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New-York tribune. [volume] (New York [N.Y.]) 1866-1924, October 10, 1921, Image 14

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Parjc^?nion
FOREIGN BANK! IQ r0R?0PATF0H
So Wall Street, New York
Reviving Opportunities
in Japan's Trade
Improved financial conditions in japan and a
marked reduction of stocks in practically all lines
of goods foreshadow a resumption of buying by
that country. This tneans fresh opportunities in
Japan for American manufacturers.
Maintaining our own branches at Tokio and
Yokohama, we are exceptionally qualified to assist
manufacturers in establishing contact with Japa?
nese markets and to place at their service the spe?
cial channels of information on trade conditions
to which we have access. We will also be glad to
co-operate by financing shipments, making collec?
tions and performing other banking functions.
Capital (fully paid).$4,000,000
Surplus and Undivided Profits. $625,000
OFFICERS
Charles A. Holder. . .President
T. Fred Aspden, Vice-President
E. B. MacKenzie.Secretary
Irving V. Scott.Treasurer
Impartial
Opinions on
260 Stocks
Just off the press?Octo?
ber issue of "Securities
Rating Bulletin," giving
in terse form the dividend
outlook, current trade condi?
tions, Aug. and Sept. prices,
1919-20 highs, present divi?
dends, business prospects and
market ratings of about 260
active listed securities. Con?
veniently arranged in 15
groups, such as: Rails, Motors,
Steels, Oils, Coal, Mining,
Tobacco, Shipping, etc., with
general discussion of factors
affecting each group. Holders
of shares as well as intending
investors and traders should
consult this valuable bulletin,
prepared by -well-known im?
partial authority.
A?k for' X". AJ-22.
RASMUSSEX&CO.
Members ' '? ago Board of Trade
STOCKS - BOND3 - GRAIN
111 Broadway New York
Tel. !:? ' - 40fi 1
The Position
of
Fifty Securities
We have prepared a
ten-line analysis on each
of fifty leading Stock
Exchange issues.
Their technical position
and financial condition
embodied in each
opinion.
? ' Tuithout nl-liqalion
4 ' ' ?; I .": V . -
MS-Wolfe si Co.
4\ BROAD ST..-NE.W YORK
Miscellaneous Murkrts
Pnhlir i tilit-, Seeurltica
Bid Val? B ! Aik
Aii r .'. ? ??
- 12"
A ??-..,
''???? . ? ? !',( 7 t
A .-. ;.
? ' .
; ;
Am V t;i ? ??? m
f.|.
??? V i I'w 4;i IC
,78 ? i
I. 6 ?
' ' 17 21
?
? , Mo pf. . 97 100
;.?.:. ? i ?
i ; : .
? ' 2
1
, .,,
: ' ! . : ?
?'. . ??-.?.- 23
P? 70 1
Bondl
M 1 - . ?
. '?
( hereh al ? tocka
' " ' ? 4
-
Am Cj ( 4 g
'?
(/ ? i, /. .
Insurant > f< mpanlea
. 4
?,.???-;? ,i
i, ? ?
Tobacco St'i'-K?
pi
l
- ? ' ?
M' K t? t
fH ?-I-? ,-. -\i\ ? iri'i ?(.: Off - !(.? '.? <t
'
V i ?
ka*'
*Z.i is. . Und
New York Bank Stocks
Bid. A?l;ed. UM. A?lted
Ai lerlca _167 174 Gotham . .
Atlantic ....210 220|Greenwlch ..235
A::i Exch....230 240 Hanover . ...776
Battery .145 loSlHarriman ..?45
Bow ?.-.? .... 425 450 Imp ? TrdH.490
Bway CntI...U5 in Industrial .. 155
Bryant Pit..105 175?lrvlng Nat..177
Bi mx Nat...150 ISOMnhUn <'?>.. .hi
Butch ?? Dr..130 140Mch&Met ..310
Cenl M".. I. . T.- 200 Metropltn .. . 350
'I ase . . . .2S0 290 Mutual .510
245 Nil Am .I4G
90 Now Nrthn. . ISO
:.: - \ Y County .!:;;.
490|N V X B A. .400
225 i' cine.7<>o
160 Park.405
785
3 60
5.; n
155
150
4?')
Chat t I'll- -ft
ChP.'sea Ex.. 80
City.308
<'!;? ftftl al .4?.'i
Coal .<;? Iron..215
Columbia ... 100
Coloi ..: . . . . 350
Common e . . 230
Conipln .... 100
Commnwlth. 215
? :ontintl ... : i
Corn Kxrli... 320
East River.. 170
First Nail. . .S50 ST"
5th Ave . . . .900
?th Nati .... 150
Garfleld . . ? .215
United States Treasure Notes and
Certificates of Indebtedness
Month. Year. P. Ct. Bui. Aakotl.TH.lrt
? Publi,
. ". Seaboard .
i 20 s. cond . . .
-Standard
; Ward
-- Ctd States
Cnion l.\
? Wshg lits
160^Yorkville .
. : 8
'. 4 6 0
.200
.235
..200
' 58
. "?:
241
24 5
225
1 '11
175
100 i 100"
100ft, 100-U 4.51 .
[OOrfV, loo,7, 4.48 ft
1 '"-'/? 100 A, 4.51 ,
tiiiift 100?3 4.60
! 00% 100 >? 4.75
100H lOOi.j 4.S 4
100 H nlflin 4.83
101 .s,t 10OV? 5.18
100% 10?% 5. IS ,
acceptable in payment ot Federal taxes ?
orr t ho dates of maturity.
Federal and Joint Stock Land Bank
Bonds
Fed. ral Farm Loan
?December. 1921
Kobruary . . 1 922
'March. ... 1 922
'.M;trrh .... 1922
?March. . . . 1922
M une. 1922
August. 1922
?September 1922
?June. If'2 1
*S : t?mb'er ; 92 I
9 '.'? ' i
00
1941 op : ?? : . . . . .
; ? , ! Y rm Loan 5s
? ' - ft;. 1923 . 99
I ? .! Farm Loa :: 4 Vis.
9, op 1924. 9." '-j
Federal Farm Loan 4'2".
; - op 1923.9 i-,
1 oral 1 -'a rm Loan ?> '2 s,
1 937, op 1922. ?;??.;
Jol it SI oek 1 ?? nd ! '.a nk . s
",' 1 . . . 2'j
Joint Stoolt !... nd Bank 5s,
1 9; 8, op 1923. 92 1,
Standard Oil Co.npanlfs
9'.'\
9-|.,?
94 U
91 '?;
93%
A.:
'
I'
Atl Kfg . 530
do pr...106
Born. Scr. 325
1 ; ? PL. -0
Cl ? Mfg. ' 45
do )'(. . . 96
Contl Oil : i -'
P 1... 27
t'U! . P 1.. 122
! .?:..:
Ci S O n pf ' 1
; 1
con 12
.7"
108
350
1:1
127
Bid
P O i Cl .520
l'ral P L..200
Solai Rfg.35C
Sou P I, . 75
So Pnn 1 '. 18S
??.?. Pa P L. .
?ft 'i Cal.. 77
5.00
0.02
5.00
5 01
6.03
5.54
A: k
520
2 0::
3 70
80
: .2
Ind.. 71
Neb.
N .1
Pf
N V .
7 .
575Vil
ion
1 i 1
108
:; 10 I
III P Une 160 165 SO? ?hio 365 395
Inrt P Ln -' 84 do pf. . . 108 110
CoLrl 13 1 ?". \* Swan ?? F. - " 35
?ft '1 t: . 27 28 Union Tk . S 5 90
N \ Ti tin 143 152 ' do pf. . . 90 98
? : ? !, ? , - ? Vi'i uu Oil.270 2S0
low ' "'. 27i \v, shg ' HI.. 30 35
!-.. , M !'. 184 2'-. ; '!':i- $25.
Miscellaneous Oil Companies
It : Ask?-1 I'.i'.i. .*?. :
V. LobOP 9 '?'??? Midw Rfg 140 150
do pf .. 40 1 sun r ?-,.. 'r nvi
Br A:'... ? ?? \'i Ihn 1 1 2" .25
Coa & i- > ? "rft .? !?, , 1 4 14
eu in ? p , ??? -. ?a ck i'r<> 11 % yy.
;? ? ' 1..1 -, Sapul llfg. -, 3 -,
Mapi Pi ?;:,*" .11 WS? ''f. 1. 2 4"
Mr rr O (.1 - -. 'Par S10
New York City Bonds
? R '' Malm Itv Bid. Ai
: ??. . . 92 9
I ? - ? ? .92 :?
4 ' - . II -
< .. 1957... 92 9
1 ?, 1. :??????
4",h. I 9ii 1.
f',:.. 1962
' . 1900
87 \
Tiel'l
4 ru
4.91
4 . 2
4 94
? , ? ' 1 ,. ,.: 19^0 -7
do 4?. 1959 . ?2"-?
do 4a, I9ftf .82 V?
87??
8-: 1,
R-g .1 13 I'M In.
? ?. 1. 0 i'..'
Reg .... ; ft . rial.I , ':
74'4
-, I 1 -,
?' ? 'A
'
. '? 'v
76?4
5 20 :, or,
. , ? 5.10
5,75 5 10
4 94
I 94
: 95
I 96
I '-6
4 9fi
4 9 7
4.9!?
-, ?7
.'. 03
1 '.:,
4 95
4 96
?? . ' 2 I in 5.755.10
Short Term Securities
' ??-) ? ? Ral . 1 Mi.- BUI \sked. Yl< IH
A m r '. ??>?? ? 78, 192S. 99', 99'^ 7.15
Cotton Oil 6s 1924 ? ? 9?', 9.60
Tel ..? I' ? ' -. 1922 99 ??, 99 % b I 2
I .',.??,.,,?.,
A ? ? : I 1 ?? - 9 7 ' ? 98 6.35
100 H 101 i? 2 95
923 101 i? 101 \ >?? 1 '.
1 ? ' 'ft !? ? ? 1920 90 \ 9 1'. 7.7."
?>
I Tel ' '
?
l.li
. ?,
-
. . 98
96 -,
ft' ' ,
98 14
100 1.
t ??? '?- \
. . ?- , '? ? ? , ' . . , n
ft : ? . : ? ? ?? i? ???'..
.-?- -. V 8m, 1921 . . 100 ion 1,
,. ? \ ? ? - ? - ? : "" '., 101
. :'ft 101 '4
1'/? yy,
8 00
7 :.",
?". 25
I 40
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? :
'
i ???: ?? ., 1: 1: 'ft.
? ? I ?. ' 7
? ?ft
Ivun fit) : ? . ?
'. I, . ? ' i "IV
.- ' ? ? Tob 6:
St Cam I
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. - ? .
P
: 'ft I
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.! 100 100
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;-')??. i"!
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1
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1 ?ngl r I irm Sefli nt I?"?
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12 ''0
' M
' I
I % I
Investment
Information
Questions of general interest to in?
vestors will be answered in thin col?
umn, in which case only initials will !
h.- used. Others will be answered l>y
mai!. Address nil inquiries, inclos?
ing a stamped, addressed envelope, tn
Financial Editor. The Tribune, /.5J
Nassau Street, New York t'i>\i.
t .. _._,_1;
Business Man $20,000 Investment
Que; i im- Will you kindly give me your'
opinion i-n the following lisl of securities
?ii an Investment for s business man to
the -?xtf-ni of about $20.000: $2,000 French i
government Ss, $2,000 Kingdom of Norway
Ss. $2,000 I'nlteil Kingdom 5 Vis, $t,oon ;
Canadian Northern guaranteed 7s. $2.000
I'nlted States Rubber first refunding mort- I
rage 5s, $2.000 Montana Power first and re?
funding mortgage (is, $2.000 New York (ins, ,
Electric Mght, Heal und rower llrst col- i
lateral trust 5s, $3,000 East Tonn.-mir".
Virginia * Georgia llrst consolidated mort?
gage 5s, $2,000 St. Louis & Ran Francisco '?
general mortgage r,s V Also will you give ;
your opinion on the National Cloak and ;
Suit Company 7 per cent preferred and ?
Aluminum Manufacturers 7 per cent pre- :
ferred ? Are they considered safe Invest- !
menta al the present time? I E D.
Answer- Neither National Clonk and
Suit preferred or Aluminum Manufac?
turers preferred are, in our opinion, j
safe investments. Especially is that;
true at the present, time. The busi
ness of both is adversely affected by j
post-war conditions, and in neither
business is it certain that the corner
has been definitely turned. This, of ;
course, is our own opinion only. Of '
the bonds that you have, we think j
that most of them are pood invest
tnents, although the East .Tennessee. ;
Virginia & Georgia first fis are not!
readily marketable. The St. Louis & '?
San Francisco general mortgage 6s are !
a business man's investment, ?n our
opinion, and only fairly attractive.
We Don't Have a "Board"
Question?Do you believe that by buy?
ing outright twcnty-Mve shares each of
General Motors and Hupp Mi.tors they will
by patient waiting bring good returns?
Also Middle State? Oil and White OH? 1
know you will say they are very specula
tlve, but the IJrst tln-pe pay dividends, and
It seems to me tiny will not go much
lower, if at all, I am not trying to tell
.\iiu. 1 am asking: but are they not a
fairly decent sp?cul?t Ion ? 1 want to take
on a few ?hares of Pierce Arrow, for I do
believe when motora start that stuck will
travel .much more rapidly than the rest,
and :t most certainly is a long way off
from the high of 00 or more, which il
showed Bbuut a year ago. Hut I believe
you are in a definite position to know the
real reason why they are as they show
to-dav. Do you believe there Is n great
ghost of a show for Alaska Gold'.' ? I".
W. W.
Answer - You guessed it when you ;
intimated that you had speculative j
leanings. VVe urge you to be cautious ,
or those leanings will be, precipitated
into a speculative crash. We absolutely :
refuse to be drawn into a discussion of ,
those stocks. Our department is not a
board-room, and although we sneak
away a bit early in the afternoon every
now and then to try out a new putting
stance we are not a customer's man.
And if we have tips we don't speak of ,
them above a murmur.
The Uncertainties of Pullman
Question?1 have some Pullman slock T
bun:,')'.; for an Investment, and from the j
action of the stock and the annual report .
which I have lust received am wondering .
if ?r is policy to hold it. As they do not j
publish quarterly or monthly reports it Is
Impossible for mo to know- if lh. ir earnings j
are improving or not. I have about $'.(>:>
to Invest, and a?k your opinion of the fol
lowing storks: General Electric, United
Fruit, Texas Company, United Fruit Stores,
ami Columbia 'las ami Electric, The Pull- !
man cost lOi;'.!,.? J. C. N.
Answer Pullman company has paid;
the regular dividend of 8 per cent an- ?
nually since. 1900, nnd it is our opin- <
ion that the company will be able to
maintain that rate. But that is.simply
opinion, based chiefly on the company's
sound management and on the possi?
bility of a revival of business within
the next six months. Wo admit that
there is much to be said against our
belief. For the year ended July ,'?l the
company reported a deficit after divi?
dends of $,'(,17S,000, against a surplus
the year before of ?3,313,000. The
company earned only S5.10 a share for
the year, against $10.76 the year be?
fore. Continuance of the 8 per cent
dividend will depend on future busi?
ness. Your guess about that may be
as good as ours. At any rate, we'll let
you try it. We think that all of the
stocks you mention are attractive, but
like General Electric best. But here
again it is simply a matter of opinion.
Coupon and Registe red Bonds
QuesMon Subject; Investments paying
?rleresl by check, rn.> coupon. My ex?
perience is thai collecting for coupons Is
tin-Infernal nuisance, and so l like regular
1 nit il States bonds receiving semi-annual
, lo i '?- punctually, but the rate, of course,
la low. Are there any Rood bonds paying
(1 vi*: cent or <o that ran In registered and
interest forwarded, or in'j?t one buy stock
In order to receive Interest without going
to bank, ami complying with sundrj red
tape formalith s? F. M T.
Answer There are many good bonds
that yield 6 ]ivr cent and which can be
registered, the interest being sent to
you by check semi-annually. We
suggest Chicago $? Northwestern col?
lateral sinking fund 6s, due 1020, re?
cently selling ai 96V6 for the coupon
bonds i you could have these trans?
ferred to registered bonds, which are
quoted at 99); Pennsylvania Railroad
7 per cent bonds, due 1930, recently
sold at. 104% for a coupon bond, and
ion1., for a registered bond; North?
western Bell Telephone 7s, due 1941,
recently sold at 104Vl fnr a coupon
bond, and in July at 101'i for a regis?
tered bond. There is a certain amount
of ni! lape involved in having your
bond registered, but after that, your
trouble ceases and you will get your
in! eres!, by check without any red
tape.
Appalachian Power 7a
Answer Appalachian Power IB-year
secured 7 per cent bonds, due 1936, are
in our opinion a "ood investment. They
are secured by the deposit, of $6,000,000
general 7s, which arc in turn secured
by a general mortgage on the property.
The company furnishes power to coal
niiiiing companies.
M. R. T. Reorganization
Question Am n widow aii-t although nol
dcp< ndi nt mi i his Intel est. I " ould n s!<
.. ,,,,. ,,|i |ee ?s to v. hel hi ' lo sell or hold
$5.000 Hrooklyn Itapid Transit Du of I ? I '
? ..., .o |e|| me of i he pri sen! slat un of
thl i - ?:??? and -i ha? ho,pc foi same max h
,.>.,..., ted " I was advised net In deposit
Answer ', here is comparatively littl ?
that we could tell you about Brooklyn
Rapid Transit ?iftecn-year ."> per cent
bondn, due [945. The receiver has is?
sued $18,000,000 of receiver's c<r?ili
cates which rank ahead of (he ? pe?
ci nl bond i, and rece?? ly i hese receiv
er'-; certificates have been extended t >
)?? hi uary I, 1922 You have read the
report of the Miller Transit Comm
imi on the New York street railway
situation. In time there will be h re
organization of the Brooklyn Rapid
Transil Compuny, nnd new securities
of one kind or another will be issued
in place of the old ones. The whole
n ices? of reorganization will probably
bo a ? low one, and wo would be in
, , .,. .| to ? di ti i b nds.
limr full columns of in
vvstnti nt questions and an
r.ui'i: art' published in The
Tribune every Sunday
i_,_
The Week in Business
Retail Trade in Apparel and Seasonable Goods
Stimulated bv Colder Weather; Cot
toi?s Continue Activity
NATURE, through providing cooler weather hist week, gave the gen?
eral business situation a decidedly better complexion. The lower
temperature had the effect of driving consumers into the retail
stores for fall apparel and other seasonable merchandise. For some time
past primary markets and the wholesale fields have been relatively more i
active than the retail trade. With the latter showing a healthier move?
ment of goods into the hands of people who consume them, the entire situa?
tion appears more relieved. ? ?-"-"-'?
However, according to most reports,)
consumers are still demanding low
prices, coupled with quality, und re?
tailers who have made an effort t >
meet this demand appear to he pros?
pering more than those tiiat have not
gone part way to meet their customers'
wishes. In the retail field here and in
other parts of the country special sales,
many of them advertised as "no profit"
sales, have materially assisted in bring?
ing out latent buying power among th ?
consumers. Where such special sales
have been held the response has been
liberal, especially in the wearing ap?
parel and piece goods departments.
Reports from many sources that the
unemployment situation is improving
also was a factor in heartening busi?
ness men who are looking into the fu?
ture.
In the textile linos cottons held their
recent price advances, and goods that
have lagged behind in the general ad?
vance were brought up more into line
with the existing level. Woolens and
silks are relatively duller than cot?
tons, but si^ns of improvement are not
lacking, and the more seasonable
weather has given manufacturers and
merchants in these lines more encour?
agement for the future.
The export trade situation continues
beset by the problems of exchanges and
credits, as pointed out last week at the
convention of the American Manufac?
turers' Export Association here. A
straw that indicates h?w some are view?
ing the situation was the adoption of a
resolution at the convent ?on condemn?
ing high tariffs and the American val?
uation plan. The uncertainty of fu?
ture internal taxation and tariff pro?
grams is still deterring business, ac?
cording to many trade leaders.
Statistical reports from chain store:
and mail order organizations showed
good increases in sales duing Septem?
ber and collections in general are in
proving now. These, together witl
other factors, seem to indicate that th(
situation is definitely better. Thes?
evidences of improvement, however, i
is pointd out, do not portend any boon
in business. Secretary of Commerci
Hoover last week stated that the recov
ery will be slow, and that much prici
readjustment still hangs over the busl
ness world.
Silk.?
Further advances were made las
week in raw silk prices, the influenc.
mainly of a better demand in th.
primary raw silk markets in Japan an.
the rise of silver affecting Chines
silks. Locally demand for raw silk
has been only slightly better and mill
are hesitating to pay the advance.
prices except for tilling in purposes o
to finish out orders for goods. Th
silk hosiery and underwear trades ar
still on a high level of activity and ar
providing most of the demand fo
raw silk. The weaving trades con
tinue depressed, although a brighte
outlook is seen in some quarter.-.. Fir
ished silks can be bought from variou
sources, chiefly jobbers, at prices be
low the open market and this has a
unsettling effect upon the manufactui
ers. Some of the smaller mills, toi
are cutting prices because of financit
pressure.
Cottons
The week in the cotton goods trad
was marked by a further advance i
unfinished goods and the naming i
new and higher prices on denim
sheetings and similar goods, and
betterment in the buying of man
goods that am still available at o
prices, or prices only slightly abo-,
the scale prevailing in mid-summe
? The better movement of dry goods, I
iMc daily cottons, in all sections of
the country is shown in the October
hulletins of the various Federal Re
serve banks which report great in?
creases in wholesale sales for last
month. The movement is continuing at ^
present, although orders are still small.
Retailers are buying more frequently,
however, which keeps the volume above
previous figures. I
Raw cott.n prices are still eon-,
lidcred speculative by cotton goods;
manufacturers and traders. The better!
demand for goods, coupled with the |
iow stocks of cotton and yarns in most !
mills, has led the mills to buy more,
cotton to cover the orders for goods j
now coming in. in the primary markets
goods are being offered out for de- !
livery into January, but further than \
this neither buyers nor sellers appear
willing to negotiate.
Woolen?
Two more important offerings of I
.women's wear fabrics for spring of I
1922 at prices lower than those made
on similar fabrics for fall featured the
woolen and worsted goods market, |
which otherwise showed little change
from the week before. Colder weather
is expected to create a demand for
more fall woolens within the near fu?
ture, but as yet any reflection of the
weather is missing in primary circles.
The selling of goods for fall and next
spring is proceeding in a leisurely
| fashion, and some cancellations have
come into the market, particularly on
! the higher grade fabrics. In the men's
wear lines the distribution of goods
costing more than ?'_'.50 a yard seems
difficult.
Fur.*
Colder weather stimulated the de?
mand for furs at retail last week, but
had little effect upon the wholesale
I market. The women appear to be
I lighting shy of buying the larger fur
garments and are confining most of
their purchases to the smaller pieces,
?such as choker scarfs of marten, mink,
; squirrel, etc. Manufacturers maintain
I that it is difficult to pass along some
: of the increases in price shown in
the recent fur auctions and therefore
are hesitating to make up stock in
| advance of retail dealers' demand. The
movement of raw furs'was light last
] week, but prices were firmly held.
Apparel
? Augmented activity in the local
, wl olesale apparel markets was re
? ported from most sources last week.
j The colder weather, together with the
; small stocks that retailers carry, made
1 the reflection of consumer buying al
! most immediate in the wholesale mar
! ket. During the week many large re
? tail concerns were in the market for
; largo quantities of women's dresses
; coats, suits, skirts and waists for spe
| cial sales to be held in the near future.
Although stocks here ready for im
I mediate delivery are not large, the re
j tailors found little difficulty ?n finding
what they wanted at low prices.
( The men'', fall clothing retail busi
I nes ; is developing slowly, and many re
! tailors are staging special sales to
stimulate consumer buying.
Leather
Some slight improvement was shown
last week in the general leather trade.
Although individual sales of magnitude
were entirely lacking, there was a
stronger demand manifested all along
trie line. Sole leather dealers reported
a broader demand for their goods,
while dealers of black calfskin upper
leather and glazed kid also noted a
better demand.
Shoe retailers experienced a slightly,
larger call for their merchandise. Man?
ufacturers, however, reported few re?
tailers who are speculating on their !
probable needs in the distant future.
Jewelry
Last week was another of those in
between-season periods, with little im?
provement noted. Littie disposition on
the part of retailers to deviate from
strict conservativeness in ordering was
apparent. Some of the articles moving
with some regularity in the retail
stores arc diamond studded bracelet;
watches, brooches, novelties, men's I
high grade American watches and pearl
necklaces.
With the fast disappearance of Rus?
sian diamonds from the European
markets, diamond dealers have taken I
on new confidence that business will \
soon begin to show some improvement, j
. -^
Holidays 'I lib Week
Monday, October 10?China (anni?
versary of the revolution), Cuba,
( revolution of Varal, Hong Kong
(bank holiday), Sierre Leone (Prince i
Alfred's Day) and South Australia'
i Eight-Hours' Day).
Tuesday, October 11?Brazil (State!
of Sergip?).
Wednesday, October 12?Argentina, j
Brazil, Colombia, Costa Rica, Domi?
nican Republic, Ecuador, Guatemala, :
Honduras, Mexico, Nicaragua, Para- \
guay, Peru (discovery of America),!
Panama, Salvador (Columbus Day),
Egypt, Morocco, Palestine, Turkey j
(Day of Atonement). Fernando Pol
(national feast) Spain (holiday rr the ?
race) and Uruguay (America Day).;
In the United States (Columbus Day); '
Alabama, Arizona, California, Colo-|
lado, Connecticut, Delaware, Idaho.'
Illinois, Indiana, Kansas, . Kentucky,
Louisiana, Maryland, Massachusetts
Michigan, Missouri, Montana, Ne?
braska, Nevada, New Hampshire, New
Jersey, New Mexico, New York, Ohio,
Oregon, Pennsylvania, Rhode Islan i,
Texas, Utah, Vermont, Washington
and West. Virginia; also in the Terri?
tory of Porto Rico and in North Da?
kota (Discovery Day).
Thursday, October 13?Alabama
i Fraternal Day ).
Friday, October 14?Mauritius (last i
day of Mohorrum), Siberia and Ukrai- j
nia i Intercession of the Holy Virgin).
Buyers Arrived
I .lirrliUri SerTic?
ATLANTA
.1. M. High i'.).; .1. D. Bellah ladles'
reaily t,-. wear anrl furs; 11C W. 32d at.
United Manufacturing Co.; A. Goldberp,
merchandise manager, woolen piece goods.
cotton piece gouds, flannel?, domestics; 3
W. 29th ?t.
ASHTAHI I.A. OHIO
Wolin's: Nathan Wolln. coatH ?n.I dress?
es: raro of Goodateln, 1270 B'w?y.
?AI.TIMOKK
American Clo.il: A- Suit Co.: S. Greon
hood, cloaks and nuits: Herald Square.
!.. Greif & ilru. ; D. L. Greif, mfr?. cloth?
ing; 200 5th fir. I
r. D. Heller ?- Co.; C, D. Keller, milli?
nery; Pennsylvania.
M. l.urle & Co.; Phil Daniel.?, job? suits
Hoffman AS- Hartblay, 117 W. 33d hi
Hlsenborg's; H. Sternfleld, dresses, coats
suits, sweaters; 27 \V. 26th st., care Ben F
Levls.
M, Swartz, furs, fur coats; Pennsylvania.
BANGOR, ME.
Besse System Co.; Georg? C. Dorr, la?
dies' and men's clothing and millinery.
Prince George.
BOSTON
Tuxedo Co.; A. Oltarsh. sport coats; Af?
filiated Retail Stores, 1372 B'way.
William Filene's Sons Co.; (bnsement
buyers) Mr. Tobey, shoes; Mr. Peardon,
gloves; Mr. Day, waists; Mrs. Kasanof,
women's neckwear; Mr. McGinty, men's
furnishings: (upstairs buyer) Miss Murphy,
misses' dresses.
R. If. White Co.; Miss S. Budwig, In?
fants' wear; Miss A. Roberge, aprons, chil?
dren's coats and dresses; ('. Koven, men's
clothing: J. A. Taylor, handkerchiefs;
neckwear, laces, trimmings and veilings
?C-?2 4th av.
Gllchrlst Co.: basement buyers: A Cohen,
conts. suits, dresses, skirts; Q. T. Wtnche, -
ter. silk and cotton waists, sweaters; Miss
I. Markus, girls' and juniors' coats and
dresses; Miss H. Kellner, muslin and flan?
nelette underwenr, Infants' wear; Miss K.
I,. Itlce. hosiery, underwear, gloves; 200
5th av.
Jordan, Marsh i" n. ; P. A. Bunllck, wom?
en's routs and skirts; Mrs I.. Altlmus,
ladies' coats and skirts (basement); Miss
C. I. Blume, (??ris' coats, dres-cs; Miss A.
V, Burns, ladies' dresses (basement); M.
Fitzgerald, representing; Miss M. A. Con?
nolly, misses' and children's corsets; M.
Hardy, representing; Miss G. 13. Hurti
buse ladies' suits (basement); It. G. How?
ard, millinery; Miss M. .). Kell.-y, trim?
mings (basement and upstairs); Miss A.
.Vagi , art embroideries (basement); Hugh
Owens, art embroideries, yarn?.; Miss A.
Chaloux, corsets (basement); Miss J. B
Rowcll, corsets; S. F Emery, cotton nnd
?ten.-h un.derwcar, petticoat?; G. W. Ross,
w. in< n's tailored and high-grade suits; r.
.1. Robinson, china, glass; .J. G. Ryan,
house (Ir-ssep. negligees, aprons (base?
ment); Miss M. Sweeney, women's tailored
and high-grade suits: 11. J. Trumble, cot
ton underwear, sweaters (basement); M.
Se<-ly. representing; Clifford Sennott, cot?
ton waists
Cohen Bros.: Joseph Cohen, hosiery, un
dcrwear, notions, lingerie*; Alcazar.
Mary Harbour Co.; t?. I.. Brown, milli?
nery; Breslln
BUFFALO
Liberty Clothing Co.; C. A. Harris, men's
and boys' furnishing goods: Pennsylvania
CANTON. OHIO
Klein-Hcsselman Co.; Miss Kuhn. N. B.
Allison. Jobs coats, s'Jits. dresses; 1170
B'way.
I'HARI.IITTK, N. ('.
Joseph Loeb Co.; Miss M. Qetzy, milli?
nery, 220 5th av.
CHICAGO
Empi rlum Wi rl ! Mil Inery Co.; 8. Kauf?
man, millln, r\ ; 621 B'way.
N Ribback ,.v Co ; M. \V. Fried, mfrs
waists ai-'! dresses; Pennsylvania
Rothschild.? Co.; W. ?. Mullen, gift
novelties; 47?> 4:h av.
Marshall Field & Co : Miss H, : ? berg
petticoats; Miss M. Williams, women's
neckwear; S. F. Cooper, wholesale corsets;
Mrs. M. It Perjiins, embroidery silks; C
Obollttle, white goods, retail, A. G Will?
ing, white goods, wholesal . F Brady
hats; G. A. Wilson, Hudson seal coats. 1107
B'way
J. Gordon Co.; J. Gordon, men's cloth?
ing. Pennsylvania
('. H. Johnson, dry goods, men's furnish?
ings; Pennsylvania,
Hamilton Bros.; J. C. Hamilton., wom?
en's ready t ?? 's - RreMln.
CINCINNATI
John Shillttr. Co.; H W. Peters, tr.-n's
clothing, care R. W. Hawkey, 4.': 4th av.
t'l.K.VKI.AMl
O. S. I, Hing a Bro ; S. Blng, carpets,
furniture ; Cmil I ni>n*nl
COM Ml? S, OHIO
F' ibel Brothers. Mrs M. GogganS, read;.'
to wear, children's war; Pennsylvania.
cox o it n, n. c
Parks-B,-1!-. Co.; J. G. Paris, general mer?
chandise; 116 W 32d st., care Alfred Fantl,
DALLAS. TKX,
Lorch Mfg. Co.; A. Lurch, tricotlne
rivolc .suits; ! 1 r,n H'way
DAYTON. OHIO
Friedlob & Lew: M. 1'. Levy, dry goo,Is.
general mdse, ; I '? nnsylva nla,
Rider-Johnson Co.; E. K. Martin, ladles'
ready to wear, nuise, manager; Charles A
Cook 276 5th
Adler &? Child?; t '. C. Adler, millinery,
coals, suits, dresses, waists, furs, fur coats,
kimonos, neglig.es. bathrobes, shoe?; 252
4th av., care Klrby, Block & Fischer.
DKNVKK
A T. Lewis & Pon. E. I". T'awson, dress
goods, silks, velvets: 3 W. 29th si.
DETROIT
Frank X- Seder: Miss Sivcrd. .lobs of
dresses; Affiliated Retail Stores, 1372
B'way.
CrowlAv. Mllner & Co.; L. T. Crockett,
|obs children's beaver hats; Alfred Fantl,
11? W. 32d s(.
.1. I.. Hudson Co. ; C J, Gibson, oats,
225 r.tii n\?,
J. L. Hudson Co.; Miss s. Cherkose, ho?
siery ; 225 5th a v.
Newi omb-F.nili. of, i'o ; F J, Fry, assist
ant merchandise manager to Mr. Scott;
MIh.-i M. McCarthy, waists; Miss H. Pllber
mnn -epresentatlve ; H. Byron Scott vlce
piisnent ami merchandise manage! ready
to wear, 20u r.tb a v.
ELMIBA, N. Y.
r.. Rosenbaum & Sons; H. M Rosenbaum
representing; :is W. 32d st.. 6th floor.
FALL RIVER, MASS.
Abraham Kosher, dry goods: Grand.
F1TCHHI RG, MASS.
C.inmbcrlain-Huntress Co.; William C.
Huntress? dry goods: Woodstock.
(?IAM) RAPIDS, MICH.
Coronet <"ors.-t Co.; W. G. Wright, mfrs
corsets anil accessories: Bristol.
GREENSBORO, N. C.
Brown-Belk Co.; T. B. Brown, ledles
ready to wear: Alfred Fantl, 1 l'i W. 32d st.
HAilERSTOWN. MIL
Emporium World Millinery Co.; C
Husch, millinery; 021 B'way.
Brown's Smart Shop; M. o. Levine, Jobs
coats, dresses, skirts; L. Harris, 120 W.
36th st.
I?ARRI8BIRG, PA.
Kaufman's Cnderselllng Stores; B. T.
Shuman, dresses, coats and suits, skirts,
muslin underwear; 11. F. McDonald, house
dresses; aprons, wraps, kimonos; care Ben
F. Levis. o7 W :??;:' st.
IIOISTON, TEX.
W. ''. Jlann Co., A. Hill, coats, suits,
waists, skirts, furs, fur coats; W. i '. Muni)
representing; ?,'?'? 7th av., caro J, M Big?
gins.
Fashion: i>n Wolfman, ready to wear;
1123 B'wnv.
INDIANAPOLIS
Nash-Liebllng Co.; N. Liebling mfrs.
and Jobber:) ladies' waists, I..?thai:..
L. S. Ayres Co.; .1 Gutman, rh
and growln girls' wear; 225 5th av
H. P. Wasson A- Co : Miss B. E. F sh
man, waists; 110 W. .IJd st.. care Alfred
FariU.
L, S. Ayres Co.; .1 Gutman, shoes; care
Retail Research association, 225 6th a\
KANSAS CITV, MO.
Emery, Bird ?.- Thayer; F. I. Wosley,
men's und boys' clothing; G. H. Glen, men's
furnishings: J. '!'. Hunt, silks and dre n
goods; W. P. Schollen and H. S. Chap?n
i basement), ready to wear; 25 Madison av.
KEENE, N. II.
W, P. Chamberlain Co . Frank Huntress,
dry goods, ladies' :-.??:; to wear; Wo-. . -
LANCASTER, PA.
Emporium World Millinery Co , H, C.
Pelser, nil lllnery ; ?.?-' ' ? I - a y
Hager & Bro , M :-? Enii i "
lions, trimmings, ribbons, hi
neckwear; D. G. A lam ? 104 4'.h .:?? .
LIMA. OHIO
Le ad e r Garment , rx.tr, n l H K ru r
ger, coats, furs. !. Harris . . V 5th si
LOS \NGELES
Bullock's: A Scharps. leather ;
blouses, milllnei y ; B. J I. - - :
nlshings. w m.n ren's
wear hosii r ? . ':. s clol h ing. 1 -
225 5th ...
A. Hamburger A Sons; E \A R ' ..
furnishings ; 225 ;?; h ,, roi -
Broadw .. : ?? pi St i - Miss ;' --? c
t'.ons ; Mrs T mi ions muslin n I
Transactions Last Week in Listed Stocks
iContlnurd from ??contl prirceiilrc ?aue)
High Bow Dir.
1231. Bale. 1921. Date, in %. Sm}ea nigh 1 n fc
101 .Ian 3 67'-. .lune 21 G Southern Pacific . 27900 80'k 78? 79V 1/
24% J?n 13 17:s? June 20? Soulhrm Railway... 4000 20'"3 20 20'-^ ' '
60 .Ian 13 42 June 21-- do pf. 1HQ0 47t j6 4? _ 1
111 Apr 5 83 Sept 2 8 Standard Milling . 100 9(5 qC qfi ? , '*
79 Se|* 14 75 June 18 6 do ?f . 10 74 ?4 ^? J_J
77-?4 Oct 4 G7-), Jrtne24 4 Standard Oil of Calif 2300 781., 751, 731,: 31
1671.. Jan 13 124' 2 June 17 5 Sl.indarii Oil of N J -'000 146% 140 " 146-1 ' I 6 *
110 Jan 20 105'3 J.in 3 7 do pf . 6100 108 107 108 "* '' V.
82 Kch il C6 Sept 23 7 Steel & Tube Fdy pf 400 68 66?4 68 ? %
f,8 Sept 8 31 Ort 8 8 Sterns Uros 3"? pf 121 82 81 81 ? 1
37 Jan 24 21 June 6 2 S'rw -Warner Speed 900 25'., 24 24 ? 13-i
46 Apr 30 25'4 Aug 24 ? Slrombrrg Carb .... 1100 29'n 29 29_1
93'4 Apr 29 433a Jan 5 7 Siudehalier . 68200 f2'5n 71 72t'-, f 17/
103-, Jan ?' ?;'., Aug 29 ? Sub lion! Corp .. 2300 4 V4 44 1/
13'4 Jan 3 1^ Aug 10 ? Suprri.ir Oil . 24400 8'4 5 8 . 2~*
25-4 Jan 10 43/i, Aeg 26 -- T.mlor (' & Kr?A . 200 7'3 7 7 ? IV
101.4 Apr 26 6'-,, Aug ?6 ? Tenn ton & (hem.. 1500 8 ~3i 7i _ -,3
45 Jan 10 P.9 June21 3 Texas Co ... .S92C0 38-',, 36'. 38%| 134
27'2 May 16 16'? Jan 5? Texm fi Pacific. . 5800 21'., ?2'8 24 II
36% June21 15% Aiir 24 1 Tex-Pac Coal & Oil, SCS'-Q 26 21% 255-* i 1
175 May 3 119 Sept 12 8 Tidewater Oil ... 1C0 123 123 123 ' 4
260 Oct 6 210 Jan 20 ? Tex & B?c Band I'r. 10 260 260 260_
203? Mar 21 12'/2 Aug 29 ? Third Avc Rway... 700 14 13 14 _ 1
72 Sept 13 45 Mar 24 6 Tobacco Products ... 12400 66 60% 6"" ,? 2'i
91 Ja" '' 76'/2 July I 7 Hopf . 200 85', 85<4 353/4-1 Vr
Wz Jan 11 8 Apr 6? Toi St I, & W ctfs. . 200 10 9">? 93-_ ,?
20 Jan 6 15 Aug 25 ? do pf ,-iB. 2C0 I >l/2 15' 2 15!/2? '
13 Apr 25 6 Aug 24 ? Transcontinental Oil 36300 0' A 8 834 : i/8
44' j Apr 25 23 Junr:'l 1 Transite Wm, Slcl. 300 33 311/. 311/,,_ 37
160'/2 Fch 25 1211-2 Aug 25 10 Underwood rypewr. 100 125 125 125 ??
75 Jan 13 57 Sept 12 ? l'nion Bas & Paper. 300 67' ? R4'4 65'ft? t/2
25' 2 May 19 ',5's Aug 25 ? I mon Oil . 25700 20 ' 17 19^ i 2',?
123:'8 Sept 24 111 Junc21 10 I ?ion Pacific . 7200 122', 120', 122',? '?
68 July 16 62U July 1? ? do pf . 400 67 65% 67 1
106 Jan ',9 100 July 21 7 ('titled Cifrar St pf.. 100 100 1C0 100_
106 .Inn 19 40 Sept 13? United Brup . 5000 59' ., 57 58' 2 1 2'4
47 Keb 16 36'ft-, July 27 3!/2 do Ist pf . 400 40', hO 40 -_
207 Jnn 7 95'-4 June 20 3 United Fruit. 3300 1095-1, 107'8 108',4 ? 1>,
12'/4 Mar 3 6 Auk 25-- United Rway lined 100 li :? 8'8 8-'? . %
26 Mar 3 17 Auk C6 ? do pf . 100 19 19 19 , i/?
621.4 May 23, 46% Au? 22 6 United Retail Slore. 40500 52'., 18 50' ?? 1%
19 M"y 8 ]V?. J-31 2 ? F S (' I Pipe & Fdy 1000 15'-, 14' -, 14'?? 1J?
H?eh low DIy. Net
1921. Bate. 1921. Oat? in $. Sale*. Hiirh. Low. Close, chfe.
50 Mar 23 38 Aug 25 ? do pf 100 44 44 44 l/a
271/4 Jan 19 8% Sept 23 ? IS Food Products 14600 13' 2 "2 12%? %
74% May 3 43% Oct 6 4 1 S Indost Alcohol . 1 1870 46% 43% 4?%? 1/s
68% May 13 41% Mar 11 ? l' S Realty & lmpvi 3000 53' - 51 52%. 1%
79% Aus 30 4C% Aug 27 ? 1' S Rubber. 16700 50' s 47<4 40' ?-? ->t
103% -I?n * 74 Aug 27 8 do 1st pf. 400 92 89% 90' 4 2' 4
35! 2 -J?n 17 26 Apr 1 ? V S Smrlt 4 Re? 7C0 34% 34 34
?i 2 jan 3 37 Aag 9 3'/2 do pf. 500 40' - 3? 39?3
8612 May 6 70% June 23 5 IS Steel. 5O00O 80'8 78% 79'/2? %
112 Jan 27 1C5 June 21 7 do pf . 2200 111 119!4 110' 2 4
59' i Jan 19 41'., Aug 25 2 1'tah Copper . 17400 53's 5'%, 52"? 4
12?, May 17 8'.. Jul? 11 ? Ltnh Securities Corp 1000 10'4 9'4 IOV4 ? %
41 Jan 11 25', June 21 ? Vanadium Corp .... 4 700 32'4 SZ*t, 31%? ',
42'-, .Inn 11 20% July 30 ? Va-Car Chemical . 1600 30' 4 29'4 29' 4? !4
102% Jan 18 57% July 30? do pf . 1000 75% 74% 74%-? 1%
95 Jan 25 59 Aug 17 6 Va Iron Coal & Coke <-00 81 77 81 6
9% May 12 5% Mar 11 ? Vivaudou lnr . 3600 8% 8 8 ? %
9 May 9 7 Mar 11 ? Wnba-sh . 3500 7% 7', 7U- <h
24% May 10 18 Marl"? do pf A. 6600 22% 20% 22' 4 ? 1%
15'2 May 6 12% Mar 12 ? do pf B. 130 14 14 14 ? %
13 Jan 11 8% Jan 6 1 Weber A Heilhroner 200 12% 12 12 ? %
72 Jon 20 49% Jsn 4 2% Wells Fargo Kxp. . . 700 65 62 62 -
Hi/2 May 10 8% Aur 26 ? West Maryland . 1300 9% 9'4 9' 4
I 21 May 6 14% ,Iune23? do 2d pf. 500 17% 17 17% 4
307, May 9 20% Aur 24 ? West Pacific . 1800 23', 22! a 22'4? %
! 70% Jan 10 58 Au? 22 6 do pf . 300 63 62 62 ? %
94 Apr 12 76 Aur 10 7 AVestern Union Tel . 3200 85 82 82%H %
90% Jan 14 31% Sept 8 7 Westingh Air Brake 100 86% 86% 86% V?
49% Mar 29 38% Aur 22 4 Westinehou'?? Mfg... 5200 45% 44% 45: 4 ? %
11% Muy 9 7% June 21 ? Wheel & Lake Fr?e. 8O0 8% B'? 8%? 4
19%. May 9 13% Jane 21 ? dn pf . 300 15% 14-% 15'v
44^ May 2 29% June 24 4 White Motor? . 2100 ^5% 33% 35% 1 j
17% Jan 9 7 July 10? White Oil . 22401 10% 8% 10:.,- 1%
10!/2 May 4 5% Jan 3? Willy? Overland ... 70?0 6 5% 5%? %
42 ,\,ay 3 23 Aur 26 ? do pf . 703 26% 26 26'% 4 ; ?
47 .Inn 7 31 July 15 5 Wilson Co . 1100 35 34 34 ? 1
89% Fob 8 79% Au? 1 ? do pf . ICO 30 80 80?1
37% May 9 25 July 21 ? Wisconsin Central... COO 26', 26 26%? -'4
117% Apr 11 105 Aur 2'i 8 Woolworth . 27r,r 116% 114: 4 1:6'.?- 2
55% May 5 30% Aur 25 4 Worth Pump & Mach :09 41 ?33 ?39 ? *-A
9% July 30 6% June 23 .25 Wright Aero . 300 8 7% 7%
I *Ex dividend.
Course of the flood Marke!
'I he graph ahowa the weekly fluctuations in the average price of ten railroad, leu intlustrial nntl fiie public utility hontk
since September 1, 1919
undermuslirrs, aproi ?.-a'era
knit goods; \ *
LOI TSVILLE. KV.
Selmao C . Miss B. Pai r, mllllnep?4
Pt nnsj ;?.??.. i *?
MEMPHIS
Dresr-I p Shop; :.- ? ,.,.,,
tu -??? i ar; Martin t ; tib --h ?v
Mil? \l I.: i
_ - .?.'..??..' . lauer. arem
MINNEAPOLIS
,'!"' " '.'; :: :"',:' '?? ? ? niuu
p. M ral li.. r ....: . ^
Wfr. I Lai,tl '" r*r?
MONTGOMERY, A! \
N'ach! * v; ' tutu*
ma igi r. .. . Itli av.. cal K. .
i- ?sell? r. ?
Ml. KKOOEE, (?Kl \
Lad Us' v R
.. imen's
" ' ? ' ' ?
woolen p
- . , I. M. H
NEW OKI EANS
Maison 1 Co.: M. 1 ?tant?
millini ry, 116 W . ;.l ?-?
philadki phi \
Wieri . ' . i:
mfrs, pants; tirai
? 1 Sllverman, i' c irings ' -aie
Square.
PITTS!? Ki.ll
Kaufman 1 '??? t. Sti
. ! ? f,
H'v. ?y,
Boggs .':? Buhl . Miss A Ei
roa t s, suit n resses
men's
.1. IL Aaron, dry ? I ;
The Pi' ter Co ; 1 C W
Im: erial
r an-k & Peder MIbs Mol
dresses \ : fillated Retall Sti ;'?
B'way.
York Waist Co; Mr Weine?
l'i'inii) 1". an', i
PITTSFIELD. M ISS
Emporiui Woi I Mill s-ern.
berg, millini - ? ; m ?
PORTLAND, ORI
1 m'. ? m; ni I ,>:? i 'n. , i . \
nery l :" B'way
i 'I.'.' Woi ' m . m ,c K Inp . i; i
?In-?us: 432 "!i ??
M?ler & 1": .m'a ; F I. !:?:
pu co Roods, blankets, bedd i
212 Oth av,
PROVIDENCE
J, P, Mourln x- ? " ' . .1 P "
to wear: Hart-Flai
Hirsch Co.; D. Stelnl
dresses, bn foment mdse
kimonos, waists, undei \ ? ,' v.-.*r
1, Harris, ; 0 \\ nth ? :
Tayhir-Symonds Co M S |?
nu sties : Pennsyli .- n :?
M. Block & Co. ; M. Bio
I m perlai.
i!,:;-. .-.- i acrossii Co i: E H * trim
i . :. I i- r I ;. 1
RALEIGH. N. < .
Huds m-Belk C L G.
wi ai . 116 \V. :"?! st.. i
Kill HESTER
Emporium World M ; E. A.
Belcgneul milllnerj IB'?
>AN VNTONIO. TEX.
M. Lute- A Co M K 'hint
and men's furnish
Wi stern Skirl Mfg ? hwart*,
w ool< a ;. goods ? fancy
tt'ontinusd On next Jiaa?i
FINANCIAL MEETINGS
THE (HASP NATIONAL BANK
??I- IHK < ITA OF NEW i'ORK.
New Tori:. Septenib? ?
, TO Till-: STI " '. HOLDERS:
N. ? l<.- is hereby given that a Spei lal
Meeting of tl'.- Stockholdc '8 ?' the Bank
?.? |1] !.. held at Its Banking i -?t??
Br ladw ay, B n ough of Mai .
N- ? i'ork, State of X ? '??*.
> day of Novi ail" r, 1"21 nt 12
! for the purpi -enflrin.
. Ins; the U'-rrn? am!
by a - lajorlty of the 1 ? ? !
The Mel I
City of Ne ?- v." k ? t
'i
? late i ho sa Id ' ???? i bai ?
?? ?
ier of The Chose National : ... ' ?'?'*
City of Now
f such othoi * r
t
By - ? ier of the Boa ' ? ? ri
IV. !' HOL1
( 11 \SI SECl'RITIES CORPORATION,
Nev York, Septi
HE si'. iCls IB i LI '1
N ? ..
Meeting of tin
Securities i ?
oil . ?? .? : '' i !<? oadu n - Boi ou
i:a-;nr, City of New Yorl
York, 'm the 1st ? of N - I
It tv Jo in ? '??
, ?. i.ji, i. proposals to
f , ? ? . ..-.?! i ii. nu
ni ..: ? " r p
Il ich the said Corpora ? w t il
at of its s I
$9,730.000 ti HO.O ' ' ' ?
rea se s n- ?
effective; I sldera '
? - ? and ond liions !
.........
shall be issu 11
f suc! ither ??? b'
:oine bef ? ?
of
E. R. TI."
HALSTEAD ?. Kill ? -ry.
rHE METROPOLITAN NATIOVA1 BA*K
<>I Til?. ? II V '?l M KW VORK
DIVIDEND NOTH E3
KELLY-SPR'NGFfE'.Q TIRE CO,
UNITED FRUIT COM! '
IU1IIII Mi M >
? ' ? ? I ? r ;
? "
'. ' :
I :. e , f I n,
-, 1. ', ft ? ft

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