, Evans^o?i, IP...
pre ?d ? ?? I M - ; ? ? ? ' Nation:?.:
ociation.
. ' ?' . Rocklcn, Conn.,
? i o r.
New York Cityj N'a
?,f laster, r of the Sons of
Pierre Mont'- i, conductor
- mpho i
Morg an, New York City,
to Turkey.
10 Robles,
oser.
Thon n Page, Washington,
-
Peabody, Chicago, presi
and Cok" Company.
Robert i'. York ('ity,
"kmerica Society,
I : a ". president
? ompany.
i < rk City, Ger
Italy,
ion, New York Ci ; .
um of Art,
tmann-Heink,
Garden C ty, !. ?.. coi I
?. i, Now York
rano.
1 ? ? : I
':- Inc.
."*ew i , cha
? . ?
?
A um. i W ? , City
w V ?rk ;.: .
r
. ?
'
Build .',?-.
-
Cincinnati Honers Caruso
?
t.. :
?
-
I HT Of '
: ? ' < i ' i:
the i
-??9- . . .
Father and Son **? '??"? !
J ame* o? BI **! in Well
fon i , ? ? . i , ? - ?
: ? ?? ?? i Wil
- ?
.... '<??:
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* . / ,,
. '
'
?iUtr k{h
o? t'?> ta-:..
9100,000 War Memorial!
Is Dedicated at Rosiynj
James Lyons Post of Legion Ac- j
ccjpl9 Building Erected in
Honor of 2 12 Native Sons
ROSLYN, L. I.', Oct. ?.?Exercises!
dedicating the first building to be
erected on Long ".--.'and as a memorial j
to tho World War were held here to- j
day in connection with the opening: of i
tit?' structure erected in honor of the
:".i'J boys of this town who served in the ?
conflict. I
The building has a huge auditorium ;
and other rooms, which will be used
for recreational activities. It is lo-1
cated in East. Broadway, in the center
of the town, and is one of the finest;
. difices here. 1: cost $100,000.
Nathan S. Jonas, president of the ;
Roslyn Neighborhood Association, was
master o? ceremonies. John II. Love,
chairman of the memorial tabiet com?
mittee, unveiled the bronze tablet!
"which adorns the fireplace in the audi?
torium. The editice' was accepted by
Henry Wallbridge on behalf of James
Ly?ns Post, of the American Legion.
In the afternoon on Harbor Hill, at
tho estate of Clarence II. Mackay,
honorary chairman of the war ?nemo
rial building committee, special serv?
iros commemorating the opening of the
building were held. The program in
. luded a concert by the United Stati's
Marine Hand and solos by two Metro?
politan Opera members, Miss Cecil Ar?
den and Porasio Dias. Mr. Mackay was
one of the founders of the memorial
fund. \
Recital Season Opened
By 2 Russian Violinists
Mishel Piastre Gives Program
at Carnegie Hall; Vladimir
(?raffman Plays at Aeolian
The i'trst violin recital of the season
?vas given yesterday afternoon at Car?
negie all by Mishel Piastro, one of the
best of last season's crop of violinists.
Mr. Piastro does not put his whole trust
in pyrotechnics, but plays with the ma?
turity and depth of feeling of a sea?
soned artist. His tone is broad and his
technique of a fine caliber. His pro?
gram included Bach's Sonata No. 3, for
violin alune, and Sinding'a ?Suite in A
minor.
At' the same time in Aeolian Hall
Vladimir Graffman, like Mr, Piastro a
Russian violinist, gave a concert, as?
sisted by Mana-Zucca, composer-pianist,
and A. Besrodny, cellist, for the benefit
o*f the Russian Babies' Milk Fund.
T?rtini's "Devil's Trill" Sonata, Pag?
aninis Concerto in D major, Mann
Zucca's Trio. op. 40, and pieces by
Tschaikowsky, Uubay and Wieniawski
made up the program.
Fleeing Suspect Killed
By Policeman's Bullet
-
Patrolman Fires. Believing the
Theft of ?.ar Was Planned;
Tho Prisoners Wounded
John O'Brien, twenty-five years old,
home not ascertained, was shot to
death yesterday by Patrolman John
Doolan, of the East, Twenty-second j
Street station. O'Brien and three other
men tire said by Doolan to have at- '
tempted to steal an automobile which
was standjng in front of the homo of
his brother, Martin Doolan, near the
station.
O'Brien was shot in the back. He
was taken to Bellevue Hospital, where
he died two hours later. The three
men that Policeman Doolan says were
with O'Brien were arrested. They gave
their names as Richard Hadibode, 427
West Sixty-sixth Street; John Gavin,
341 West ?Sixty-fifth Street, and
Matthew McCarthy. 1162 First Avenue.
The three are charged with resisting
arrest. Patrolman "Richard Dunn, oi*
the East Twenty second ?Street station,
assisted in locating the trio.
Detective McGregor, of the "West
Forty-seventh Street station, saw two
men loitering before the James M. Mc
Cunn Company building, at 314 West.
Fourteenth Street, yesterday. They
were in an automobil?;. When he chal?
lenged them both fled. Patrolman
Ward joined McGregor and both offi?
cers fired several shots, Frederick
Noble was shot in the neck and John
?'lark in the back. Property from the
McCunn plant was in the automobile,
which was also found to have been
stolen. Both men gave 258 West Fif?
teenth Street as their address. They
w? re taken to New York Hospital.
Special Policeman Peter Connolly,
employed by the Hudson and Manhat?
tan Railroad, arrested George Walsh,
: of 38 Burnette Street. Fast Orange,
after a fight in the Cortlandt Street
terminal yesterday. A crowd watched
struggle.
Alleged Floating Bar* Banned
From F i shin a Fleet Races
Svecial Dispatch toTh? Tribtm?
BOSTON1, Oct. 2. The schooner
?Vrcthusa will not b?; accepted as an
sntry in the fisherman elimination
races to be held off Gloucester October
12 The Aretinisa. is the vessel alleged
., have functioned as a "floating bar"
New Bedford and other ports dur?
ing ?-.-cent. week-.
Committee members indicate quite
oleaTly that an application from the
Arethusa will not be welcome and there
is little chance that one will be pre
sented.
The Sta^e Door
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O?i the Screen
_i
""Dangerous Curve Ahead," at
Capitol; Pola Ncgri in '"One
Arabian Night," at Strand
By Harriette Underhill
Rupert Hughes, the best title writer
in the world, has a pictrre at the
Capitol this week. It is called "Dan
gerous Curve Ahead." Now, for thor.e ,
who arc not familiar with Mr. ?lughes's ;
work this title will have a meaning
which has not in the present instance '
been written into it at all. If it were
?i Cecil Do Mule picture. "Dangerous
Curve Ahead" would mean just what ;
you would think it meant; but with]
Rupert Hughes it means something
quite different. The story proves that
the matrimonial bark is quite as apt j
to be wrecked in a quiet lake as in a ?
whirlpool. The life of Phoebe Mabee ,
and ilarley Jones seemed terribly dull i
after they were married. Perhaps it !
is really bound to be so when a lot
of children curr.c quickly, but the lives
of none of the people we happen t.i
know are like that, and it seemed as
though (he Joneses missed lots of
chances of having n good time. Of ?
course, there are plenty of people who !
would have preferred the De Mille :
translation of which we spoke, and wc !
arc not sure that we should not have !
done so realizing, even as wc do, that
"Dangerous Curve Ahead" is a perfect
performance as it stands.
The titles are n delight, the picture ?
is beautifully directed and the cast
leaves nothing to be desired. We have ;
only one criticism to ntgister two, '
rather. Why was it necessary at the ;
end of the picture, when husband' and I
wife clasped hands over the cut of the
convalescent child, to flash a large,
brilliant circle, presumably a wedding
ring, in the middle of the scene? And ?
why was it necessary, after convincing '
every one in the. action of the picture ;
and in the titles that the young wife ?
was enceinte, to show her looking wist- j
ful, while a halo appeared over her j
head and spread until it covered the j
whole screen. Lots of people have ?
children!
Phoebe Mabee is an excell?;nt name
for the heroine. Site was the great:
potentiality in her own home town.
Tho title stated that she had been |
engaged and disengaged with every i
eligible young man she knew. When
the story opens she is engaged to I
Harley Jones, but he breaks the en- j
gagement because he catches her kiss?
ing Anson Newton, in the d?nouement ;
both men renounce her and a little i
later she is seen kneeling at her window '
ieiige delivering the maiden's prayer.
It is, "Send me a good husband, make
me a good wife." Knowing Phoebe as ;
we already did, we felt she should hiive. j
added: "Give me a good time."
You see, Phoebe was temperamentally
unfitted to become what she did be- !
come. After Phoebe's prayer there is
another title which says: "This is the
noblest wish a woman can utter." or
words to that effect, but this is one ,
more thing which does not sound like
Rupert Hughes. Mr. Hughes never
tells people what is noble and what
isn't.
Phoebe's prayer -vas soon answered.
Harley came back and they were mar?
ried. That was when their trouble
started. Phoebe had children faster
than Harley could afford them, and the
Joneses seemed the soft of people who
believe a woman's place is in the home
exclusively, and that if you have any?
thing to do with another man after you
ore married ho will seize tho op- ?
portunity to make love to you. There?
fore, Phoebe was lonely a lot of the
time. When Harley's salary was raised ?
so that he could afford a Business tri)
to Europe, Phoebe refused to go because
she couitln't leave the children, al?
though by that time they had all sorts
of maids standing about the apartment.
Anyhow, Phoebe didn't go. She ?went,
to Palm Beach instead, and there in a
perfectly innocent way she nearly made
the dangeroui curve a fatal one. Tho '
? finish of the picture seems merely an
interlude, for although Phoebe's three
children were doing very well and her ;
troubles wer? over, you feel that -lu?
is going to have a lot more of them.
Helene Chadwick is delightful as I
Phoebe. It is th ehest thing- she has
done. Richard Dix is perfect as the ;
I young husband. Lefty Flynn is seen !
as the other man, and the beautiful and
1 stately Kate Lester is the wealthy aunt.
I Miss Lester is the wealthiest looking
screen lady we know and no one eise
\ can ever be half so imposing in the j
? grand dame roles. The picture is ;{
Goldwyn. (t was directed by Mason
I Hopper. The prologue is a distinct
novelty. Prizma has a picture on the :
program called "A Little Love Nest." ?
? The overture is Liszt's 13th Hungarian i
' Rhapsody. There is also a Chester ;
j conic called "The Lust Hope," and a
ballet which includes Danse Orientale '.
1 by Doris Niles, Cassandra by Thalia ?
Zanou and Glow Worm by Gambarelli. ',
There is variety at the theatre this ?
week for, after the quiet at the?Capit >1
picture comes the tense and colorful !
drama at the Strand, ft is called "One \
; Arabian Night," and it has for the star '
that marvelous actress, Pola Negri. ;
; The only fault we can find with the ?
. picture is that there is not. half enough
; of Pola Negri in it. If the star were
' anyone else we should say woll-and ;
good, for we hate directors who sacri
! lice everything that their star may i
I have hundreds of feet of film to do
nothing in. That is one beautiful fea
? ture of the German films. The director !
i tolls the story, let the chips fall where ;
they may.
This new picture which Ernest Lu I
bitsch has sent us has everything in it j
which makes the German lilnis such
joua things. And the truth must be
confessed, they are well nigh per-]
feet, whether one relishes if or not.
Mr, Lubitsch is seen in the role of.
the Hunchback himself, but nothing is
made of the fact that "The Golem"
plays the ?Sheik. His name does riot
even appear on the program. But who.
having seen the Golem, can ever for?
get him ?
Tho story is the story of "Sumurun,"
which was done here ?n pantomine a
? i?-,.,- seasons ago. How Lubitsch could.
m addition to playing the mont ?im?
portant part in the pirturc, direct such
u colossal production is more than we
can understand. Yet neither seems to
have suffered. N'ol only is the picture
ftllod with action ami with suspense
hut it is i! ?o full 01' the mo,.! quaintly
humorous touches. In some instance's
tiii:, is bo subtle that we doubt very
much i<" it waa appreciated by very !
many or the speewtors. However
: lose who did nol get ij ,??.1 not m?3s
it. ior it ?3 ?vriten m :.s ;?. sort o? ??
*:de line. 1:' tins lountl , snobbish *?."
tpologize l?.v Baying that we are nuil
sure Mr. Lubitseb ?>ui into hi* picturu
much ??.?' th.? name sort of thing which
ivsnt de i- over out* ?'? ad. If,? is a :
?vizard. ?;?- ?i ?? , no . lef in ; imagina
tion run wild. He hitches it up and
make ; ;!. work for ?.. ?,
'?'? gri's n? ., r?le is a arosa be
";'; - ' ' " ""'I "Gypsy Blood "
se? il ,??" the Desert Dancer, t?ri?l
when Monarch, Prince, roving player
arid hunchbnek, fall at nor feet, swoon?
ing witi-, luv.-, there is nothing s .,,.
eially suppriaing in it. , Pol? ' Negri
? ? her i. roin? .. thai son of people
"'' ?-' b? ".cnl, but ih? v pos
?';" ' '"?'? ry othei charm known to b ?
?-loH'lly to the opposite sox, In on
-' ' ? ' ,r no other artist on
reeii .<?? y -i .,' :?< shc
::"' p? i foi manee of th? ? ? ?
LI ? diroetcm -tr? - ,
Uw P?rform?ncQ3 given by the
11 ' "?' !.;'v;- There are '/,?.<?
, ' ! lavorito ?..?,., H1,i v,,,,, ?,-,| 1(l,,
I wb? r?-?*ir'?.(.(| the Dnaorl Dm cue i ? ? I
*'"?'??" '? ' bin !? ??? for /?ii. ika, and the
prince and tho chiof eunuch and
Haidee, they ar.> perfect. So iu-e the
settings and the tr-ob scenes and ail the
rest of it. The titles are done in color,
but wc should hav?.: liked to see the
Whole thing in color. "'One Arabian
Kiglit" i- presented by First National.
?Joseph Plunkett has arranged his pro?
gram entirely around the feature. The
overture "Queen of Sheba" and
there is a prologue showing a street
in Bagdad. Frank Mellor sings "Across
( le D serf Sands," there is a Darise
Arabe and Joseph Martel sings "Less
Than the Dust."
At the Rivoli EIp?c Ferguson Is ap?
pearing in Rita Weiman's "Footlights."
'After the Show" is the feature a-, the
Rialto. These will be reviewed t -
morrow.
Slain Woman's Husband
And Girl KcpL From Mob
\ trgiiiia Sheriff Rushes Pair to
?Safety in Auto: ""Soul Mate"
Evidence Is Found
Special Dispatch to The Tribune
COLONIAL BEACH, Va.. Oct. 2. But
for the quick work of Sheriff Griffith,
R. N. Eastlake and Miss Sarah Knox,
held for the murder of Mrs. Eastlake,
whose mutilated body was found in her
home here Friday morning, probably
would have fallen into the hands of a
mob whfch began forming early this
morning.
?Sheriff Griffith took the prisoners
out of the Mont rose jail nnd hurried
them to Frcdyrieksburg, fifteen miles
away, in au .automobile.
Mrs. Eastlnke's body was taken to
Mount Airy. Pa., to-day for burial. The
police announced to-day they found a
bloodstained revolver in Miss Knox's
hand bag. One chamber was empty.
The authorities also say Miss Knox
and Eastlake had been reading "sou!
mate" and trial marriage literature
npd had discussed il in conversation
with people at Colonial Beach before
the crime was committed.
Miss Knox is ten years older than
Eastlake. Neighbors of the Eastlakes
say he said some time ago Miss Knox
had more influence with him than any
woman he had ever met. She is said
to have considerable money or expects
to inherit money soon.
Extra guards were placed around the
Fredericksburg jail to-night to prevent
an attack by mobs.
Boy Slam, Po! ire Believe
Special Disvaich t<> The Tribune
CHICAGO, Oct. 2. Myste-?y in the
finding of il?e body of Samuel T? u Di y p; -
ton, fourteen years old, a high school
student, hanging in a closet in his
home at Ill's East Sixty-fifth Street, to?
night brought a coroner's investigation
of what is believed may be a peculiarly
diabolical murder.
The body was fcAind by the boy's
mother, Mrs. Charles F. Pingham, ami
his st. pfather wh?n they returned to
the hou"0 after several hours' absence.
A ropo, slip-noosed, was around the
neclc. The hands were bound.
Examination led '!..? police to believe
that the boy had been murdered. Their
theory i? that a burglar encountered
the boy. killed him. and then attempted
t.? arrange the body so that it would
appear to !.;.? a suicido.
Engineers Assail
Stanley Plan to
Guard Inventions
Would Not Prevent Germans
From Patenting Work of
Americana as Monopoly,
Says Society's Committee
From Tin* Tribune's Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON, Oct. 2 ?Tho Ameri?
can Engineering Council of the Feder- !
ate 1 American Engineering Societies, !
i
which is seeking to remedy what it calis
"deplorable conditions" in the Patent \
Office, to-day made public the report of ]
its patent committee opposing the
Stanley bill. The council previously ?
h:*.'t adopted recommendations of the I
committee urging the passage of the
Lampert bill, which, it is asserted, will j
"slop the retrogression of the Paten";
Office."
The committee, headed by Edwin J. ;
Prindle, of New York, announced "it
is very much opposed to the Stanley
bill." and :id?io".'..
"This bill is said to have been in?
troduced at the request of the Secre-'
tary of War because foreigners were I
patenting inventions which had been ;
made by American engineers and sell?
ing them to the Krupps, and the Krupps \
were buying them so that we could not j
use our own inventions for our own :
defense.
"The measure provides that any
patents issued to persona who ere not
citizens of the United ?States shall be
wi rked in this country .within two years
from the date of issue.
"The bill introduces a dangerous in-'
novation. The remedy for preventing
the Germans from patenting the inven?
tions made by Americans, but which
have not been patented by Americans,
is simply to prove when a suit is
brought under the patent that the in?
vention was made and publicly used
by Americans before the application by
the Germans was tiled, which proof
i would result in invalidating the
j patents.
"If the object is to compel the Ger?
mans to manufacture the inventions in
; this country that would be just the op
: posite of the efforts which were rt?ade
1 during the war to root out the 'peace?
ful penetration' of American industry
by the Germans.
"Where an invention is one which
i could be kept secret, as in the case of
! ma"y chemical inventions, the Ger-,
i mans would either not patent the in
| vention in ?lie United States, or they
|| BROADWAY A 43 6T.
Con. II A.M. to 12 P.M.
AFT. SOe, NIGHT BO?.
lex. ?xt., Sun. k Hol.)
AL8GE BRADY *Tf?A&$?f
Marie Tollman Revue, Chase & La Tour, others.
FATS.
AEQUAN HALL, TOM'
PIAXO
KB' .V.M.
?Eim PALMQREH
PERCY GRAHM3ER
Plaa?s
s ta H ?O UK'S M ? *- 1? * - *? T
rssn-nr' ?rt^w - ?m i lotli si Rvks. s s i
EMPIRE ?'(.I and !*
ft ra a i u t: :
A N I> S l C C !?: S S K
NPW AMSTERDAM W 42nd ST.
MA?S. WED. S. SAT 5<Mt ?.*?
, d?*?x THE CQtATXST MUSICAL
,r-S in "BLOOD ; '; ?W^ry COMEDY EVER CONC?fV?0
\S Kl) M VT. BEST SEATS $2.00
FHE 0'BR?EN GIRL" ^miitWi
ai \ -|-|\!:::s v.r.i>. and SAT., ?:\z. '' '"^ m*^? %
???BBOPCNIN-nTONIGHTii 3:30????? ?g iU?tfct*** L ?N^> J^.,
HSLP? ?SA. #3f5?%> I? SSATS AT ??>
SP?Nf? '';:r^;-' ^%T OLOBE--F?RST NU
PUMOH 8 JUDY ? ?i ?-Sg^ JOHN M?RLES THOMAS
X* OFFICE
?GHTTG-l^'W
i m:i?.i. s\ i?;n & s.vj'.
HAUL.K.S DIMJX?3HAH
?A NOTABLE ADDITION TO THE THEATRf i,
OFTHISCOUflTRY.---,-.,,- ,. ,!<? Reamei /'? raid
DAVID liM.lMO 1
l?HlBf? '?? "LILIES OF
WWW THE FIELD"
NOItSl \\ TBEVOR.
T
3 iuii^^
in "THE EAS?EST WAY"
E?Pe-** W.Itcr'8 A.near* Masterpiece, HEHHY MILLER'S SLBSlSr. f .?I
btL?dby M.? Thuw. & Sal MOIiE. ?VVoiI t-SFE '.? ?ther^lRISH PtjfvEnqTJ
"NEVER HAS MR. WARFIELD BEEN SO ?Tj,?? 'ujuyrt; Uc?rirn D?'vi
KINr..'-r,-.r,; Unrnton, Vve. World. ?iMfc V? H? ! K-hL/^Dt; ? BOY'
DAVID ??KLASCO Presents ;.'.,. r? -r
David u/innri n in"THE ? ix' SS?-dwk1? ^?-2*:.2?
Si:STHE WHEEL
THEA.. B*w?*v 13d SI Etc?. A X"W ' "y ''? "'1 NTH Kl.J. SMITH.
tttA^;?f ek"' 63" ST. "u-*_K?*i_i?,B.y-& c??. p vv
(i??- ??Hi
?Aar. l? II? (Tu
OM.V MID.N
ii??
"TWO BLOCKS A W A Y"?;..':? "? ; ?'Y
F1HST I?l(?HT XKXT MOX. ?eut.-* Thur. -_. B... _ ,, . .
CHARTAS DILLEMill A X, enta |^ |S S Al-7 i..- ..? ' ?.:'.,'" -j?t'uee,
A Bll.r. OF DIVOItCE.M?NT,"
With I \ N l-)-|- I3K15? 'I LEU.
LYNM FONTANNE
A GREAT PLAY?A GREAT CAST
.... ?->
t? ?
'1#|
es S.-] \?
ru
L??*aa
mmim
A PL A YEV ER Y A MER ICA N BOY SHOULD SEE
There is, of course, one answer to the wholesome
endorsement this play has had from presa and public_
In that it takes yon two hours and a half of breath?
less-vivid entertainment through problema that are
close to home, and does it engagingly.
A GENUINELY AMERICAN ROMANCE,
DONALD GALLAHER
i
lvii: M.'cil < ou?es \ s
i-, il : ..?.-.?,,,
It i ; ,v m ? 11 ? I 1111 c I ? i
: ilwii ','? ;i!tor
'??'?-' :- t?J-riK- William ... Mack
' '? "L V '? ?? "-i-:..,in- VVlIJw
I r i/.-r ( oulier Dur.ruii Harris
?'?w'l'n <?tifhri-> Koberl l-i-,!.^.
.Justin Leos und BUlie i:.-?; I.
?KNICKEPBOftKER ^, '?*&. W 3 ? LAST 3 WEEKS
memo \\. jjAVA<ii*"s m:v? :?!?<>!>(< TI(>\ of
EMBRRY WSP61
i ?? . ml I vi.,.? i "?:. hWSI? \. i., mu nil : ?i.\ -M : ?
.n:i'l I i:-1? ?i. AN'.i.l.l.-. I;.;..: :,.\i ,, 1 ?? . :,, : :: \- \ WEHST! ?. MARIE nb'l.l;-.
SAM H. HARRIS' ATTRACTIONS
TW, is
BKLMONT
West 48 St.
! ;.. M. ?
I
i 'jMl'SIC BOX
iT1V-' ??.-< '?.;?!.
HA ? B ? S
Wfsl '? !S1
i ?;? : ?11 ; hi
?i: 1 i: a I?? ?:-:i:\- ti:ki i i.r:i?
"IML'f SS?? wirb MA?.Y BYAN
Bim-. Mantle hai (labliihed in the Ever.in-- Miil a iis? of
seven of the mason's p!ays tlut hs want? In see a second
lime. "THE HERO" will* Richard Bennett il the Balnont
Theatre h'h'ADS THE LIST!
??rliI?I "MUSIC BOX REVUE"
; : i'*?)l,i.OWi -.?? ? a. 1 ,-,..?1 :??.,.?;: .1. M ?ilium
lelli i', riorinre Vlnore, U'lliJn ;.?.,-i,. .in.-.v!? tinnttuy, I?.'
,yJ?...'f, l,.i??i: ?Ir-h-i ?. 1 r, , . ?. Ilieis Stag J I. r Ii?, .?r.l 3,iort
? \\ OIC! !)"> I..F 1 111: ? r ( HOIK S."
"SIX CYLI?dIe" LOVE"
With ERNEST TRUEX
would work out the invention in this
country in order to maintain the com?
plete monopoly of the patent and pre?
vent the ?rranting of licenses.
"There is grave danger that if com
pulsory working is introduced into our
law, as applied to patents issued to
foreigners, it '?''ill bo extended to ap?
ply to all American patents. In fact,
members of Congress have already ex?
pressed the opinion that such should
bo the case.
"The Stanley bill would discriminate
strongly in favor of the wealthy and
against tho poor inventors."
.o
Miss McArdle on Trial
In Kabf-i- Murder To-day
Stepdaughter of Cleveland Man
Faces Charge on Which
Mother Got Life Term
CLEVELAND, Oct. 2.*-Marion Mc?
Ardle, daughter 01 Mrs. Eva Catherine
Kaber. goes on trial to-morrow for the
first decree murder of Daniel Kaber,
her step-father, who was stabbed to
death in his Lakewood home more than
two years ago. Mrs. Kjiber ;s serving
a lif?3? sentence for her part in the
crime, and a third member of the fam?
ily, ??!rs. Mary Bricke.l, iifty-nine-year
old grandmother of Miss McArdle, .is
awaiting trial for alleged complicity.
Mrs. Emma Colavito, who is alleged
to have hired Salvatore C*ala and \ it
tori? P?aselli to stab the victim, also it;
awaiting trial. Cala, who confessed
having held Kaber while Pisseili
stabbed the victim, also received a
life sentence. Pisseili has not been
captured.
?
15,000 Drug Users Here,
Says Report of Simons
There are 15,000 drug addicts in this
city and the retail traftic in prohibited
drugs aggregates $76,000 a ?lav, accord
i ing to estimates made by Dr. Carelton
Simon, head of the narcotic division of
the Police Department, in a report
made public yesterday.
Dr. Simon makes this estimate in
spite of his ftatement that 2,488 ar?
rests, which his men made in the first
nine months of this year, cut down the
illicit drug business by more than
Sl?.OOO a day. Nine of those arrested
were children who were acting as
venders' apprentices.
Since the enactment of the drug
amendment to the sanitary code, about
two months ago. Dr. Simon says, 032
persons have been arrested for illegal
possession or sale of drugs. A record
of 98 per cent convictions has been
made, he says, m the 059 of these
cases, which have been brought to
trial.
"The drug-user who has sufficient
means to purchase his drug?," says Dr.
Simon, "without resorting to crime
and who can maintain a private resi?
dence, cannot be reached by us unless
we catch him in the actual ace of
smuggling or purchasing drug?. These
addicts do not carry drugs, and if we
could enter their homes it probably
would be difficult to lind narcotics, as
secret panels and other means are
adopted to hide the contraband stuff."
Illness Keep? I>r. Nichols From
Institute of Technology Post
CAMBRIDGE, Mass., Oct. 2. ?Dr.
Ernest Fox Nichols, inaugurated last
spring as president of the Massachu?
setts Institute of Technology, will be
prevented by illness from assuming
his duties at the opening of the aca?
demic year to-morrow. Until his re?
turn, which is expected by ?Tanuary 1,
the institute will continue to be gov?
erned by an administrative committee.
Dr. Nichols's ill-health was brought on
iby overwork previous to hit? election
to the presidency.
This year's enrollment figure?"? show
a slight decrease over those of 1920,
when the registration was approxi?
mately 3,500.
Prohibition Is Gaining
Respect, Says I la\ nes
National Director Asserts Press
Film Theaters and Hotels'
Are Curhing I .aw Defiance
From The Tribune'* IV, r(an
WASHINGTON, Oct. j. _ u. ^
Haynes, Federal Prohibition Cemmi?.
si? nor, gavo out a statement to-day
saying he is gratified over tin support
enforcement of the national prohfoi
tion act is receiving an over *; c x>0uiv
"'Many large newsp w?,4
not in favor of th? Eighteenth A
ment, newspapers that have be?
garde! ?i- 'v. ??'.'' < mmissioner
Haynes asserted, "are . ?uu_
editorials urging support ? the la^
advocating strict e: an,j
frowning upon Close w ,K0 ^y
collusion illegal purchi hot.
"Smaller dailies aim i-'.j'm
missioner Haynes declared, "are prsf.
tically unanimous in favor of strict en?
forcement, and cviitoi . w)m?
appeals to readers to give the Commit.
sioner full support. A numb? r of news?
papers refuse tc pub! tratloni
and rart'M?;-..? depiclting
"Reports from over} 1'cat*
that hotel management! iish
ing ironclM rule? ... 0f
liquor in rooms, and
participating in the ti being
discharged.
"Most encouraging is the attil id? 0f
moving picture theai ban?
ning drinking scene . as a result of ^
protests by patrons, and information
comes that producers i I ? -rady
to co-operate in in? . rough
pictures, proper respect Cor law and
the Constitution.
"Addresses of Attorney General H.
M Daughorty and Solicito) ?ieneral
James M. Beck at the
of tho American Bar
which law enforc? n >catod
had a most salutary efl
.IJlKfiK'.l'S IOKKMOST THEATRES AM) HITS, DIRECTION" OF I.EE AND .). J, Mil ?l'??
39TK ST. &S'^?& ^: IBROADHURST ^ TO-NIGHT &
$1>00 Uo??*r sIioa- fo
1 $?,0O
WINTERN 4 T H ST
GARDENTHEATRE
Marie
Dressier &
John T. Murray
ii AKTHl'U (;t"AHl
Emily Ann
Weihnaa
With ICchard ?..ordo:
Bert Clark &
Flavia Arcaro
Du-Calion
Llora Hoffman
George Rosener
Whipple &
Huston Co.
Dolly Connolly
Ernestine
Myers Co.
A. Robins
Clark & Verdi
Storsrnau & v anc
"The Kiss
Burglar"
OPENING TO-NIGHT AT 8.30
AI)i*H.rH KLATJBKR Presents
LIKE A KING
A COMEDY OF TO-DAY
By JOHN HUNTttK BOOTH.
WILLIAM
O DC E
in BEWARE
OF DOGS
A SaUrlca* T*\p in W
FIRST MAllM'K, III l.K-M > \Y.
PERFORMANCE WED. N?GHT t??M
Tli? Dramatic Event of The Tear!
MAIN STREET
Founded on Sinclair Lewi.-,'-, nun mi? N'oVil
"."Vitli ALMA TEW? and JlcKAV MORRIS ?
EVENIKOfi ? 30.
MATINEES
WED. anil 8AT., 2:30 ?
JOHN COLDEN ?ill
.-i . 40th, W. of n
Greatest Musicai Hit of AM Time!
AMBASSADOR
Taca . 40th, W. of B'y.
Greatest Musicai
BLOSSOM TIME
" 'Hlossom Time' lias the diattnctlon of
j)r?fK(>nt;i?if tlu> rli'bfst jnusical Hcoru
EVER KRESJESNIKD."
1?R. C Welsh. Telegram.
to be in your seats
Longacre 1 heatrc pr implly
at 8.15 to-night for the fir?
performance of the new com
edy by Messrs. Smith and
Cuthing entitled
You," staged by
WINCHELL SMITH.
CASINO ei'** &?? W**!**- ^?-"''sat iV3
f? c- : : st at s ? a i
| LITTLE
?THEATRE
1 "-Vent 4 i St.
Jt 1st Year
C E H T ? It Y UK I V^.V.Sft.'t ?f*
1:1S-TW1CE DAILY-8:15 P. MJ | Hfllffl*?.Ugl^^^gf^ i Wfcf ~*-C*MJNTEft
? t??' fi?l?%& 5? S^ ?? ?Lai *9<k fiyR ????rii.u* m\ti\i:i: inn, . t??
%WAIT TfLLWE?E MAPPIEIV
AT THE PLAYHOUSE
(5 THE BIGGEST
WH HIT IN
TOWN
aie sin/M?t ?PCX*
UHMH? CJIiOSSMITU-VIOLET K?1SLE CWTO??***""
B08??AJS?.^a.i,??.r5::?
au ?orce thesreeN
in
eOODESS
Goigia can make tlue dumb
?j 'Sito talk with those devil!
^things of his. "Theodora" at
the Astor 1 heatre next week
lA Goldwyn Picture.
F rom turbulent childhood
he emerged into fascinating
womanhood. "Theodora" at
he Astor Theatre next week
INAClAIPE
l/M THS- OAy
mgmmt
R8T21 TOT?SB
THE
.JOHN DREW
?MRS. ?;fiSI,lE iCARTEB
f? ' ? i-"" * ?v i.si'^.i.j.t: hinVi?o!)
IlinULC ERNEST I.AW'KORD
WITH THIS JOHN fi.M.llD.VV
citl.AT? AST ROBERT RENDEI,
PRINCESS BSStfr*ALB???-&S3J
-Sfflg-ca "?",B SPRING"
i In the House of the Silver
iCobwebs the Empress met
l,.her lover. "Theod
.the Astor Theatre next we
A GoldwTn Picture.
V
? n<\cr, jk?a wen cu? ;; i I act* o ""-~""~- i ' ?*"' Wi'n I'KI ? If ' ? it?' ' - ?l-minA,
anMM?rMt?tA|T..Mopft<CO?iW ,,.,. ,?.?T,
?AND VKAH_ - 4eTH ST' T
ARE
E?00
"A
mm
"V/ITHOUT A DULL MOMENT."?Sum SflkUven
FVITOEI ??'?
SCmLOKRAUT
gGfllUElNfie
Jf you don't see "Theodora" "?
?next week at the Astor Thea-?a
itre, you might as well stoppa
lgoing to see motion pictures. ?
HEA. ?.
VlOLtrT OTTO
HEMlNG^KftUGEtti*
UOROSUp THEATRK
THEATRE Evrsa-y? nA-Vtpi^.T^?
*? ^
HIT Ul
S? fl?????'."*' "V
8wi &^nl
I
i S? nii'
?Helen
M ??eke 51a?- in
*>. I?J?3.?V PU?S" BY p-AWMta HURST
BEP?BLIG r?ffn4.M-*??i ^:.:.^7T;:;
? 'i m u I t jW ?i -^ i-i S $1 ff? ? i<! 5 S A
TIIKATliK. iZ I Si.. XV. of B'way
TW1? '. DAD Y. !":30
'l'HKA , |l.i.y .- - I"
i ni S n ? l 1'. SI
POP? 1..AR l'HICE?.
hi Her M?
?I.ITTDK I.ORD i Al X'I'LEROY"
A IMVr?S.il. riCTl KE.
1 he history ol the wo
.been written in lo\"
1 heodora sacrificed a
^because of love. A ' 1
jtre next w eck.
**?LYWCiS^
DOUGLAS
??FAIRBANKS
B'vaA
^TOV/S-i HALL ! ; st,
TO-DAY. AT 2?3J -V
AMERICAN LEGION
W? DALY.
THE MAN WITHOUT
A CO?MT?Y "
KVES. 8:20. DAILY M Yi'S. *!:r?0
;?<?!?( I.Ait PUD US, 50c .1- SI.
DPfej^UD?\f I LIE .Cfl^flS^I
riiP?fflnSSi Mrs. G no Rushat 4*C?|? mtorrti
fcli'Tl?vH Ki.-.'i ft I'?.. H.iiy & Cr-t
VjlUi-XAk " ' :.:i-t. :. Iteue Rrtbert^
pS"?*l Coocan ?v Casej', Edna l>rer?: ?nd
|pf?"?dlhSr ! hers
"THE BLOT"
ALL STAR CAST
und S"UPR(-.ME VAUDEVILLE
i miUn ? i. -?. It. ?-In : A Mh
K ? ; '. . .-. !.
HS? IP?g
I'J'l'jHWil
L?iilKJfJ" ? DANTELK i
P??9 Jd?/E '' ' ' "??? " '? ' ? &
Whm.hi.i ni.1 i nul?; Mahl.
P Vi? ' ''-"vi ? .lo?!' Ro & ?
f?M'iwil '"' A"? ''' ,;?-?? ?'?? BwaarU, "*]*|i
'^FffTili ' '''i-' > ? ' failildi? ?? Kan?. ?
rc?vi : ? ?'r ?
'r.nnan?' ' Ti?: BLOT."
ay, at 49th ?- Ire? ?.
? lontlnuoua
N'qi i ??? ; : i)
MANH/MTAM
TO-NIGHT, "GAVALLE?1IA I
h ? i '.
Pap? u ... "PACLIACCI,
r. ??inl, V'\ |.
TO-ITW. "TOSCA,'
"HANDEL ? GRETEL." '
Pre?e
le? . , WED. EVI
C?iNDA. -,
?
rHURSDA
VIATA." ' ?
.
"LOH[ \f,RIH. t
II
??
in "0^? ARABIAN NS8HT"
MKAND SyjIPHON'Y ORCHESTRA
Carnegie Hall, To-Day, at 2- '? 30.
rhino Koc?lal?ERWIN
11 InLo 1 h/
i rl i KpuI .
:,; get i ni 11 E Jolt
8
lu it
SAT. MAT., -TALCS OF ?
'?? '"-'*,'? I
It ?T EVE.
??AIOA .'* hj;
I
' i*!IICE6 Mo?$3.M. r
KrEoof?fiUHST0s^ ASH!? S?MPU3W
\ I 'aramounl Piel un
RIVOlJ l'?l\( I.HT ORCHESTRA.
SPAL?0 "AFTER THE SHOW"
n niv.s
ls<)i Art;:
A ! ';i : . -.: .1 .' Plct ur.i
KainouM lUaltii Orch.
?be Pla??
Pre . ? - t?tu
iS?2iV?-:
MKIIi'l ( ?1 \ t I -.
VINCENT U'IMIY.
?
1 * Tlnir?. Afl?. i'?-! ! ' ' ?' '" . ' ^^
t? *ut. A??-. f.?- ^ i.iim? i'? ?
A ! ?
10 SUItdu* \lt. IW 1 ' ? ?'? ' *
1 Mi?. Marniiie?
1
?irore?> KacttM, Ma 1- 1
CARNEC?E KAlITFri. Eve.. <
\ da*wt? of unp 1
v' ? "??:-\-: '"? KEFi HVAUDEVILLE
TDK ?standard HIPPODROME, NEXT SUNc EVE. Resolvedj
M?tAT?5T
success
Should \}.s a Republic.
\fllrmiiln.-: ,ii?U.? John ?'? ? ??-?" ''"' "**'
?<*.j;?<ti\ ?
''?^:''?f'T???Iiil# SEAT SALE BEGINS TO-DAY
1 Um 11 fa?
is*1 - v liane ' Aeolian Hall, T"*?ura. 1 ?..?
V *vrir!)/"rf /"HT 111 t'Vf\ m \ r r, >~ 1 > \ > |P ? '?' tl "" ?3. '-???'. ; ;. 1 '?:. lOii Taj
TanIeSs f ?MJ?,Bi* *';'vH? - -S- ALICE FRISCA
I. CURVE AHEAD"' **"?*' I I I f 0 f I A I and SPENCER fMBL Danlol Mayei
v 1 !?*?">?

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